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THE DAILY NEWS 

ALMANAC 



LIBRARY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 




Page 41. 6th Dist. Massachusetts for "Chandler" read Candler. 

" 41. 33d Dist. New York for "W-ildey" read Wiley. 

70. For "R. S. Green" Gov. of New Jersey read Leon Abbett. 

71. National Prohibition, for "Chicago" read New York. 
71. " " " "J. B. Hobbs" read J.L.Thomas. 

70. For "1890" expiration of term of Gov. of Virginia, read 1894. 

74. For ' W. J. Campbell" read Arthur Dixon. 

74. For "Arthur Dixon" read A. H. Jones. 

' 84. Add S. P. McConnnell to list of Circuit Judges Cook County. 

" 154. Footing of Nelson's vote should be 55,040.2; footing of Prendergast's should be 

55,601.1; footing of Willing's vote should be 54,605.3. 

" If6. Footing of Guthrie's vote should be 37,023.7; footing of Coy's vote should be 
29,520.1; footing of Russell's vote should be 49, C 67 8. 

[FORM 1299] 



THE DAILY NEWS 

ALMANAC 



AND 



POLITICAL REGISTER 



FOR 



I 890. 



COMPILED BY GEO. E. PLUMBE, A. B., LL. B. 



PRICE: 25 CENTS. 



ISSUED BY 

THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS. 



PREFACE. 



The year 18S9 is one of those known in politics as an ''off year." 
Notwitlistanding this, the elections in the four new States of North 
Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and Washington, the submission 
of Constitutions to the people in the lerritories of Wyoming and 
Idaho, the large number of non-partisan elections in several of the 
states, and the curious turn of political affairs in Ohio and Iowa make 
the year a more than usually important one, considered politically. 

In preparing the DAILY NEWS ALMANAC it has been the 
design to give each year new and fresh statistical matter avoiding, as 
far as possible, repetitions, thus making each volume worthy of per- 
manent preservation for purposes of reference. This year considerable 
space has been given to statistics of the various religious denominations 
of the country, base ball, imports and exports, education and crime, 
rainfall and temperature, and other statistics which have been spe- 
cially asked for. Many statistics are given with a view to the fact that 
in 1890 a Congress is to be elected and voters will require information 
upon the issues likely to be prominent. 

It is hoped that the present volume will fully justify the hearty 
indorsement the DAILY NEWS ALMANAC is each year receiv- 
ing in increasing measure from its appreciative patrons. 






REMQTE STORAGE 

- 



Chicago Daily ]STews Almanac 

189O. 



ECLIPSES. 

In the year 1890 there will be three eclipses two of the Sun and one of the Moon, and a 
Lunar Appulse. 

A Lunar Appulse, June 2-3. The Moon being visible to North and South America, and 
adjacent oceans. Occurring as follows : 



Standard. 


Time of nearest 
approach. 


Eastern 


TJ. 
3 
3 

2 
2 


H. 

1 



11 

10 


M. 
45 M. 
45 M. 
45 A. 
45 A. 


Central 


Mountain 


Pacific 





Angle of position of point of nearest approach from North point of the Moon's limb 167 
degrees to West. The nearness of the approach and the uncertainty as to the effect of the 
Earth's atmosphere render it doubtful whether the moon will enter the shadow of the Earth, 
(causing a partial eclipse) or not. 

I. An Annular eclipse of the Sun, June 17. Invisible to the United States. Visible to 
Europe, Asia, northern half of Africa, eastern extremity of South America and the inter- 
mediate Atlantic Ocean 

II. A slight Partial Eclipse of the Moon, November 26. Invisible east of Dakota. Visible 
to the western part of North America, Asia, Australia and the Pacific Ocean. Occurring as 
follows: 



Moon enters penumbra. 
Moon enters shadow. . . . 
Middle of eclipse 
Moon leaves shadow 


TIMES OF PHASES. 


Eastern 


Time. 


Central Time. 


Mountain Time. 


Pacific 


Time. 


D. 

26 
26 
26 
26 


H. 

(i 
8 
8 

8 


M. 

16 M. 
25 M. 
34 M. 
42 M. 


D. 

26 
26 
26 
26 


H. M. 

5 16 M. 
7 25 M. 
7 34 M. 
7 42 M. 


D. 
26 
26 
26 
26 


H. 

4 
6 
t! 
6 


M. 

16 M. 
25 M. 
34 M. 
42 M. 


D. 

26 
26 


H. 
3 

5 

1 


M. 

16 M. 
25 M. 
34 M. 

42 M. 



Magnitude of eclipse equals 0.005 (moon's diameter equals 1). 

III. A Central Eclipse of the Sun, December 12. Invisible to the United States. Visible 
to Australia, the Indian Ocean and around the South Pole. 



MORNING AND EVENING STARS. 

Mercury will be Evening Star about January 13, May 6, September 3 and December 27; and 
Morning Star about February 23, June 24 and October 15. 



Venus will be Morning Star till February 18; then 
Morning Star again the rest of the year 



Evening Star till December 3, and 



Jupiter will be Evening Star till January 10; then Morning Star till July 30, and Evening 
Star again the rest of the year. 



CHTJRCH DAYS AND CYCLES OF TIME. 



Circumcision ........... Jan. II Good Friday .............. Apr. 4 1 Hebrew New Year(5651).Sept. 15 

Epiphany ............... Jan. 6 First day of Pesach ..... Apr. 5| Michaelmas Day ......... Sept.29 

Candlemas ............. Feb. 2 Easter Sunday ........... Apr. til Advent Sunday .......... Nov. 30 

Septuagesima .......... Feb. 2 Low Sunday ............... Apr. 13 1 Dominical Letter ........ B. 

Shrove Sunday ......... Feb. Ifi Rogation Sunday ........ May 11 Epac-t ...................... 9 

Ash Wednesday ........ Feb. 1!) Ascension Day ........... May. '15 Golden Number .......... 10 

First Sunday in Lent. .Feb. 23 Whit Sunday .............. May 25 Solar Cycle ............... 23 

Purim ................... Mar. 6 Trinity Sunday ........... June 1 Roman Indiction ......... 

S: Patrick .............. Mar. 17 Corpus Christ!. ............ June 5 Julian Period ............ 6603 

Palm Sunday ........... Mar. 30 , Mohammedan New Y'r.Aug. 17, 







fHoon's $3{)ascs. 


1890. 




D. 

27 


EASTERN TIME. 


CENTRAL TIME. 


MOUNTAIN TIME. 


PACIFIC TIMB. 


January. 


Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter . 
New Moon 
First Quarter. 


H. M. 

41 morn. 
1 37 morn. 
6 53 eve. 
3 20 eve. 


H. M. 

11 41 eve.* 
37 morn. 
5 53 eve. 
2 20 eve. 
*5th. 


H. M. 

10 41 eve.* 
11 37 eve.t 
4 53 eve. 
1 20 eve. 
! -5th. H3th. 


H. M. 

9 41 eve.* 
10 37 eve.f 
3 53 eve. 
20 eve. 
*5th. tl3th. 


t*. 


Full Moon 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon.... 
First Quarter. 


ijj 


817 eve. 
1 55 eve. 
5 32 morn. 
9 10 morn. 


7 17 eve. 
55 eve. 
4 32 morn. 
8 10 morn. 


6 17 eve. 
11 55 morn.* 
3 32 morn. 
7 10 morn. 
*llth. 


5 17 eve. 
10 55 morn.* 
2 32 morn. 
6 10 morn. 
*llth. 


March. 


Full Moon .... 
Last Quarter. 
Sew Moon 
First Quarter. 


6 

13 
20 

28 


151 eve. 
11 9 eve. 
4 5 eve. 
4 36 morn. 


51 eve. 
10 9 eve. 
3 5 eve. 
3 36 morn. 


11 51 morn.* 
9 9 eve. 
2 5 eve. 
2 36 morn. 
*5th. 


10 51 morn.* 
8 9 eve. 
1 5 eve. 
1 36 morn. 
*5th. 


o. 


Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter.. 
Sew Moon 
First Quarter 


5 
12 

19 
26 


4 28 morn. 
5 57 morn. 
3 9 morn. 
11 55 eve. 


3 28 morn. 
4 57 morn. 
2 9 morn. 
10 55 eve. 


2 28 morn. 
?57 morn. 
9 morn. 
9 55 eve. 


1 28 morn. 
2 57 morn. 
9 morn. 
8 55 eve. 


03 


Full Moon 
Last Quarter.. 
Sew Moon 
First Quarter. 


4 
11 
IS 
l-'U 


4 13 eve. 
11 25 morn. 
3 22 eve. 
5 38 eve. 


3 13 eve. 
10 25 morn. 
2 22 eve. 
4 38 eve. 


2 13 eve. 
9 25 morn 
1 22 eve. 
3 38 eve. 


1 13 eve. 
8 25 morn. 
22 eve. 
2 38 eve. 


d 


Full Moon 
Last Quarter.. 
Sew Moon 
First Quarter. 


8 

it 
17 
25 

2 

24 

31 

7 
2'J 


1 38 morn. 
4 54 eve. 
5 2 morn. 
8 57 morn. 


38 morn. 
3 54 eve. 
4 2 morn. 
7 57 morn. 


11 38 eve.* 
2 54 eve. 
3 2 morn. 
6 57 morn. 
*2d. 


10 38 eve.* 
1 54 eve. 
2 2 morn. 
5 57 morn. 
*2d. 


"p 


Full Moon .... 
Last Quarter.. 
S'ew Moon 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 


9 27 morn. 
11 47 eve. 
7 53 eve. 
9 48 eve. 
4 28 eve. 


8 27 morn. 
10 47 eve. 
6 53 eve. 
48 eve. 
28 eve. 


7 27 morn. 
9 47 eve. 
5 53 eve. 
7 48 eve. 
2 28 eve. 


6 27 morn. 
8 47 eve. 
4 53 eve. 
6 48 eve. 
1 28 eve. 


to 


Last Quarter- 
Sew Moon 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon 


?23 morn. 
23 morn. 
8 24 morn. 
11 39 eve. 


e23 morn. 
23 morn. 
7 24 morn. 
10 39 eve. 


7 23 morn. 
9 23 morn. 
(> 24 morn. 
9 39 eve. 


6 23 morn 
8 23 morn. 
5 24 morn. 
8 39 eve. 


September 


Last Quarter- 
Sew Moon 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 


21 

28 


10 33 eve. 
2 57 morn. 
5 9 eve. 
8 4 morn. 


?33 eve. 
57 morn. 
4 9 eve. 
7 4 morn. 


8 33 eve. 
57 morn 
3 9 eve. 

6 4 morn 


7 33 eve. 
11 57 eve.* 
2 9 eve. 
5 4 morn. 
*13th. 


O 


Last Quarter- 
New Moon 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 


13 

21 
27 


3 27 eve 
6 9 eve. 
40 morn 
6 46 eve. 


2 27 eve. 
5 9 eve. 
11 40 eve.* 
5 46 eve. 
*20th. 


1 27 eve. 
4 9 eve. 
10 40 eve.* 
4 46 eve. 
*20tb. 


27 eve. 
3 9 eve. 
9 40 eve.* 
3 46 eve. 
*20th. 


November 


Last Quarter- 
New Moon 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon 


4 
12 
lil 
20 


11 17 morn. 
8 41 morn. 
7 48 morn. 
8 27 morn. 


10 17 morn. 
7 41 morn. 
6 48 morn. 
7 27 morn. 


917 morn. 
6 41 morn. 
e48 morn. 
27 morn. 


8 17 morn. 
5 41 morn. 
t48 morn. 
27 morn. 


1 December 


Last Quarter . 
New Moon 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 


4 

11 
18 
2(3 


8 30 morn. 
10 15 eve. 
3 40 eve. 
1 1 morn. 


7 30 morn. 
9 15 eve. 
2 40 eve. 
1 morn. 


6 30 morn. 
8 15 eve. 
1 40 eve. 
11 1 eve.* 

*25th. 


5 30 morn. 
7 15 eve. 
( 40 eve. 
10 1 eve.* 
*25th. 



1st MOXTH. JANUARY. 31 DAYS. 




_. 




January is named from Janus, 
an ancient Roman divinitv, and 


Chicago, Iowa, 
N2b.,Tsj.Y., Pa., 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 


St. Paul, N. E. 
Wis. and Mich., 


o a 


jg 


Sd 


was added to the Roman Calen- 


S.Wis., S.Mich.. 


Kan., Col., Cal., 


N. E. NewYork, 


'"s 


^ 


^ W 


dar 713 B. c. 


N. 111.. Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


& 


S 


fi 


BIOGRAPHICAL EVENTS. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 

sets 


Moon 
sets. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
sets. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
sets. 










H.M. 


H.M. 


n. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


1 


1 


We. 


Edmund Burke born, 1730. 


7 29 


4 39 


3 11 


7 19 


4 49 


3 5 


7 41 


4 27 


3 18 


2 


5 


Th. 


Gen. Wolf born, 1727. 




4 40 


4 13 


7 19 


450 


4 4 


741 


4 28 


4 2] 


jj 


3 FrT. 


Douglas Jerrold born, 1803. 




4 40 


5 14 


7 19 


451 


5 3 


7 41 


4 29 


5 2^ 


4 


4 Sat. 


Archbishop Usher born, 1580. 




4 41 


6 12 


7 19 


4 52 


6 


7 41 


430 


6 23 


5 


5 SUN. 


Stephen Decatur born, 1779. 


7 29 


4 42 


7 7 


7 19 


4 52 


6 55 


7 41 


4 31 


7 18 


(3 
7 


6 Mo. 
7iTu. 


Benjamin Franklin born, 1706. 
Millard Fillmore born, 1800. 


729 

7 29 


4 43 
4 44 


rises 
6 7 


7 19 
7 19 


4 53 

4 54 


rises 
6 15 


7 41 
7 41 


4 32 
4 33 


rises 
5 59 


8 


8iWe. 


Galileo died, 1642. 


7 28 


4 45 


7 5 


7 19 


4 55 


7 12 


7 4C 


4 34 




9 


9 Th. 


Catherine Herschel died, 1843. 


7 28 


4 46 


8 6 


7 19 


4 56 


8 11 


7 40 


435 


O f 


10 
11 
12 


10 Fri. 
Ill Sat. 
12 SUN. 


Archbishop Laud beheaded, 1645 
Alexander Hamilton born, 1757. 
John Hancock born, 1737. 


7 28 
728 
7 27 


Ul 

4 49 


9 8 
10 9 
11 12 


7 19 
7 19 

7 *i 


4 57 
4 58 
4 59 


9 11 
10 11 
11 11 


7 40 
7 39 
7 39 


436 
4 37 
4 39 


10 \ 
11 13 


13 


13 


Mo. 


Salmon P. Chase born, 1808. 


7 27 


4 51 


morn 




5 


morn 


7 3 


4 40 


morn 


14 


14 


Tu. 


Lord Bruce died, 1610. 


7 26 


4 52 


17 


7 18 


5 1 


14 


7 3 


4 42 


2( 


15 


15 


We. 


Dr. Thomas Parr born, 1747. 


7 26 


4 53 


1 25 


7 17 


5 2 


I 20 


7 37 


4 43 




16 


16 


Th. 


Edmund Spencer born. 1599. 


7 25 


4 54 


2 35 


7 17 


5 4 


2 28 


7 36 


4 44 


2 45 


17 
18 
19 


17 Frt. 
18 Sat. 
19 SUN. 


Caleb Cushing born, 1800. 
Daniel Webster born, 1782. 
James Watt born, 1736. 


7 25 
7 24 
724 


4 55 
4 57 
4 58 




III 

7 16 


1 I 

5 7 


3 38 
4 49 
6 1 


7 36 

in 


4 45 
4 47 
4 48 


3 57 
5 11 
6 24 


20 


20 Mo. 


David Garrick died, 1779. 


7 23 


4 59 


sets 


7155 8 


sets 


7 34 


4 49 


sets 


21 


21|Tu. 


J. C. Fremont born, 1813. 


7 22 


5 


5 59 


7 15 5 9 


6 6 


7 33 


4 50 


562 


22 


22 We. 


Lord Bacon born, 1561. 


7 22 


5 1 


7 17 


7 1415 10 


7 22 


7 32 


4 52 


7 12 


23 


23 Th. 


William Pitt died, 1836. 


721 


5 3 


8 32 


7 145 11 


8 35 


7 31 


4 53 


830 


?* 


24; Fri. 
25 Sat. 


John W. Colenso born, 1814. 
Robert Burns born, 1759. 


7 21 
7 20 


5 4 
5 5 


9 44 
10 53 


7 13 5 12 
7 12|5 13 


9 45 
10 51 


7 30 

7 29 


4 55 


9 43 
10 55 


20 


26 SUN. 


Bernadotte born, 1716. 


7 19 


5 6 


11 59 


7 12 5 15 


11 55 


7 28 


4 58 


morn 


27 


27|Mo. 


John James Audubon died, 1851 


7 18 


5 8 


morn 


7 11 


5 16 


morn 


7 27 


4 59 


2 


28 


28Tu. 


W. H. Prescott died, 1859. 


717 


5 9 




7 10 


5 17 


58 


7 26 


5 1 


1 9 


29 29 We. 


Albert Gallatin born, 1761. 


7 16 


5 11 


2 6 


7 9 5 18 


1 58 


7 25 


5 2 


2 14 


30j30 Th. 


Rollin born, 1661. 


7 15 5 12 


3 7 


7 8!5 19 


2 57 


7 24 


5 4 


3 16 


31 31; Fri. 


James G. Blaine born, 1830. 


7 14 5 13 


4 6 


7 815 20 


3 55 


7 23i5 5 


4 16 


3d MONTH. FKBRUARY. 28 DAYS. 


CM 


O 


s a 


February is named from Roman 
divinity FebruicsiPluto), or Feb- 
rua (Juno), and was added to 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb.,1sf.Y., Pa., 
S.Wis. S. Mich., 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 


St.Paul,N.E. 
Wis. and Mich., 
N.E. New York, 


< a 


> 


s^ 


Roman Calendar about 713 B. c. 


N. 111., Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


~ ^ 


ft 


a 


BIOGRAPHICAL EVENTS. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
sets. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 

sets. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
sets. 










H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H M 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


I 


1 Sat, 
2 SUN. 


George F. Edmunds born, 1828. 
Bishop Thomas died, 1613. 


7 13 
7 12 


5 14 
5 16 


5 2 
5 52 


n 


.I 22 
5 23 


4 50 
5 40 


7 22 
7 20 


5 7 
5 8 


5 13 
6 3 


34 




Mo. 


Horace Greeley born, 1811. 


7 11 


517 


6 37 


7 5 


524 


6 25 


7 19 


5 10 


6 48 


1 35 


A 


Tu, 


John Rogers burned, 1555. 


7 10 


5 18 


rises 


7 4 


5 25 


rises 


7 18 


5 11 


rises 


36 





We. 


Sir Robert Peel born, 1788. 


7 9 


5 19 


5 58 


7 3 


5 26 


6 3 


7 17 


5 12 


5 52 




8 


Th. 


Aaron Burr born, 1756. 


7 8 


5 21 


7 1 


7 2 


5 27 


7 4 


7 15 


5 14 


6 57 






Fri. 


Charles Dickens born, 1812. 


7 6 


r> 22 


8 3 


7 1 


5 28 


8 5 


7 14 


5 15 


8 1 




Q 


Sat. 


Gen. Sherman born, 1820. 


7 5 


5 24 


9 6 


7 


530 


9 6 


7 12 


5 17 


9 6 


40 


q 


SUN. 


W. H. Harrison born, 1773. 


7. 4 


5 25 


10 10 


6 59 


5 31 


10 8 


7 11 


5 18 


10 12 


41 


10 


Mo. 


Montesquieu died, 1755. 


1* 3 


;, 26 


11 15 


(> as 


5 32 


11 11 


7 1C 


5 20 


11 19 


42 
43 




Tu. 
We. 


Daniel Booneborn, 1735. 
Abraham Lincoln born, 1809. 


7 15 27 
7 05 29 


morn 
22 


li 57 
6 55 


5 33 
5 34 


morn 
o 16 




521 
5 23 


morn 
29 


44il3 




Catherine Howard died, 1543. 


6 58 5 30 


1 32 


6 54 


5 35 


123 


7 5 


5 24 


1 40 


45!l4 


Fri. 


Capt. Cook died, 1771). 


6 57 5 31 


2 43 


6 53 


.1 :M 


232 


7 4 


526 


2 53 


46115 


Sat, 


John Hadley died. 1744. 


6 56 'o 32 


3 53 


6 52 


5 38 


3 41 


7 2 


527 


4 4 


47 16 
4817 
49ll8 


SUN. 

Mo. 
Tu. 


Lindley Murray died, 1745. 
Michael Angelo died, 1563. 
Charles Lamb born. 1775 


6 54 5 34 
6 53 5 35 
6 51 5 37 


23 

6 43 


6 50 

^ 


5 39 
5 40 

5 41 


445 
5 44 
6 33 


7 1 

88 


5 29 
5 30 
5 32 


1 I 

6 52 


50 19 


We. 


Copernicus born, 1473. 


6 50 5 38 


sets 


6 47 


5 42 


seta 


6 56 


5 33 


sets 


61120 


Th. 


David Garrick born. 1716. 


6 49 5 39 


7 18 


6 45 


5 43 


7 20 


6 54 


534 


7 17 


0221 


Fri. 


Rev. Robert Hall died, 1831. 


6 47 


5 40 


8 31 


6 44 


1 44 


8 30 


6 52 


5 36 


8 32 


63 

54 


22 

_';; 


Sat. 
SUN. 


George Washington born, 1732. 
Sir Joshua Reynolds died, 1792. 


346 

6 44 


5 42 
5 43 


841 
48 


6 43 

6 41 


5 45 
5 46 


9 38 
10 44 


6 51 
6 49 


5 37 
5 39 


9 44 
10 53 


55 


24 


Mo. 


Handel born, 1684. 


5 43 


5 44 


11 54 


6 40 


5 48 


11 47 


647 


5 40 


morn 


56 


2.1 


Tu. 


Sir ChristopherWren died, 1723. 


6 41 5 45 


morn 


6 39 


5 49 


morn 


6 45 


5 41 


1 


57 26 
5827 
59 2H 


We. 
Th. 
Fri. 


Victor Hugo born, 1802. 
H. W. Longfellow born, 1807. 
Montaigne born. 1533. 


6 40 5 46 

; :;< r> 4s 
6 37l5 49 


58 

i 


I! 37 
6 36 
6 34 


5 50 
5 51 

> 52 


48 
1 48 
2 45 


6 44 
6 42 
6 41 


5 43 
=> 44 
5 46 


1 7 
2 9 
3 8 





3d MOXTH. MARCH. 31 DAYS. 


!l 


d 


<^ 


March was named from Mars, 
the god of war. It was the 
first month of the Roman year. 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb., N.Y., Pa., 

S.Wis., S.Mich.. 
N. 111., Ind.. 0. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal.. 
Ind., Ohio. 


St. Paul, N.B. 
Wis. and Mich., 
N.E. New York, 
Minn., Or. 


^ 





a* 


BIOGRAPHICAL EVENTS. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
sets. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
sets. 


Sun 
rtees 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 
sets. 










H.M. 


H . M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


II. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


60 
61 


3 


Sat. 
SUN". 


W. D. Howells born, 1837. 
DeWitt Clinton born, 1769. 


6 35 
6 3.3 


5 50 
5 51 


3 49 

4 35 


6 3;; 

6 31 


5 53 
5 54 


3 36 
4 23 


6 :;. 
6 37 


5 47 

5 48 


4 1 
4 46 


62 


3 


Mo. 


George M. Pullman born, 1831. 


6 32 


5 52 


6 16 


6 30 


5 55 


5 5 


(i 35 


5 50 


526 


63 


4 


Tu. 


Gen. Pulaski born, 1748. 


6 30 


5 54 


5 51 


6 29 


.-, 56 


541 


6 34 


5 51 


6 


64 
65 


i 


We. 
Th. 


Dr. 1. 1. Hayes born, 1832. 
P. H. Sheridan born, 1831. 


HI? 


."> 55 
5 56 


6 21 
rises 


6 27 

6 26 


5 57 

5 58 


613, 

rises 


6 32 
6 30 


5 53 
5 54 


629 

rises 


66 


7 


Fri. 


Antonio Sanchez born, 1699. 


6 25 


5 57 


(i 58 


6 24 


5 59 


6 59 


6 28 


5 55 


a 58 




8 


Sat. 


A. H. Layard born, 1817. 


6 24 


5 58 


8 2 


6 23 


6 


8 


626 


5 57 


3 


68 


9 


SUN. 


David Davis born, 1815. 


6 22 


6 


9 7 


6 21 


6 1 


9 3 


624 


558 


9 10 


70 


B 


Mo. 
Tu. 


W. D. Porter born, 1809. 
Robert Treat Paine born. 1731. 


6 216 1 
6 19 6 2 


1014 
11 24 


6 20 
6 18 


i I 


10 9 
11 16 


6 22 
6 20 


6 
6 1 


10 20 
11 32 


71 

72 
73 


12 
13 
14 


We. 
Th. 
Fri. 


Bishop Berkeley born, 1684. 
Dr. Joseph Priestley born, 1733. 
T. H. Benton born, 1782. 


6 17 6 3 
6 15 6 4 
6 14 6 6 


morn 
34| 
1 43 


6 166 4 
6 156 5 
6 13 6 6 


morn 
23 
131 


618 
616 
6 15 


6 2 

8 i 


morn 
044 
1 54 


74 


15 


Sat, 


Andrew Jackson born. 1767. 


6 I* 


6 7 


2 48 


6 12 6 7 


2 35 


6 13 


6 6 


3 


75 


16 


SUN. 


James Madison born, 1751. 


6 10 


6 8 


3 46 


6 106 8 


3 34 


6 11 


6 6 


3 57 


76 

77 


17 
18 

19 


Mo. 
Tu. 
We. 


John Covode born, 1808. 
Grover Cleveland born. 1S37. 
Dr. Livingston born, 1813. 


6 86 9 
676 10 
6 5611 


4 35 
5 16 
5 51 


6 9|6 9 

6 76 10 
6 66 11 


424 

lil 


6 7 
6 5 


6 8 
6 10 
6 11 


4 45 
5 24 
5 57 


T*} 


20 


Th. 


Neal Dow born, 1804. 


6 4 


6 12 


sets 


6 46 12 


sets 


6 S 


6 13 


sets 


80 


21 


Fri. 


Henry Kirk White born, 17S5. 


6 2 


6 13 


7 18 


6 26 13 


7 16 


6 i 


6 14 


7 20 


81 


22 


Sat, 


Rosa Bonheur born, 1822. 


6 


6 14 


827| 


6 16 14 


8 23 


5 59 


6 15 


831 


82 


21! 


SUN. 


Schuyler Colfax born, 1823. 


5 58 


6 15 


9 35 


5 59 6 15 


9 29 


5 57 


6 17 


9 42 


83 
84 


->- 


Mo. 
Tu. 


Joel Barlow born, 1754. 
Sir Richard Cox born, 1650. 


5 57 6 17 10 42 
5 55 6 18 11 46 


5 58 6 16 
5 56 6 17 


10 33 
11 35 


m 


6 18 
6 20 


10 50 
11 56 


85 

86 


27 


We. 
Th. 


John Winthrop born, 1649. 
i John Keill born, 1671. 


5 53.6 19 
5 51|6 20 


morn 
047 


5 54 6 18 
5 53!6 19 


morn 
35 


:> 52 

5 50 


621 
6 22 


morn 
58 


87 


2S 


Fri. 


Sir Thomas Smith born, 1514. 


549 


6 21 


1 42 


5 51 6 19 


1 29 


5 48 


6 23 


1 54 


88 
89 


29 
30 


Sat. 
SUN. 


John Tyler born, 1790. 
Sir Henry Walton born, 1563. 


5 48 
5 46 


6 22 
6 23 


2 31 
3 14 


5 50 6 20 
5 48 6 21 


2 18 
3 2 


5 46 
5 44 


6 25 
6 26 


2 43 
3 25 


90 


3llMo. 


John P. Hale born. 1806. 


5 44!6 24 3 5ll 5 47 6 22 


3 40 5 42 6 27 


4 1 


4 til MONTH. APRIL. 3 O DAYS. 


OK 




a 


gg 


April was named from apriere 
(to open), the season when buds 


Chicago, Iowa, I 
Neb.,N. Y., Pa., 

S.Wis., S.Mich. 


St. Louis, S. Hl.,1 St. Paul, N. E. 
Va., Ky., Mo., IWis. and Mich. 
Kan., Col., Cal. N.E. New York, 


< W 


h 


<fe 


open. 


N. 111., Ind., 0. 


Ind., Ohio. Minn., Or. 


fi 


Q 


Q 


BIOGRAPHICAL EVENTS. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
sets. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 1 Suni Sun 
sets, rises sets. 


Moon 

sets. 










H.M. 


H M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


PI 


1 


Tu. 


Bismarck born, 1815. 


5 42 


li 2.-, 


423 


5 45 


6 23 


4 14 5 40 


6 2S 


4 31 




2 


We. 


Thomas Jefferson born, 1743. 


5 41 


6 26 


451 


5 44 


6 24 


4 45 5 38 


6 29 


4 58 


03 


3 


Th. 


Washington Irving born, 1783. 




6 28 


5 18 


5 42 


6 25 


5 13 5 37 


6 31 


522 


94 


4 


Fri. 


Thaddeus Stevens born, 1792. 


5 3S 


6 29 


543 


5 40 


6 26 


5 41 5 35 


6 32 


5 40 


95 


5 


Sat. 


Gen. James Nagle born. 1822. 


"> 36 


6 30 


rises 


5 39 


6 27 


rises! ^5 33 


6 33 


rises 


96 


(J 


SUN. 


Rousseau born, 1669. 


5 34 


6 31 


8 3 5 37 


6 28 


7 58; 5 31 


6 31 


8 9 


97 


7 


Mo. 


W. E. Channing born, 1780. 


5 32 


6 32 


9 13 5 36 


6 29 


9 6 5 29 6 36 


921 


98 


g 


Tu. 


John C. Louddn born, 1783. 


5 31 


6 33 


10 26 \o 34 


30 


10 16 5 286 37 


10 35 


99 


( I 


We. 


Adelina Patti born, 1843. 


5 29 


6 34 


11 37 5 33 


6 31 


11 25 5 26 6 39 


11 48 


100 


1 () 


Th. 


William Hazlitt born, 1778. 


5 27 


6 35 


morn 5 31 


(i 32 


morn j 5 24 6 40 


morn 


101 


11 


Fri. 


Edward Everett born, 1794. 


5 25 


6 36 


43 5 30 


6 33 


30 5 2216 41 


55 


102 
103 


12 Sat, 
13 i SUN. 


Henry Clay born, 1777 
Dr. Thomas Beddoes horn, 17vTO. 


524 

5 22 


6 37 

6 39 


1 42 6 28 

2 31! T) 27 


6 :: 4 

6 3.1 


1 29 5 20 
2 21! 5 19 


6 42 
6 44 


1 54 
243 


104 
105 

5!!! 


14 

15 

17 


Mo. 
Tu. 
We. 
Th. 


Horace Bushnell born, 1802. 
Shakspere born , 15('4 
Sir Hans Sloane born, 1660. 
William Gilmore Simms b.1806 


5 21 
5 19 

5 IS 
5 10 


6 40 

6 41 
6 42 
(i 43 


3 16 5 25 
3 51 5 24 
4 23 5 22 
4 51 5 21 


6 36 
6 37 

6 38 
6 39 


3 6 5 17 

3 44 5 15 
4 18 5 13 
4 48 5 11 


6 45 
6 46 
6 47 
6 49 


3 25 
3 58 
427 
4 53 


108 


18 


Fri. 


George II. Lewes born, 1817. 


5 15 


6 41 


517 5 19 


6 40 


5 17 


5 lu 


6 50 


5 17 


103 


19 


Sat. 


Roger Sherman born. 1721. 


5 13 


6 45 


sets 5 18 


6 41 


sets 


5 8 


6 52 


sets 


110 


20 


SUN. 


Napoleon III. born, 1808. 


5 lJ 


6 46 


8 24 5 17 


6 42 


8 17 


5 6 


6 53 


8 32 


111 


21 


Mo. 


"Josh Billings" born, 1818. 


5 10 


6 -17 


9 30 5 15 


6 43 


9 20 


5 4 


6 54 


9 39 


112 


22 


Tu. 


Madame de JStael born, 17P6. 


5 9 


6 4S 


10 33 5 1416 24 


10 21 


5 3 


6 55 


10 44 


113 


23 


We. 


James Buchanan born, 1791. 


5 7 


6 49 


11 32 5 136 44 


11 19 


5 1 


6 57 


11 44 


114 


24 


Th. 


Edmund Cartwright born, 1743. 


5 6 


6 50 


morn 5 1 1 


(i 45 


morn 


5 


!i 5S 


morn 


115 


25 1 Fri. 


Oliver Cromwell born, 1599. 


5 4 


6 51 


o 25 


5 10 


6 46 


12 4 58 


6 59 


37 


116 


26 Sat. 


David Hume born, 1711. 


5 3 


(i 52 


1 11 


.-, 9 


6 47 


59 4 50 


7 


1 22 


117 


27 SUN. 


i U. S. Grant born, 1822. 


5 1 


6 53 


1 50 


5 7 


6 48 


1 3!) 4 55 


7 1 


2 


118 


28 Mo. 


Charles Cotton born, lf>30. 


5 


6 55 


2 23 


:> 6 


6 49 


2 14 4 f>.> 


7 3 


2 32 


119129 Tu. 


Gen. Boulangcr born. 1837. 


4 58 


6 56 


2 5J 


5 5 


6 50 


2 45 4 52 


7 4 


2 59 


120 30 We. Queen Mary born. ir>r,2. 457 


6 57 3 19 


-, 4 


6 51 3 14 4 5i> 7 '5 3 25 



5th MOXTH. MAY. 31 DAYS. 




3 


fa 


May is from the Latin Jfaius, 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb., N. Y., Pa.. 


St. Louis. S. 111., 
Va., Kv., Mo.. 


St. Paul, N.E. 
Wis. and Mich.. 


o 

5J" 


>j 


> 


the growing month. 


S.Wis., 8 Mich. 
X. 111.. Ind., (). 


Kan., Col., Cal., 
Ind., Ohio. 


N.I-;. New York, 
Minn., Or. 


p h 


Q 


fl^ 


BIOGRAPHICAL EVENTS. 


Sun Sun 
rises sets. 


Moon 

sets. 


Sun 

Vises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
sets. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 
sets. 










H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


121 


1 


Th. 


Wellington born, 1769. 


1 06 


6 OS 


3 45 5 2 


02 


3 42 


4 49 


7 (3 


3 48 


122 


2 


Fri. 


Rev. Robert Hall born, 1764. 


1 00 


6 59 


4 9 5 1 


6 53 


4 8 


4 47 


7 7 


4 10 


123 


3 


Sar. 


Machiavelli born, 1469. 


1 53 


7 


4 SI 5 6 51 


435 


4 46 


7 9 


4 33 


124 


4 


SO. 


Horace Mann born, 1796. 


4 52 


7 1 


rises 


4 09 6 00 


rises 


4 44 


7 10 


rises 


125 


5 


Mo. 


John W. Draper born, 1811. 


4 51 




8 11 


4 OS 6 56 


8 2 


1 43 


7 11 


8 20 


126 


6 


Tu. 


Empress Eugenie born, 1826. 


4 50 


7 3 


9 24 


4 57 


6 57 


9 13 


4 42 


7 12 


9 34 


127 


7 


We. 


Bainbridge born, 1774. 


449 


7 4 


10 30 


4 55 


6 OS 


10 22 


4 40 


7 13 10 47 


128 


8 


Th. 


Rev. William Jay born, : T69. 


447 


7 6 


11 39 


4 5 1 


6 59 11 26 


4 39 


?10 11 51 


129 91 Fri. 
130 10 Sat. 


LeSage born, 1663. 
Montgomery Blair born, 1813. 


4 46 ! 7 7 
4 45 7 8 


morn 
34 


4 53 
4 52 


? ? 


morn 

22 


4 37 

4 36 


16 morn 

7 17 45 


131 


11 so. 


Theodore Parker died. 1860. 


444 


7 9 


1 18 


4 51 


7 1 


1 8 


4 30 


7 18 ! 1 28 


132 


12 


Mo. 


John R. Hind born, 1823. 


4 43 


7 iO 


1 54 


4 50 


7 2 


1 46 


4 34 


7 19 


2 2 


133 


13 


Tu. 


Charles O'Conor died. 1S4. 


4 41 


7 11 


2 26 


4 49 


7 3 


2 21 


4 32 


7 21 


2 32 


134 


14 


We. 


Maria Theresa born, 1717. 


4 40 


7 12 2 55 


4 48 


7 4 


2 52 


4 31 


7 22 


2 58 


1 30 


15 


Th. 


James Gadsden born, 1788. 


4 39 


7 13 


3 21 


4 47 


7 5 


3 20 


4 30 


7 23 


3 22 


136 




Fri. 


Levi P. Morton born, 1824. 


438 


7 14 


3 45 


4 47 


7 6 


3 47 


4 29 


724 


3 44 


137 


17 Sat. 


Dr. Jenner born, 1749. 


4 37 


7 15 4 12 


4 4(3 


7 7 


4 15 


4 2S 


7 25 


4 8 


138 


IS six. 


Gen. E. A. Hitchcock born,1798 


4 37 


7 16 


sets 


4 45 


7 8 


sets 


4 27 


7 27 


sets 


139 


19 M<. 


Lafayette died, 1834. 


4 36 


7 17 


8 19 


4 44 


7 9 


8 8 


4 26 


7 28 


8 29 


110 


20 Tu. 


Elijah Fenton born, 1471. 


4 35 


7 181 9 2 1 


4 43 


7 9 


9 9 


4 25 


7 29 


9 32 


141 

142 

1 13 


21 

22 


We. 
Th. 
Fri. 


Reverdy Johnson born. 1796. 
Alexander Pope, born 1688. 
Gen. Burnside born, 1824. 


4 3)5 


7 19 10 17 
72011 6 
7 20 11 48 


4 43 
4 42 
4 41 


7 10 

7 11 
7 12 


10 4 
10 53 
11 36 


1 21 
4 23 
4 22 


7 30 10 29 
7 31,11 18 
7 32 11 59 


1 4 1 24 Sat. 


Queen Victoria born, 1819. 


4 32 


7 21 


morn 


441 


7 13 


morn 


4 21 


7 33 morn 


1 10 20 SVX. 


R. W. Emerson born, 1803. 


4 31 






4 40 


7 14 


14 


4 20 


7 34 34 


111! 26 Mo. ' 
1 17 27 Tu. 


Bishop Barrington born, 1734. 
C. Vanderbilt born, 1794. 


11 


7 24 


04 
1 21 


4 39 7 14 
4 39 7 1 5 


46 
1 15 


1 19 
4 IS 


735 
7 36 


id 


1 is 28 We. 


Thomas Moore born, 1779. 




7 24 


1 47 


4 38 7 1(5 


1 43 


4 18 7 37 


1 51 


1 t!( 29 Th. 
100 30 Fri. 


Patrick Henrv born, Ii36. 
Peter the Great born, 1672. 


4 28 


7 26 


2 35 


4 37i7 18 


2 9 
2 35 i 


4 17 

4 16 


/ .-> 
7 39 


2 13 
2 35 


151 31 Sat, 


Horatio Seymour born, 1810. 


4 28 


727 


3 01 14 3717 18 3 21 14 1617 40 2 58 


Gtli MOXTH. JUNE. 3 O DAYS. 


*j 


i 


^ 


June traced to Juno, the queen 
of heaven, who was thought to 
preside over marriages. 


Chicago, 
Neb., N.Tc 

S.Wis.,8. 
N. 111., Ir 


Iowa, 
'. Pa 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 


St. Paul, N.E. 
Wis. and Mich., 
N.E. New York, 
Minn., Or. 


Mich. 
id., 0. 


Kan., Col., Cal.. 
Ind., Ohio. 


^ 





Z* 


BIOGRAPHICAL EVENTS. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 
seta. 


Moon 
sets. 


Sun Sun 
rises sets. 


Moon 
sets. 


1 Sun 

lises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 
sets. 










H M 


[[ M 


II M 


II M 


H M 


H M 


II M 


H M 


H M 


152 


i 


SUN. 


Nicolas Poussin born, 159-J, 


4 27 


7 2S 


3 30 


4 3(5 


7'ii) 


3 34 


4'l5 


7 41 


3 25 


153 
154 

: 150 


2 Mo. 
3 Tu. 

4 We. 


I John Randolph born, 1773. 
Jefferson Davis born. 1808. 
George III. born, 1738. 


4 27 
4 26 


7 28 

1% 


4 3 

rises 
9 26 


4 36 7 20 
4 36 7 20 
4 35 7 21 


4 9 

rises 
9 13 


4 15 
4 14 
4 14 


7 41 
7 42 

7 43 


3 56 

rises 
9 38 


156 


olTh. 


Adam Smith born, 1723 


4 2(3 


7 31 


10 20 


4 35 7 22 


10 13 


4 14 


744 


10 37 


157 


(i Fri. 


Alexander the Great b. 356 B.C. 


t 26 


7 31 


11 16 


4 35 


7 *>*> 


11 5 


4 13 


7 44 


11 26 


158 7 3a1 
159 8 SO. 


Mohammed died, 632. 
Kobert Stevenson born, 1772. 


4 25 

4 25 


7 32 
7 32 


11 57 

morn 


4 34 
4 34 


7 23 
7 23 


11 48 
morn 


4 13 
4 12 


7 45 
7 45 


morn 
5 


160 


9 Mo. 


John Howard Payne born, 1792. 


4 20 




30 


4 34 


7 24 


24 


4 12 


7 46 


37 


161 


lOTu. 


Bishop Simpson Horn, 1810. 


4 20 


7 * > i 


1 


4 34 


7 24 


56 


4 12 


7 47 


1 4 


162 
163 
161 


Ill We. 

12 Th. 
13 Fri. 


Copernicus died, 1543. 
Charles Kingslev horn, 1819. 
Wintteld Scott born. 1786. 


4 25 
4 24 
4 24 


7 34 

7 35 

7 35 


1 26 
1 51 
2 16 


4 3i 
4 34 
4 31 


7 20 
7 20 
7 26 


1 24 

1 52 
2 19 


4 12 
4 11 
4 11 


7 47 
7 48 
7 48 


lit 

2 14 


i 165 


14 Sat. 


H. B. Stowe born, 1812 


4 24 


7 3.! 


2 44 


4 34 


7 2(5 


2 48 


4 11 


7 49 


2 39 


166 


15 SIX. 


Thomas Randolph born, 1605. 


4 24 


7 30 


3 14 


4 34 


7 27 


3 20 


4 11 


7 49 


3 7 


167 


16 


Mo. 


Sir John Cheke born, 1514. 


4 24 


7 36 


3 49 


4 34 


727 


3 57 


4 11 


7 00 


3 41 


168 


17 


Tu. 


John Wesley born, 1703 


4 24 


7 37 


sets 


4 34 


7 27 


sets' 


4 11 


7 50 


sets 


169 

170 
171 
172 


is 
19 
20 
21 


We. 
Th. 

Fri. 
Sat. 


Frances S. Ogood born. 1811. 
Rev. H. C. Spurgeon born, 1834, 
Gen. J. L. Rei.o born. 1823. 
iHoratio King born. 1811 


4 24 7 37 
4 24:7 37 
4 25 7 37 
4 20 7 37 


9 1 

9 46 
10 24 
10 56 


4 34 
4 34 
4 34 
4 34 


7 28 
7 28 
7 28 
728 


8 48 
9 34 
10 13 
10 47 


4 11 
4 11 
4 11 
4 11 


7 51 
751 

751 
7 01 


9 13 
9 57 
10 34 
11 5 


173 


22 si X. 


Robert Nelson born, 1656. 


t 20 


7 38 11 21 4 30 7 29 


11 18 4 12 


752 


11 31 


17423 Mo. 


Leibnitz born. ItViii 4 26 


7 38' 11 49 4 30 7 29 


n 10 i 12 


7 52 


11 54 


175.24 Tu. 


Henrv \Var.l r,eecherborn,1813. 4 26 


7 3S morn 4 35 7 29 


morn 


|4 12 


7 02 


morn 


176 20 We 
177 26 Th. 


Eliphalet Nott born. 1773. 
Dr. Dottdndge bom. 1702 


4 26 7 38: 13 4 30 7 29 
4 26 7 3S 36 4 36 7 29 


o 10 
35 


4 12 
4 13 


7 02 
7 52 


88 


178 27 Fri. 


Harriet Martineau died, 1870. 


4 27 


7 39 


1 1 36 7 29 


1 1 


1 13 


7 5^' 


59 


179 28' Sat. 


Rubens born. l.YiV 


4 27 


7 3<t 


1 27 1 36 7 29 


1 30 


1 14 


7 52 


1 23 


180.29 SO. 
181 30 Mo. 


Elizabeth B Browning d.. 1861. t 27 7 39 

1 Alexander Brome died. lun;. t 2* 7 39 


1 57 t 37 7 29 
2 33 4 37 7 29 


2 V 
2 40 


4 14 
4 15 


7 52 
7 52 


1 51 
_2J?6_ 



7th MONTH. JULY. 31 


DAYS. 


grf 


c 


grf 


July named in honor of Julius 
Caesar.who was born on the 12th 


Chicago, Iowa, St. Louis, S. 111., 
Neb., N.Y., Pa., i Va., Ky., Mo., 
S.Wis., S.Mich., 'Kan.. Col.. Cal.. 


St. Paul, N.E. 
Wis.and Mich., 
N.E. New York, ' 


>" k w 


>< 


!" W 


of July. 


N. 111., Ind., 0. 


Ind.. Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


^ 


& 


Q^ 


BIOGRAPHICAL EVENTS. 


Sun Sun 
rises sets. 


Moon 
sets. 


Sun] Sun 
rises sets. 


Moon 
sets. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
sets. 










H M. 


H.M. 


H M. 


H.M.IH.M. 


H. M. 


H M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


182 


1 


Tu. 


Rochambeau born, 1725. 


428 


738 


3 19 


4 38 7 29 


328 


4 15 


7 52 


3 10 


1S3 


2 




R. H. Stoddard born, 1825. 


4 29 


7 38 


rises 


4 38 7 29 


rises 


4 16 


7 51 


rises 


184 
185 


3 Th".' 
4IFri. 


Henry Grattan born, 1750. 
Nathaniel Hawthorne b., 1801. 


4 29 7 38 
4 30:7 38 


9 7 
9 52 


4 39 7 29 
4 39 7 29 


8 55 
9 42 


4 16 
4 17 


7 51 
751 


9 18 
10 1 


186 

187 


5 'Sat. 

6j SUN. 
7 Mo. 


D. G. Farragut born, 1801. 
Joshua Barney born, 1759. 
Nicholas of Russia born, 1796. 


4 31 7 38 
4 31 7 37 
4 32 7 37 


10 30 
11 3 
11 30 


4 40 7 28 
4 40 7 28 
4 41 7 28 


10 23 4 187 51 10 37 
10 OS 4 19 7 50 11 7 
11 27 4 19,7 50 11 32 


1 ^' } 




Tu. 


Fitz-Green Halleck born. 17.K). 


432 


7 36 


11 55 


4 42 


7 27 


11 55 


420 


7 49 11 55 


190 


ft 


We. 


Ann Radcliffborn. 1764. 


4 33 


7 36 


morn 


4 42 


7 27 


morn 


4 21 


7 49 morn 


191 
192 


li) 
11 


Jft. 


G. M. Dallas born, 1792. 
John Q. Adams born, 1767. 


4 34 7 36 
4 35 7 35 


21 
48 


4 43 7 27 
4 44 7 26 


23 
52 


4 22 
4 23 


748 
7 48 


19 
44 


193 


12 


Sat. 


Clara L. Kellogg born, 1842. 


4 35 


7 35 


1 16 


4 44 7 26 


1 22 


1 23 


7 47 


11 10 


194 


13 


SUN. 


Marat killed by Corday. 1793. 


4 36 


7 34 


1 49 


4 45 7 26 


1 57 


4 24 


747 


1 41 


195 


14 


Mo. 


Gen. N. Lyon born, 1818. 


4 37 


7 34 


2 27 


4 46 7 25 


2 36 


4 25 


746 


2 18 


196 
197 
198 
199 


15 
16 

17 

18 


Tu. 
We. 
Th. 

Fri. 


Gen Langbaine born, 1656 
Sir Joshua Reynolds born, 1723. 
Timothy Pickering born, 1745. 
James Monroe born, 1758. 


438 
4 40 


?! 

7 32 


3 11 

sets 
823 
8 58 


4 46 7 24 
4 47 7 24 
4 48,7 23 
4 49:7 23 


3 21 
sets 
8 11 
8 48 


4 2(> 
4 27 
4 28 
4 29 


7 45 
7 44 
7 44 
7 43 


3 1 

sets 
8 33 
9 7 


200 


19 


Sat. 


John Martin born, 1789. 


441 


7 31 


9 27 


4 49 7 22 


9 20 


4 30 


7 42 


9 35 


201 


'() 


SUN. 


John Sterling born. 1806. 


4 42 


7 30 


9 53 


4 50i7 21 


9 48 


4 31 


7 41 


9 59 


202 


L'l 


Mo. 


Gen. David Hunter barn. 1802. 


4 43 


7 29 


10 17 


4 51 7 21 


10 13 


4 32 


7 40 10 20 1 


203 


22 


Tu. 


Emma Lazarus born, 1849. 


4 44 


729 


10 39 


4 52 7 20 


10 37 


4 33 


7 39 10 41 


204 




We. 


Charlotte Cushman born, 1816. 


4 45 


7 28 


11 2 


4 53 7 19 


11 3 


4 34 


7 38 11 2 


205 


~"\ 


Th. 


John A. Dix born, 1798. 


446 


7 27 


11 27 


4 53 7 18 


11 30 4 35 


7 37 11 25 


206 


>r> 


Fri. 


|Gen. Henry Knox born, 1750. 


447 


7 26 


11 55 


4 54 7 18 


11 59 : 4 36 


7 36 


1150 


207 


21; 


Sat. 


'Charles Morris born, 1784. 


448 


7 25 


morn 


4 55 7 18 


morn 4 37 


7 35 


morn 




27 


SUN. 


Thomas Campbell born, 1777. 


4 48 


724 




4 56^7 16 


33 4 38 




20 


1 ' *i r * 


28 


Mo. 


Gen. 0. M. Mitchell born, 1809. 


449 


723 


1 7 


4 57i7 15 


1 15 i 39 


7 S*"* 


59 


210 


29 


Tu 


Tom Corwln born, 1794. 


4 50 


7 22 


1 57 


4 58 7 14 


2 7 440 


731 


1 47 


211 


30 


We. 


Samuel Roarers born. 1763. 


4 51 


7 21 


2 58 


4 59 7 13 


3 8 4 41 


7 30 


2 48 


212 


31 Th. Ijohn Ericsson born, 1803. 4 52 


7 20 rises 


5 7 12 


rises !4 42 7 29 rises 


8tli MONTH. AUGUST. 31 


DAYS. 


H 


O 


N 


August was named in honor 
of Augustus Caesar, he having 
been made consul in this month. 


Chicago, Iowa, 
!Neb.,N. Y.,Pa., 
S.Wis., S.Mich.. 
N. 111., Ind., O. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 
Ind., Ohio. 


St. Paul, N. E. 
Wis. and Mich., 
N.E. New York, 
Minn., Or. 




Q 


Q 


BIOGRAPHICAL EVENTS. 


| Sun 
'rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 
rises. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
rises. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
rises. 










H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


213 


1 


Fri. 


Rev. R. Mumson died, 1834. 


4 53 


7 18 


8 24 


5 


7 11 


8 15 


4 44 


7 27 


8 32 


214 


2iSat. 


Cardinal Wiseman born. 1802. 


4 54 


7 17 


8 59 


5 1 


7 10 


8 53 


4 45 


7 26 


9 5 


215 
216 


3 SUN. 
4lMo. 


Christine Nilsson born, 1843, 
O. P. Morton born, 1823. 


4 55 
4 56 


7 16 

7 15 


9 30 

9 58 


5 2 
5 3 


7 9 

7 8 


9 26 
9 57 


446 
4 47 


725 
724 


8i 


217 




Tu. 


Gen. Sheridan died. 1888. 


4 57 


7 14 


10 24 


5 4 


7 7 


10 26 


4 4S 


7 22 10 23 


218 


6 


We. 


Ben Jonson died, 1637. 


4 58 


7 12 


10 51 


5 5 


7 6 


10 54 


4 50 


7 21 


10 47 


219 




Th. 


Joseph R. Drake born. 1795. 


4 59 


7 11 


11 19 


5 6 


7 5 


11 24 


451 


7 19 


11 13 


220 


o 


Fri. 


Admiral John Rogers b.. 1812. 


5 


7 10 


11 51 


5 6 


7 4 


11 58 


4 52 


7 18 


11 44 


221 


9 


Sat. 


Adoniram Judson born, 1788. 






morn 


5 7 


7 2 


morn 


4 53 


7 17 morn 


222 


10 srx. 


Sir Charles Napier born, 1782. 


5 2 


7 8 




5 8 


7 1 


36 


4 54 


7 15; 18 


223 


11 Mo. 


R. G. Ingersoll born, 1833. 


5 4 


7 6 


1 8 


5 9 


7 


1 18 


4 56 


7 14 58 


224 


12 Tu. 


Robert Southey born, 1774. 


5 5 


7 5 


1 56 


'5 10 


c. .v.i 




4 57 


7 12 1 46 


225 13 We. 


Lucy Stone born, 1818. 


5 6 


7 4 


2 50 


5 11 


r, 07 


2 59 14 58 


7 11 2 41 


226 14 Th. 


George Combe died, 1858. 


5 7 


7 2 


3 47 


5 12 


6 56 


3 55 


.4 59 


7 9! 3 39 


227 15 Fri. 


'Napoleon I. born, 1769. 


5 8 




sets 


5 1316 55 sets 


5 


7 8 sets 


228 16 Sat. 


| Nathan Hale born, 1784. 


5 9 


6 59 


7 57 15 14 ] 6 54 7 51 5 2 


7 6 


8 4 


229 17 Sl'X. 


i David Crockett born, 1786. 


5 10 


( i ~,s 


8 22 15 156 52! 817115 3 


7 5 


8 26 


230 18 Mo. 


T. DeWitt Talmage born, 1832. 


5 11 


6 56 


8 45! 5 16 


6 511 8 43 5 4 


7 3 


847 


231 19 Tu. 


S. G. Goodrich born, 1793. 


5 12 


6 55 


9 7!;5 17 


6 50j 9 75 5 


7 1 


9 7 


232 201 We. 


Benjamin Harrison born, 1833. 


o 13 


6 53 


9 30j;5 17 


6 48 9 32! 5 6 


6 59 


9 29 


233 21 


Th. 


Prof. Tyndal' born, 1820. 


5 14 


6 52 


9 56 5 18 


6 47 9 59 5 8 


658 


9 52 


234 22 


Fri. 


John B. Gough born, 1817. 


.5 15 


6 50 10 25 r> 1!) 


6 45 10 31: 5 9 


6 56 10 19 


235 23 Sat. 


0. H. Perry born, 1785. 


5 16 


6 49 11 5 20 


6 44 ! 11 8 5 10 


6 54 10 52 


236 i 24 Si:x. 


Gen. John Newton born, 1823. 


5 17 


6 47 


11 44i 


5 21 


6 43ill 53 5 11 


6 52 11 35 


237! 25 Mo. 


Bret Harte born, 1839. 


5 18 


6 46 


morn! 


5 22 


6 41 morn 5 12 


6 50 morn 1 


238 26 Tu. 


Prince Albert born, 1819. 


5 19 


(544 


39 15 23 


6 40 


49 5 14 


6 49 


29 


239:27 We. 


Hannibal Hamlin born. 1809. 


5 20 


6 43 


1 44; lo 24 


6 39 


1 54 5 15 


6 47 


1 34 


240 28 Th. 


Gen. John Stark born, 1728. 


15 21 


6 41 


2 58 5 25 


6 37 


3 6 5 lt> 


6 45 


2 50 


241;29 Fri. 
242 30 Sat. 


"Parson" Brownlow born, 1805. 
William Palev born. 1743. 


5 22 6 39 
5 23 6 38 


4 18 5 26 

rises 5 27 


6 35 
6 34 


4 24 :> 17 
rises '!5 18 


6 43 
6 41 


4 12 

rises 


243 :!1 srx. G A. Grow born, 1824. \5 24|6 36 7 55 h 5 28 


6 32 7 53 5 20 


6 40 7 57 



9th MOXTH. SEPTEMBER. 3O DAYS. 


AY OF , 
r EAR. 


! 


N 


September, from Septem (sev- 
enth), as it was the seventh 
Roman mouth. 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Xeb., N.Y., Pa., 
S.Wis., S. Mich. 
N. 111., Ind., O. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 
Ind., Ohio, 


St. Paul,N.E. 
W is. and Mich.' 
N.E.NewYork- 
Minn., Or. 


^ 


fi 





BIOGRAPHICAL EVENTS. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 

sets. 


.Moon 
rises. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 
rises. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 
rises. 










H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


244 

2 45 
246 


1 
g 


Mo. 
Tu. 
We. 


John A. Quitman born, 1799. 
Henry George born. 1839. 
Eugene de Beauharnais b.,1781. 


5 25 
5 26 
5 27 


6 35 
6 3:; 
6 31 


8 21 
8 48 
9 18 


5 28 
5 2!) 
5 30 


6 31 

i 29 
6 27 


821 
8 51 
9 '. 


5 21 

11 


<; 36 
6 34 


21 
4(3 
9 13 


217 


4 


Th. 


Pindar born, 518 B. C. 


5 28 


6 29 


9 49 


5 31 


6 26 


9 55 


5 24 


6 32 


9 42 


i 248 


5 


Fri. 


J. G. Carlisle born, 1835. 


5 30 


(i 28 


10 21 


5 32 


6 2 1 


10 32 


5 26 


6 31 


10 16 


249 
250 


6 


Sat. 
SIN. 


Lafayette born, 1757. 
Thomas A. Hendricks b., 1819. 


5 31 

5 32 


6 2(1 
6 24 


11 5 

11 51 


5 :',:; 
5 :;! 


6 23 
6 21 


11 15 
morn 


5 27 
5 28 


6 29 
6 27 


10 56 
11 42 


251 


S 


Mo. 


John Leyden born, 1775. 


5 33 


6 22 


morn 


5 35 


6 20 


2 


5 29 


6 25 


morn 


252 


9 


Tu. 


Richard C. French born, 1807. 


534 


li 21 


44 




6 18 


54 


5 30 


6 23 


34 


253 
254 


10 
11 


We. 
Th. 


John J. Crittenden born, 1787. 
James Thomson born, 1700. 


5 35 6 19 
5 36!6 18 


1 40 
2 40 


5 37 

5 37 


6 17 
6 15 


1 49 
2 47 


5 32 

5 33 


6 21 
6 19 


181 
233 


255112 


Fri. 


A. H. Foote born, 1806. 


5 37 


6 16 


3 41 


5 38 


6 13 


3 46 


5 34 


6 17 


3 35 


256 13 


Sat. 


Gen. John Sedgwick born, 1813. 


5 38 


6 14 


4 42 


5 39 


6 12 


4 45 


5 35 


6 15 


4 38 


26714 

258 15 
259 16 


SUN. 

Mo. 
Tu. 


Bishop Hobart born, 1775. 
J. Fenimore Cooper born, 1789. 
Fahrenheit died, 1736. 


5 39 
5 40 
5 41 


6 12 
6 11 
6 9 


sets 
7 12 
7 34 


5 40 
5 41 
5 42 


6 10 
6 9 
6 7 


sets. 
7 11 
7 36 


5 36 
5 38 
5 39 


6 13 
6 12 
6 10 


sets 
7 13 
7 33 


260 


17 


We. 


Samuel Prout born, 1783. 


5 42 


6 7 


8 


5 43 


6 6 


8 3 |5 40 


6 8 


7 56 


261 


18 


Th. 


Joseph Story born, 1779. 


5 43 


6 5 


8 28 


5 44 


6 4 


8 33 5 41 


6 6 


8 22 


262 


19 


Fri. 


Robert Sanderson born, 1587. 


5 44 


6 3 




5 44 


6 2 


9 8 


5 43 


6 4 


8 54 


263 


20 


Sat. 


Gen. J. F. Reynolds born, 1820. 


5 45 


6 2 


9 40 


5 45 


6 1 


9 49 


5 44 


6 2 


9 31 


264 


21 


SIX- 


Louis Bonaparte born, 1778. 


5 4l> 


6 


10 29 


5 46 


5 59 


10 38 :> 46 


6 


10 18 


265 


22 


MO. 


Lord Chesterfield born, 1694. 


5 47 


5 58 


11 28 


5 47 


5 57 


1 1 38 


5 47 


:, -,H 


11 18 


266 
267 


2:; 
24 


Tu. 
We. 


Grace Greenwood born. 1823. 
Zachary Taylor born, 1784. 


5 48 
5 49 


5 56 
5 54 


morn 
37 


5 49 


5 56 
5 54 


morn 
4Tj 


5 48 5 56 
5 49 5 54 


morn 

28 I 


268 


25 


Th. 


Mrs. Hemans born, 1794. 


;551 


5 53 


1 52 


5 50 


5 .-,;! 


1 59 


5 51 


5 52 


1 45 


269 


26 


Fri. 


Lord Collingwood born, 1750. 


5 52 


5 51 


3 10 


5 51 


5 51 


3 15 


5 52 


5 50 


3 5 


270 


27 


Sat. 


S. F. Dupont born. 1803. 


5 53 


5 49 


4 27 


5 52 


5 49 


4 30 


5 53 


5 48 


4 25 


271 


28 


SUN. 


Sir William Jones born. 1746. 


5 54 


5 47 


rises 


5 53 


548 


rises 


5 54 


5 46 


rises 


272 


29 


Mo. 


Gen. J. M. Schofleld born, 1831. 


5 55 


5 46 


6 47 


5 54 


5 46 


?49 


5 55 


5 44 


6 46 


273 


:;o 


Tu. 


Gen. Heintzelman born, 1805. 


'5 56 


5 44 


7 16 


5 54 


5 45 


19 


5 57i5 43 


7 12 


lOtli MOXTH. OCTOBER. 31 DAYS. 


li 


O 


i! 


October was formerly the 
eighth month, and hence the 
name from Octem (eighth). 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb., N.Y., Pa., 
S.Wis., S.Mich. 
N. 111.. Ind., O. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Kv., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 
Ind., Ohio, 


1 St.Paul,N.E. 
'Wis. and Mich., 
.N.E.NewYork 
Minn.. Or. 


5* 


fl 


QP 


BIOGRAPHICAL EVENTS. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
rises. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 
rises. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

rises. 










H M 


H.M. 


H. M 


H M 


H M 


H M 


H AI 


H M 


H M 


274 


1 


We. 


Ruf us Choate born, 1799. 


5 57 


5 43 


7 45 


5 55 


5 43 


7 51 


5 58 


5 41 


7 39 


i 275 


2 


Th. 


Sam Adams born, 1803. 


5 58 


5 41 


8 19 


5 56 


5 41 


8 27 


5 59 


5 39 


811 


276 
277 


3 

4 


Fri. 
Sat. 


George Bancroft born, 1800. 
B. B. Hayes born, 1S22. 


5 59 5 39 
6 5 37 


8 59 
9 44 


5 57 

5 58 


5 40 

5 38 


I A 


6 
6 2 


5 37 
5 35 


88 


278 


5 


SIX. 


C. A. Arthur born, 1830. 




5 36 


10 35 


5 r>u 


5 37 


10 45 


6 3 


533 


10 25 


279 

280 


L ; 


Mo. 
Tu. 


J. R. Giddings born, 1795. 
William Laud born, 1573. 


6 4 


5 34 
5 32 


11 30 

morn 


6 


5 35 
5 34 


11 40 

morn 


6 5 
6 6 


5 31 11 21 
5 29 morn 


281 


8 


We. 


C. E. Stedman born. 1833. 


6 5 


5 30 


2S 


6 2 




36 


6 7 


527 


20 


282 
2s;-; 


9 
10 


Th. 
Fri. 


Lewis Cass born, 1782. 
Beiii amin West born, 1738. 


6 6 
6 7 


r, _: 
5 27 


1 29 
2 31 


6 3 
6 4 


5 31 


1 35 

2 35 


6 8 
6 10 


5 25 
5 24 


1 22 
2 26 


284 
285 
, 28C, 


11 
12 
13 


Sat. 
SIX. 

Mo. 


Dr. Samuel Clarke born. 1675. 
A T Stewart born, 1803. 
Virgil born, 70 B. C. 


6 9 
6 10 


5 26 
5 24 
5 22 


3 32 
4 35 
5 38 


6 5 
6 6 

6 7 


5 28 
5 26 

5 25 


3 35 

1% 


6 11 

15 13 


5 22 
520 
5 18 


3 30 i 
4 34 j 
5 40 


! 287 


14 


Tu. 


William Penn born, 1644. 


6 11 


5 21 


sets 


6 8 


:, 2; 


sets 


6 15 


5 16 


sets , 




15 


We. 


Gen. McDowell born, 1818. 


6 1315 19 


6 30 


6 95 22 


6 34 


6 16 


5 15 


6 25 


"'Si) 


16 


Th. 


William P. Fessenden b., 1806. 


6 14 5 18 


7 


i6 10 


5 21 


7 7 


6 18 


5 13 


6 53 


'290 


17 


Fri. 


John Wilkes born, 1727. 


6 15;5 16 


7 38 


6 11 


5 19 


7 47 


6 19 


5 11 


7 29 


291 


18 


Sat. 


Helen Hunt Jackson born, 1831. 


6 16 5 14 


8 24 


6 12 


5 18 


8 34 


6 20 


5 9 


8 14 


292 


19 1 SUN. 


Leigh Hunt born, 1784. 


6 1715 13 


9 20 


6 13 


5 16 


9 30 


6 22 


5 8 


9 10 


293 


20 Mo. 


Oliver Ditson born. 1811. 


6 19 


5 11 


10 24 


6 14 


5 15 


10 34 


6 23 


5 6 


10 14 




21|Tu. 


Samuel Taylor Coolr;dgeb.l772 


(J 20 


5 10 


11 36 


6 15 


5 14 


11 44 


6 25 


5 5 


11 28, 


'><),") 


22 


We. 


Sir Philip Francis born. 17-10. 


6 21 


5 8 


morn 


6 16 


5 12 


morn 


6 26 


5 3 


morn 


*")' ) 


23 


Th. 


Francis (Lord) "Jeffrey b., 1773. 


6 22 


5 7 


51 


6 17 


5 11 


57 


6 27 


5 1 


45 


297 


24 


Fri. 


Sir James Mackintosh b.. 1765. 


6 23 


5 5 


2 7 


<; 18 


5 9 


2 10 


6 29 


4 59 


2 3 


298 


25 


Sat. 


John P. Kennedy born. 1795. 


6 25 


5 4 


3 22 


6 19 


5 8 


3 23 


6 30 


4 58 


3 20 


, 299 


26 


SIX. 


Charles Hprague born, 1791. 


6 2*1 


5 2 


436 


6 21 


5 7 


4 35 


6 32 


4 56 


4 :-7 


300 


27 


Mo. 


Benjamin F. Wade born. 1800. 


6 27 


5 1 


5 49 


6 22 


5 6 


5 45 


6 33 


4 54 


5 62 


301 


28 


Tu. 


Anna Dickinson born, 1842. 


6 28 


5 


rises 


li 2;; 


5 5 


rises 


6 31 


4 53 


rises 


302 


29 


We. 


John Kears born 1796. 


6 _". 


4 58 


6 15 


6 24 


5 3 


6 22 


6 36 


4 51 


6 8 


303 


30!Th. 


Roscoe Conkling born, 1830. 


6 31 


4 57 


6 52 


li 25 


5 2 


7 1 


6 37 


4 50 


643 


304 


31! Fri. 


John Adams born. 1735. 


6 32 


1 55 


7 35 


<; 21 ; 


5 1 


7 45 


6 39 4 48 





iitu MOXTII. NOVEMBER. 


30 DAYS. 


Opi 


d 


N 


November, from Xore m (nine l. S^Jj 
as it was formerly the ninth ;. w 


iV, S.Mich! 


St. Louis, S. 111., St. Paul, N. E. 
Va., Ky., Mo., Wis. andMich., 
Kan.. Col.. Cal.. N.E. New York. 


< a 


Z 


<~. 


month. 


N. 111., Ind., 0. 


Ind.. Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


^ 


- 


" 


BIOGRAPHICAL EVEXTS. 


Suni Sun 


Moon 

rises. 


1 Sun 
rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 

rises. 


Sun 

lises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 
rises. 




~ 






1 1 . M . 


H.M. 


H.M. 




II. .M. 


1!. >!. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


305 


\ 


Sat, 


Mrs. L,. II. Sigourney born, 1791. 


C 33 


1 51 


824 


(i 27 


5 


S 31 


6 40 


4 47 


8 14 




_' 


six. 


James K. Polk born, 1795. 




4 53 


9 18 


C -_'s 


4 50 


9 2S C 41 


44(5 


9 8 


307 

1 :;o8 


3 

4 


Mo. 
Tu. 


W. C. Bryant born, 1794. 
Sam I. Prime born, 1812. 


6 37 


4 52 
4 50 


10 1C 
11 16 


(5 29 
(5 30 


4 5S 
4 56 


10 25 fi 43 
11 23 16 44 


4 44 
4 43 


10 7 
11 9 


309 


5 


We. 


Washington Allston born, 1779. 


(i 38 


4 49 morn 


6 32 


4 55 


morn 


(i 46 


4 41 


morn 


310 


i; 


Th. 


Richard Dale born, 17515. 


(i 30 


4 48 18 


6 33 


4 54 


L'3 (i 47 


4 40 


12 


311 


7 


Fri. 


S. H. Stringham born, 1798. 


6 40 


1 47 1 20 


6 34 


4 53 


1 23 C 4S 


4 39 


1 16 


312 
313 


8 
9 


Sat. 
srx. 


Gen. O. O. Howard born, 1830. 
W. H. Harrison born. 1773. 


(i 12 
6 43 


4 1C 2 21 
1 45 3 23 


li 35 

C, 3C 


4 52 
4 51 


2 L'3 C 5d 
3 23 6 51 




2 20 
3 24 


314 


10 Mo. 


Gen. A. H. Terrv born, 1827. 


6 45 


4 44 


4 27 


6 37 


1 51 


4 24 C 5:; 


4 35 


4 30 


315 


11 


Tu. 


T. B. Ahlrich born, 1837. 


6 46 


4 43 


5 32 


6 38 


4 50 


5 28 6 54 


4 34 


537 


316 


12 


We. 


Rev. Ray Palmer born, 1808. 


6 47 


4 42 


sets 


6 39 


4 49 


sets 6 55 


4 33 


sets 


317 

, 318 
319 


LSTfa. 

14 Fri. 
15 Sat. 


Edwin Booth born, 1833. 
Anson Burlingame born, 1820. 
Richard H. Dana born, 1787. 


6 4s 
6 50 
6 51 


4 41 

4 40 
4 39 


gfg 

7 13 


6 40 
6 42 
(i 43 


4 48 5 44 
4 47 6 29 
4 46 7 23 


6 57 
(i 58 
7 


4 32 
431 
4 30 


5 28 
6 9 


320 


1C SI X. 


Timothv Dwight born, 1828. 


6 52 




8 16 


C 44 


4 46 8 26 


7 1 


4 2!) 


8 6 


321 


17 


Mo. 


Marshall Macdonald born, 1763. 


6 53 


1 87 


'. 25 


,6 45 


4 45 9 34 


7 2 


4 28 


9 16 


322 
323 
324 
325 
326 


IS 
1!) 
20 
21 
22 


Tu. 
We. 
Th. 
Fri. 
Sat, 


Asa Gray born, 1810. 
J. A. Gar field born, 1831. 
Thomas Chatterton born, 1752. 
Admiral Lord Lyons born, 1790. 
LaSalle born,lf>43. 


6 54 4 36 
C 56 t 30 
6 57 4 35 

fi 58 4 31 
C 59 4 3:; 


10 39 
11 54 
morn 
1 7 

2 20 


6 4(5 4 44 

6 47 I 44 
6 4S 4 43 
6 49 4 4:'> 
6 50 4 42 


10 46 
11 58 
morn 
1 10 
2 20 


n 

7 8 
7 9 


4 27 
4 2(5 
4 25 
4 24 
4 23 


10 32 
11 49 
morn 


327 


23 SVX. 


Franklin Pierce born, 1804. 


7 


4 33 


3 32 


6 51 


4 42 


3 29 


7 11 


4 22 


3 35 


328 


24 Mo. 


Fra*nces H. Burnett born. 1S49. 7 2 


4 32 


4 43 


6 52 


4 41 


4 38 


7 12 


4 22 


448 


32!) 


25 Tu. 


Charles Kemble born, 1775. 


7 3 


4 32 


5 53 


6 54 


4 41 


546 


7 11 


t 21 


G 1 


330 


26 We. 


William Cowper born. 1731. 


7 4 


4 31 


rises 


6 55 


4 40 


rises 


7 15 


4 20 


rises 


331 


27 Th. : 


Robert Lowth born, 1710. 


7 5 


4 31 


5 26 


6 56 


4 40 


5 31 i 


7 16 


4 20 


5 17 


332 


28 Fri. . 


John W. Mackav born. 1831. 


7 6 


4 30 




! 6 57 


4 39 


(J 23 


17 17 


4 1!) 


6 _3 


\ 333 29 Sat. ! 
j 334 30 SUN. 


Wendell Phillips born. 1811. 
"Mark Twain" born, 1835. 


7 7 4 30 

7 8(4 29 


8 3 


,6 57 4 39 

'6 58 4 39 


7 16 
813 


17 19 4 19 
\7 2014 18 


7 54 


i2th MOXTH. DECEMBER. 


31 


DAYS. 


i* 


c 
"<, 


AY OF 

I'KEK. 


December, from Decem (ten). 
the Roman Calender terming it 
the tenth month. 


Chicago, Iowa 
Xel...X.Y., Pa.. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va.. Kv.. Mo.. 


St. Paul, N. E. 
Wis. and MIcJi., 
N.E. New York, 
Minn., Or. 


S.Wis., S.Mich., 
N. 111., Ind., O. 


Kan 
In 


, Col., Cal., 
d., Ohio. 


" 


= 


a;> 


BIOGRAPHICAL EVEXTS. 


Sun 
rise? 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 
rises. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 

rises. 


Sun Sun j Moon 
rises sets. Irises. 










H.M. 


H.M. 


II. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H M 


H.M.| H M 


335 


1 


Mo. 


Matilda Heron born, 1830. 


7 9 


4 2ii 


9 3 


(i 59 


4 39 


9 11 


7 21 


4 18 8 55 


33(5 


2 


Tu. 


Cortez born, 1485. 


7 10 


4 29 


10 4 


7 


1 3s 


10 10 


7 22 


4 18 


9 58 


337 




We. 


George B. McClellan born, 1826. 


7 11 


4 29 


11 5 


7 1 


1 3s 


11 9 


23 


4 17 11 "n 


il 


4 
5 


Th. 
Fri. 


Thomas Carlyle born, 1795. 
Martin Van Buren born. 1782. 


7 12 4 28 
7 13 4 28 


morn 1 7 2 

57 3 


438 

4 38 


morn 
8 


21 

25 


4 17 

4 16 


morn 
3 


340 


(i Sat. 


(Rev. R. H. Barbara born. 1788. 


7 14 


4 28 


1 7 


7 4 


4 38 


1 8 


26 


4 It: 


1 7 


341 


7 si x. 


!Hugh McCulloch born, 1808. 


7 15 


4 28 2 10 


7 5 


4 38 


2 8 27 


4 16 


212 


342 
*43 


8 Mo. 
9lTu. 


Mary. Queeji of Scotts, b., 1542. 
John Milton born, 1608. 


7 1614 28 

7 17 4 28 


3 15 
4 21 


7 7- 


4 38 
14 38 


3 11 28 
4 15 29 


4 16 
4 1(5 


3 19 

4 28 


344 
345 


10 We. 
11 Th. 


W. L. Garrison born, 1805. 
iCharles Wesley born, 1757. 


7 is 4 2s 
7 19 4 28 


53117 8 
43 7 ! 


1 3s 
4 38 


5 22 7 30 
6 32 7 31 


4 16 
4 1(5 


5 39 
6 53 


346 


12 Fri. 


ijobn Jay born, 1745. 


i -; 


4 28 sets 


7 9 


4 39 


sets 7 32 


4 16 


sets 


347 

348 


13 Sat. 
14 SIX. 


iCornwallis born, 1737. 
iTycho Brahe born, 1546. 




4 28 G 3 
4 29 7 13 


7 IV 


4 39 

4 39 


(i 13 7 3:; 4 ic 

7 22 7 33 4 17 


553 

7 4 


34! t 
350 
351 


15 Mo. 
1C Tu. 
17 We. 


Henry C. Carey born, 1793. 
Abbott Lawrence born, 1792. 
(Joseph Henry born. 177R 


7 22 4 29 8 28 

7 23 4 2!) 9 45 
72442011 


7 12 
7 12 
7 13 


4 39 
4 40 
440 


8 35 7 34 4 17 
9 49 17 35 4 17 
11 21736417 


8 20 
9 39 
10 57 


352 
353 


18 Th. 
19 Fri. 


Sir Humphrey Davy born, 1778. 
E. M. Stanton born, 1824. 


7 24 4 30 morn 
7 25 4 30 12 


7 14 4 4O morn 
7 14 4 41 I-S' 


7 36 4 18 

7 37 4 18 


morn 
12 


354 


20 Sat. 


John W. Crocker born, 1780. 


725 


4 31 


1 23 


7 15 


4 41 


I 21 


- 37 


4 19 


1 25 


355 


21 SI X. 


Thomas a Becket born. 1117. 


7 26 


t 31 


2 32 


7 15 


4 42 


2 27 ~ 38 


4 19 


2 36 


35C 


22 Mo. 


T. W. Higginson born, 1823. 


7 26 


4 :-!_ 


3 40 


7 1C 


4 42 


3 33 ~ 38 


4 20 


3 47 


357 
35S 


23 Tu. 
24 We. 


Thomas Macdonough born,] 783. 
.George Crabbe born, 1754. 




4 32 
4 33 


4 40 
5 57 


III 


4 43 

4 43 


4 40 ~ 39 4 20 
5 46 - 39 4 21 




350 


25 Th. 


'Sir Isaac Newton born. 1(542. 


7 28 


4 .33 


7 




4 44 


C 47 7 40 


4 21 


7 12 




26 : Fri. 


K. D. E. N. Sonthworth b., 1819. 


7 2S 


1 31 


risos 


7 17 


4 45 rises 


7 10 


t 22 


rises 


' ( \ 1 


27 Sat. 


John Kepler born, 1571. 


7 28 


4 35 5 51 


7 is 


41" 


6- J 


7 40 


4 23 


5 41 


'<)'* 


28 SVX. 


Thomas Henderson born. 1798. 


7 2s 


4 3'i C 51 


7 is 


4 40 


707 10 


4 24 


6 42 


363 


20 Mo. 


Andrew Johnson born, 1808. 


7 2! 


4 36 7 5J 


7 IS 


1 47 


7 5!) 7 41 


4 24 


7 45 


i 364 30 Tu. 


John Phillins born, 1676. 


7 20 


4 371 8 53 


7 19 


4 47 


s 5s 7 4 


4 25 


8 47 


366 31 We. Gen. G. G. Meade born, 1815. 


7 29 4 381 9 55 


7 l-.i 


! is ;, 5$., 7 41! 


426 951 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 11 


IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE, WITH RATE OF DUTY, 

For the twelve months ending June 30, 1889, compared with the corresponding period of 1888. 
(Corrected to July 26, 1889.) 
Abbreviation: n. e. s., not elsewhere specified. 


ARTICLES FREE OF DUTY. 


QUANTITIES. 


VALUES. 


Fiscal Years. 


Fiscal Years. 


Animals n e s Cattle . No. 


1089. 
4,462 
9,911 
5,926 


1888. 
6,8f.6 
10.378 

18,866 


1889. 
$156,230 
2,706,239 
69,824 
355,245 
3,287,538 


1888. 
206,095 
2,720.704 

SIKHS'.) 

320,404 
3,328,092 


Horses ... No. 




All other, including fowls 


Total 






Articles, the growth, produce, and manufacture of the 
United States, returned Spirits, distilled.. proof gails. 
All other 


1,615,316 


2,795.562 


1,678,802 
4,178,896 

5,857,788 


2,800,789 
5,660.530 
8,461,319 


Total 






Art Works, n. e. s. Paintings, statuary, fountains, and 
other works of art, the production of American artists 
Asphaltum or bitumen, crude Ibs. 


86.348,171 
40,279 


81,346,814 
62,918 


337399 

89,211 

185,782 
299,416 

1,155.215 


530,711 

113,854 
290,265 
297,571 

975,637 


Bark hemlock. . cords. 


Bolting-cloths 


Books, maps, engravings, etchings, and other printed mat- 
ter, n. e. s 






Chemicals. Drugs, and Dyes, n. e, s. Alizarine, natural, or 
artificial, including extract of madder Ibs. 


2,574,993 
21.429434 

2,865.968 

349,998 


2,464,243 
17.226,491 
2,801,443 

181,495 


438,708 
2,490,871 
367,966 

74,285 


414,298 
2,320.512 
344,718 

46.444 




Barks' Cinchona, or other, used in the manufacture of 


Cochineal Ibs. 




69,354 


78,691 


1,449,037 
216,415 
1,665,452 


1,535,309! 
136.204 
1,671,513 


All other 


Total 








718,334 
1.961,018 
17.851,339 
5.509,873 
36,069,118 
62,109,682 


915,799 

2,779.719 
36.8'.,670 
4,206,850 
20,496,859 
65,289,897 


174,432 
287,333 
903.888 
789.464 
3,121,350 
5,276,467 


260,931 
304,459 
1,736,919 
524,782 
2,664,469 
5,491,560 




Cutcn, or'catechu, and terra japonica, orgambia Ibs. 


All other gums and gum resins, n. e. s Ibs. 


Total 


Indigo Ibs. 


3,550,756 
104,115,003 
57,068,600 
1.609,923 
71,703.130 
2,889.882 
151,148,574 
130,191 
168,791 


3,114,279 

95.318,471 
49,151.664 
1,800.863 
56,065,179 
1,628,414 
178,954,024 
99,253 
145,379 


2,684,105 
1,659.473 
874,430 
331,114 
1,067,344 
909201 
2,275,021 
2,Q2544 
699.903 
3,755,451 
26,625,435 


2,231,555 
1,568,417 
830,490 
375.559 i 
S22.08'.) 
651,535 
2,449,639 
1,581,582 
842.201 
4,035,565 
25.677,677 






Mineral waters all not artificial gal. 


Potash muriate of . ...lbs. 


Quinia sulphate and other salts of oz. 


Soda nitrate of Ibs. 


Sulphur, or brimstone, crude tons. 






Total chemicals, drugs, etc 






Cocoa, or cacao, crude, and leaves and shells of Ibs. 
Coffee Ibs. 


16,743.964 
578.397,454 
4,370,700 


16,402.287 
423,645,794 
4,451,440 


2,142,061 
74,724,882 
124^56 
902,047 
1,194,505 
257,505 
2,418,976 
941,998 


2,251,773 
60,507,630 
141,096 
1,078,802 
744,800 
309,613 
2,312,478 
905,991 








7,973,139 


5,497,542 






15,918,809 


15,642,861 


Karinaceous substances, and preparations of , n. e. s 




14.274 
34,603 


8,042 
29,317 


289.745 
338,965 
984,952 
1,613,662 


154,937 
252,411 
661,374 

1,068,722 


Phosphates crude or native, for fertilizing tons. 


All other 


T otal 








5,974 
1,020,507 
46,348,854 


7,397 
1,223,975 

31,828,427 


483,212 
104,887 
823342 
517,534 
127,734 
1.573,497 


318,133 
119.552 
743,710 
429.668 
109,215 
1,402,145 


Fish, n. e. s. Fresh, other than shell fish Salmon Ibs. 
All others . . ... Ibs 


Lobsters canned or preserved 


All other shell fish 






Total 












3,571.024 
782,706 
1,597,632 
5,961,362 


3,153,654 

824,762 
1,80:1,451 

:>.7s7,S67 i 








All other 






Total 









12 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. -Continued. 


ARTICLES FREE OF DTJTT. 


QUANTITIES. 


VALUES. 


Fiscal Years. 


Fiscal Years. . 




1889. 


1888. 


1889. 

$2,088,167 
2,431,518 


1888. 
$1,952,316 
2,130!892 


Hair, n. e. s 






Hides and Skins other than Fur Skins Goat skins 






7,668,472 
17,459,278 
25,127,750 


6,369,411 
17,569,928 
23,939,339 


All other 






Total 






Household and personal effects, and wear ng apparel in 
use, and implements, instruments, and tools of trade ot 
persons arriving from foreign countries and of citizens 






2,732,972 
12,387,131 
591,502 
96,574 


3,037,280 

16,067,262 
685,763 
156,533 




32,339,501 
170,63a 
5,776,406 


36,628,351 
210,224 
7,051,664 




Vegetable Ibs. 


Oils n e s Fixed or expressed Ibs. 


16.105.242 
2,065,316 


21,158,638 
1,524,680 


713,364 
1,036,524 
1,749,888 


9*0,991 i 
1,050,317 
2,031,308 


Volatile or essential Ibs. 


Total 








87,287 
*6,951,719 


3,288 
5,115,563 


Silver bearing 








142,738,858 


113,435,454 


2,552,851 
3,372,196 
5,925,047 


2,032,560 
3,430,476 
5,463,036 


All other 


Total 






Plaster of paris, or sulphate of lime, unground ,tons. 


171,087 
5,464 
132,157 


135,426 
5,335 
181,329 


184,472 
565,301 
248,487 
658,792 


148,316 
564,761 
371,441 

720,189 






Seeds, not medicinal, n. e.s 




93,537 


454,169 


62,998 
1,319 
18,544,025 
724,887 
19,333,229 


324,701 
1,540 
19.151,208 
454,233 
19,931,682 




Raw or as reeled from the cocoon Ibs. 


5,329,646 
1,221,941 


5,173,840 
742,313 


Waste Ibs. 


Total 




1,155.102 
ll,358,62b 
12,138,372 
24,652,100 


1,248,096 
12,949,598 
13,317,870 
27,515,564 


514,888 
1,578,421 
1,109,996 
3,203,305 


914^773 
3,341,568 




All other Ibs 


Total 


Tea Ibs. 


78,292.116 

3,877,287 


84,627,870 
31,690,583 


12,435,533 
7,014,495 
4,439,624 


13.3i!0,685 ! 
8,758,562 i 
4,139,787 


Tin, bars, blocks, or pigs, grain or granulated Ibs. 


Wood, unmanufactured, n. e. s 


Articles Admitted Free Under Reciprocity Treaty with 
Hawaiian Islands Rice Ibs. 


10,660,300 
48,140 
243.324,683 


13,269,500 
52,582 
228,540,513 


494,166 
6,148 
12,078,518 
9,761 
12.588,593 


551,257 
6,417 
10,260,048 
762 
10,818,484 




Sugar, brown , Ibs. 


Allother 


Total 






All other free articles 






5,479,445 
256.487,078 


4,829,384 
244,071,615 


Total free of duty 






QUANTITIES. VALUES. | 


of Duty. 


Fiscal Years. r iscal Years. 


1889. 188 
Animals, n. e. s. Cattle No 57567 5' 


8. 1589. 188 
,505 $552,145 $66< 
!,033 2,157.717 2,68, 
1,213 1,189,176 1,28, 
37,728 3' 
. 3.936.766 4.67J 


8. 
)903 <x\<t 


Horses No. 48,768 5; 


a59 
>,436 

f,795 
5.293 


....30*. 


Sheep No. 398,891 4& 


All other 


Total 


Art works, n. e. s. Paintings, in oil or water 
colors, and statuary 1,303,336 1,679,807 


*Of the total value, $6,951,719, the value of importations of silver ore into 
customs districts amounted to $6,205.777, or 89 per cent. These importations e 
lowing quantities of lead admitted free of duty: 
Corpus Christ! Tex pc 


the below-named 
ontained the fol- 

unds 4,520,739 
unds 2,090 
unds 20,209 
unds 36,997,532 
unds 14,023,980 
unds 55^550 


New Orleans, La . . po 


New York City po 


Paso del Norte, Tex., and N. Mex po 


Saluria, Tex po 


Total po 





IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 13 


IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. -Continued. 




QUANTITIES. 


VALUES. 


Rate of Duty. 




Fiscal Years. 


Fiscal Years. 


Books, maps, engravings,etchings. and other 


1889. 


1888. 


1889. 

$2,9ia742 
183,861 


1888. 

$2,907,779 
293,093 




Brass and manufactures of 








Breadstuff's Barley bu. 


11,368,419 
2,401 
22,310 
1,965,433 

130,645 
1,156 


10,831,461 
37,493 
67.838 
1,007,620 

2&C 


7,723,838 
1,216 
10,178 
56,002 
24 
119,017 
5J92 

113,657 
8,029,724 


8,076,082 
20,507 
23,655 
37,515 
20 
466,886 
13357 

117,870 
8,755,792 


lOcbu. 
.10c bu. 




Oats bu 


Oatmeal .Ibs. 


Rye bu 


1fv> hn " 


Wheat bu. 


20c bu 


Wheat flour. . brls. 


20*. 
20* 


All other breadstuff's and preparations of, 


Total 






15c Ib 


Bristles Ibs. 


1,330,787 


1,114,214 


1,284,724 
654,641 
3.252.40 
1,459,838 


1,215,325 
639.155 
3,710,705 
1,903.650 






Buttons . ... 






Cement brls. 


1,517,350 


2.016,990 


20^' 


Chemicals, Drugs, Dyes, and Medicines. 






1,686,456 
933,354 

149,789 
809,893 
644,204 
209,426 


1,539,678 
1,064,756 

162,669 
1,234 321 


35* 


Glycerine Ibs. 


10,959,719 

2,195,284 
391,563 
96,678 
7,749,981 


10,060,719 

2,391,377 
447,020 
65,986 
7,983,812 


2c Ib 


Logwood and other dye woods, extracts, 
decoctions of Ibs. 


10* 


Opium Crude Ibs. 


$llb 




555,339 
212,049 


$10 Ib 


Potash, nitrate of, or saltpeter, crude.. Ibs. 


Iclb. 


Soda Bicarbonate of Ibs. 
Carbonate, including sal-soda and soda- 
ash Ibs. 


1,167,197 
308.990.77J 

16,93738s 
405,658,119 


2,020,643 

284,580,151 
89.421,4;? 
17,611,357 
393,633,618 


19,912 

2,900,827 
1,300,851 
74,698 
4,504,288 


28,843 

2,849,371 
1,565.930 
59,986 

4.504,130 


l^clb. 
Vc Ib 


Caustic . ...Ibs. 


Ic Ib 


All other salts of Ibs. 


20* 


Total 


.'.'.'.'.'.'.. ...2oV. 




11,197,347 


13,456,563 


206.643 
4,092,883 


264,728 
3,800602 


Allother 


Total chemicals, drugs, etc 






13,028.936 


13,338,272 


$3 ton. 
.... 30*. 


Clays or earths of all kinds, including china 
clay, or kaoline tons. 


49,050 


46,551 


322.960 


319,202 


Clocks and Watches, and Parts of Clocks, 






420.822 

1,662,118 
2,082.940 


388^53 

1,662,096 
2,050,349 


Watches, and parts of, and watch mate- 






125* 


Total 






75c ton. 
2J^clb. 




1,155,829 
5,037.886 


877,504 
4,454,458 


3,929,245 
400,229 


2,846,741 
291,185 


Copper, and Manufactures of Ore (fine cop- 
per contained therein) Ibs. 


Pigs, bars, ingots, old, and other unmanu- 
factured .. Ibs 


112,513 


173,760 


7,919 
74,730 
82.649 


13,369 
103,326 
116,695 


Various. 
35*. 


Manufactures of 


Total, not including ore 






35*. 


Corsets 






869.957 


1,001,306 


Cotton, Manufactures of Cloths Not 
bleached, dyed, colored, stained, painted, 
or printed sq. yards. 


2,573,607 

27,812,582 
30,386,189 


1,077,070 

26,483,126 
27,560,196 


202,602 

3,696,780 
3,899,382 


82,613 

3,356,532 
3,439.145 


.2^csq. yard. 
...4csq.yard. 

35*. 
40*. 


Bleached, dyed, colored, stained, painted, 


Total 


Clothing, ready-made, and other wearing 
apparel, not including knit goods 






383,612 
9,591.944 

6,389,3M 

860,703 
5,681,065 
26,806,030 


392,307 
11,071.907 

6,373,780 

957,705 
6,682,955 
28,917,799 


Embroideries, laces, insertings, trimmings, 






Knit goods: Stockings, hose, half hose, 
shirts, drawers, and all goods made, 
fashioned, or shaped on knitting ma- 






40*. 


Thread (not on spools), yarn, warps, or 


1,744,852 


1,886,672 


..10to48clb. 
35 & 


All otner 


Total manufactures of 









14 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. -Continued, 


ARTICLES DUTIABLE. 


QUANTITIES. 


VALUES. 


Rate of Duty. 


Fiscal Years, 


Fiscal Years. 


Earthen, Stone, and China Ware: China, 
porcelain, parian and bisque, earthen 
stone, and crockery ware Not deco- 


1889. 


1888. 


1889. 
81 175848 


18S8. 

$1,060,855 
4,133,384 
1,216,632 
6,410,871 


TKrf 


Decorated or ornamented 
All other 








4,247001 
1,053,350 
6,476,199 


60$. 
55$. 


Total 






Fancy Articles Beads (except amber) and 
bead ornaments 






1,259,942 

1,865,389 
462,727 
848,103 
979,861 

343,964 
290,782 
610,764 
6,661,532 


2,007,859 
1,683,532 
504;3i* 
1,408,571 
483,940 

361,485 
236,774 
590,744 
7,277,217 








or 3? * 








!!.'."!.".".'.'25tf>! 

50 a. 














Perfumeries, cosmetics, and all toilet prep- 
arations 






$2 gal. and 50 $. 
35 to 70$. 








All other 






Total 






2^cbox. 

Icbox. 
Slbrl. 
. . . .IJ^clb. 
$2brl. 
Iclb. 
Iclb 


Fish, n. e. s. Anchovies and sardines- 






793,969 

474,818 
172,731 
803,888 
575,239 
78,416 
336,799 
3,235,860 


993,559 

507.729 
118,711 
840,978 
615,761 
73,411 
312,779 
3,462,928 


Cod, haddock, hake, and poliock, dried, 
smoked, or pickled 1 bs. 


13,896,04! 
6,095,437 
113,464 
42,394 
5,138 


15,049,231 

5,549,244 
131,368 
64,987 
5,064 


Herring Dried or smoked '. . . . .Ibs. 


Pickled or salted brls 


Mackerel pickled brls 


Salmon pickled . .. ..brls. 


All other 


Total 






?5ton. 
J25 ton. 
20$. 

$15 ton. 

:::::::::: 

:::::::::|,|: 


Flax, Hemp, Jute, and other Vegetable Sub- 
stances, and Manufactures of: Un- 
manufactured Flax tons. 


7,896 
55,835 

88,655 

38,542 
190.928 


5,691 
47.947 
115,163 

36,401 
205,202 


2,070,729 
9.433,774 
2,853,664 

6,110,308 
20,468,475 


1,802,089 
6,934,837 
3,377.369 

5,430.894 
17.545,189 


Hemp, and substitutes for tons. 


jute tons. 


Sisal grass and other vegetable sub- 


Total 


Manufactures of flax, hemp, or lute, or of 
which flax, hemp, or jute shall be the 
component material of chief value- 
Bags and bagging, and like manufactures 
Burlaps (except for bagging for cotton) 






1,449,098 
5,383,768 

14,741.104 
57.831 
530,380 
905,142 
2,638,230 
25,705,553 


1,283,382 
4.039,826 

14,003,235 
60,351 
516,013 
926,493 
2,912,871 
23,742,171 






Brown or bleached linens, ducks, canvas, 
paddings, cot bottoms, diapers, crash, 








567,819 


560,389 


Thread, twine and pack thread 


Yarns. Ibs 


16,285,809 


16,988,814 


All other 


Total manufactures of 






....2clb. 
SOcbox. 
25cbox. 
Iclb. 

....2clb. 
35clb. 
7clb. 


Fruits, including Nuts,.n. e. s. Figs Ibs. 
Lemons 


10,649,049 


10,058,053 


482,759 
3,189,534 
l,9til.8S9 
1,423,304 
1,736,786 
1,042.846 
1,7(54,393 
595,227 
598,317 
12,795,055 


2;268,872 
2,197,150 
2,070,120 
941,302 
1,968.758 
631,748 
743,668 
14,714,356 


Oranges. 






Plums and prunes . Ibs 


46,154,825 
35,091,139 


70,626,027 
40,476,763 


Raisins Ibs. 




All other fruits 






Nuts Almonds Ibs 


5,545,400 


5,747,957 


Allother 


3clb. 
20&. 


Total 






Furs, dressed on the skin, and manufact- 
ures of fur 






5,329,588 


4,783,028 


Glass and Glassware: Bottles, vials, demi- 
johns, carboys, and jars, empty or tilled. 
Cylinder, crown, and common window- 
glass, unpolished Ibs 


75,595,286 
259,038 
1,990,385 

2,702,870 
3,029,807 
3,211,067 


7i,'449,076 
275,354 
147,250 

3.0.35.242 
3,955,201 
4,923,157 


823,879 
1,444,982 

91,105 

756.577 

130.172 
983,316 

1.24IM55 


815,564 
1,397,898 

95,147 
59,208 

131,224 

1,258,736 
1,801,514 


3ceach. 
I^cto2%clb. 

3c to 50c sq.ft. 
4c to 60c sq. ft. 

Various. 
Various. 
Various. 


Cylinder and crown glass, polished Un- 


Silvered . . sq feet 


Plate Glass Fluted, rolled, or rough 


Unsilvered sq feet 


Silvered sg. feet. 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 15 


IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. --Continued. 




QUANTITIES. 


VALUES. 


Rate of Duty. 




Fiscal Years. 


Fiscal Years. 


All other 


1889. 


1888. 


1889. 
$2,238,9K 
7,712,38< 
154.42C 
4.197,877 
l,082,88c 
1,155,475 
336,227 


1888. 
t I2,295,43J 
7,854,72; 
172,591 
6,336,35; 
979,524 
L017,49 
34&20S 


Various. 

.. '.20% 'to' 30$.' 
$2 ton 


Total 






Hair n e s and manufactures of 






Hats, bonnets, and hoods, and materials for 






105,39. 
3,976,1ft 


ioo,26< 

5,585,0 




8clb. 
...25$ to 35$. 


Indiana rubber and gutta percha, manufs.oi 
Iron and Steel, and Manufactures of Iron 
o re tons 


653,2 


919,644 


1,507,658 


1,818,034 


75c ton. 
$6.72 ton. 

$6.72 ton . 
3-10clb. 
8-10toll-10clb 
7-10c Ib. 
$17 ton 


Pig iron tons 


183,25( 

34,21" 

4,224 
69,180,491 
2C 
24557 

71,654,636 
587,168 

46,736,057 

215,630,935 
15,413,75t 

735,737,990 

180,209,180 

7,818,714 

2,737,957 
1,616,880 


325,517 

142.087 
13.019 
74,363,371 
225 
136,799 

42,696,591 
20,68 

50,223,909 

414,489,698 
16,351,57 

634,944,94 

270,939,550 
7,105,977 

2.907,802 
4065,787 


2,860,462 

394,904 
55,432 
1,135,665 
481 
581,109 

897,762 
7,314 

902,456 

2,460,390 
447,01 

21,222,653 

2,500,394 
638,55 

164,292 
84,tWO 
2,362,537 
65,233 
1,159,147 
2,445.379 
283,600 
1,708,462 
42,377,842 


5,042,886 

1,957,135 
161,014 
1,219,461 
5,375 
3^19,212 

528,334 
295 

831,941 

4,442,647 
531,484 

18,979,344 

3,648,480 
600,988 

182,743 
97,506 
2,210,736 
64,956 
1,070,685 
J.0?.).:i 
316,295 
1,801,859 
48,992,757 


Scrap, fit only to be remanuf actured Iron, 




Bar iron rolled or hammered Ibs 


Bars railway Of iron tons. 




Cotton ties, or hoops for baling purposes, 
of iron and steel Ibs. 


....35* 
.Itol4-10clb. 

45$ to 3^c Ib. 

45$ to 3^fc Ib. 
45$ to 3^c Ib. 

Iclb 




HOODS, bands, strips, sheets, and plates, of 
steel Ibs 


Ingots, blooms, slabs, billets, and bars of 


Sheet, plate, and taggers' iron Ibs. 
Tin plates, terne plates, or taggers' tin 
Ibs. 


Wire rods (rivet, screw, nail, and fence), 
round, in coils and loops, of iron or 

steel IbS 


12-10clb. 
Various. 

2clb 


Wire, and wire rope and strand, iron or 
steel Ibs 


Manufactures of, n.e.s. Anvils, axles, and 


Chains, of iron or steel Ibs 


.I%to2^clb. 
35cto'50c'doz.' 


Files, file blanks, rasps, and floats 












Needles... 






...25$ to 35$. 


All other 
Total, not including iron ore 








Jewelrv, Manufactures of Gold and Silver 
and Precious Stones Jewelry,and manu- 






1,228,369 

10,771,633 
549,257 


1,160,754 

10,520,907 
661,917 


Precious stones, n. e. s., and imitations of, 






::.::::::& 


Lead, and manufactures of 






Leather, and Manufactures of: Leather- 
Bend or belting and all sole leather 
Calf-skins, tanned, or tanned and dressed. 






31,113 
1.172.080 
3,416,935 

1,399,695 
6,019,823 


33,519 
1,363.081 
3,450,571 

2,022,861 
6,870,032 


!$ 












Upper leather of all other kinds, dressed, 






3M 


Total 






50$, 


Manufactures of Gloves, kid and leather. 






4,523,613 
752,886 
5,270,490 
111,381 


4,437,267 
664,460 
5101,727 


Total 






30$. 

...20cbu. 
35cgal. 


flalt, barley bu. 


150,182 


216,757 


164,585 


rtalt Liquors In bottles or jugs gal. 
Not in bottles or jugs gal. 


1,150,465 
1,373,606 
2,524,131 


1.126.771 
1,390,123 
2,516,894 


956.243 
405,968 
1,362,211 


923,141 
440,717 
1,363,858 


Total 


>5c per 100ft to 
5056. 
Various. 


Marble and Stone, and Manufactures of 
Marble, and manufactures of, n. e. s 






574.738 

431,839 
1,006.577 


545.891 

419.371 
965,262 


Stone, and manufactures of, including 
slate 






Total 






Metals, Metal Compositions, and Manufact- 
ures of, n. e. s. Bronze manufactures... 






861,626 
2,465,394 
3,327,020 


878,418 
2,248,447. 
3,126,865J 


Allother 






450! 


Total 









16 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1S90. 


IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. -Continued, 


ARTICLES DUTIABLE. 


QUANTITIES. 


VALUES. 


Rate of Duty. 


Fiscal Years. 


Fiscal Years. 




1889. 


1888. 


1889. 

$116,713 
1,722,380 


1888. 
$144,735 
1,843.344 


on rf 


Musical instruments, and parts of 






:::::::::::: 


ils, n. e. s.: Animal Whale and fish... gal 
Other gal 


455,865 
18,490 
329,039 
892,862 
843,837 
630,232 


242,450 
16,744 


115,862 
3,677 
21,039 
696,065 
395,490 
146,481 
1,378,614 


106,550 
3.744 
14.543 
617,172 
316,212 
141,554 
1,199.775 


25. 


Mineral gal 


377,713 
654,162 
650.a32 
602,421 


Vegetable: Fixed or expressed Olive. .gal. 
Other gal 


Various. 
Various. 

Various. 
Various. 

25^ 


Volatile or essential Tbs 


Total 


Paints and colors 






IS 


L244.320 


Provisions, Comprising Meats and Dairy 
Products: Meat Products Meats, pre- 
pared, of all kinds, and meat extracts. . . 
All other 






329411 
199,734 
24,577 
1,135,184 

1,774,391 


317,235 
154,619 
26,429 
1,214,936 
376,062 
2,089,281 
1,613,016 
848,688 
2,461,704 






S2 


Dairy Products Butter Ibs 


178,856 
8,207,026 


143,215 
8,750,185 


4cl*. 
4clb. 
20&. 

l^clb. 
..W%. 


Cheese Ibs 




Total 






Rice, n. e. s. Rice Ibs. 


122,346,138 
53,280,122 
175,626,260 


87,546,501 
54,807,500 
142,354,001 


2,125,935 
?79,336 
3,005.271 




Total 


8 to 12c 100 Ibs. 

20cbu. 
Mclb. 

50$ 


Salt Ibs. 


582,379,147 


690,346.2% 


943,131 


1,156,962 


Seeds, Not Medicinal, n. e. s.-Linseed, or 
tiaxseed .. bu 


3,259,460 


1,583,964 


3,851.685 
586,746 
4,438,431 


1,624.964 
488,268 
2,lia232 




Total 






Silk, Manufactures of Clothing, ready- 






521,358 

7,588,508 
3,399,878 
1,708,831 
21,06,191 
35,122,766 


604,302 
10,774.902 
2,572,602 
2.171,155 
17,228,038 
33,350,999 








50& 








50 <jn 








50&. 
Sol. 


All other 






Total 






.. .15clb. 
2056. 


Soap Fancy, perfumed, and all descriptions 
of toiletsoap Ibs 


617,223 


615,918 


225,996 
229,170 
455,166 


243 65 
2454,354 
478,189 


All other 


Total 






5clb. 


Spices, ground Ibs. 


704,433 


760,538 


173,668 


187,677 


Spirits, Distilled, and Spiritous Compounds 


400,155 
1,130,392 
1,530,547 


416,899 
1,152,944 
1,569,843 


1,076,322 
851,765 
1,928,087 


1,119,327 
838,484 
1,957.811 


$-2 gal. 
Various. 

20&. 
...4cto8cgal. 
1.4c to 3>c Ib. 
75clb, 

$2.501b.&25$. 
30. 


All other . proof gal 


Total 


Sponges 






318,385 


358,104 


Molasses gal 


26,976,407 


35^29,957 


4,747,749 

81,249,872 


5.484,678 
69,49^,426 


Sugar Tbs. 


Tobacco, and Manufactures of Leaf . . .-Ibs. 
Manufactures of Cigars, cigarettes, and 


20,106,881 


18,600,142 


10,868,226 


10,870,S41 


1,245,263 


1,153,468 


3,662.<;03 
80,161 
3,742,764 
786,343 
321,106 
349,422 

375,494 
437,434 
2,269,799 


3,404,956 
101,993 
3,506,949 


Allother 


Total 








Vegetables Beans and peas bu. 
Potatoes ' bu 


765,483 
883,380 


1,942.864 
8^59,538 


2,190,137 

3,f,<t:;.o:n 

416,958 

715,063 
350,245 
7,365,424 


10&. 
15cbu. 


Pickles and sauces 


35&. 
10 <f 


All other In their natural state, or in 
salt or brine 






Prepared or preserved 






30&. 

$2.25 gal. 
Various. 
Various. 

35^ 


Total 






Wines Champagne, and other sparkling 


315.870 
3,078.554 
260,038 


274,914 
3,333.322 
284,174 


4,254,413 

2.126,548 
1,325,811 
7,706,772 


3,646,475 

2.287,062 
1,402.661 
7,336,198 


Stillwines In casks. . gal 


In bottles doz 


Total 


Wood, and Manufactures of Unmanufact- 
ured, n. e s 






13,461 
3,369 


20,352 
5,819 


Timber, sawed and hewed 






20|! 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 



17 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. -Continued. 



ARTICLES-DUTIABLE. 



QUANTITIES. 



Fiscal Years. 



VALUES. 



Fiscal Tears. 



Rate of Duty. 



Lumber Boards, planks, deals, and other 
sawed lumber M ft. 

Shingles M. 

Other lumber 

Manufactures of Cabinetware and house 
furniture 

Allother 



1889. 



644,203 
214,546 



Total 

Wools, Hair of the Alpaca, Goat, and Other 
Like Animals, and Manufactures of: Un- 
manufacturedClothing wools Ibs. 

Combing wools Ibs. 

Carpet and other similar wools Ibs. 

Total 

Manufactures of Carpets and carpeting 
of all kinds so. yards. 

Clothing, ready-made, and other wearing 
apparel, except shawls and knit goods. . . 

Cloths Ibs. 

Dress goods, women's and children's 
sq. yards 

Knit goods 

Rags, shoddy, mungo, waste, and flocks. Ibs 

Shawls 



29,226,317 

6,869,871 
90,391,541 



126,487,729 113558,753 



601,791 



8,852,713 
91,284,188 



Yarns Ibs. 

Allother 

Total 

Zinc, Spelter, or Tutenegue, and Manufact" 
ures of In blocks or pigs, and old. . .Ibs. 

Manufactures of 

Total 

All other dutiable articles 

Total value of dutiable m'd'se 

Total value of m'd'se free of duty 

Total value of imports of m'd'se 



3,616,326 



608,743 
161,715 



J889. 

$7,823,721 

461,841 

1,324,125 

347,308 
1,261,153 

11,234,978 



5,639,528 

84,879,540 



5,971.246 
1586,079 
10,417,190 
17,974,515 



85,630,007 



4,483.325 



3,740,604 



730,513 

1,974.977 
9,475,999 

19,466,474 
1,623,736 
3,447,20] 

858,768 

2,063,511 
12,923,763 
52564.942 



5,528,017 



112,179 
54,518 



1888. 

$7,515,719 

331,329 

1,071,420 

344,909 
1,235,470 
10525,018 



$2M. 

35cM. 

....$2M. 



4.541,2423^c to 20c Ib. 



10.015,410 
15,887,217 



1,300,186450 y'd&30&. 

Ib.and35 
Various. 



18,342,363 Various. 

1,765,194 25c Ib.and 40% . 
1,719154... lOclb 
953,197 35clb.,40&;40c 
ID., 35$. 
. ...Various. 
Various. 



2,156,195 
8396581 



47,719,393 






222,524 



6,255,026 5,919,083 



188,644,587 479,885,499 
256,487,078244,071,615 
r45,131,665l723,957,114 



COMPARATIVE EXPORTS OF LEADING DOMESTIC PRODUCTS. 

The following table exhibits the exports of the domestic merchandise during each of 
the past tive years, ending June 30, from the statements of the Bureau of Statisti 



treasury department: 



ics of the 



ARTICLES. 



1888-9. 



1887-8. 1886-7. 



1885-6. 1884-5. 



Cotton, pounds 

Wheat, bushels 

Flour, barrels 

Wheat and flour, bushels 

Corn, bushels 

Bacon, pounds 

Hams, pounds 

Pork, salted, pounds 

Lard, pounds 

Hog product, pounds 

Beef , 'fresh, pounds 

Beef, salted, pounds 

Canned beef, pounds* 

Tallow, pounds 

Butter, pounds 

Cheese, pounds 

Oleo, oil, pounds 

Mineral oil, refined, gallons 

Cotton-seed oil, gallons 

Oil cake and meal, pounds 

Tobacco, leaf pounds 

Leather, sole, pounds 

Sugar, refined, pounds 

Cotton cloths, yards 



2,384.816,669 
46,414,129 
9,374,803 

88,600,742 



357,423,188 
42,801,458 
64,110,845 

318,242,990 

782,578,481 



2,264,120,826 
65,789,261 
11,963,574 

119,625,344 
24,2?8,417 

331,306,703 
44,132,980 



297,740,007 
732,016,656 



55,006,399 

51,025,254 
77,844,555 
15,504,517 
84,999,828 
28,102,534 

541,523,172 
2,(KK).7()0 

588,167,880 

211,521,051 
35,558,945 
14,167,216 

118,453,191 



48,980,269 
40,458,375 
92,483,052 
10,455,651 
88,008,458 
30,146,595 

491,443,671 
4,458,597 

562,744,209 

249,195,681 
28,712,673 
34,505,311 

170,213,615 



2,169,457,330 
101,971,949 
11,518,449 
153,804,969 
40,307,252 
364,417,744 
55,505,211 
85,869.367 
321,533,746 
827,326,068 
83,560,874 
36,287,188 
43,050,588 



2,058,037,444 
57,759,209 
8,179,241 
94,565,793 
63,655,433 
369,423,351 
50,365,445 
87,196,966 
293,728,019 
8UO,7i:i.7Sl 
99,423,362 
58,903.370 



1,891,659,472 
84,653,714 
10,648,145 
132,570,366 
51,834,416 
245,924,217 
54,202.902 
71,649,365 
283,216,339 
754,992,823 
115.780,830 
48,143,711 



12,531,121 
81,255,994 
45,712,985 
513,491,563 
4,067,138 
622,295,233 
293,666.995 
30,530,483 
190,61 2.154 
204,602,087 



40,919,951 
18,953,9<.X) 
91877235 
27,729,885 
494,308,717 
6,240,139 
585,947,181 
281,737,120 
24,265,880 
164,339,967 
193,841,353 



50,431,719 

21,1)83,148 
111,992,990 

37,120,217 
487,0(58,528 
6,364,279 
498,664,241 
219,221,207 

27,31::,766 
252,579,077 
147,544,718 



'Previous to 1886-7 canned beef not reported as to quantity. 



18 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



FOREIGN CARRYING TRADE. 

Values of the imports and exports of the United States carried in American vessels and 
in foreign vessels during each fiscal year from 1857 to 1889 inclusive, with the percentage 
carried in American vessels. 



TEAR ENDING JCNE 30. 



1857. 

1859! 

ISfiO. 
isr,i. 
1st;-.'. 



1870. 
1871. 

1872. 

ma. 

'5. 

1876. 
1877. 

1878. 



1887. 



IMPORTS. 



In Ameri- 
can Vessels. 



$259,116,170 
203,700,016 
216,123,428 
228,164,855 
201,544,055 
92,274,100 
109,744,580 
81,212,079 
74,385,116 
112,040,395 
117.201I..W. 
122,965,225 
136,802.024 
153.237.077 
163.285,710 
177,286,302 
174,739,834 
176,027,778 
157,872,726 
143,380,704 
151,834,067 



143,599,353 
149,317,368 
1.33,631,146 



136,002,290 
135,046,207 
112,864,052 
118,942,817 
121,365,493 
, 123,525,298 
120,781,102 



In Foreign 

Vessels. 



$101,773,971 
78,913,134 
122,644,702 
134,001,399 
134,106,098 
113,497,629 
143,175,340 
248,350,818 
174,170,536 
333,471,763 
300,622.035 
248,659,583 
300.512.2Sl 
309,140,510 



445,416,783 
471,806,765 
405,320,135 



321,139,500 
329,565,833 
307,407,565 
310,499,599 
503,494,913 
491,840,269 
571,517,802 
564,175,576 
512,511,192 
443,513,801 
491,937,636 
543,392,216 



506,120,677 



EXPORTS. 



In Ameri- In Foreign 



can Vessels 



$251,214,857 
243,491,288 
249,617,953 
279,082,902 
179,972,733 
125,421.318 
132,127,891 
102,849,409 
93.017,756 
213,671,466 
180,625,368 
175,016,348 
153,154,748 
199,732,324 
190,378,462 
168,044,799 
171,566,758 
174,424,216 
156,385,066 
167,686,467 
164,826,214 
166,551,624 
128,425,339 



116,955,324 

96,962,919 
104,418,210 
98,652,828 
82,001,691 
78,406,686 
72.991,253 
67,332,175 
80.919,782 



Vessels. 



$111,745,825 
81,153,133 
107,171,509 
121,039,394 
69,372,180 
104,517,697 
199,880,691 
237,442,730 
262,839,588 
351,754,928 
280,708.368 
301.886.491 
285,979,781 
329,786,978 
392,801.932 
393,929,579 
494,915,886 
533.SS.VJ71 
501,838,949 
492,215,487 
530,354,703 



600,769,633 
720,770,521 
777,162,714 
641,460,967 
694,331,348 
615,287,007 
636,004,7(55 
581,973,477 
621,802,292 
606,474,964 
623,137,521 



70.50 
73.70 
66.90 
66.50 
65.20 
50.00 
41.40 
27.50 
27.70 
32.20 
33.90 
35.10 
33.10 
35.60 
31.20 
28.50 
25.80 
26.70 
25.80 
33.10 
26.50 
25.90 
22.W 
17.18 
16.22 
15.40 
15.54 
16.60 
14.76 
15.01 ' 
13.80 
13.44 i 
14.28 



INCREASE IN WEALTH. 
(Prepared by T. E. Willson of New York.) 

The increase in the wealth of the states during the past eight years whether compared 
with the assessed value in 1888 or with the wealth according to the census measuring rods is 
worth notice. The assessments are the last reports of the state officers to the librarian of 
congress and average about October, 1888: 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut ... 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 



Assessed 
Valuation 
in Millions 



1888. 



ft* 



211 32.50 
12635.13 
1,01240.88 
13049.98 
34938.40 
.43.44 



798|25.44 
79448.55 
501i28.17 
35327.98 
559 39.83 
213 37.95 
266 47.10 
48657.23 
1,933 56.70 
851 37.79 
46940.44 
12234.14 




STATES. 



Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire. 

New Jersev 

New York 

North Carolina.. 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania... 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina.. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia... 
Wisconsin 



Total..... 



Assessed 
Valuation 
in Millions. 



188*. 



533 ! 

91 1 

29 

165 

573 ! 

2,tM 

156 1 

1,534 

53 

1,6S3 
253 
133 
212 

1? 

308 
140 
439 



842 34.82 
16031.24 
31 42.45 
247:50.23 
621-39.95 

3,361 34.81 
20335.00 

1,70546.48 
85!41.68 

3,16131.22 
32960.13 
15045.12 
27231.80 
56244.19 
161 30.04 
38044.51 
179,45.48 
58145.30 



True 

Valuation 
in Millions. 



16,677: 23,438 38.73 43,102 59.374 




MISCELLANEOUS. 



19 



FARM ANIMALS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Prepared by the Department of Agriculture. Table showing the estimated number of ani- 
mals on farms and ranches and average price Jan. 1, 1889: 




I 

|S 

II; 1 1 pi | rpf i fi Is 

s 
H 

SgSSg^gg^ee^;aa^5^ggElfegg55gS5a^g:gg5S5lg&5;gS5^gx: 

2' 

s __ : . 

^ 
S3 s*~*$F~$v*vpZ*.%$?^& ? >Z&a&%xg3&Z8$S*$+& S Dp,\ : : ! $1 K 

i llllsliigsgigiigggg||8iil|ggigiggg|: ; ; p 

"^ 

R 

|S 2 
< to ^ "e o 

g "^"' ' ^\^\ y \^\\^^^^'_ y \ yr "^^^ r 'rr"rr^-"'rr^r_r_i^_ 

i| I 
' 

i ^^^gs^^^^b^s^s^^^^bb^^^^ss^ I' i 

ll g 
' ? g 

S-r^ilXr-S^iV^--" -^^^---^^i^^^^iV-^'-^r^i:::^ 

IT ~; v. 2" H 2 ;." ic cc - ^ S tb -~' g S S: <>: S :- C- ?. . -i -J -i ic "> ^- i -. tc -j . to vs ~. 2: *-~i- 
^ 

Total aggregate value- 
Horses $ 982,194.872 

Mules 17'..414.4S1 

Cows ai'i.22 '-.37i > 

Oxen 597..':;r,H-,> 

Sheep 90,640,369 

Hogs 291.307.193 

Total.... ....>,507.050.102 



'20 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



ACREAGE DEVOTED TO CEREAL CROPS 
In the United States and territorlps, as per returns of the U. S. Agricultural Department. 



YEARS. 



Wheat. 



Corn. 



Oats. 



Eye. 



Barley. 



Buckwheat. 




37,33T),138 
37,641,783 
36,808,184 
34,189.246 
39,475.885 
36.455,593 
37,067.194 
37,709.020 
37,986,717 
32,545,950 
32.108,560 



75,672,763 
72,39,>,720 
75,1)94,203 
73,130,150 



65,f,59,546 
64,262,025 
62.317.842 
53,085,450 
51.585,000 



26,998^82 

25,920,906 
23,658,474 
22,783.630 
21,300,917 
20,324,962 
18,494,691 



16,187,977 



13,176,500 



2.05:3,447 
2,12'.),918 
2.129,301 
2,343,963 
2.214,754 
2,227,889 
1,789,100 
1,767,619 
1,625,450 
1.622.700 



2,901,953 
2,65 -,957 
2,729.359 
2,608,818 
2,379,009 
2.272,103 
1,967,510 
1343^29 
1,680,700 
1,791,400 



910,506 
917,915 
914,394 
879,403 
857,349 
847.112 
828.M5 
822,802 
639.900 
673.100 



CEREAL PRODUCTION 
Of the United States and territories, as per returns of the United States Agricultural De- 
partment. Computed in bshels. 



YEARS. 



1835. . 



1879. 



Wheat. 



4ir>.8 -8.1)00 



457,218,000 
357,112,000 
512,763,900 
421,086.160 
504,185,470 
380.280,090 



448.753.630 



Corn. 




Oats. 



701,736.000 

859,618.000 
624,134.000 
629,409.000 
583,628,000 
571,302,400 
488,250,610 
416,481.000 
417,885,380 
3*13.761.320 



Rye. 



20,691,000 
24.489,000 
21,756,000 

t 637,594 
058,583 
2:,960,037 
20,704,950 
24,540,829 
23,639.460 



Barley. 



5fi.812.000 
59,428,000 



61,206,652 
50,136,097 
48,953,926 
41,161330 
45.165,346 
40,283.100 



Buckwheat. 



10,844,000 
11.86;),000 
12.636.000 
11,116,922 

7,668.954 
11,019,353 

9,486.200 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

Their Rulers. Population, Religion, and Standing Armies. 



COUNTRIES. 



Ruler. 



Title. 



PopulaVn. 



Religion* 



Armyf 



Argentine Republic 

Austro-Hungary 

Belgium 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

hill 

hina 

olombia 

Corea 

Costa Rica 

Denmark 

Ecuador 

Egypt 

France 

Germany 

Great Britain and Ireland. 

Greece 

Guatemala 

Hayti 

Hawaii 

Honduras 

Italy 

Japan 

Mexico 

Morocco 

Netherlands 

Nicaragua 

Paraguay 

Persia 

Peru 

Portugal 

Roumania 

Russia 

Salvador 

San Domingo 

Servia 

Siam 

Spain 

Sweden and Norway 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 



Juarez Celman.. 
Franz Joseph I.. 
Leopold II 

A. Arce 

Gen. di Fonseca.. 
J. M.Balmaceda. 

KwangSu 

R. Nunez 

H'ung 

B. Soto 

Christian IX 

A. Flores 

M.Tewflk 

M.F.SadiCarnot 

Wilhelmll 

Victoria I 

GeorgiosI 

M.L. Barillas.... 
Gen. Hippolite.. 

Kalakaua I 

L. Bogran 

Humbert I 

MutsuHito 

P.Diaz 

M. Hassan 

Wiliemlll 

E. Carazo 

Escobar 

Nassr-ed-Din 

Caceres 

Carlos I 

Karll 

Alexander III.... 



President 
Emperor . 

King 

President 
President 
President 



President 



President 



3,800,000 Roman Cath.. 
41,056,206 Roman Cath.. 

5,853,278! Roman Cath.. 

2,080,000 Roman Cat.h.. 
12,333,375! Roman Cath.. 

2,527.320! Roman Cath.. 
382,429.572 Confucian 

3,403,5321 Roman Cath.. 

8,000,000 Buddhist 

213,5781 Roman Cath. . 

1,989,039 Protestant.... 

1.004,651 Roman Cath.. 

6,817,265 Mohammedan 
38,218,903 Protestant. . . . 
46,852,450 Protestant. . . . 



35.246,633 



Protestant 



7,000 
280433 

43,734 

2,421 

15,040 

6,570 

300,000 

6,500 

2,000 

900 

59,562 

4,730 

4,845 

511,472 



1,979.423 Greek 

1,322,544 Roman Cath.. 
960,000 Roman Cath. . . 

57,985 Protestant 

323,274 Roman Cath. . . 
30,260,065 Roman Cath.. 

38,507,177 Buddhist 

10,460.636 Roman Cath. . 
5,000,000 Mohammedan. 
4,450,8~0 Protestant. 



400,000 
300,000 



Roman Cath.. 
Roman Cath.. 



Emperor. 



i\ Menendez I President 

U. Henreaux President 

Obrenovic I King 

Khulalonkorn I. King 



Alfonso XIII.... 

Oscar II 

LouisRuchonnet 

Hamidll 

M. Tages 

Ij. P. R. Paul.... 



Kin*. 
King. 
President 

Sultan 

President 
President 



1,050.000 Mohammedan . 
3,OoO,000 Roman Cath.... 
4,7u8 178:Roman Cath... 

5,500 000 Greek 

108,843.192 Greek 

im,120 Roman Cath... 

504.000 Roman Cath. . . 

1,937.172 Greek 

6,030,000 Buddhist 

16.733,200 Roman Cath.. 

4,734.901 Protestant 

2,906,750 Protestant. .. 
25.496,480 Mohammedan 

59*5,463 Roman Cath . . 
2,198,320 Roman Cath. . 



26.345 

2,180 

6,828 

250 

830 

879.092 
54,388 
31,967 
12,400 
65.733 



24,500 

6,200 

30.607 

100,000 

707,140 

2,200 

4,003 

18,000 

isi'.ioo 

3S.289 

123,031 

182.000 

4,052 

3,000 



'Prevailing Religion. tOn a peace footing. 



MILITARY SOCIETIES. 



21 



iHflitarg Societies of tfjc hutcfc States. 

SOCIETY OF THE CINCINNATI. 

The Order of Cincinnati was instituted at the cantonments of the Continental Army on 
the Hudson river, May 10, 1783. Membership is restricted to the eldest male descendant of an 
original member, or to the eldest male descendant of any Continental or French officer of 
the Revolution who was qualified by his service to become an original member. There are 
spven state societies, there having been originally thirteen. Gen. Washington was the first 
president-general and Alexander Hamilton was the second. Ex-Secretary of State Fi&h is 
the ninth. 

General Officers. 

President-Generql, Hon. Hajnilton Fish, LL.D., | Assistant Treasurer-General, Dr. Herman Bur- 
gin of New Jersey. Germantown, Pa. 
Secretary-Genera', Judge Advocate Asa Bird 
Gardiner, LL. D., U. S. A., retired, of Rhode 
Island. Garden City, N. Y. 



of New York, New York City. 
Vice- President-General, Hon. Robert M. Me 

Lane of Maryland, Baltimore. 
Treasurer General, Mr. John Schuyler of New 

York, New York City. 

State Societies. 



Massachusetts Organized June 9, 1783; Hon. 
Samuel Crocker Cobb, president, Boston. 

New York Organized June 9. 1778; Hon. Ham- 
ilton Fish, LL. D., president. New York City 

Pennsylvania Organized Oct. 4, 1783; Hon. 
William Wayne, president, Paoli, Chester 
County, Pa. 

Maryland Organized Nov. 21, 1783; Hon. Rob- 
ert Milligan McLane, president, Baltimore, 
Md. 



Rhode Island Organized June 24, 1783; Hon. 
Nathanael Greene, president, Newport, R. I. 

New Jersey Organized June 11, 1783; Hon.Clif- 
ford Stanley Sims, president. Mt. Holly, N.J. 

South Carolina-Organized Aug. 29. 1783; Rev. 
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, D.D^ presi- 
dent, Charleston. S. C. 

.France Organized at Paris, Jan.7,1784; reinsti- 
tuted July 1, 1887; Marquis de Rochambeau, 
president, 51 Rue de Naples. Paris. 



ORDER OF THE LOYAL LEGION. 

(Instituted 1865.) 

Commander-in-Chief Bvt. Maj.-Gen. R. B. Hayes, U. S. V., Fremont, O. 
Senior Vice-Commander-in- Chief Bvt. Maj.-Gen. J. R. Hawley, Hartford, Ct. 
Junior Vtce-C'ommander-in-Chief Brig.-Gen. Walter Q. Gresham, Chicago. 

Commanderies. 



California Lieut.-Col. A. G. Hawes, U. S. V., 
commander, San Francisco. 

Colorado Bvt. Maj.-Gen. E. A. Gove, U. S. V., 
commander, Denver. 

lllinois-Bvt, Maj.-Gen. J. C. Smith, U. S. V., 
commander, Chicago. 

Indiana Maj.-Gen. Lew Wallace, U. S. V., 
commander, Crawfordsville. 

Iowa Capt. M. A. Highley, U. S.V., com- 
mander. Cedar Rapids. 

.Kansas-Cart. M. H. Insley, U. S. A., com- 
mander. Leavenworth. 

JIme-Lieut.-Col. C. B. Merrill, U. S. V., com- 
mander, Portland. 

Massachusetts Bvt. Brig.-Gen. S. G. Griffin, 
U. S. V., commander, Keene. N. H. 

Michigan Bvt. Brig.-Gen. H. B. Clitz, U. S. A., 
commander, Detroit. 



Minnesota-Bvt. Maj.-Gen. H. H. Sibley, U. S 
V., commander, St. Paul.- 

Missouri Lieut.-Col. J. F. How, U. &. V., com- 
mander, St. Louis. 

Nebraska Capt. G. M. Humphrey,commander, 
Omaha. 

New Forfc-Maj.-Gen. J. M. Schofleld, U. S. A. 
commander, Washington, D. C. 

Ohio Bvt. Lieut.-Col. E. C. Dawes, TJ. S. V., 
commander, Cincinnati. 

Oregon Lieut. W. Kapus, U. S.V., commander 
Portland. 

Pennsylvania Bvt. Maj.-Gen. D. McM. Gregg, 
U. S. V., commander, Reading. 

Wisconsin Capt. G. I. Robinson, U. S.V., com- 
mander, Milwaukee. 

District of Columbia Bvt. Brig.-Gen. C. F. Man- 
derson, U. S. V., (senator from Neb.), com. 



GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC. 

(Organized 1866.) 

Cmnmander-in-Chief- Russell A. Alger, Detroit, Mich. 
Senior Vice-Commander-m-C fiief A. G. Weissert. Milwaukee, Wis. 
Junior Vice-Commander-in-chief J. F. Lovett, Trenton, N. J. 
Adjutant- General George H. Hopkins, Detroit, Mich. 

Department Commanders. 



Alabama F. G. Sheppard, Birmingham. 
Arizona A. B. Sampson, Tucson. 
Arkansas A. S. Fowler, Little Rock. 
California George E. Gard, Los Angeles. 
Colorado Thomas M. Fisher, Cheyenne, Wyo. 
Connecticut Wm. H. Pierpont, New Haven. 
Dakota- -George A. Silsby, Mitchell. 
Delaware -Peter B. Ayars, Wilmington. 
Wnrida3. W. V. R. Plummer, Key West. 
Georgia 3. R. Lewis, Atlanta. 
Idtiho A. S. Senter, Shoshone. 
Illinois James S. Martin. Salem. 
Indiana Charles M. Travis, Crawfordsville. 
Lnva Charles H. Smith, Mt. Pleasant. 
Kansas Henry Booth, Lamed. 
Kentucky Vincent Boering, London. 



Louisiana and Mississippi Jacob Gray, New 

Orleans, La. 

Maine Franklin M. Drew, Lewiston. 
Maryland George F. Wheeler, Baltimore. 
Massachusetts George L. Goodale, Medford. 
Micfciflttn-Michael Brown, Big Rapids. 
3/mnesota-Alphonso Barto, Sauk Center. 
Missouri John E. Phelps, Springfield. 
Montana J. E. Callaway, Virginia City. 
Nebraska-J. B. Davis, Wahoo. 
.A'ew Hampshire James F. Grimes, Hillsboro 

Bridge. 

New Jersey W. B. E. Miller, Camden. 
New Mexico John H. Mills, Socorro. 
New York Harrison Clark, Norwich. 
0/iio-S. H. Hurst, Chillicothe, 



22 CHICAGO DAILY STEWS ALMANAC FOR MO- 


Department Comms 

Oregon- E. B. McElroy, Salem. 
Pennsylvania Thos.J. Stewart, Philadelphia 
Potomac W. S.Odell, Washington. 
Rhode Island Alonzo Williams, Providence. 
Tennessee A. H.Pettibone, Greenville. 
Texas A.. G. Malloy, Dallas. 

SONS OF ' 

(Organiz 
Officers of Comn 

General Charles F. Griffir 
Lieut.- General U.. B. Bagi 
Major- General George W 

Colonels of 

Alabama and Tennessee M. D. Friedman, 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Arkansas Otis E. Gulley, Springdale. 
California E. W. Conant, San Jose. 
Colorado- E. T. Beltz, Laramie, Wyo. 
Connecticut -G. Brainerd Smith. Hartford. 
Florida 3. W. V. R. Plummer, Key West. 
Illinois George B. Stadden. Springfield. 
Indiana George C. Harvey, Danville. 
Imva-F. W. White, Waterloo. 
Kansas-C. S. Nation, Fredonia. 
Kentu ky George H. Capito, 925 W. Jefferson- 
st., Louisville. 
Maine Charles F. Hutchins, Bangor, 
Maryland-S. J. Brown, Washington, Box 641. 
Massachusetts Dudley B. Purbeck, Salem. 
Michigan F. M.Williams, 72 Monroe-st., Grand 
Rapids. 


inders. Continuued. 

Utah Henry T. Snyder, Ogden. 
Vermont A. S. Tracy. Midcllebury. 
FwYmim-Richard P. Wheeler, Norfolk. 
Washington S. G. Cosgrove, Pomeroy. 
West Virginia S. S. Hazen, Parkersburg. 
Wisconsin A. G. Weissert, Milwaukee. 

iTETERANS. 
ed 1881.) 
landery-in-Chief. 

, Indianapolis, Ind. 
iley. Wheeling, W. Va. 
Pollitt, Paterson,N. J. 

Divisions. 

Minnesota A. S. Morgan, Duluth. . 
Missouri Rudolph Loebenstein, Warrens- 
burg. 
Montana John R. Miller, Helena. 
Nebraska A. M. Appelget. Tecumseh. 
New Hampshire B. O. Roby, Nashua. 
Neiv Jersey A. Durrom, Jr., Paterson. 
Neiv York George Addington, Albany. 
North Dakota Frank V. Kent, Grand Forks. 
Ohio William E. Bundy, Lincoln Inn Court, 
Cincinnati. 
Pennsylvania-C. M. Cott. Meadville. 
Rhode Island-Theo. A. Barton, Providence. 
South Dakota G. C. Bross, Mitchell. 
Vermont E. T. Griswold, Bennington. 
West Virginia H. B. Baguley, Wheeling. 
Wisconsin C. H. Hudson, Madison. 


VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS. 

As adopted by the United States Treasury Department Jan. 1, 1889. Par of exchange or 
equivalent in terms of U. S. gold dollar. 


COUNTRIES. 




Monetary Unit. 


Equiva- 
lent. 


Argentine Republic 
Austria 


Flor 
Fran 


n 


$ .5*6,5 
.33,6 
.19,3 
.68 
.54,6 
1.00 
.91,2 
1.20 
.92,6 
.263 
.68 
4.94,3 
.19,3 
.23,8 
4><;,r,'.; 
.19,3 
.68 
.96,5 
.68 
.32,3 
.19,3 
.99,7 
.73,4 
1.00 
.73,9 
.40,2 
.68 
.26,8 
.68 
1.08 
.54,4 
19 3 


Belgium 


c t 


Bolivia. 


Boln 
Miln 
Dolh 


"iano 


Brazil 


ijs of 1 000 reis 


British Possessions in N A 




Chili 


Peso 




China. . 


Haik 
Peso 


wan tael 


Cuba.... 




Denmark . 


Crow 


n . . . .. 


Ecuador 


Sucr 


e 


Egypt 


Pour 
Fran 


id (100 pi asters) 




c 


German Empire 


Marl 


i 


Great Britain 


Poui 
Drac 

Peso 


id sterling. . . 


Greece 


hma 






Hayti 


Gour 
Peso 


de 


Honduras 




India... 


Rup< 
Lira 


?e of 16 annas .... 


Italy 




Japan 


Yen 


JGold.... 


Liberia 


Doll 
Doll 
Klor 


< Silver... 
ir 


Mexico 


ir (silver) 






Nicaragua 


Peso 




Norway. . . 


Crow 


n 


Peru 


Sol 




Portugal 


Mili- 
Rubl 
Pese 
Crow 


3is of 1,000 reis 


Russia 


e of 100 copecks 


Spain 


ta of 100 centimes 


Sweden 


r n 


.26,8 
.19,3 
.72 
.61,4 
.04,4 
.68 
.13,6 


Switzerland 


Fran 


c 


Tonquin 


Piast 
Mah 

Pi as 


er . 


Tripoli 


bud of 20 piasters 


Turkey 




United States of Colombia 


Ppsn 




Venezuela. Bolivar 



THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. 



_':* 



National (Erobernmmt. 



A List of Principal Officers, with Salaries. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

President, Benjamin Harrison (Ind.) $50,000 

Priv. Sec., Elijah W. Halford (Ind.) 5.000 

Vice-President, Levi P. Morton (N. Y.).... 8.000 
U.S.Dist. Marshal, D. M. Ransdell (Ind.). . . 6,000 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

Secretary. James G. Blaine (Me.) 8.000 

Asst. Secretary, W. F. Wharton (Mass.).. . 4,500 
Second Asst. Secretary, Alvey A. Adee... 3.500 

Tliird Asst. Secretary, John B. Moore 3,500 

Chief Clerk, James Fenner Lee 2,750 

Chief of Diplomatic Bureau, Thomas W. 

Cridler(W.Va.) 2.100 

Chief of Consular Bureau, F. O. St. Clair. 2,100 
Chief of Bureau of Archives and Indexes, 

John H. Haswell 2,100 

Chief of Bureau of Accounts Francis J. 

Kieckhoefer...: 2,100 

Chief of Bureau of Statistics, Michael 

Scanlon (N. Y.) 2,100 

Chief of Bureau of Rolls and Library, 

Frederic A. Bancroft 2,100 

Passport Clerk, Henry P. Randolph (Va.) 1,800 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

Secretary. William Windom (Minn.) 8,000 

Private Sec., Charles M. Hendley 2,400 

Asst. Sec., Geo. S. Batcheller (N. Y.) 4,500 

Asst. Sec., Geo. C.Tichenor (111.) 4.500 

Chief Clerk, Fred Brackitt (D. C.) 3.000 

Chief of Appt. Div., T. E. Byrnes (Minn.). 2,750 
Chief of Warrants Div., W. F. Maclennan. 2,750 
Chief of Public Moneys Div., Eugene B. 

Daskam 2,500 

Chief of Customs Div., John G. Macgregor. 2,700 
Chief of Rev., Marine Div., Peter Bonnet. 2,500 
Chief of Stationery, Printing, and Blanks 

Div., A. L. Sturtevant 2,500 

Chief of Loans and Currency Div., An- 
drew T. Hun tington (Mass.) 2,500 

Chief of Miscellaneous Division, 2,500 

Stiperotstng Special Agent, A. K. Tingle 

(Ind.) $8 day 

Government Actuary, Jos. S. McCoy (N.J.)$2,250 

Supervising Architect's Office. 
Supervising Architect.!?. H.Windrim (Pa.) 4,500 

Bureau of Engraving and Printing. 

Chief, W. M. Meredith (111.) 4,500 

Asst. Chief, Thomas J.Sullivan 2,250 

Supt. Engraving Div., John A. O'Neill. . . . 3,600 

Office Steamboat Inspector. 
Supervising Inspector, James A. Dumont. 3,500 

Bureau of Statistics. 
Chief, S. G. Brock (Mo.) 3,000 

Life-Saving Service. 

Gen'ISupt.. S. I. Kimball (Me.) 4,000 

Asst., Frank Baker (N. Y.) 2.500 

Comptrollers. 
First Comptroller, Asa C. Matthews (111.). 5,000 

Deputy. John R. Garrison 2,700 

Second Com.pt., B. F. Gilkeson (Pa.) 5,000 

Deputy, E. N. Hartshorn (O.) 2,700 

Commissioner of Customs. 

Commissioner, S. V. Holliday (Pa.) 4,000 

Deputy, H. A. Lockwood 2,250 

Register of the Treasury. 

Register, Wm. S. Rosecrans 4,000 

Asst., L. W.Reid (Va.) 2,250 1 



Auditors, 

First Auditor, Geo. P. Fisher (Del.) 

Deputy, O. B. Hallam (Ky.) 

Second Auditor, J. N. Patterson (N. H.).. 

Deputy, J. B. Franklin (Kas.) 

Third Auditor, W. H. Hart (Ind.) 

Deputy, Augustus Shaw (Ind.) 

Fourth Auditor, J. R. Lynch (Miss.). 

Deputy, Andrew J. Whittaker (111.) 

Fifth Auditor, L.W. Habercomb (D. C.) . 

Deputy, J. Lee Tucker (N. Y.) 

Sixth Auditor, Thos. B. Coulter (O.). 
Deputy, J. I. Rankin (Pa.) 



. 3,600 

. 2.2=30 

. 3.600 

. 2.250 

. 3,600 

. 2,250 

. 3.HOO 

. 2.250 

. 3.600 

. 2.250 

. 3.600 

. 2,250 



Treasurer of the United States. 

Treasurer, James N. Huston (Ind.) 6,000 

Asst. Treasurer, James W. Whelpley 3,600 

Supt. Nat. Bank Redemption Z>fa.,Thos. E. 
Rogers 3,500 

Comptroller of the Currency. 

Comptroller, E. S. Lacy (Mich.) 5.000 

Deputy, J. D. Abrahams ( Va.) 2,800 

Commissioner of Internal Revenue. 

Commissioner, J. W. Mason (Va.) 6,000 

Deputy, G. W.Wilson (O.) 3,200 

Director of the Mint. 
Director, E. O. Leech (D. C.) 4,500 

Bureau of Navigation. 
Commissioner, William W. Bates (N.Y.). . 3,600 

United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. 
Superintendent, T. C. Mendenhall (Ind.).. 6,000 

Marine Hospital Service. 
Supervising Surg.- Gen., J. B. Hamilton. . . . 4,000 



WAR DEPARTMENT. 

Secretary, Redfleld Proctor ( Vt. ) $8,000 

Priv. Sec., Frank C. Partridge 1,800 

Chief Clerk, John Tweedale (Pa.; 2,750 

Officer on Duty. Lt. Col. T. F. Barr, Judge 
Advocate. 

Headquarters of the Army. 
Major- General, J. M. Schofleld. 
Aides-de-Camp, First Lts. C. B. Schofleld, T. 
H. Bliss, and John Pitcher. 

Adjutant-General's Department. 
Adjt.-Gen'l, Brig.-Gen. J. C. Kelton (Pa.). 
Assistants, Bvt. Brig.-Gen. C. McKeever, Bvt. 

Brig.-Gen. S. Brock, Maj. Theo. Schwan, Maj. 

A. MacArthur. Jr., Capt. D. M. Taylor. 
Chief Clerk, R. P. Thian $2,000 

Inspector-General's Department. 
Inspector- Gen' I, Brig.-Gen. J. C. Breckinridge. 

Quartermaster's Department. 
Quartermaster~Gen'l, Brig.-Gen. S. B. Holabird. 
Assistants, Bvt. Bwg.-Gen. C. G. Sawtelle, Maj. 

James Gilliss, Caot. J. F. Rodgers. 
Depot Quartermaster, Bvt. Brig.-Gen. G. B. 

Dandy, 
Chief Clerk, J. Z. Dare. 

Subsistence Department. 

Commissary- Gen 1 1, Brig.-Gen. Robt. Macfeely. 
Assistants, Bvt. Col. Beekman DuBarry, Bvt. 

Lt.-Col. J. H. Gllman. 
Chief Clerk, Wm. A. DeCaindry. 
Depot Commissary, Capt. F. E. Nye. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



Medical Department, 

Surgeon- Gen' I, John Moore. 

Assistants, Col. J. H.Baxter, Maj. C. R. Green- 
leaf, Lt.-Col. J. S. Billings, Maj. C. Smart, 
Maj. W.Matthews. 

Chief Clerk, Samuel Ramsay. 

Chief Medical Purveyor, Col. J. H. Baxter. 

Attending Surgeon, Lt. Col. A. Heger. 

Pay Department. 

Paymaster- Gen' I, Brig.-Gen.Wm. B. Rochester, 
Assistant, Maj. C. C. Sniffln. 

Corps of Engineers. 

Chief of Engineers, Brig.-Gen. T. L. Casey. 
Assistants, Maj. H. M. Adams, Capt. C. B. 

Sears, Capt. Thos. Turtle. 
Chief Clerk, Wm. J. Warren. 
Sec. to Lighthouse Board, Maj. J. F. Gregory. 

Public Buildings and Grounds. 
Commissioner, Col. O. H. Ernst. 

Ordnance Department. 

Chief of Ordnance, Brig.-Gen. Stephen V. Benet- 
Assistants, Capt. Chas. S. Smith, Capt. Rogers 

Birnie, Capt. V. McNally, First Lt. Win. 

Crozier, Lt. J. W Benet. 
Chief Clerk, John J. Cook. 

Judge Advocate-General's Department. 

Judge Advocate- General, Col.G.N. Leiber (act- 
ing). 

Assistant, Maj. Jno. W. Clous. 
Chief Clerk, J. N. Morrison. 
Signal Office. 

Chief Signal Officer, Brig.-Gen. A. W. Greely. 
Assistants, Capt. James Alten, First Lts. H. 

H. C. Dunwoody, R. E. Thompson; Second 

Lts. W. A. Glassford, W. D. Wright, James 

Mitchell. 

Publication OfficeWar Records. 
Board of Publication. Maj. Geo. B. Davis, L. 

J. Perry, J. W. Kirkley. 
Agent for Collection of Confederate Records, 

M. J. Wright. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT. 

Secretary, B. F. Tracy (N. Y.) $8,000 

Naval Secretary, Lt. T. M. B. Mason. 
Private Secretary, Henry W. Raymond 
Chief Clerk, John W. Hogg (Md .) 2,500 

Bureau Yards and Docks. 

Chief, Commodore G. B. White. 
Lieut., A. B. Wyckoff. 

Bureau of Navigation. 
Chief, Commodore Francis M. Ramsay. 
Lieuts., E. B. F. Heald, E. B. Barry. 

Nautical Almanac. 
Supt.. Prof. Simon Newcomb. 
Assistants. Prof. H. D. Todd, E. J. Loomis, G. 
W. Hill, Dr. J. Morrison. 

Office Naval Intelligence. 

Chief Intelligence Officer, Comdr. C. H. Davis. 

Lieuts.. F. Singer. Henry McCrea, W. H. H. 
Southerland,Chas. E.Fox,Aug. F. Fechteler, 
Chas. C. Rogers, J T. Newton, Benj. Tappan. 

Ensigns,. J. B. Bernadon, W. F. Truxtou, T. G. 
Dewey, J. M. Ellicott. 

P.-Asst. Engineer, C. W. Rae. 

Library and War Records. 
Professor, J. R. Soley. 

Lieutenants. Richard Rush, E. D. Taussig, L. 
Young, F. E. Beatty, W. H. Allen. 



Officers on Duty in the Hydrographic Office. 
Hydrographer, Capt. H. F. Picking. 
Lieutenants, H. S. Warring, C. M. McCarteney, 

F. H. Sherman, D. W. Coffman, H. M. Witzel. 
Ensigns, L. S. Van Duser, J.E. Cravin, Hugh 

Rodman. 

Naval Observatory. 

Supt.. Capt. L. R. Phythian. 

Lieutenants, W. Goodwin, H, Taylor, B. W. 
Hodges. 

Ensigns, H. S. Chase, C. C. Marsh. Thos. Snow- 
den, F. W. Kellogg, J. A. Hoogewerff, B. C. 
Decker, W. B. Wells, Jr. 

Professors of Mathematics, Asaph Hall, Will- 
iam Harkness, J. R.. Eastman, Edgar Frisby, 
S. J. Brown. 

Bureau of Ordnance. 

Chief, Commodore Montgomery Sicard. 

Commander, A. H. McCormick. 

Lt.-Commander, W. Maynard. 

Lieutenants, C. A. Stone, S. H. May, Alex. Mc- 

grackin, Henry Morrell, Frank F. Fletcher, 
. Y. Boush. 
Ensign, P. R. Alger. 

Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting. 
Chief, Capt. Geo. B. Dewey. 
Naval Inspector of Electric- Lighting, Comdr. 

R. B. Bradford. 
Lieuts., W. H. Reeder, S. W. B. Diehl, T. E. 

DeWitt Veeder. 
Ensigns, John Gibson, Gilbert Wilkes. 

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. 
Chief, Surgeon-General J. Mills Browne. 
Special-Duty, Surg. W. A. McClurg. 

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing. 

Chief, Paymaster-General James Fulton. 

Pay Inspector, A. S. Kenny. 

Paymaster, C. P. Thompson. 

Assistant Paymasters, A.K. Michler. C. M. Ray. 

Bureau of Steam Engineering. 

Engineer-in- Chief, G. W. Melville. 

Chief Engineers, N. P. Towne, F. G. McKean. 

Passed Asst. Engineers, W. S. Moore, S. Potts, 

J. H. Perry, R. S. Griffin. 
Asst. Engineers, F. C.Bieg,H. P. Norton, Emil 

Thiess. R. B. Higgins, W. P. Winchell, W. H. 

Chambers, H. Gage, W. M. McFarland, S. 

H. Leonard, Jr., D. C. Redgrave, H. G. 

Leopold. 

Bureau of Construction and Repair. 

Chief Constructor, T. D. Wilson. 
Naval Constructor, Philip Hichborn. 

Office of Judge Advocate General. 

Judge Advocate Gen"l, Col. William B. Remey, 
United States Marine Corps. 

Lieutenants, Perry Garst, W. H. Stayton, Ma- 
rine Corps; R. M. G. Brown, U. S. N. 

Admiral's Office. 
Admiral, D. D. Porter. 
Aide, Lt. Chauncey Thomas. 

Naval Examining Board. 

Commodore A. W. Weaver, Capt. R. R. Wal- 
lace, Commodore S. W. Terry. 

Retiring Board. 

Commodores A. W. Weaver. President; Capt. 
R. R. Wallace. Medical Directors, John F. 
Taylor, D. K.indleberger. 

State, War, and Navy Department Building. 
Supt., Thomas Williamson, Chief Engineer. 
Assistant, G.W. Baird, 1st Assistant Engineer. 



THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. 



26 



Board of Inspection and Survey. 

President, Rear Admiral J. E. Jouett. 
Members, Captain, T. O. Self ridge; Comdr., 

W. R. Bridgeman; Chief Engineer, W. G. 

Buchler; Naval Constructor, John F. Hans- 

com; Lt.-Comdr, A. S. Snow; Lieuts.,L. C. 

Logan. 

Naval Dispensary. 
Surgeon, A. F. Price. 
Passed Asst. Surg., P. M. Rexsey. 

Museum of Hygiene. 
Medical Inspector, H. M. Wells. 
Passed Asst. Surg., S. H. Griffith. 

Navy Pay Office. 
Pay Inspector, G. B. Thornton. 
Headquarters of United States Marine Corps. 
Col. Commandant, Charles G. McCawley. 
Adjt. and Inspector, Maj. Aug. S. Nicholson. 
Quartermaster, Maj.H. B.Lowry. 
Paymaster, Maj. Green Clay Goodloe. 

Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C 
Lieut.-Col., Chas. Hey wood. 
Captain, D. Pratt Mannix. 
Surgeon, A. F. Magruder. 
First Lieut., S. W. Quackenbush. 



POSTOFFICE DEPARTMENT. 

OFFICE OF THE POSTMASTER-GEXERAL. 

Postmaster- Gen' I, JohnWanamaker(Pa.).. 8,000 
Private Sec., John B. Minick (Mich.) ...... 1,800 

Chief Clerk, W. B. Cooley (Pa.) ............ 2,500 

Asst. Atty.-Gen'l, James N. Tyner (Ind.).. 4,000 
Law Clerk, Ralph W. Haynes (111,) ......... 2,500 

Appointment Clerk, James A. Vose (Me.). 1.800 
Chief P. 0. Inspector, E. G. Rathbone(O-). 3,000 
Chief Clerk Div. Depredations, J. Maynard. 2.000 
Topographer, Charles Roeser (Wis.) ....... 2,500 

OFFICE FIRST ASSISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

First Asst.. J. S. Clarkson (Iowa) .......... 4,000 

Chief Clerk, E. C. Fowler (Md.) ............ 2,000 

Supt. Free Delivery, J. F. Bates (Iowa) ____ 2,100 

OFFICE SECOND ASSISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Second Asst., O. A.Whitfleld (O.) ........... 4,000 

OFFICE THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Third Asst., A. D. Hazen (Pa.) .............. 4,000 

Genl. Supt. Railway Mail Service, J. Low- 

rieBeil (Pa.) ...... . ........................ 3,500 

Supt. Foreign Mails, Vacant ................ 3,000 

Supt. Money Order System, Chas. F. Mac- 

donald (Mass.) .............................. 3,500 

Dead-Letter Office. 
Supt., David P. Leibhardt (Ind.) .......... 2,500 

INTERIOR DEPARTMENT. 

Secretary, John W. Noble (Mo.) ............ 8,000 

First Asst. do, George Chandler (Kas.) ____ 4,500 

Second Asst. do, Cyrus Bussey (N.Y.) ...... 4,000 

Chief Clerk, Edward M. Dawson (Md.) ..... 2,500 

Appt. Clerk, A. C. Tonner (O.) .............. 2,000 

General Land Office. 
Commissioner, L. A. Goff (Neb.) ............ 4,000 

Asst. do, Wm. M. Stone (Iowa) ............. 3,000 

Chief Clerk, George Redway (D. C.) ....... 2,250 

Office of Indian Affairs. 
Commissioner, T. J. Morgan (R.I.) ........ 4,000 

Asst. do, R.V. Belt (Md.) .................... 3,000 

Supt. Indian Schools, D. Dorchester(Mass.) 4,000 

Pension Office. 
Commissioner, Green B. Raum (111.) ....... 5,000 

First Deputy do, Hiram Smith, Jr. (Mo.). . 3,600 
Second Deputy do, Chas. P. Lincoln(Mich.) 3,600 
Chief Clerk, A. W. Fisher (N.O. ) .......... 2.250 

Medical Referee, Charles McMillan (B.C.).. 3,000 



Office of Commissioner of Railroads. 

Commissioner, Horace A. Taylor (Wis.). .. 4,500 

Patent Office. 

Commissioner. Chas. E. Mitchell (Conn.).. 5,000 
Asst. do, R. J. Fisher (111.) . ... 3.000 
Chief Clerk, Schuyler Duryea (Va.) 2,250 

Office of Education. 

Commissioner, W. T. Harris (Mass.) 3,000 

Chief Clerk, J. W. Holcombe 1,800 

Geological Survey. 

Director, John W. Powell (111.) 6,000 

Chief Clerk, James C. Pilling 2,400 

Census Division. 

Supt.. R. P. Porter (N. Y.) 6,000 

Chief Clerk, A. F. Childs(O.) 2.500 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE. 

Atty.-Gen'l,W. H. H. Miller (Ind.) ... 8,000 

Solicitor Gen' I, O. W. Chapman (N. Y.). . . . 7,000 

Asst. Atty.- Gen' I, Robert A. Howard 5,000 

Asst. do, J. B. Cotton (Me.) 5,000 

Asst.do(Dept. of Int.), Geo.H.ShieldsfMo.) 5,000 
Asst. do (P. 0. Dept.), J. N. Tyner (Ind.)... 4,000 
Solicitor of Int. Rev. (Treas. Dept.),A.\- 

phonso Hart(O.) 4,500 

Examiner of Claims (State Dept.), Walker 

Elaine (Me.) 3,500 

Law Clerk and Examiner of Titles, A. J. 

Bentley 2,700 

Chief Clerk and Supt. of Building, Cecil 

Clay ' 2,450 

Gen' I Agent, E. C. Foster (Iowa) $10 per diem 

Appt. and Disbursing Clerk, Frank A. 

Branagan $2,000 

Clerk of Pardons, Chas. F. Scott (W. Va.). 2,000 
Solicitor of Treas. (Treas. Dept.),W. P. 

Hepburn (Iowa) 4,500 

Asst. Solicitor (Treas. Dept.), F. A. Reeve.. 3,000 
Chief Clerk Solicitor's Office (Treas. Dept.), 

Webster Elmes ...2.000 



DEPARTMENT CF AGRICULTURE. 

Secretary, 3. M. Rusk (Wis.) $8,000 

Asst. -Secretary, B. Willits (Mich.) 4,500 

Chief Clerk, S. S. Rockwood (Wis.) 2,500 

Statistician, J. R. Dodge (Ohio) 2,500 

Entomologist, C. V. Riley (Mo.) 2,500 

Botanist, Geo. Vassy (111.) 2,500 

Chemist, H. W. Wiley (Ind.) 2,500 

Microscopist, Thomas Taylor (Mass.) 2,000 

Chief Experimental Stations, O. W. At- 

water 2,000 

Ornithologist, C. H. Mirriam 2,000 

Chief Forestry Div., B. E. Fernow (N. Y.). 2,000 

Pomologist, H. B. Van Demen 2,500 

Bureau Animal Industry, D.E. Salomon. 2,000 

INDEPENDENT DEPARTMENTS. 

Government Printing Office. 
Public Printer, Frank W. Palmer (111.). . . . 4,500 

Chief Clerk, W. H. Collins (N. Y.) 2,400 

Foreman of Printing, H. T. Brian (Md.). .. 2,100 
Foreman of Binding, Jas. W. White(D.C.). 2,100 

United States Civil-Service Commission. 
Commissioners, Theodore Roosevelt (N. 

Y.), Charles Lyman (Conn.), Hugh S. 

Thompson (S. C.) 3,500 

Chief Examiner, W. H. Webster (Conn.). 3,000 

Bureau of Labor. 

Commissioner, Carroll D. Wright (Mass.).. 3,000 
Chief Clerk, Oren W. Weaver (Mass.) 2,500 



L'G 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



General and Field Officers United States Army on the Active and Retired Lists, with their 
Stations or Address and Yearly Pay. (Arranged according to rank.) 

ACTIVE LIST. 

MAJOR-GENERAL, $7.500. 

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Commanding Army, Washington, D. C. 

MAJOR-GENERALS, $7,500. 
O.O.Howard, comdg Div. Atlantic, New York. | G. Crook, comdg Div. Missouri, Chicago, 111. 

BRIGADIER-GENERALS, $5,500. 



S.V. Benet, Chief of Ordnance,Washington,D.C. 
Robert Macfeeley, Com's'y Gen'l, Washington. 
N. A. Miles, comdg Div Pacific, San Francisco. 
D. G. Swaim, under suspension. 
W. B. Rochester, Paymaster Ge^Washington. 
8. B. Holabird, QmstrGenl.Washington, D. C. 
D.S.Stanley.comdgDept Texas,San Antonio,Tex. 
John Gibbon, comdg Dept Columbia, Vancou- 



ver Bks, Washington Ter. 



T. H. Ruger, comdg Dept Dakota, St.Paul, Minn. 
John Moore, Surgeon-Genl, Washington. D. C. 
A. W. Greely, Chief Signal Officer, Washington. 
W. Merritt, comdg Dept Missouri, Ft. Leaven- 
worth, Kas. 

J. R. Brooke, comdg Dept Platte. Omaha, Neb. 
Thos. L. Casey, Engs, Washington, D. C. 



J. C. Breckenr 



r , Engs 
idge, I 



nsp.-Genl, Washington, 



J. C. Kelton, Adjt. Genl, Washington, D. C. 
COLONELS, $4,500. 



B. H. Grierson, 10 Cav., comdg Ft. Apache, A.T. 

C. H. Smith, 19 Inf., comdg San Antonio, Tex. 
G. L. Andrews, 25 Inf., Ft. Missoula, Mont. 
A.V. Kautz, 8 Inf., Ft. Niobrara, Neb. 

J. H. Baxter, Chief Med. Purveyor, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Frank Wheaton, 2 Inf., comdg Ft. Omaha. 

Chas. Sutherland, Surgeon, Governor's Id., N.Y, 

W. R. Shatter, 1 Inf., comdg Angel Id., Cal. 

A. G. Brackett, 3 Cav., Ft. Clarke, Tex. 

H. A. Morrow, 21 Inf., Ft. Sidney, Neb. 

E. A. Carr, 6 Cav., comdg Ft.Wingate, N. M. 

E. S. Otis, 20 Inf.,comdg Ft.Assinaboine, Mont. 

A. McD. McCook, 6 Inf., comdg inf. and cav. 
school, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 

C. H. Tompkins, Asst. Q. M. G., New York. 

Robert Williams, A. G. D., Chicago. 111. 

Silas Crispin, Ord. Dept, comdg Benicia Ar- 
senal, Cal. 

H. M. Black, 23 Inf., comdg Ft. Wayne, Mich. 

W. P. Carlin, 4 Inf., comdg Ft. Sherman, Idaho. 

R. I. Dodge, 11 Inf., comdg Madison Barracks, 
N.Y. 

T. G. Baylor, Ord. Dept, comdgRock Island Ar- 
senal, 111. 

Elmer Otis, 8 Cav., comdg Ft. Meade, Dak. 

M. M. Blunt, 16 Inf., comdg Ft. Douglass, Utah. 

J. D.Bingham,Q. M. D., Chicago, 111. 

A. J. Perry, Q. M. D., San Francisco, Cal. 

H. G. Gibson, 3 Art., comdg Wash. Bks, D. C. 

P. T. Swaine, 22 Inf., comdg Ft. Keogh, Mont. 

G. N. Leiber, Asst Judge Advocate Genl, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Henry Douglas, 10 Inf., comdg Ft, Marcy, N. M. 

H. C. Merriam.7 Inf ., comdg Ft. Logan. Col. 

Z.R. Bliss, 24 Inf., comdg Ft. Bayard, N. M. 

J.W. Forsyth,7Cav.,comdg Ft. Riley. Kas. 

T. M. Anderson, 14 Inf., Vancouver, Wash. 

G. H. Mendall, Engs, San Francisco, Cal. 

H. L. Abbott, Engs.. New York. 

E. F. Townsend, 12 Inf., comdg Ft. Yates, Dak. 



R. E. A. Crof ton, 15 Inf., comdg Ft. Buf ord, Dak. 

Rodney Smith, Pay Dent, New York City. 

J. M. Whittemore, Ordnance Dept, comdg. 

Watervliet Arsenal. N. Y. 
W. P. Craighill, Engs, Baltimore. Md. 
W. D. Whipple, A. G. D., Governor's Id., N. Y. 
Chauncey McKeever, A. G. D., Washington. 
J. F. Wade, 5 Cav., comdg Ft. Reno. Ind. Ter. 
A. Piper, 5 Art., comdg Ft. Hamilton, N. Y. 
C. E. Compton, 4 Cav. comdg Ft. Lowell, A.T. 
C. Page, Med. Dept., Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 
H. R. Mizner, 17 Inf.. Ft. D. A. Russell, Wyo. 
E. C. Mason, 3 Inf., Ft. Snelling, Minn. 

C. B. Comstock, Engs., New York City. 
H.W. Closson, 4 Art., Ft. McPherson, Ga. 
O. M. Poe, Engs, Detroit, Mich. 

N.W. Osborne, 5 Inf., Ft. Bliss, Tex. 

A. L. Hough, 9 Inf., Whipple Bks, A. T. 

A. Beckwith, Sub. Dept, St. Louis. Mo. 

R. P. Hughes, Insp. Gen., New York. 

Henry C. Hodges, Q. M. D., Jeffersonville, Ind. 

D. R. Clendenin, 2 Cav., comdg Ft.WallaWalla, 
Wash. 

Basil Norris, Med Dept, San Francisco. 

J. Mendenhall, 2 Art., Ft. Adams, R. I. 

M. Bryant, 13 Inf., Ft. Supply, I. T. 

W. A.Rucker, Pay Dept, Ft. Leavenworth, Ks. 

L. I. Langdon, 1 Art., San Francisco. 

E. M. Heyl, I. G. D., Chicago, 111. 

H. M. Lazelle,8 Inf., Ft. Niobrara, Neb. 

A. R. Buffington, comdg Armorv.Springfleld,Ms. 
J. G. Tilford, 9 Cav , Ft. Robinson, Neb. 

E. P.Vollum, Med. Dept, New York. 

G. D. Ruggles, A. G. D., San Francisco. 

D. C. Houston. Engs, New York. 

A.K. Smith, Med. Dept, New York. 

J. S. Brisbin, 1 Cav., Ft. Custer. Mont. 

J. M. Wilson, supt M. Acad., West Point, N. Y. 

O. H. Ernst, supt bldgs, Washington, D. C. 

B. DuBarry, C. G. D.,Washington, D. C. 
George Bell, C. G. D., New York. 



LIEUTENANT-COLONELS, $4,000. 



J. G. Chandler, Q. M. D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

C. G. Sawtelle. Qmstr Dept, Washington, D. C. 
G. A. Forsyth, 4 Cav., Chicago, 111. 

T. M. Vincent. A. G. D., Washington, D. C. 

D. W. Flagler, Ord. Dept, comdg Frankfort 
Arsenal, Pa. 

R. N. Batchelder, Q. M D., New York. 

G. H. Elliott, Engs, Washington, D. C. 

Alfred Mordecai, Ord. Dept, Governor's Island, 

H. M. Robert, Engs, Philadelphia. Pa. 

W. E. Merrill, Engs, Custom House, Cincinnati. 

M. I. Ludington, Q. M. D.. San Francisco. 

M. A. Cochran, 5 Inf., Ft. Bliss, Tex. 

J. M. Moore, Q. M. D., St. Louis, Mo. 

J. J. Coppinger, 18 Inf., supt recruits. NewYork. 

J. M.Wilson, Engs, supt M. A., West Point,N.Y. 

J. W. Barlow, Engs, Nashville, Tenn. 

R. F. O'Beirne, 15 Inf., Ft. Buford, Dak. 



Wm. Winthrop, Deputy Judge Advocate Genl, 

West Point, N. Y. 

T. F. Barr, Mil. Sec. Sec. War, Washington, D. C. 
R. H. Offley, 17 Inf., comdg Ft. D. A. Russe'l, 

Wyo. 

J. R. Smith, M. Director, Los Angeles, Cal. 
J. J, Van Horn, 25 Inf., comdg Ft. Shaw, Mont. 
I. D. DeRussy, 14 Inf., San Francisco. 
J. S. Fletcher, 2 Inf., comdg Ft. Omaha, Neb. 
B. J. D. Irwin, Asst. Med. Pur., San Francisco. 
J. K. Mizner, 8 Cav., comdg Ft. Meade, Dak. 
A. Heger, Surgn, Washington, D. C. 
J. S. Poland, 21 Inf., Ft. Sidney, Neb. 
E. P. Pearson, 24 Inf., comdg Ft. Grant, Ariz. 
W. H. Jordan, 19 Inf., Columbus Bks, O. 
A. K. Arnold, 1 Cav., on leave. 
A. P. Morrow, 6 Cav., Ft. Stanton. N. M. 
H. Jewett, 3 Inf., Ft. Snelling, Minn. 



THE ARMY. 



27 



G.M. Brayton, 9 Inf., Hot Springs, Ark. 
P. C. Hains, Engs, Washington, D. C. 
G. L. Gillespie, Engs, Astoria, N. Y. 

E. G. Bush, 11 Inf., Madison Bks. N. Y. 

J. C. Bates, 13 Inf., Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 
J. C. Bailey, Med. Dept, San Francisco, Cal. 
W. R. Gibson, San Antonio, Tex. 
W. F. Drum, 12 Inf., St. Paul, Minn. 

F. H. Parker, Watertown Arsenal, N. Y. 
C. R. Suter, Engs, St. Louis, Mo. 

O. D. Greene, A. G. D., Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 
Samuel Breck, A. G. D.,Washington, D. C. 
H. C. Wood, A. G. D., Washington, D. C. 
J. P. Martin, A. G. D., San Antonio, Tex. 
L. R. L. Livingston, comdg Ft. McHenry, Md. 

G. G. Huntt, 10 Cav., comdg Ft. Apache, Ariz. 



. . , ., . , . 

W. M. Graham, 1 Art., comdg Alcatraz Id., Cal. 
James Biddle, 5 Cav.,Washington, D. C. 
G. M. Dandy, Q. M. D., Washington, D. C. 
J. C. McKee, M. D., Philadelphia,Pa. 
A. S. Burt, 7 Inf.,Washakie, Wyo. 
S. Snyder, 10 Inf., Oklahoma, I. T. 
J. A. Smith, Engs, Portland, Me. 
F. Mears, 4 Inf., comdg Davis Id., N. Y. 
R. Lodor, 5 Art,, comdg_Ft. Wadsworth, N. Y, 
S. M. Mansfield, Engs, Boston, Mass. 
W. R. King, Engs, comdg Willet's Point, N.Y. 



LIEUTENANT-COLONELS. CONTINUED. 

R. H. Hall, 6 Inf., Los Angeles, Cal. 

W. H. Penrose, 16 Inf.. comdg Ft. Douglass, 

Utah. 

M. R. Morgan, Sub. Dept, Chicago, 111. 
G. H. Burton, Insp. Genl, Los Angeles, Cal. 
W. Smith, Pay Dept, Ft. Snelling, Minn. 
H. P. Curtis, Judge Advocate. New York. 
G. H. Weeks, Qmstr Dept, San Antonio, Tex. 
J. J. Upham, 3 Cav., San Antonio, Tex. 
C. H. Alden, Med. Dept, St. Paul, Minn. 
R. H.Jackson, 4 Art., St. Augustine, Fla. 
A. T. Smith, 4 Cav., Ft. Lowell, Ariz. 
C. M. Terrell, Pay Dent, Omaha, Neb. 
R. T. Frank, 2 Art., Ft. Monroe, Va. 
H. W. Lawten, Insp Gen., Washington, D. C. 
W. B. Hughes, Q. M.D., Omaha, Neb. 



H. S. Hawkins, 23 Inf.. West Point, N.Y. 

J. P.Farley, Ord. Bd, New York. 

C. C.Byrne, Med Dept, Sol.Home,Washington. 

C. H. Carlton, 7 Cav., Ft, Sill, I. T. 

J. P. 



. , 

Wright, Med Dept, Ft, Leavenworth, Kas. 
. arker, 20 Inf., Davis Id., N. Y. 
H. C.Corbin, A. G. D., Chicago, 111. 

F. L. Town, Med Dept Post Surg., San Francisco 

G. B. Sanford, 9 Cav., Leavenworth, Kas. 

J. P. Hawkins, Sub. Dept, San Francisco, Cal. 



P. Small, Sub. Dept, New York. 



MAJORS, $3. 500. 



T. H. Stancon. Pay Dept, Chicago, 111. 
G. E. Glenn, Pay Dept, Los Angeles, Cal. 
P. P. G. Hall, Pay Dept,on leave. 
J. P. Canby, Pay Dept, Portland, Or. 
G. W. Candee, Pay Dept, Helena. Mont. 
Dallas Bache, Surgn, Omaha, Neb. 

A. B. Carey, Pay Dept, New York. 

B. E. Fryer, Surgn, waiting orders. 

J. P. Willard, Pay Dept, Washington, D. C. 

F. M. Coxe, Pay Dept, San Francisco, Cal. 
A. E. Bates, Pay Dept, St. Paul, Minn. 
Charles I. Wilson, Pay Dept., St. Louis, Mo. 
W. H. Eckles, Pay Dept, St. Paul, Minn. 

J. R. Roche, Pay Dept, El Paso, Tex. 

A. S. Torwar, Pay Dept, Tucson, Ariz. 

T. C. Sullivan, Sub. Dent, St. Paul, Minn. 

W. M. Maynadier, Pay Dept, Albuquerque,N.M. 

Wm. Arthur, Pay Dept, San Antonio, Tex. 

J. W. Barriger, Sub. Dept, St. Louis, Mo. 

G. M. Sternoerg. Surgn. Baltimore, Md. 

C. R. Greenleaf, Surgn, Washington, D. C. 
W. H. Forwood, Surgn, on leave. 

Ely McClellan, Surgn, Chicago, 111. 

W. D.Wolverton, Surgn, Ft. Douglass, Utah. 

J. V. D. Middleton, Surgn, Davis Island, N. Y. 

J. H. Janeway, Surgn, Benicia Bks, Cal. 

Albert Hartsuff, Surgn, Ft. Omaha, Neb. 

H. R. Tilton, Surgn, West*Point, N. Y. 

S. M. Horton, Surgn, Ft.Adams, R. I. 

J. C. G. Happersett, Med Dept, Atlanta Bks,Ga. 

A. A. Woodhull, Surgn, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 

H. G. Thomas, Pay Dept, on leave. 

J. S. Billings, Surgn, Washington, D. C. 

J. B. Keef er, Pay Dept, Walla Walla, Wash. 

J. W. Wham, Pay Dept, Tucson, Ariz. 

C. C. Sniffln, Pay Dept, Army Bldg, N. Y. City. 
J. R. Gibson, Surgn, New York. 

D. L. Huntington, Surgn, San Diego, Cal. 

D. S. Gordon, 2 Cav., Ft. Bidwell, Cal. 
Anson Mills, 10 Cav., Ft. Bliss, Tex. 

L. S. Babbitt, Ord. Dept, San Antonio, Tex. 
W. A. Marye, Ord. Debt, Benecia Arsenal, Cal. 
W. E. Waters, Surgn, Vancouver Bks, Wash. 
A. G. Robinson, Q. M. D., New Orleans, La, 

E. V. Sumner, 5 Cav., comdg Ft. Leavenworth, 
Kas. 

J A. Wilcox, 8 Cav., Ft. Keogh, Mont. 

S. S. Sumer, 8 Cav., Vancouver Bks, Wash. 

David Perry, 6 Cav., New York. 

Isaac Arnold,Ord. Dept, Ft.Monroe Arsenal.Va. 

H. E. Noyes, 4 Cav., comdg Ft. Bowie, Ariz. 

G. W. Baird, Pay Dept, Boston, Mass. 

D. R. Larned, Pay Dept, Washington, D. C. 

G. F. Robinson, Pay Dept, San Francisco, Cal. 

W. E. Creary, Pay Dept, Salt Lake City, Utah. 



J. C. G. Lee, Q.M.D.,Vancouver Bks.Wash. 
Clifton Comly, Ord. Dept, Columbia Arsenal, 
Tenn. 

E. B. Beaumont, 4 Cav., comdg San Antonio, Tex. 

F. S. Dodge, Pay Dept. New York. 

G. J. Lydecker, Engs, Vancouver, Wash. 
Chas. McClure, Pay Dept, El Paso, Tex. 
J. S. Witcher, Pay Dept, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Amos Stickney. Engs, Louisville, Ky. 
Jas. Gilliss, Q. M. D., Washington, D. C. 

C. H. Whippe, Pay Dept, Cheyenne, Wyo. 
W. H. Comegys, Pay Dept, Atlanta, Ga. 

D. N. Bash, Pay Dept, Denver, Col. 
J. M. Brown, Surgn, Ft. Meade, Dak. 

J. R. McGinnis, Ord. Dept, Rock Island Ar- 
senal, 111. 

G. V. Henry, 9 Cav., Ft. McKinney, Wyo. 

Van B. Hubbard, Surgn, Columbus Bks, O. 

G. W. McKee, Ord. Dept, comdg Allegheny Ar- 
senal, Pa. 

C. B. McLellan, 10 Cav., comdg Ft. Apache. Ariz. 
A. J. McGonnigle, Q.M.D., Baltimore. Md. 

W. F. Tucker, Pay Dept, Washington, D. C. 
John Brooke, Surgn, Ft. Monroe, Va. 

E. C. Bainbridge, 3 Art., Washington, D. C. 

J. C. Muhlenburg, Pay Dept, Vancouver Bks, 

Wash. 

Alexander Mackenzie. Engs. Rock Island, 111. 
O. H. Ernst, Engs, Washington, D. C. 
Thos. Wilson, Sub. Dept, Chicago, 111. 
W. H. Gardner, Surgn, Washington, D. C. 

D. P. Heap, Engs, New York. 

F. L. Guenther, 2 Art., comdg Ft. Trumbull, Ct. 

F. VanVliet, 10 Cav., Ft Bayard, N. M. 
Merritt Barber, A. G. D.. St. Paul, Minn. 
Charles Smart, Surgn,Washington, D. C. 
W. S. Tremaine, Surgn, on leave. 
William Ludlow, Engs, Detroit, Mich. 
W. A. Jones, Engs, St. Paul, Minn. 
DeWitt C. Poole, Pay Dept, San Antonio, Tex. 

G. R. Smith, Pay Dept, Leavenworth, Kas. 
A. N. Damrell, Engs, Mobile, Ala. 

R. F. Bernard, 8 Cav., Jefferson Bks, Mo. 

F. H. Phipps. Ord. Dept, comdg Powder Depot, 

Dover, N. J. 

J. P. Baker, Pay Dept, Omaha, Neb. 
D. G. Caldwell, Surgeon, Jefferson Bks, Mo. 
C. J. Allen, Engs, Galveston, Tex. 
J. W. Scully, Q.M.D., Atlanta, Ga. 
P. J. A. Cleary, Surgn, Ft. Wingate, N.M. 
L. H. Carpenter, 5 Cav., Ft. Myer, Va. 
C.W. Raymond, Engs, Washington, D. C. 
C.W. Foster, Q. M. D., Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 
L.C. Overman Engs, Cleveland, O. 
S. B. M. Young, 3 Cav., comdg Ft.McIntosh,Tex. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



MAJORS.- 

A. M. Miller, Engs, Custom House, St. Louis, Mo. 
M. V. Sheridan, A. G. D., Omaha, Neb. 

J. H. Belcher, Q. M. D., Portland. Or. 

M. B. Adams, Engs, Burlington,Vt. 

W. H. Bell, Sub. Dept, Omaha, Neb. 

E. B. Kirk, Qmstr Dept, Jeffersonville, Ind. 

M. P. Miller, 5 Art., comdg Ft. Monroe, Va. 

J. I. Rodgers, 1 Art., San Francisco, Cal. 

B. S.Vickery, Surgn, Hot Springs, Ark. 

A. S. Kimball, Qmstr Dept, Los Angeles, Cal. 
G. A. Purington, 3 Cav., Ft. Clarke, Tex. 

C. B.Throckmorton, 2 Art,Ft.Wadsworth, N.Y. 
W. R. Livermore, Engs, Newport, R. I. 

W. H. Heuer, Engs, San Francisco, Cal. 

"W. S. Stanton, Engs, Boston, Mass. 

J. M. Bacon, 7 Cav , Ft. Riley, Kas. 

T. H. Handbury, Engs, Portland, Or. 

J. S. Casey, 17 Inf.. Ft. D. A. Russell, Wyo. 

Thomas Ward, A. A. G.,Vancouver Bks,Wash. 

Passmore Middleton, Surgn, St. Augustine, Fla. 

Henry Lippincott, Surgn, Ft. Union, N.M. 

William L. Kellogg, 19 Inf., comdg Columbus 

Bks, O. 

J. H. Gilman, Sub. Dept, Washington, D. C. 
Henry McElderry, Surgn, Ft. Wayne, Mich. 
Thomas McGregor, 2 Cav., San Francisco, Cal. 
E. A. Koerper, Surgn, Ft. WallaWalla,Wash. 

A. F. Rockwell, Q. M. D., St. Paul, Minn. 
S. M.Whitside, 7 Cav., Ft. Riley, Kas. 

E. B. Williston, 3 Art., Ft. Riley, Kas. 
W. J. Volkmarr, A. G. D., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Wm. Sinclair, 2 Art., Ft. Warren, Mass. 
G. C. Smith, Q. M. D , Helena, Mont. 
J. W. Reilly, Ord. Dept, comdg Augusta Ar- 
senal, Ga. , 

J. F. Kent, 4 Inf., Ft. Spokane, Wash. 
Henry Carroll, 1 Cav., Ft. Custer, Mont. 
Samuel Ovenshine,23 Inf,comdgFt.Porter,N.Y. 
Calvin DeWitt, Surgn, Ft. Missoula. Mont. 
J. H. Page, 11 Inf., Ft. Niagara, N. Y. 

B. F. Pope, Surgn.Whipple Bks, Ariz. 
Edmund Butler, 2 Inf., Ft. Omaha, Neb. 
J. H. Bartholf, Surgn, Plattsburg, N. Y. 
J. P. Kimball, Surgn, Ft. Elliott Tex. 
G. K. Brady, 18 Inf., Ft. Clarke, Tex. 
J.W. Clous. Washington, D. C. 

J. N. Andrews, 12 Inf., Ft. Bridger. Wyo. 

G. B. Head, 3 Inf., Ft. Meade, Dak. 

E. Adam, 6 Cav., Ft. Stanton. N. M. 

J. F. Randlett, 9 Cav., comdg Ft. Robinson, Neb. 

T. Schawn, A. A. G., Washington, D. C. 

H. M. Cronkite, Surg. . Little Rock, Ark. 

J. B. Parke, 16th Inf., Ft. Douglass, Utah. 

H. A. Theaker, 15 Inf., Ft. Pembina, Dak. 

J. C. Post, Engs.,Washington, D. C. 

J. F. Gregory, Washington, D. C. 

W. J. Lyster, 6 Inf., comdg Ft. Sheridan, 111. 

D.D.VauValzah, 20 Inf., Ft.Assinaboine, Mont. 



CONTINUED. 

R. M. O'Reilly, Med Dept, on leave. 
C. L. Heizman, Med Dept, Sari Antonio, Tex 
C. A. Wikoff, 14 Inf., Vancouver Bks, Wash. 
J. A. Kress, Benicia Bks, Cal. 
H. M. Adams, Engs., Washington, D. C. 
E. Moale, 1 Inf. , comdg Benicia Bks, Cal. 
H. C. Cook, 13 Inf. , Ft. Elliott, Tex. 
H. C. Hasbrouck, 4 Art., Ft. Leavenworth. Kas. 
J. M. Hamilton, 1 Cav., Ft. Assinaboine, Mont. 
R. H. White, Surg., Ft. Myer, Va. 
J. B. Rawles, 4 Art. , comdg Atlanta, Ga. 
W. L. Haskin, 1 Art., comdg Presidio, Cal. 
Theo. A. Baldwin, 7 Cav., Ft. Sill, Ind. T. 
Jacob Kline, 24 Inf., Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 
T. C. Tupper. 6 Cav,, Ft. Wingate, N. M. 
JohnV. Furey, Q.M.D., Schuylkill Arsenal, Pa. 
A. C. Girard, Med Dept, Ft. Niagara, N. \. 
E. C. Woodruff, 5 Inf. , Ft. Ringgold, Tex. 
J. B. Girard, Med. Dept, Ft. Lowell, Ariz. 

C. B. L. Davis, Engs., Milwaukee, Wis. 
E. Miles, 25 Inf. , St. Paul, Minn. 

W. F. Randolph, 3 Art. . Governor's Id, N Y. 
J. V. Lauerdale, Med. Dept, Ft. Davis. Tex. 
A. R. Chaffee, 9 Cav., Ft, DuChesne, Utah. 
J. B. Quinn, Engs, Duluth, Minn 

D. W. Lockwood, Engs. Cincinnati. O. 

W. H. Powell 22 Inf., Ft. A. Lincoln, Dak. 

J. A. P. Hampson, 12 Inf., Ft. Sully, Dak 

S. T. Cushing, Sub. Dept, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 

L. Y. Loring, Med Dept, Ft. Wingate, N. M. 

L. C. Forsyth, Q.M.D., Boston, Mass. 

G. Russell, 5 Cav., Ft. Reno, I. T. 

J. K. Carson, Med Dept, Ft. Sherman, Idaho. 

T. McCrea, 5 Art., Governor's Id., N. Y. 

P. D. Vroom, Insp. Genl, Omaha, Neb. 

E. Hunter, A. G. D., San Francisco. 

G. B. Davis, A. G. D., Washington. D. C. 
M. Cooney, 4 Cav., Ft. Huachuca, Ariz. 

D. W. Benham, 7 Inf., Ft. Omaha, Neb. 

E. R. Kellogg, 8 Inf., Ft. Robinson. Neb. 
J. Jackson, 2 Cav., Ft. Walla Walla, Wash. 
J. Bgan, 1 Art., Ft. Canby, Wash. 

J. P. Sanger, Insp. Genl, Ft. Leavenworth, Ks. 

E. W. Whittemore, 10 Inf., Ft. Union, N.M. 

O. E. Michaels, Ord. Dept, Augusta, Me. 

J. H. Patzki, Med. Dept, Ft. Huachuca. Ariz. 

C. E. Munn, Med. Dept. Madison Bks, N. Y. 

L. T. Morris, 3 Cav., San Antonio, Tex. 

C. Ewen, Med. Dept, Willett's Pt., N. Y. 

E. Woodruff, Med. Dept, Ft. Hamilton, X. Y. 

R. Comba, 9 Inf.. Ft. Verde, Ariz. 

A. MacArthur, Jr., A.A.G., Washington, D. C. 

E. H, Raffner, Engs. Quincy, 111. 

W. Matthews, Med. Dept, Washington, D. C. 

C. D. Viele, 1 Cav., Ft. Custer, Mont. 

W. A. Elderkin, Sub. Dept, Los Angeles, Cal. 

C. B. Penrose, Sub. Dept, Baltimore, Md. 

J . H. Lord, Q. M. D., New York. 



RETIRED LIST. 

GENERAL, $13,500. 
WILLIAM T. SHERMAN, 75 W. 17th-st., New York City. 

MAJOR-GEXERALS, $5,625. 

D. E. Sickles, 23 5th-av.. New York City. I John Pope, St. Louis, Mo. 

J. C. Robinson, Biughamton, N. Y. A. H. Terry, New Haven, Conn. 

S. S. Carroll.Washington, D. C. 

BRIGADIER-GENERALS, $4,125. 

D. H. Rucker, Washington, D. C. 



Francis Fessenden, Portland, Me. 

Eli Long. New York City. 

R.W. Johnson, St. Paul, Minn. 

T. J. Wood, in Europe. 

T.W. Sweeny, Astoria, N. Y. 

M. D. Hardin, 59 Clark-st.. Chicago, 111. 

B.W. Brice, Washington. D. C. 

S.W. Crawford, in Europe. 

P. St. G. Cooke, Detroit, Mich. 

Joseph Holt, Washington, D. C. 

W. A. Hammond, Washington, D. C. 

E. D. Townsend, Washington, D. C. 

M. C. Meigs, Washington, D. C. 

N.W. Brown, Washington, D. C. 



Ruf us Ingalls, Portland, Or. 

H. G.Wright, Washington, D. C. 

C. C. Augur, Washington, D. C. 

N. H. Davis, 7Nassau-st., New York City. 

Robert Murray, New York City, 

John Newton, New York City. 

J. H. Potter, Concord, N. H. 

O. B. Wilcox, Washington, D. C. 

J. C. Duane, New York City. 

A. Baird, Washington, D. C. 

W. S. Rosecranz. Washington, D. C. 

R. C. Drum, Bethesda, Md. 



THE ARMY. 



'-'9 



Hannibal Day, Morristown, N. J. 

M. B.Walker, Kenton, O. 

Theodore Yates, Washington, D. C. 

R. E. Clary, Washington, D. C. 

J. R. Lewis, Atlanta, Ga. 

I. S. Catlin, 25 Court-st., Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Wager Swayne, 195 Broadway, N. Y. City. 

H. B. Carrington, Hyde Park, Mass. 

0. L. Shepherd, near llth-av., N. Y. City. 
L. B. Graham. Washington, D. C. 

E.W. Hinks, Cambridge, Mass. 

S. H. Starr, 3319 N. Broad-st., Philadelphia, Pa. 

T. F. Rodenbough, 45 W. 25th-st., N.Y. City. 

R. L. Kilpatrlck, Springfield, O. 

A. J. McNett, Belmont, N. Y. 

John Pulford, Detroit, Mich. 

J.V. D. Reeve, Minneapolis, Minn. 

R. S. Granger, Zanesville, O. 

Abner Doubleday, N. Y. City. 

G.W. Cullum, 261 5th-av., New York. 

J.V. Bomford, Elizabeth, N. J. 

R.H.K.Whiteley,721Madison-av.,Baltimore,Md. 

Horace Brooks, N.Y. City. 

J. J. Reynolds, Washington, D. C. 

Joseph Roberts, Philadelphia, Pa. 

T. G. Pitcher, Washington, D. C. 

P. R. DeTrobriand, New Orleans, La. 

DeL. Floyd-Jones, New York City. 

1. N. Palmer, Washington, D. C. 

G. A. Woodward. Washington, D. C. 

J.I. Gregg, Washington, D. C. 

James Oakes, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Israel Vogdes, West Point, N.Y. 

Edmund Schriver, Salem, N. Y. 

Stewart Van Vliet.Washington, D. C. 

J. E. Smith, 376 Warren-av., Chicago, 111. 

T.L.Crittenden.N. Y. City. 

P.V. Hagner, Washington, D. C. 

J. B. Fry, 30 E. 63d-st., New York City. 

G. O. Haller, Seattle, Wash. 

F. F. Flint, Highland Park, 111. 

J. M. Brannan, New York City. 

C. L. Kllburn, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 



COLONELS, $3,375. 



W. S. King, 4042 Chestnut-st., Philadelphia, Pa, 

A. P. Howe, Cambridge, Mass. 

Joseph Conrad, Washington, D. C. 

G. N. DeRussey, Detroit, Mich. 

John Head, Washington, D. C. 

Z. B. Tower, Portland. Me. 

George Thorn, Washington, D. C. 

James Van Voast, 123 E. 3d-st., Cincinnati, O. 

Galusha Pennypacker, Philadelphia, Pa. 

J. A. Ekln, Louisville, Ky. 

G.W. Getty, Forest Glen, Md. 

F. T. Dent, Denver, Col. 
W. F. Raynolds, in Europe. 
H. B. Clitz, Detroit, Mich. 

John Campbell, Cold Springs, N. Y. 
Charles C. Gilbert, Chicago, 111. 
John P. Hatch, New York City. 
John E. Summers, Omaha, Neb. 
J. B. Brown, Albion, N. Y. 
J. D. Wilkins, Washington, D. C. 
Fitz-John Porter, New York City. 
C. S. Stewart, Cooperstown, N. Y. 
J. N. G. Whistler. Ridgelawn. Mont. 
Luther F. Bradley, Chicago, 111. 

G. L. Febeger, New Haven, Conn. 
C. E. Blunt, New York City. 

J. Hamilton, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

W. B. Royall, Washington, D. C. 

Glover Perin, St. Paul, Minn. 

C. L. Best, Newport, R. I. 

J. S. Mason, Washington, D. C. 

M. D. L. Simpson, Winnetka, 111. 

E. I. Bally, San Francisco. 

R. Saxton, Washington, D. C. 

N. B. Sweitzer, Washington, D. C. 

Daniel McClure, Side View, Ky. 

J. C. Tldball, Germantown, Pa. 

A. J. Smith, St. Louis, Mo. 

J. G. Parke. 

T. A. McParlln. 

N. A. M. Dudley. 

W. W. Burns. 

A. Beckwith. 



LIEUTENANT-COLONELS, $3,000. 

D. P. Whiting, Washingt on, D. C; 
D. Woodruff, Trenton, N. J. 

A. A. Gibson, Fryeburg, Me. 

?. E. Maley, Englewood, 111. 
homas Shea, Lexington, Ind. 
G.W. Gile, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Robert Avery, 98 2d place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
S. B Hayman, Houstonia, Mo. 
Alex. Montgomery. Glens Falls, N. Y. 
L. C. Bootes, Wilmington, Del. 
F. O.Wyse, Pikesville, Md. 
Joseph Stewart, Berkley, Cal. 
Henry Prince, in Europe. 

MAJORS, $2,825. 
H. B. Judd,Wllmington,Del. 
Wm. Austine, Brattleboro,Vt. 
W. F. Edgar, Los Angeles, Cal. 
J. H. McArthur, 2813 Indiana-av., Chicago. 111. 
Wm. E. Prince, 29 W. 35th-st., New York City. 
Albert Tracey, Boston, Mass. 
J. C. Clark, Jr.. Ridley Park. Pa. 
F. H. Lamed, 361N. Charles-st., Baltimore, Md. 
H.W. Freedley, 281 Hollins-st., Baltimore, Md. 

E. McK. Hudson. Washington, D. C. 
Hugh B. Fleming, Erie, Pa. 

W. B. Lane, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 
S. P. Lee, Vineyard Haven, Mass. 

F. E. Prime, Litchfield. Conn. 

R. M. Morris, Vineyard Haven, Mass. 



J. E. Burbank. Maiden, Mass. 

D. B. McKibbin, Chambersburg, Pa. 
H. M. Enos,Waukesha,Wis. 
Truman Seymour, traveling in Europe. 
R. C.Walker, Helena. Mont. 

T. S. Dunn, Santa Monica, Cal. 
A. E. Latimer, Bronxville. N Y. 
J. M. Robertson, Plattsburg, N. Y. 
Robert Nugent, N. Y. City. 

E. H. Ludiugton, Uniontown, Pa. 



J. B. M. Potter, Kingston, R. I. 
A. W. Evans, Elkton, Md. 

A. J. Dallas, Orlando, Fla. 
O. H. Moore, New York City. 
J. J. Dana, Washington, D. C. 

H. C. Chapman, Hot Springs, Ark. 
C. A. Reynolds, Baltimore, Md. 
E.Collins, Milton, Mass. 
H. B. Burnbam, Richmond, Va. 
W. H. Johnson, Portland. Or. 

B. C. Card, Washington, D. C. 
L. S. Smith, S. Norwalk, Conn, 



H. A. Hambrlght, Lancaster, Pa. 

P.W. Stanhope, Waldron, 111. 

E. D. Juda, Hartford, Conn. 

Wm. Hawley, San Jose, Cal. 

James Belger, Hot Springs, Ark. 

H. C. Bankhead, Jersey City, N. J. 

J. H. Eaton, Portland, Or. 

James E. McMillan, Washington, D. C. 

R. D. Clarke, York, Pa. 

E. H. Brooke, Detroit, Mich. 

Ed Ingersoll, Springfield, Mass. 

Nicholas Vedder, Washington, D. C. 

T. C. H. Smith, Nordhoff; Cal. 

Frank Bridgman, Washington, D. C. 



J. J. Eckerson, Portland, Or. 
. E. Tourtellotte, LaCrosse, Wis. 
Wm. P. Gould, Indianapolis, Ind. ' 
Lewis Merrill, Philadelphia, Pa. 

C. J. Sprague, San Francisco, Cal. 
M. K. Taylor, San Antonio, Tex. 
B. P. Runkle, New York City. 

E. R. Warren, Montrose, Pa. 

D. Maiden, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
H. B. Reese, Lancaster, O. 

E. Bentley, Little Rock, Ark. 



30 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 



F.W. Benteen, Atlanta, Ga. 
A. Pleasanton, Washington, D. C. 
A. B. Gardiner, Garden City, N. Y. 
C. J. Dickey, Indianapolis, Ind. 
F. T. Bennett, San Francisco. 



MAJORS. CONTINUED. 

W. Webster, Washington, D. C. 
W. F. Smith, Philadelphia, Pa. 
A. Sharp. 
C. H. Hoyt. 



NUMBERS AND STATIONS OF REGIMENTS. 



1ST CAVALRY. Hdqrs B, D, E, G. and M, 
Ft. Custer, Mont.; A and K. Camp Sheridan, 
Mont.; C, F, and H, Ft. Assinaboine, Mont.; I, 
Ft. Leavenworth, Kas.; L, Ft. Maginnis, Mont. 
Col., J. S. Brisbin; Lt. Col., A. K. Arnold; 
Majs., H. Carroll, J. M. Hamilton, C. D. Viele; 
Adjt., R. P. P. Wainwright. 

2D CAVALRY.-Hdqrs B, E, H, I, and M, Ft. 
Walla Walla, Wash.; A and K. Presidio, San 
Francisco; C and G. Ft. Bidwell, Wash.; D, 
Boise bks, Idaho; F, Ft, Leavenworth, Kas.; L, 
Ft. Sherman, Idaho. Col.,D. R. Clendenin; Lt. 
Col., John Green; Majs., D. S. Gordon, T. Mc- 
Gregor, J. Jackson, Adjt., F. W. Sibley. 
3D CAVALRY. Hdqrs C, E, and M, Ft.Clarke, 
Tex.; B, G, and L, San Antonio, Tex.; F, 
Camp Pena, Col.; land K, Ft. Brown, Tex.; D, 
Ft. Ringgold, Tex.; H, Ft, Mclntosh, Tex.; A, 
Camp Eagle Pass, Tex. Col., A. G. Bracket! ; 
Lt. Col., J. J. Upham; Majs., S. B. M. Young, 
G. A. Purington. L. T. Morris; Adjt., J. T. 
Dickman. 

4TH CAVALRY.-Hdqrs E and L, Ft. Low 
ell, Ariz.; A, F^ 7 

Ariz!; D/Ft. McDowelVArTz.""G,^an' Carlos' 



and M, Ft. Huachuca, 
r a.; C and H, Ft. Bowie, 



. , . , . , , 

Ariz.; K, Ft. Verde, Ariz.; Col., C. E. Comp- 
ton; Lt. Col., G. A. Forsyth; Majs., H.E.Noyes, 
E. B. Beaumont, M. Cooney. Adjt., 3. B. Erwin. 
TH CAVALRY.-Hdqrs B, C, G, and K, Ft. 
O Reno, Ind. Ter.; A. F, and I, Ft. Supply, Ind. 
Ter.; D and L, Ft. Sill, Ind. Ter.; E and H, Ft. 
Elliott, Tex.; M, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. Col. 
J. F. Wade; Lt. Col., J. Biddle; Majs. E.W. 
Sumner, L. H. Carpenter, Gerald Russell; Adjt., 
C. H. Watts. 

TH CAVALRY.-Hdqrs A, C, F, H, I, and K, Ft. 
Wingate, N. M. ; B, Ft.Myer,Va.; D and L, Ft. 



Stanton, N. M.; 
Ft. Union, N.M.; 
P. Morrow; Maj. 



** and M, Ft. Lewis, Col.; G, 
Col.,~E. A. Carr; Lt. Col., A. 
David Perry, Emil Adam, T. 



C.' Tapper;' Atijt^i,. A. Craig 
HTH CAVALRY.-Hdqrs A, B, 'C, D, G, I, L, 
I andM, Ft. Riley, Kas.; E. F, H, and K, Ft. 
Sill, Ind. T.; Col., J. W. Forsyth; Lt. Col., Caleb 
H. Carleton ; Majs., J. M. Bacon, S.M.Whiteside, 
T. Baldwin; Adjt., L. S. McCormick. 

8TH CAVALRY.-Hdqrs A, B, C, D, I, and M, 
Ft.Meade, Dak.; E andK, Ft.Buford, Dak.; 
F and G, Ft. Yates, Dak. ; H and L, Ft.Keogh, 
Mont. Col.. Elmer Otis; Lt. Col., J. K. Mizner; 
Majs., J. A. Wilcox, S. S. Sumner, R. F. Bernard ; 
Adjt. C. M. O'Conner. 

9TH CAVALRY.-Hdqrs, B, I. F. and K, Ft. 
Robinson,Neb.; A and G.Ft. Niobrara, Neb.; 
C and M. Ft. DuChesne, Utah; D and H, Ft. 



Kinney, W 



Washakie, Wyo 



STyo.; . 
, Wyo. 



L, Leavenworth, Kas.; E, Ft, 
J. G. Tilford; Lt. Col., 



G. B. Sanf brd ; Majs.,'G. V. Henrv. J/F. Rand- 
lett, A. R. Chaffee; Adjt., W. L. Finley. 
1 ATH CAVALRY. Hdqrs A,B, H, and I, Ft. 
U Apache, Ariz.; C. F,andG,Ft. Grant, Ariz.; 
E, San Carlos, Ariz.; D, L, and M, Ft. Bavard, 
N.M. Co/.,B.H. Grlerson; Lt.Col.,G. G.Huntt; 
Majs., Anson Mills, C. B. McLellan, F. Van Vliet; 
Adjt., T. W. Jones. 

1ST ARTILLERY.-Hdqrs A, C, D, E, H, I, 
and K, Presidio, San Francisco, Cal.; E. Van- 
couver bks, Wash.; F, Ft. Monroe, Va.; B, Ft. 
Canby, Wash.; G and M, Alcatraz Id., Cal.; L, 
Ft. Mason, Cal. Col., L. L. Langdon ; Lt. Col., 
W. H. Graham; Majs., W. L. Haskin, John I. 
Rodgers, J. Egan; Adjt., H. L. Harris. 



2D ARTILLERY. HdqrsC,G,and H,Ft.Adams, 
R. L; A, Ft. Riley, Kas.; B and D, Ft.Warren, 
.; F, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas.; I, Ft. Monroe. 



Mass 



Va.; K and M, Ft. Wadsworth, N. Y.; L, Ft. 
Trumbull, Conn. Col., John Mendenhall; Lt. 
Col., R. T. Frank; Majs., F. L. Guenther; C. B. 
Throckmorton,Wm.Sinclair;^1^7,W.A.Simpson 

3D ARTILLERY. Hdqrs A, C, E, H, K, and 
L.Washington bks, D. C.; B and M, Ft. Mon- 
roe. Va.;D,G, and LFt.McHenry, Md.; F,SanAn- 
tonio, Tex. Col., H. G. Gibson; Lt. Col., L. L 
Livingston; Majs., E. C. Bainbridge, E. B. Will 
listen, W. F. Randolph; Adjt., Chas. Satterlee 
A TH ARTILLERY. Hdqrs A, C, D, E, G, K, 
tt L, and M, Ft, McPherson, Ga.; B, Ft. Adams, 
R. L; F, Ft. Riley, Kas.; H, Ft. Monroe, Va.; I 
Jackson bks, La. Col.,H. W.Closson; Lt. Col. 
R. H.Jackson; Majs., A. C. M. Pennington. H. 



J.*. JLJL. VO*sA0VU] jmUUO.4 JT.. V. JJJ.. A C 11 U 1JJK I U 1 1, JO. 

C. Hasbrook, J. B. Rawles; Adjt.,S. W.Taylor 
FTTH ARTILLERY.-Hdqrs F, I, H, and E. Ft." 

JfJ Hamilton, N. Y.; A, C, and L, Ft. Columbus, 
N. Y. ; G, Ft. Monroe, Va. ; B, Ft. Wadsworth, N. 
Y.; D, Ft. Douglass, Utah; M and K, Ft. Schuy- 
ler, N. Y. Col., Alex. Piper; Lt. Col., R. Lodor; 
Majs., A. C.Wildrick, M. P. Miller, T. McCrea; 
Adjt., W. H.Coffln. 

TTtNGINEER BATTALION.-Hdqrs A, B, and 
JJJ C, Willett's Point, N. Y.; E, West Point, 
N.Y. Maj.Comdt., W.R.King; Adjt., J.G. Warren. 

1ST INFANTRY. Angel Island, Cal., hdqrs 
B,E, F,G, and H; Presidio, Cal., A, D, and 
K; Benicia bks, Cal., C and I. Col., W. B. Shaf- 
ter; Lt. Col.,G. G. Bartlett; Maj., Edw. Moale; 
Adjt.,~L. H. Strother. 

2D INFANTRY.-Ft. Omaha, Neb., all 2d In- 
fantry. Col., F. Wheaton; Lt. Col., J. S. 
Fletcher; Maj., E. Butler; Adjt., J. Kenzie. 

3D INFANTRY. Ft. Snelling, Minn., hdqrs 
A,D,E,H, G, andK; Ft. Meade, Dak., B. C, 
F, and I. Col., E. C. Mason; Lt. Col., H. Jew- 
ett; Maj.,G.E. Head; Adjt., F. P. Fremont. 
/I TH IXFANTRY. Ft. Sherman, Idaho, hdqrs 
tt C, D, E, and H; Ft. Spokane, Wash., A, B, 
F, I, and K; Boise bks, Idaho, G. Col., W. P. 
Carlin; Lt. Col., FredMears; 3/cy., J. F. Kent; 
AOjt., C. Howland. 

5TH INFANTRY. Ft. Bliss, Tex., hdqrs B 
andE; Ft. Ringgold, Tex., A and G; Ft. Mc- 
lntosh, Tex., C and F; Ft. Brown, Tex., D; Ft. 
Hancock, Tex., H; Ft. Davis, Tex., I and K. 
CW.,N. W. Osborne; Lt. Col.,~M. A. Cochran; 
Maj., E. C. Woodruff; Adjt., O. F. Long. 

6TH INFANTRY. Ft. Leavenworth, Kas., 
hdqrs G; Ft. Lewis, Col., A, B, C. D, ami E: 
Ft. Sheridan, 111., K; Ft, Gibson, I. T., II. Co/., 
A. D.McCook: Lt.Col.,R. H.Hall; Jfaj., W. J. 
Lyster; Adjt., B. A. Byrne. 

7TH INFANTRY. -Ft. Logan, Col., hdqrs B. 
i C, D, F, G, and E ; Camp at Pilot Butte, Rock 
Springs, Wyo., A and H; Ft. Washakie, Wyo., 
I. CoZ.,H. C. Merriman; Lt. Col., A. S. Burt; 
3/iay., D. W. Benham; Adjt., C. A. Worden. 

8TH INFANTRY.-Ft. Niobrara, Neb., hdqrs 
A, B, E, F, G, and H; Ft. Robinson, Neb., C, 

D, I, and K. Col., A. V. Kautz; Lt. Col., A. 
T.Smith; Maj., E.R.Kellogg; Adjt., J.McE.Hyde. 

9TH INFANTRY. - Whipple bks, Ariz., 
hdqrs B, C, F, and I; Ft. Mojave. Ariz., A; 
San Diego bks, Cal.,E; Ft. McDowell. Ariz., D; 
Ft. Huachuca, Ariz., G; Ft. Wingate, N. M.. K. 
Col., A. L. Hough; Lt. Col., G. M. Brayton; 
Maj., R. Comba; Adjt., J. McB. Sternbel. 



THE NATIONAL GUARD. 



:u 



NUMBERS AND STATIONS OF REGIMENTS. --Continued. 



1 ATH INFANTRY.-Ft.Marcy, N.M., hdqrs D 
JLU and I; Ft. Union, N. M.. C and H; Ft. 
Stanton, N. M., B; Ft. Gibson, N. M., G; Ft. 
Crawford, Col., A and E. Col., Henry Douglass ; 
Lt. Col., S. Snyder; Maj., E. W. Whittemore; 
Adjt.. S. Y. Seyburn. 

nTH INFANTRY.-Madison bks. N. Y., hdqre 
A, D, G, H, and I; Ft, Niagara. N. Y., E 
and K; Ft. Wood, N. Y., B; Ft. Ontario, N. Y., 
C; Plattsburg bks, N. Y., F. Col., R. I. Dodge; 
Lt. Col., E. G. Bush; Maj., J. H. Page; Adjt., 
R. J. C. Irvine. 

1 OTH INFANTRY. Ft. Yates, Dak., hdqrs E, 
14 G, H, and I; Ft. Sully, Dak., A, B, C, and 
D; Ft. A. Lincoln, Dak., F; Ft. Bennett, Dak., 
K. Col., E. F. Townsend; Lt. Col., W. F. Drum; 
Maj.,J. A. P. Hampson; Adjt.,C.W. Abbott, Jr. 
-J OTH INFANTRY. Ft. Supply, Ind.T.,hdqrs 
lOB, and H; Ft. Sill, I. T., A; Ft. Reno, I. T., 
C; Little Rock, Ark., D and E; Ft. Rlley, Kas., 
F; Ft. Elliott, Tex., G and I; Ft. Leavenworth, 
Kas., K. Col., M. Bryant; Lt. Col., J. C. Bates; 
Maj., H. C. Cook; Adjt., G. R. Cecil. 

UTH INFANTRY. Vancouver bks. Wash., 
hdqrs B, C, D, E, F, G, H, and K; Ft. 
Townsend, Wash,, A; Ft. Leavenworth. Kas., 
I, Col., T. M. Anderson; Lt. Col., I. D. De 
Rassy ; Maj., C. A.Wikoff; Adjt., R.T.Yeatman. 
TH INFANTRY. Ft. Buford, Dak., hdqrs 

' E, F, G, and K ; Ft. Pembina, Dak., B and I ; 

Ft. Randall, Dak., A, C, D, and H. Col., R. E. 

A. Crofton; Lt. Col., R. F. O'Beirne; Maj., H. 

A. Theaker; Adjt., C. K. McGunnegle. 

-I TH INFANTRY. Ft.Douglass.Utah, hdqrs 

JLD B D E G, H, and I; Ft. DuChesne, Utah, 

A, C, F, and K. Col., M. M. Blunt; Lt. CoL.W. 

H. Penrose; Maj., J. B. Parke; Adjt., S. W. 

Dunning. 

1 I7TH INFANTRY.-Ft. D. A. Russell, Wyo. 

I/ T., hdqrs A, B, C, E, F, G, I, and K; Ft. 

Bridger, Wyo. T., H and D. Col., H. R. Miz- 



15 1 



ner; Lt. Col., R. H. Offley; Maj., 3. S. Casey; 
Adjt., G. Eahlen. 

1 OTH INFANTRY. Ft. Clarke, Tex., hdqrs. 
lO CoZ.,H.M.Lazelle; Lt. Col., J.J. Coppiuger; 
Maj., G. K. Brady; Adjt., G. L, Turner. 
-| QTH INFANTRY.-San Antonio, Tex., hdqrs 
1</ A, E, G, H, I, and K; Mt. Vernon bks, Ala., 
B and C; Ft. Davis, Tex., D and F. Col., C. H. 
Smith; Lt. Col.,W. H. Jordon; Maj., W. L. Kel- 
logg; Adjt.. C. C. Hewitt. 

OATH INFANTRY.-Ft. Assinaboine, Mont., 
4U hdqrs B, C, D, E, F, H, and K; Ft. Magin- 
nis, "Mont.. A; Camp Popular River, Mont., I 
andG. Col.,E. S.Otis; Lt. Col., D. Parker; 
Maj., D. D. VanValzah; Adjt., H. A. Greene. 
O1 ST INFANTRY.- Ft. Sidney, Neb., hdqrs 
41 A, C, E, G, and I; Ft. Bridger, Wyo., D, F, 
and H; Ft. Douglass, Utah, B; Ft. McKinney, 
Wyo., K. Col., H. A. Morrow; Lt. Col., J. S. 
Poland; Maj., J. N. Andrews; Adjt., Willis 
Wittich. 

OO D INFANTRY. Ft. Keogh, Mont., hdqrs 
44 A, B, C, D, F, H, and K; Ft. Totten. 
Dak., E and G; Ft. A. Lincoln, Dak., I. Col., 
P. T. Swaine; Lt. Col., J. S. Conrad; Maj.,W. H. 

! Powell; Adjt., W. H. Kell. 

i OQD INFANTRY.-Ft. Wayne, Mich., hdqrs 
4D F, G, H, and I; Ft. Brady, Mich., A and B; 
Ft.Mackinac, Mich., E and K; Ft. Porter, N. Y.. 
C and D. Col., H. M. Black; Lt. Col., H. S. Hop- 
kins; Maj.,S. Ovenshine; Adjt., E. B. Bolton. 
O/| TH INFANTRY.-Ft. Bayard, N. M., hdqrs 
4* A, D, and F; Ft. Grant. Ariz., B, C, and K; 
Ft. San Carlos, Ariz., G and H; Ft. St. Thomas, 
N. M.. I. Col., Z. R. Bliss; Lt. Col., E. P. Pear- 
son; Maj., J. Klein; Adj., J. J. Brereton. 
OKTH INFANTRY. Ft. Missoula, Mont., 

i 4e) hdqrs G, H, I, and K; Ft. Shaw, Mont,, B, 

! C, E. and F; Ft. Custer, Mont., A. Col., G. L. 
Andrews; Lt. Col.. James Van Home; Maj., E. 

i Miles; Adjt., Geo. Andrews. 



Cfje National (Suartr. 

ILLINOIS. 

Hon. Joseph W. Fifer, Governor and Comma nder-in- Chief. 



1ST BRIGADE. Hdqrs Chicago, Charles Fitz- 
Simons. Brig. Gen. Corndg; AsstAdjt. Gen., 
H. B. Maxwell. 

1ST REGIMENT Hdqrs Chicago. Col., C. R. E. 
Koch; Lt. Col., H. L.Turner; Majs., Geo. V. 
Lauman ; Adjt.. W. L. DeRemer. 
2r> REGIMENT Hdqrs Chicago. Col., H. A. 
Wheeler; Lt. CoL.Vf. G. Purdy; Majs., G. M. 
Moulton, C. C. Hilton, W. N. Pelouze. 
3D REGIMENT -Hdqrs Rockford. Col., T. G. 
Lawler; Zi.CoZ., J. W. Bartlett; Majs., E. J. 
Sill, Frank Lohr: Adjt., L. F. Lake. 
4TH REGIMENT Hdqrs Joliet. CoZ.,Fred Ben- 
nett; Lt. Col.,C. H. Ingalls; Majs., E. S. Mon- 
roe. A. J. Bradford; Adjt., D. C. Haven. 
2D BRIGADE. -Hdqrs Springfield. Jasper N. 
Reece. Brig. Gen. Comdg; Asst. Adjt. Gen., 
G. S. Dana. 



5TH REGIMENT Hdqrs Springfield. Col., J. H 
Barkley; Lt. Col., J. S. Culver; Majs., C. E. 
McDougal, E. H. Dibble, J. J. Brinkerhoff; 
Adjt.. 3. VV. Black. 

J.TH REGIMENT Hdqrs Moline. Co/.,W.Clen- 
denin; Lt. Col., D. J. Foster; Majs., E. Kittil 
son, H. M. Abell; Adjt., P. C. Simmon. 

TTH REGIMENT Not organized. 

STH REGIMENT Hdqrs Greenup. Col., R. M. 
Smith; Lt. Col., C. V. Joquith; Majs., B. Hol- 
land. B. W. Harris, S. R. Coan; Adjt.. L. L. 
Souther. 

BATTERT A Hdqrs Danville. 2d brigade. 
Capt., E. Winter. 

BATTER YD HdqrsChicago. 1st brigade.Capt., 
E. P. Tobey. 



INDIANA. 
Hon. Alvin P. Hovey, Governor and Commander -in- Chief. 

1ST VETERAN LEGION. Hdqrs Indianapo- 1 OD LEGION. Hdqrs Kokomo. Co?., I.E. Kirk; 
lis. CV>Z.,W.D.Ewing; Lt. Col., J.H. Rohan; fj Lt. Col.,R. W. McBride; Majs., J. M. Powell, 
Majs., F. R. Weldon. R. P. Davis. Wm. Kreus- C. W. Barr, E. H. Gresham, G. S. Haste; Adjt., 
burg, C.F. Griffin, I. M.Davis; Adjt., W.C.Keller. I C. T. Downs. 

2 D LEGION. Hdqrs Indianapolis. Col.. W. j 1 ST REGIMENT LIGHT ARTILLERY 
J. McKee; Lt. Col., B. C. Wright; Majs.. E. L. j 1 Hdqrs Indianapolis. Col., C. G. 



. 

Silver, J. H. Oliver, C. A. Reith, C. A. Smith, Col., J. B. Curtis; Maj., H. H. Wo 
A. S. Helms; Adjt., H. B. Smith. I J. S. Dodge. 



n; Lt. 
s; Adjt., 



32 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



IOWA. 

Hon. Horace Boies, Governor and Commander-in- Chief. 



1 ST BRIGADE. Hdqrs Centerville. H. H. 
1 Wright, Brig. Gen.Comdg; Asst. Adjt. Gen., 
G. W. French. 
2D REGIMENT Hdqrs Davenport. Col., P.W. 

McManus; Lt. Col., Jas. A. Guest; Maj., J. T. 

Connor; Adjt., John Rix. 
3D REGIMENT Hdqrs Iowa City. Col., J. G. 

Gilchrist; Lt. Col., A. W.Swalm; 3faj.,H..W. 

Parker; Adjt., Thos. B. Wales. 
5TH REGIMENT Hdqrs Shenandoah. Col.,G. 

H. Castle; Lt. Col., W. M. Wilson; Jfaj., J. T. 

Fitzgerald; Adjt., E. H. Wright. 



2D BRIGADE. Hdqrs Marshalltown. B. A. 
Beeson, Brig. Gen. Comdg; Asst. Adj. Gen 
G. W. Weeks. 

1ST REGIMENT Hdqrs Cedar Rapids. Col.,W. 
L. Davis; Lt. Col.. W. W. Woods; Maj., A. 
L.Wright; Adjt., W.W. Douglass. 
4TH REGIMENT Hdqrs Waukon. Col., A. G. 
Stewart; Lt. Col., Darius Orr; Maj., F. D, 
Merritt; Adjt., E. B. Gibbs. 
GTH REGIMENT Hdqrs Hampton. Col.,'C. W. 
Boutin; Lt. Col., L. B. Raymond; Maj., J.M. 
Emery; Adjt., L. J. Moss. 



DAKOTA. 
Hon. John Miller, Governor and Commander-in*C hief. 



-1ST BRIGADE. Hdqrs Bismarck. , 

J. Brig. Gen. Comdg. 

1ST REGIMENT Hdqrs Bismarck. Col., W. A. 

Bentley; Lt. Col., E. S. Miller ; v Maj., A. L. 

Lott; Adjt., W. A. Dillion. 



2D REGIMENT Hdqrs Watertown. Col., M.W. 

Sheafe; Lt. Col., 3. M. Adams; Maj., Thos. 

H. Ruth; Adjt., E. M. Thomas. 
BATTERY A Hdqrs Lisbon. Capt.W. K.Smith. 
CAVALRY Hdqrs Dunseith. J/aj.,W.H.Makee. 



KANSAS. 



Hon. L. U. Humphrey, Governor and Commander-in-C hief. 

Thomas M.Carroll, Paola, Maj. Gen.; A.M. Fuller,Topeka; Murray Myers, Wichita; Adam Dixon, 
Bellville; S.L. Patrick, Ottawa, Brig. Gens. 



1ST REGIMENT Hdqrs Ottawa. Col., R. S. 
Burch; Lt. Col., Geo. E. Howard; Maj., H. S. 
Miller; Adjt.,G. H. Hodge. 

2D REGIMENT Hdqrs Wichita. Col., L. N- 
Woodcock; Lt. Col., J. H. Ricksecker; Maj.* 
J. T. Showalter; Adjt., J. A. Ask. 



3D REGIMENT Hdqrs Topeka. Col., 3. W. F. 

MICHIGAN. 



Hughes; Lt. Col., L. E. Finch; Maj., J. Me 
Pherson; Adjt., H. W. Frost. 

4TH REGIMENT Hdqrs Beloit. Col., W. Lar- 
zalere; Lt. Col.,C. E.Gifford; Maj., C. T.Hil- 
ton; Adjt., Geo. Mackenzie. 

ARTILLERY Section A, hdqrs Wichita; Capt., 
W. Metcalf. Section B, hdqrs Topeka; Lt., O. 
L. Mclntosh. 



Hon. Cyrus G. Luce, Governor and Commander-in- Chief. 



1ST BRIGADE. Hdqrs Flint; C. 8. Brown, 
Brig. Gen. Comdg; Asst. Adjt. Gen., J. L. Wil- 
letts. 

1ST REGIMENT Hdqrs Lansing. Col., E. W. 

Bowen; Lt. CoZ., J.E. Tyrrell; Maj., J. Gaebe- 

lin; Adjt., R. Darton. 
2D REGIMENT Hdqrs Kalamazoo. Col.,~E. M. 



Irish; Lt. Col.,W.T. McGurrin; Maj., C. H. 
Rose; Adjt., H. W. Bush. 

3D REGIMENT Hdqrs Bay City; Col..C. E. Haw- 
ley; Lt. Col., F. B. Lyon; Jfctf.,C.C.Yawkey; 
Adjt., J. A. McKay. 

4TH REGIMENT Hdqrs Detroit, Col., E. Rob- 
inson; Lt. Col., P. J. Shehan; Maj., G.W. 
Corns; Adjt.,G. E. Locke. 



MINNESOTA. 
Hon. William R. Merriam, Governor and Commander-in- Chief. 



1ST REGIMENT Hdqrs St. Paul. Col.,W. B. 

Bend; Lt. Col., C. M. Reeve; Maj., A. P. 

Pierce; Adjt., J. P. Knowles. 
2D REGIMENT Hdqrs St. Paul. Col., J. Bob- 

leter; Lt. Col., G.W. Mead; Maj.,G. S. Ives; 



Adjt., A.J.Eckstein. 



ley. 
NEBRASKA. 



3D REGIMENT Hdqrs St. Paul. Col., F. P. 

Wright; Lt.CoL.J.C. Donahower; Maj., A.H. 

Boxrud; Adjt.. J. C. Shandrew. 
ARTILLERY Hdqrs St. Paul. Capt., H. C. Huot. 
CAVALRY St. Paul Troop. Maj., J. B. Haw- 



Hon. JohnM. Thayer, Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 



1ST BRIGADE. Hdqrs Beatrice. L. W. Colby, 
Brig. Gen. Comdg; Asst. Adjt. Gen., Charles 

IST REGIMENT Hdqrs Beatrice. Col., O. H. 
Phillips; Lt. Col., J. P. Bratt; Maj., W. A. 



Lt. Col., W. H. McCann; Maj., Geo. Cross; 

Adjt.,1,. A. Stacey. 
ARTILLERY Battery A. Hdqrs Wymore. 

Capt., C. M. Murdock. 
CAVALRY Troop A. Hdqrs Milford. Capt., 

J. H. Culver. 



Wollcott; Adjt., G- M. Mellor. 
2o REGIMENT Hdqrs Clark's. Col., F. Sweet; 

WISCONSIN. 
W. D. Hoard, Governor and Commander-in- Chief. 



1ST REGIMENT Hdqrs Madison. Col., Wm. 

Helm; Lt. Col., A. F. Caldwell; Majs., S. P. 

Schadel. M. A. Newman; Adjt., C.T.Young. 
2D REGIMENT Hdqrs Oshkosh. Col., W. H. 

Patton; Lt.Col., A. A.Kelley; Majs., F.Becker, 

O. F. Weaver; Adjt.. J. H. Solliday. 
3D REGIMENT Hdqrs LaCrosse. Col., M. T. 

Moore; Lt. Col., B. F. Parker; Majs., T. J. 



George; J. D.Wormer; Adjt.. A. F. Metzger. 

4TH REGIMENT Hdqrs Milwaukee. Lt. Col.. 
OttoH. Falk; Maj., L. Auer; Adjt., H. M. 
Seaman. 

CAVALRY Light-Horse Squadron, Milwau- 
kee. Capt.. C. P. Huntington. 

ARTILLERY Hdqrs Milwaukee. Capt., 3. B. 
Oliver. 



THE NAVY. 



Cfje 



General Officers of the United States Navy on the Active and Retired Lists, with their Stations 
or Address and Yearly Pay. (Arranged according to rank.) 

ACTIVE LIST. 

ADMIRAL, $13,000. 

DAVID D. PORTER, Special Duty, Washington, D. C. 
REAR ADMIRALS, $6,000. 



Jas. E. Jouett. Pres. Board Inspection and Sur. 
Lewis A. Kimberly, comdg Pacific Station. 
Bancroft Gherardi, comdt North Atlantic Sta. 



Daniel L. Braine, comdt Navy Yd, New York. 
George E. Belknap, comdg Asiatic Station. 
David B. Harmony, chairman Light-House B'd. 



A. E. K. Benham, comdt Mare Island. 
John Irwin, waiting orders. 
James A. Greer, Pres. B'd on Organization. 
Aaron W.Weaver, Pres. Examining Board. 
William P. McCaun. comdt Navy Yard. Boston. 
James H. Gillis, comdg South Atlantic Station. 



COMMODORES, $5,000 



George Brown, comdt Navy Yard. Norfolk. 

J. G. Walker, comdg U. S. Squadron of Evo- 

lution. 

F. M. Ramsay, Chief Bureau of Navigation. 
Joseph S. Skerrett, comdt Navy Yard, Ports- 



Joseph Fyffe, waiting orders. 

Oscar F. Stanton, waiting orders. 

Henry Erben. waiting orders. 

Richard W. Meade, comdt Navy Yard, Wash- 

ington, D. C. 

Chas. C. Carpenter, comdg Rec'g-ship Wabash. 
William A. Kirkland, special duty. New York. 
Edward E. Potter, Governor Naval Home, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lester A. Beardslee, comdg Vermont 



Thomas O. Se fridge, member Board of In- 

ard. New York. 
Montgomery Sicard. Chief Bureau of Ordnance. 
Edmund O. Matthews, Navy Yard, Boston. 
Charles S. Norton. Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va. 
Robt. F. Bradford, special duty, Philadelphia. 
R. L. Phythian, Supt. Naval Observatory. 
Augustus P. Cooke.comdg Rec'g-ship Franklin. 
Rush R. Wallace, member Examining Board 
G. H. Perkins, leave of absence. 
Robert Boyd. Pres. Board Inspection Mer- 



mouth, N. H. 
CAPTAINS, $4,500. 

Frederick V. McNair, comdg Omaha 

Arthur R. Yates, comdg Pensacola. 

John A. Howell, comdg Atlanta. 

Allen V. Reed, comdg Richmond. 

George Dewey, Chief Bureau Equipment and 

Recruiting. 

Geo. B. White.Chief Bureau Yards and Docks. 
Henry L. Howison, Pres. Steel Board. 
Albert Kautz, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 
Alfred T. Mahan, special duty. 



chant Vessels. 

Francis M. Bunce, waiting orders. 
Byron Wilson, comdg Naval Station, New Lon- 

don, Conn. 



George C. Remey, comdg Charleston. 

Norman H. Farquhar, Light-House Board. 

Theodore F. Kane, Navy Yard, New York. 

H.B.Seely, comdt Navy Y'd, League Island, Pa. 

Gilbert C.Wiltse, comdg Rec'g-ship Minnesota. 

J. O'Kane, comdg Boston. 

J. C. Watson, special duty, San Francisco. 

H. B. Robeson, comdg Chicago. 

W. Whitehead, comdg Rec'g-ship St. Louis. 

W. S. Schley, comdg Baltimore. 

Silas Casey, leave of absence. 

William T. Sampson, Supt. Naval Academy. 



F. Rodgers, light-house inspector. 
John F. McGlensey. sick leave. 

Edgar C.Merriman. Navy Yard, New York. 

C.L.Huntington. comdg Navy Yard. Pensacola. 

Louis Kempff, Navy Yard. Mare Island. 

Francis J. Higginson, comdg Rec.-ship New 
H mijshire. 

George W. Sumner. comdg Galena. 

Benjamin F. Day, Navy Yard, Boston. 

Frederick R. Smith, waiting orders. 

James D. Graham, Navy Yard, New York. 

William R. Bridgman, member Board Inspec- 
tion and Survey. 

Alex. H. McCormick, Navy Yard, New York. 

Albert S. Barker, waiting orders. 

Charles S. Cotton, light-house inspector. 

John R. Bartlett, leave of absence. 

Oliver A. Batcheller, Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va. 

Silas W. Terry, member Examining Board. 

Merrill Miller. Naval Home. Philadelphia. 

John J. Read, light-house inspector. 

Edwin T. Woodward, sick. 

Henry L. Johnson, under suspension. 

George W. Wood. Navy Yard, Norfolk. 

M. L. Johnson, comdg MoRocacy. 

E. M. Shepard, waiting orders. 

Charles McGregor, waiting orders. 

Robley D. Evans, leave of absence. 

G. W. Coffin, Light-House Bo trd. 
Henry Glass. Naval Academy. 
Philip H. Cooper, waiting orders. 
Henry C. Taylor, leave of absence. 
Allan D. Brown, waiting orders. 
George H. Wadleigh, comdg Michigan. 



B. J. Cromwell, Navy Yard. League Island, Pa. 
J. W. Philip, comdg Rec'g-ship Independence. 
Henry F. Picking, Hydrographer Navy De- 

partment. 
COMMANDERS, $3 500. 



A. S. Crowninshield, comdg Nau. School-ship 

St. Mary's. 

Frank Wildes, light-house inspector. 
Augustus G. Kellogg, waiting orders. 
James H. Sands, leave of absence. 
Yates Stirling, comdg Rec'g-ship Dale, 
William C. Wise, Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Puruell F. Harrington, suspended. 
William Bainbridge Hoff, waiting orders. 
William S. Dana, waiting orders. 
Nicoll Ludlow, lighthouse inspector. 
Francis A. Cook, waiting orders. 
Colby M. Chester, special duty. 
Charles E. Clark, light-house inspector. 
Charles J. Ban-lay, ord. officer, Navy Yard, 

Portsmouth, N. H. 
Joseph B. Coghlan, comdg Mohican. 
Charles V. Gridley, light-house inspector 
Charles D. Sigsbee, Naval Academy. 
Richard P. Leary, waiting orders. 
William H. Whiting, leave of absence. 
D. W. Mullan. leave of absence. 
N. Mayo Dyer, comdg Marion. 
Francis M. Green, comdg Nautical School-ship 

Saratoga. 

Charles O'Neil. comdg Dolphin. 
Caspar F. Goodrich, leave of absence. 
Bowman H. McCalla, comdg Enterprise. 
French E. Chadwick, comdg Yorktown. 
Theodore F. Jewell, coradg Torpedo Station. 
William M. Folger.Inspector of Ordnance.Navy 

Yard, Washington. 
Horace Elmer, comdg Kearsa ge. 
Benj. P. Lamberton, comdg Jamestown. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



COMMANDERS. CONTINUED. 
John Schonler, comdg Portsmouth. 
Francis W. Dickins, waiting orders. 
George F. F. Wilde, light-house inspector. 
Charles H. Davis,Chief Otfl. Intelligence Office. 
Charles J. Train, light-house inspector. 



E. White, Equipment Officer, Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth. N. H. 

Oscar F. Heyerman, light-house inspector. 
George W. Pigman, waiting orders. 
T.E.Nelson,Eq.Offi.,Navy Y'd, Mare Island,Cal. 

F. McCurley. comdg iron-dads. City Point, Ya. 
John McGowan, Jr., comdg Swatara. 

James G. Green, comdg Alert. 



Geo. E.Wingate, comdg Monongaliela. 

Joshua Bishop, comdg Iroquois. 

John K.Winn, charge Naval Station, Key West. 

Charles H.Rockwell, comdg Yantle. 

James M. Forsyth, comdsr Tallanoosa. 

Geo. A. Converse, special duty, Bristol, R. I. 

Royal B. Bradford, Bureau Equipment and 

Recruiting. 

George R. Durand, light-house Inspector. 
Francis M. Barber, leave of absence. 
Timothy A. Lyons, member Board Inspection 

Merchant Yessels. 
John S. Newell, Navy Yard, Boston. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS, $3,000. 



Joseph E. Craig, cmdg Palos. 

Charles M. Thomas, Hydrographic Inspector, 

Coast Survey. 

A. S.Snow, mem. Board Inspection and Survey. 
George C. Reiter, comdg Ranger. 
Roswell D. Hitchcock, light-house inspector. 
Willard H. Brownson, comdg Petrel. 
Henry E. Nichols, Coast Survey office. 
William W. Mead, light-house inspector. 
Edwin S. Houston, Minnesota. 
George M. Book, suspended. 
Edwin Longnecker, Rec'g-ship yeic Hampshire. 
George E. Ide, leave. 
Holman Vail, light-house inspector. 
Thomas Perry, special, Navy Department. 
Charles H. Stockton, comdg Tiietis. 
Louis Kings'ey, Richmond. 
Geo. B. Livingston, Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
John J. Brice, Fish Commission. 
Oscar W. Farenholt, comdg Pinta. 
William B. Newman, Navy Yard, New York. 
Andrew J. Iverson, comdg Fortune. 
Joseph Marthon, waiting orders. 
Edward T. Strong, Nau. School-ship Saratoga. 
Robert E. Impey, Tallapoosa. 
Z. L. Tanner, comdg Fish Com. Str Albatross. 
Samuel Belden, Rec'g-ship Franklin. 
E. W. Watson, Swatara. 
John F. Merry, Rec'g-ship Wabash. 
William W. Rhoades, light-House inspector. 
John C.Morong, Rec'g-ship Independence. 
William H. Webb, Rec'g-ship St. Louis. 
William C. Gibson, Store-ship Monongahela. 
W.A.Morgan.charge Nitre Depot. Malden,Mass. 
Washburn Maynard, Bureau of Ordnance. 
Henry W Lyon, comdg Xipsic. 
James H. Dayton, under orders to N. Ord. 

Prov'g Gr'nd. 
Asa Walker ; Naval Academy. 



M. R. S. Mackenzie. Chicago. 

Charles S. Sperry, Naval Academy. 

Frank Courtis, steel inspector, Pittsburg, Pa. 

William W. Reisinger, Omaha. 

John C. Rich, waiting orders. 

Wm. T. Burwell, Navy Yard, Norfolk. 

John J. Hunker, Adams. 

Franklin Hanford, Pennacola. 

Frederick W. Crocker, Mohican. 

Robert M. Berry, light-house inspector. 

Samuel W. Very, Naval Academy. 

George A. Bicknell. Navy Yard, New York. 

Henry N. Manney, Naval Home, Philadelphia 

Chapman C. Todd. Charleston. 

George A. Norris, Omaha. 

William H. Parker, Iroquois. 

Joseph N. Hemphill, Jamestmrn. 

Abraham B. H. Lillie, Navy Yard, New York. 

William T. Swinburne, Naval Academy. 

William H. Emory, U. S. Legation, London. 

Charles T. Hutchms, Marion. 

Seth M. Ackley, Coast-Survev Office. 

William W.Gillpatrick, Naval Academy. 

Benjamin S. Richards, Monocacy. 

Benjamin F. Tilley, special. 

Harry Knox, Boston. 

Clifford H. West, on return. 

John P. Merrell, Naval Academy. 

Joseph G. Eaton, Inspector of Ordnance, South 

Boston Iron Works. 
William I. Moore, Torpedo Station. 
Charles Belknap Kearsarge. 
F. P. Gilmore, inspector of steel new cruisers. 
Eugene H. C Leutze, Naval Academy. 
Uriel Sebree, Baltimore. 
Albert R. Couden, Atlanta. 
Edwin C. Pendleton, ord. duty, Navy Yard, 

Washington. 
W. Swift, ord. duty. Navy Yard, Washington. 



Medical Corps. 

MEDICAL DIRECTORS, $4.400. 
(With relative rank of Captain.) 



J. M.Browne. Chief Bu. Medicine and Surgery. 

Thomas J. Turner, leave of absence. 

John Y. Taylor, member Medical Examining 

Board. 

William T. Hord. member Board of Examiners. 
Albert L. Gihon, Naval Hospital. New York. 
Richard C. Dean, Naval Hospital. Chelsea, Mass. 
Albert C.Gorgas.Naval Hospital, Philadelphia. 



D. Bloodgood, Naval Laboratory, New York. 

D. Kindleberger, mem. Med Examining Board. 
Chris. J. Cleborne, Naval Hospital. Norfolk. 

M. Bradley, special duty, Philadelphia. 
Philip S. Wales, under suspension 
A. Hudson, Naval Hospital. Mare Island, Cal. 
Newton L Bates, waiting orders. 

E. S. Bogert, Navy Yard, New York. 



MEDICAL INSPECTORS, $4.400. 
(With relative rank of Commander.) 



Walter K. Scofleld. waiting orders. 
Grove S. Beardsley, leave of absence. 
Henry M.AVells, in charge Museum of Hygiene. 
John H. Clark, mem. Examining Board, N. Y. 
A. A. Hoehling, Naval Hospital, Washington, 

D C. 
Benj. H. Kidder, Naval Academy. 



W. K. Van Reypen, asst. Bureau of Medicine. 

Thomas C. "Walton. Chicago. 

T Woolverton, Navy Yard, Washington. 

Charles H. White. Pensacola. 

Geo. W. Woods, Navy Yard, Mare Island, Cal. 

F. L. DuBois, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N, H. 

George H. Cooke, Navy Yard, League Island. 



Thomas H, Looker, special fluty. 
Charles W. Abbot, Navy Yard. Boston. 
James D. Murray, special duty. 



Pay Corps. 

PAY DIRECTORS. $4.400. 
(With relative rank of Captain.) 

I James Fulton, Chief Bureau Provisions and 
Clothing. 
Caspar Schenck, waiting orders. 



THE NAVY. 



35 



PAY DIRECTORS. -CONTINUED. 

Charles H. Eldredge. Navy Yard, Norfolk. I H. M. Denniston. Naval Home, Philadelphia. 

G. E. Thornton. Pay Office. Washington. | R. Washington. Pay Office, Norfolk. 

Wm. W. Williams. "Navy Y'd. Mare Island, Cal. Rufus Parks. Navy" Yard, Boston. 
Edward May, Pay Office, Boston, Mass. Frank C. Cosby, leave of absence. 

PAY INSPECTORS, $4,400. 
(With relative rank of Commander.) 

Edwin Stewart. Pay Office, New York. I Luther G. Billings, Pensacola. 

Ambrose J. Clark, settling accounts. 
George Cochran. Pay Office, Philadelphia, 
.losepb A. Smith, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 



John H. Stevenson, Naval Academy. 
Thomas T. Caswell, Naval Academy. 
James Hoy, Richmond. 



Arthur J. Prltchard. Pay Office. 

Albert S. Kenny, Bureau of Provisions and 

Clothing. 

James E. Tolfree, Navy Yard, New York. 
G. A. Lyon. Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 
Edward Bellows, Swatara. 



Montgomery Fletcher, leave of absence. 
Chas. H. Loring, Navy Yard, New York. 
Alexander Henderson, Navy Yard, Boston. 
Edward D. Robie, Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va. 
George R. Johnson, inspector machinery new 

cruisers, Baltimore. 
Wm. B. Brooks, special, Richmond. Va. 
John W. Moore, Navy Yard, Mare Island. 
Thorn Williamson. Supt. State, War, and Navy 

Department Building. 
Charles H. Baker, leave of absence. 



G. F. Kutz, Union Iron Works, San Francisco. 
Andrew J. Kiersted, specia , Philadelphia. 
William W. Dungan. Navy Yard. New York. 
Jackson McElmell, Pres. Board Examiners, 

Philadelphia. 

James W. Thomson. Pensacola. 
B. B. H. Wharton, Cramp & Sons. Philadelphia. 
Philip Inch, Vulcan Iron Works, Chicago 
William G. Buehler,mem. B'd Insp. and Survey. 
H. B. Nones, Richmond. 

Charles E. De Valin. Navy Yard. Washington. 
Samuel L. P.Ayres, Exam. B'd, Philadelphia. 
Elijah Laws, waiting orders. 
Edward Farmer, Chicago. 
Henry W r . Fitch, Naval Academy. 
Louis J. Allen, Navy 1 ard, League Island. 
David Smith, waiting orders. 
Fletcher A. WMlson. inspector machinery new 

cruisers, San Francisco, Cal. 
Albert S. Greene, waiting orders. 



Engineer Corps,. 
CHIEF ENGINEERS, $4,400. 

George W. Magee, Navy Yard, New York. 
Frederick G. McKean, Bu Steam Engineering. 
George H. White, Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Isaac R. McNary, iron-clads, Richmond. 
Alfred Adamson, Rec'g-ship Wabash. 
George J. Burnap, Navy Yard, Mare Island. 
G. W. Melville, Chief Bu. Steam Engineering. 
James Butterworth, Marion. 
Daniel P. McCartney, Galena. 
Cipriano Andrade, Y rktown. 
G. M. L. Maccarty, Omaha. 



Henry D. McEwan, Boston. 

Albert W. Morley, Quintard Iron Works. 

Robert B. Hine, inspector machinery new 
cruisers. New York. 

John P. Kelly, Navy Yard. Portsmouth, N. H. 

John Lowe, waiting orders. 

Lewis W. Robinson, member Board Examin- 
ers, Philadelphia. 

Benjamin F.Wood,Continental I.W.,New York. 

Wm. H. Harris, Atlanta. 

John A. Scot. 

John L. D. Borthwick, Swatara. 

Charles J. MacConnell, Mohican. 

George W. Stivers, Navy Yard, New York. 

W W. Heaton. 

B. C. Gowing, Alert. 

Absalom Kirby, Adams. 

George' E. Tower, Kearsarge. 

G. Entwistle, Enterprise. 

N. P. Towne, Bureau Steam Engineering. 



Robert Potts, inspector machinery new cruis- Hugh H. Cline, Rec'g-ship f-ranklin. 

R. Aston, inspector of machinery of the Ben- 



nington, New York. 
_>avid Jones, Rec'g-shio New Hampshire. 
James H. Chasman, special duty. New York. 



ers, Philadelphia 

Joseph Trilley. Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H 
Ezra J. Whitaker, Rec'g-ship Vermont. 
Peter A. Rearick, Iroquois. 
Augustus H.Abie, inspector machinery new ! E. A. Magee, Navy Yard, New York. 

cruisers. Philadelphia. I. F. Bingham, waiting orders. 

William S. Smith, inspector machinery new W . A. Windsor. Dolphin. 

cruisers, San Francisco. : G. W. Roche, special, Navy Yard, New York. 

Marine Corps. 

COLONEL COMMANDANT. $3,500. 
CHARLES G. MCCAWLEY, Headquarters, Washington, D. C. 

GENERAL STAFF. 

Augustus S. Nicholson. Major.Adjutant, and In- 1 Woodhull S. Schenck, Captain and Assistant 
spector. Headquarters Washington, D. C. Quartermaster. Assistant Quartermaster's 

Green Clay Goodloe Major and Paymaster. ! office San Francisco, Cal. 
Headquarters Washington, D. C. I Richard S. Collum, Captain and Assistant 

Ass stanr Quartermaster's 



Horatio B. Lowry, Major and Quartermaster. 
Headquarters Washington, D. C. 



Quartermaster. 

office, Philadelphia, Pa. 



COLONEL, $3,500. 
Clement D. Hebb, Marine Barracks League Island, Pa. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONELS. $3.000. 

Charles Heywood. Marine Bks, Washington, George P. Houston. Marine Bks, Boston. 
D.C. 

MAJORS, .f_'. 5 Ml. 

J. Forney. Marine Bks.Navy Yard. Mare Id.Cal. I James Forney, Navy Yard. Mare Island. 
McLane Tilton, Marine Bks, Navy Yard, Nor- I R. W. Huntington, Navy Yard, New York, 
folk, Va. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 



RETIRED LIST. 

VICE-ADMIRAL, $9,000. 
S. C. ROWAN, Chairman Light-House Board, Washington, D. C. 

REAR-ADMIRALS, $4,500. 



Thomas O. Selfridge, Washington, D. C. 
William Kadford. Washington, D. C. 
Samuel Phillips Lee, Silver Springs, Sligo, Md. 
Oliver S. Glisson, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Melancton Smith, South Oyster Bay, N. Y. 
Joseph F. Green, Brookline. Mass. 
Thornton A. Jenkins. Washington, D. C. 
Charles Steedman. Washington, D. C. 
Alfred Taylor, New York. 
Augustus L. Case, Washington, D. C. 
John J. Aliuy. Washington, D. C. 
Roger N. Stembel, Washington. D. C. 
C. R. P. Rodgers, Washington, D. C. 
John C. Howell, Washington. D. C. 
George B. Balch, Baltimore, Md, 
Thomas H. Stevens. Washington. D. C. 
George H. Cooper, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Samuel P. Carter, Washington,D. C. 
Aaron K. Hughes, Washington. D. C. 
Edmond R. Colhoun, Washington, D. C. 
Rohert W. Shufeldt, Washington. 



Alexander C. Rhind, New York. 
Thomas Pattison, New York. 
Thomas S. Phelps, Washington, D. C. 
S. P. Quackenbush, Washington, D. C. 
Earl English, Culpepper, Va, 
Francis A. Roe, Washington. D. C. 
Samuel R. Franklin. Washington. D. C, 
Walter W. Queen, Washington, D. C. 
John L. Worden, Washington, D. C. 
Henry Walke, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Daniel Ammen, Beltsville, Md. 
John M. B. Clitz, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Andrew Bryson, Washington. D. C. 
D. McN. Fairfax, Hagerstown, Md. 
John C. Febiger, Washington, D. C. 
Peirce Crosby, Washington, D. C. 
Wm. G. Temple, Washington, D. C. 
John H. Upshur, Washington, D. C. 
Edward Y. McCauley, Philadelphia, Pa. 
John H. Russell. Washington, D, C. 
S. P. Luce, Newport, R. I. 



COMMODORES, $3,750. 



Joseph B. Hull. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lewis C. Sartori, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Wm. Ronckendorf, New York. 
Albert G. Clary, leave of absence. 
Wm. E. Hopkins, Fresno City, Cal. 
Oscar C. Badger, Washington, D. C. 



I Wm. D. Whiting, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

I Somerville Nicholson, Washington. D. C. 

William K. Mayo, Washington, D. C. 
I Samuel Lockwood, Roxbur'y, Mass. 

Henry Bruce, Boston, Mass. 



CAPTAINS, $3,375. 



Richard L. Law, Washington, D. C. 
Milton Haxtun, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
S. Livingston Breese, Chambersburg, Pa. 
George, A. Stevens, Boston, Mass. 
Francis S. Haggerty, New York City. 



Thomas G. Corbin. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mathias C. Marin. Boston. Mass. 
Edward C. Bowers, Watertown, Conn. 
Francis Lowry, Burlington, Vt. 
Charles Thomas, Baltimore, Md. 



W. M. Gamble, M9rristown. N. J. 
Thos. L. Swann, sick leave. 
H. DeH. Manley, Media, Pa. 
George M. Bache, Washington, D. C. 
Smith W. Nichols. Dorchester. Mass. 
Edward Hooker, Brooklyn, N. Y, 



COMMANDERS, $2,625. 

Greenleaf Cilley, leave. 
Edward E. Stone, Washington, D. C. 
Bayse N.Wescott, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Francis G. Dallas, Philadelphia, Pa. 
C. A. Schatky. Haddonfleld. N. J. 
Geo. T. Davis, Beverly, Mas?. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS, $2,250. 



Antoine R. McNair, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 
Charles E. McKay, New York. 
Henry C. Tallman, New York. 
Francis O. Davenport, Detroit, Mich. 
Frederick I. Naile, Norristown, Pa. 
Gouverueur K. Haswell, Short Hills, N. J. 
Edward M. Stedman, Colorado Springs, Col. 
Charles H Black. Baltimore, Md. 
Socrates Hubbard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Leonard Chenery, New York. 
E. L. Amory, Boston. Mass. 
E. B. Thomas, Asheville, N. C. 



Isaac Hazlitt. Morristown, O. 
Frederick A. Miller, Morristown. N. J. 
Wm. P. Randall, New Bedford. Mass. 
Charles H. Craven, Washington. D. C. 
Charles E. Hawley. leave, Europe. 
Francis H. Sheppard, St. And7-ews, Fla. 
George F. Morrison. Washington. D. C. 
John Weidinan, Washington, D. C. 
Charles W. Tracy, Portsmouth, N. H. 
David C. Woodrow, Cincinnati. O. 
Wesley W. Bassett, Washington, D. C. 



MEDICAL DIRECTORS, $3,300. 



Gustav R. B. Horner, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Wm. S. W. Ruschenberger, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Thomas L. Smith. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
David Harlan. Churchville, Md. 
J. Dickinson Miller, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Charles D. Maxwcll.Washington. D. C. 
William Grier, Washington, D. C. 
Samuel Jackson, Boston, Mass. 
John S. Messersmith. Lancaster, Pa. 
Thomas M. Potter. Kingston, R. I. 
Marius Duvall, Baltimore, Md. 



Robert T. Maccoun, Baltimore. Md. 
Philip Lansdale, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Phineas J. Horwitz, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Charles Martin, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
F. M. Grinnell. Washington. 
Samuel F. Coues, Cambridge, Mass. 
Edward Shippen, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Jacob S. Dungan, San Francisco, Cal. 
George Peck, Elizabeth, N. J. 
Henry O. Mayo, New York. 



MEDICAL INSPECTORS, $3,300. 



Thomas Walter Leach. New Market. N. H. 
William E. Taylor, Vallejo, Cal. 
John C. Spear, Norristown, Pa. 
Henry C. Nelson, Westminster, Md. 



Somerset Robinson. Paso Robles, Cal. 
Archibald C. Rhoades. New York. 
A. S.Oberly, Washington, D. C. 



THE NAVY. 



PAY DIRECTORS, $3,300. 

Horatio Bridtre. Washington, D. C. i J. S. Cunningham, Washington, D. C. 

Horace M. Heiskell. Germantown. Pa. Alexander W, Russell, Philadelphia, Pa. 

George F. Cutter. Washington, D. C. I Augustus H. Gilman, Portland, Me. 

James H.Watmough, Washington, D. C. I C. P. Wallach, New York. 

J. George Harris, Nashville, Tenn.^ IN8pE( J T oR S . $ ^. 

James N. Carpenter, Washington. D. C. I Charles F. Guild, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Francis H. Swan, Charlestown, Mass. 

CHIEF ENGINEERS, $3,300. 

Benj. F. Isherwood. New York City. I D. B. Macomb, Boston, Mass. 

L. D. Hibbert, Wallingford, Pa. 
Elbridge Lawton, Boston, Mass. 
Edmund S. DeLuce, N. Brighton (S. I.), N. Y. 
Wm. H. Rutherford, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Henry Mason, New York. 
John Johnson, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Edward B. Latch, Overbrook, Pa. 
George W Sensner, Falmouth, Va. 
Nathan B. Clark, Washington, D. C. 
Marine Corps. 
COLONEL, $2,625. 

MATHEW R. KINTZING, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
LIEUTENANT-COLONELS. 

John L. Broome, Brooklyn, N. Y. I Geo. W. Collier, . 

MAJORS, $1,875. 
William B. Slack, Washington.^. C. I David M. Cohen, New York City. 



William H. Shock. Wasliingt on, D. 
Theodore Zeller, New York City. 
Geo. Sewell, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Jas. W. King. Philadelphia. Pa. 
Benj. F. Garvin, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Henry H. Stewart, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Edwin Fithian, leave of absence. 
Wm. S. Stamm, Philadelphia, Pa. 
F. C. Dade. Philadelphia, Pa. 



Isaac T. Doughty, New York City. 

LIST OF NAVAL STATIONS 
North Atlantic Station. 

Rear Admiral, Bancroft Gherardi. 
C hief of Staff, Comdr. G. W. Sumner. 
Flag Lieut., Lieut. A. G. Paul. 
Secretary, Lt. C. H. Arnold. 

GALENA (3d rate), Flag-Shlp.-C'omdr., G.W. 
Sumner; Lieuts.,W.,l. Barnette.A.B.Speyers, 
Alex. Sharp,Jr.; Ensigns.W.J. MaxwelLT. C. 
Fenton, J.W.Oman; Surg., J. G.Ayers; Pass. 
Asst. Paym., I. R Martin; Chief Eng., D. P. 
McCarteney. 

KEARSARGE (3d rate). -Comdr., Horace El- 
mer; Lt.-Comdr., Charles Belknap; Lieuts., 
C. W. Rusche berger. W. S. Hughes, W. C. 
Cowles, J. H. Oliver; Ensigns, Geo.R. French, 
Geo. F. Cooper, W. S. Cloke; Surg., A. M. 
Moore: Pass. Asst. Paym., E. B. Rogers; 
Chief Eny., Geo. E. Tower. 

YANTIC (3d rate). C'omdr.,C.H. Rockwell; 
Lieuts., E. H. Gheen, C. S. Ricbman, M. A. 
Shufeldt, E. E. Wright; Ensign, W. C. P. 
Muir; Pas*. Asst. Surg., Rufus H. McCarty; 
Pass. Asst. Paytn., Leeds C. Kerr; Pat*. Asst. 
Eng., Jefferson Brown. 

DOLPHIN (3d rate). Comdr., Chas. "Neill; 
Lieuts., Andrew Dunlap, J.D. Adams, Albert 
Gleaves, W. S. Benson; Ensigns, J. B. Blish, 
W.W.Buchanan: Pass. Asst. Surg., Frank 
Anderson; Asst. Paym., Jas. H. Chapman; 
Chief Eng., Wm. A. Windsor. 

European Station. 
(Squadron of Evolution.) 
Rear Admiral, John G. Walker. 
Chief of Staff , Capt. H. B. Robeson. 
Flag Lieut., Lieut. S. A. Staunton. 
Secretary, Lieut. B. H. Buckingham. 

CHICAGO (1st rate), Flag-Ship. Capt., H. B. 
Robeson; Lt.-Comdr., M. R. S. Mackenzie; 
Lieuts., R. P Uodgers, Kare Rohrer, J. A. H. 
Nickels, John Hubbard, W. H. Schuetze, A. 
M. Knight; Ensigns, A. P. Niblack, Geo. R. 
Evans, Geo. F. Hawk, E. T. Whiterspoon; 
Med. Insp., T. C. Walton; Paym., E. N. 
Whitehouse; Chief Eng., Edward Farmer. 

BOSTON (2d rate). t ant., .lames O'Kane; Lt.- 
CV>?wd?-.,HarryKnox:/^>^s..Wainwrieht Kel- 
logg, Hamilton Hutchins, W. R. Rush, Ed- 
ward Lloyd; Ensigns, F. J. Uaeseler, M. K. 
Eyere, W. A. Edgar; Surg., Wm. S. Dixon; 
l\H/i,i., H. T. B. Harris:' thief Eny., H. D. 
McEwan. 



VESSELS, AND OFFICERS. 

ATLANTA. (2d rate). Capt., John A. Howell; 
Lt.-Comdr.,A. R. Conden;Ztew*s.,N.E. Niles, 
Geo.A.Calhoun,Geo. H. Peters, H. S. Knapp; 
Ensigns, A. L. Key. John M. Poyer; Stira.,M. 
C. Drennan; Paym., Edwin Putnam; Chief 
Eng., W. H. Harris. 

YORKTOWN (3d rate).-Comdr., F. E. Chad- 
wick; Lieuts. ,'H. G. O. Colby, Chas. A. Brad- 
bury, J. C. Colwell, A. G. Winterhalter, W. 
F. Pullam; Ensigns, Robert Stocker, F. M. 
Russell; Surg., J. C. Boyd; Pass.Asst.Paym., 
C. W. Littlefield; Chief 'Eng., C. Andrade. 

Pacific Station. 
Rear Admiral, L. A. Kimberly. 

Chief of Staff, . 

Flag Lieut., Lieut. H. O. Rittenhouse. 
Secretary, Lieut. G. A. Merriam. 

MOHICAN (3d rate),Flag-Ship. Rear Admiral, 
L.A. Kimberly: Comdr., J.B. Coghlan; Lieut.- 
Comdr., F.W. Crocker; Lieuts..Geo.W. Tyler, 
Rogers H. Gait, R. Mitchell, W. G. Hammon; 
Ensigns, D. P.Menefee.Joseph Beale: Surg., 
G.P.Bradley; Paym., Stephen Rand; Chief 
Eng.. C. J. MacConnell. 

IROQUOIS (3d rate). Comdr., Joseph Bishop; 
Lieut.- Comdr., W. JH. Parker; Lieuts., Sum- 
ner C. Paine, Chas. A. Clarke, J. C. Burnett, 
H, W. Harrison; Ensign, Guy W. Brown; 
Sura., L. G. Heneberger; Paym., Henry C. 
Machette; Chief Eng., Peter A. Rearick. 

ALERT (3d rate). Comdr., Jas. G. Green; 
Lieuts., R. E. Carmody. F. E. Greene, C. B. 
Moore; Ensigns, J. J. Knapp, I. K. Seymour, 
H. H. Whittles?y, W. W. Gilmer; Pass. A*st. 
Surg., E. H. Green; Asst. Paym., S. L. Heap; 
Chief Eng., B. C. Gowing. 

MONONGAHELA (3d rate). -Comdr., Geo. E. 
Wingate; Lieut. -Comdr., Wm. C. Gibson; 
Lieuts., T. Dix Bolles, W. D. Rose: Ensigns, 
Allen G. Rogers, Wm. P. Wright: Pass. Just, 
Surg., M. H. Crawford; Pass. Asst. Paym., 
Artnur Paterson. 

NIPSIC (3d rate). Lieut. -Comdr., H. W. Lyon; 
Lieuts., John M. Hawley, R. G. Davenport, J. 
A. Shearman; Ensigns, J. L. Purcell, J. J. 
Blandin, H. K. Jones, Jr.; Surg., E. Z. Dorr; 
Pass. Asst. Paym.. John Corwine; Pass. Asst. 
Eng., Harry Webster. 

PIXTA (4th rate ). Lieut. -Comdr.. O. W. Karon- 
holt; Lieuts., A. C. Hodgson, J.T. Smith: En- 
Nir/ns, C.W.Jungen. R. E. Coontz; Asst. Sura., 
W. F. Arnold; .l.-sV. Pat/in., E. B. Webster; 
Asst. Eng., T. W. Kinkaid. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



ADAMS (3d rate). Comdr., E. T. Woodward; 
Lieut.- Comdr. ,.l. J. Hunker; Lieut*., W. H. 
Beechler.Herbert Winslow. Hanson R.Tyler; 
Ensign*, J. H. Gibbons.W. H. Fletcher; Pass. 
Asst. Surg., A. H. Marsteller; Pass. Asst. 
Paym..John C. Sullivan; Chief Eng., Absa- 
lom Kirby. 

South Atlantic Station. 
Rear Admiral, J. H. Gillis. 
Chief of Staff, Capt, A. V. Reed. 
Flag Lieut., Lieut. F. E. Sawyer. 
Secretary. Lieut. W. M. Irwin. 

RICHMOND (2d rate). Flag-Ship. Hear Ad- 
miralj. H. Gillis; CjD*..Allen V. Recd;Lieut.- 
C nidr., Louis Kingslev; Lieuts., Wm. H. 
Everette, John H. C. Coffin, Freeman H. 
Crosby, John O. Nicolson. John M. Robinson; 
Med. Insp., Thomas N. Fenrose; Pay Insp., 
James Hoy; Chief Eng., H. B. Nores. 

TALLAPOOSA (3d' rate).-Cowidr., F.W. Dick- 
ins; Lieut. -Comdr., R. E. Impey; Lieuts., J. 
K. Cogswell, C. P. Rees, A. W Dodd, N. J. L. 
T. Halpine; Pass. Asst. Surg., Clement Bid- 
die; Asst. Paym., W. B. Wilcox; Pass. Asst. 
Eng., G. H. Kearny. 

Asiatic Station. 

Rear Admiral, George E. Belknap. 
Chief of Staff. Capt. Frederick V. Mr.Nair. 
Flag Lieut., Lieut.-Comar. George A. Norris. 
Flag Secretarj/.Lieut.-Comdr.Clifford H.West. 
Aide, Naval Cadet C. F. Hughes. 

OMAHA (2d rate), Flag-Ship. Capt., Frederick 
V. McNair; Lieut. -Comdr., W. W.Reisinger; 
Lieuts., J. M. Miller, J. B. Murdock, C. A. Fos- 
ter, J. M. Bowyer; Ensigns. Simon Cook,A. C. 
Dieffenbach; Surg.,G. R. Brush; Paym., C. A. 
McDaniel; Chief Eng., G. M. L. Maccarty. 

MONOCACY (3d rate). Comdr., M. L. John- 
son; Lieut. -Comdr., B. 8. Richards; Lieut.. J. 
H. Bull; Ensigns, S. S. Wood, W. B. Wbittel- 
ser, B. E. Thurston, H. F. Bryan, G. W. 
Logan; Pass. Asst. Surg., E. Norfleet; Pass. 
Asst. Paym., O. C. Tiffany; Pass. Asst. Eng., 
W. A. Mintzer. 

MARION (3d rate). Comdr.,N. M. Byer; Lieut.- 
Comdr.,CharlesT. Hutchins; Lieuts.,Cb&s. F. 
Emmerich, Downs L. Wilson, James C. Gill- 
more, William S. Hogg; Ensign, William G. 
Miller; Surg., Paul Fitzsimoris; Paym. H. T. 
Stancliff; < hief Eng., James Butterworth. 

SWATARA (3d rate). Comdr., John Mc- 
Gowan; Lieut. -Comdr., E.W. Watson; Lieuts., 
C.P. Perkins, A. Reynolds.W. R. A.Rooney, 
W. M. Constant; Ensigns, V. O. Chase, H. E. 
Rumscy; Surg., H. M. Martin; Paym., E. 
Bellows; Chief Eng., J. L. D. Borthwick. 

PALOS (4th rate ). Lieut'.- Comdr.. J. E. Craig: 
Lieuts., T. S. Phelps, Jr.. Henry Minett; En- 
sign, Gleunie Tarbox; Pass. Asst. Surg., J. 
W. Baker; Asst. Paym., J. S. Phillips; Pass. 
Asst. Eng., H. Hervvig. 

IT. S. Naval Hospital, Yokohama. 

In Charge, Surg. Charles U. Gravatt. 

Pass. Asst. Surg., A. C. H. Russell. 

Pass. Asst. Paym., Mitchell C. McDonald. 
Training Squadron. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE (2d rate), Receiving-Ship 
at Newport. Comdr., Francis J. Higginson: 
Lieut. -Comdr., E. Longnecker; Lieuts., N. H. 



Baines, E. S. Prime; Ensign*, Harry George, 
W. J. Sears; Surg., C. A. Siegfried; Pnym.. 
Lawrence G. Boggs; Pass. Asst. Eng., Robert 
Crawford. 

MINNESOTA (1st rate), Receiving-Ship at New 
York.-CVfp*. G. C. Wiltse; Lieut. -Comdr.. N. 
T. Houston; Lieut*., J. E. Raller, Albert 
Mertz; Ensigns, W. R. M. Field, C. P. Eaton; 
Furg.. J. K. Waggem-r; Pniim., J. R. Stan- 
ton; Pass. Asst. Lng., A. B. Bates. 

JAMESTOWN (3d rate). Comdr.. B. P. Lam- 
berton;Zf0vf.-CbfiMfr.^?N. Hemphill Lieuts., 
Adolph Marix. O. E. Lasher, John B. Miller, 



H. T. Mayo; Ensigns, T. W. Ryan. A. Rust; 
Asst. Surg., R. W. DuBose; Asst. Paym., 
Geo. W. Simpson. 

PORTSMOUTH (3d rate). Comdr., John 
Shouler; Lieuts., Richard i ush, D. I). V. 
Stuart, F. H. Tyler, H. M. Hod es: Ensif/n, 
R. M. Hughes, C. N. Atwater, R. L. Russell. 
H. K. Hines, A. T. Long: Surg.. John L. Neil- 
son: Pass. Asst. Paym., Livingston Hunt. 

SARATOGA. Nautical School-Ship, Philadel- 
phia. Comdr.,F.^l.Green; Lieut.- f'om<tr.,E.T. 
Strong; Lieut., B. O.Scott; Pass. Asst. Surg., 
W. H. Rush. 



ST. MARY'S. Nautical School Ship. New York. 
Comdr., A, S. Crowninshielci; Lieuts., C. C. 
Cornwell, F. S. Carter; Puss. Asst. Surg., H. 
W. Whitaker, 

Special Duty. 

PENSACOLA (2d rate,. Capt., A. R. Yates; 

Lieut.- Comdr., Franklin Hanford; Lieuts. .L. 

C. Heilner, F.W. Nichols. Martin E. Hall; 

Ensigns, A. N. Mayer, J. H. Rohi bacher. J. 

A. Dougherty, N. A. McCully, A. H. Scales, 

A. H. Davis, G. H. Burrage; Med. Insp., Chas. 

H. White; Pay Insp., L. G. Billings; Chief 

Eng., James W. Thomson. 
DISPATCH (4th rate). Lieuts., W. S. Cowles, 

York Noel; Ensign, Houston Eldredge; Pass. 

Asst. Surg., D. M. Guiteras; Pass. Asst. Eng., 

J. S. Ogden. 

Fish Commission Service. 

ALBATROSS. Lieut.-Comdr.. Z. L. Tanner; 

Ensi'ms, Marbury Johnston.H. E.Parmenter, 

E. W. Eberle, C. M. McConnick; Pass. Asst. 

Surg., J. E. Gardner; Asst. Paym., C. S.Will- 

iams; Pass. Asst. Eng-., C. R. Roelker. 
RANGER (3d r&te).Lieut.-Cmdr., Geo. C. 
Keiter:Lieuis..U.R. Harris.C.W. Bartlett, O. 

W.Lowey,W. F. Halsey, C. F. Pond; Ensigns, 

Geo. H. Stafford, W. A. Gill, L. J. Clark, C. 

N. Knepper, Benj. Wright. W. S. Burke, C. 

Churchill; Surg., H. P. Harvev; Pass. Asst. 

Paym., H.E. Dewey; Pass. Asst. Eng., R. W. 

Milligan. 
MICHIGAN (4th rate). Comdr., G. H. Wad- 

leigh; Lieut., F. M. Symonds; Ensigns, J. H. 

Hetherington, F. L. Chapin, John H.Shipley; 

Pass. Asst. Surg., Jonn M. Edgar; Asst. 
/ra., J. S. Carpenter; Pass. Asst. Eng., 
3ert I. Reid. 

En Route Home. 

ENTERPRISE (3d rate). Comdr., B. H. Mc- 
Calla; Lieuts., R. R. Ingersoll, H. F. Fick- 
bohm. H. Osterhaus, S. C. Lemly. R. T. Mul- 
ligan, P. J. Werlich; Pass. Asst. Surg., C. G. 
Hernoon; Asst. Paym., J. A. Mudd; chief 
Eng., J. Emwistle. 

Navy Yards and Stations. 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., Com. J. S. 
Skerrett comdt.; no receiving-ship attached 
Navy Yard, Boston, Mass., Com. W.P.McCann 
comdt.; receiving-ship Wabash, Capt. C.C.Car- 
penter comdg. Torpedo Station, Newport. R.I., 
Com. Comdr.T. F.Jewell in charge. Naval Sta- 
tion, New London, Capt. Byron Wilson comdg. 
Navy Yard, New York, Rear Admiral D. 
L. Braine comdt.; receivin 



. 

Vermont, 

Capt. L. A. Beardslee comdg. Jsavy Yard, 
League Island. Pa., Cavt. H. B. Seely comdt.; 
receiving-ship St. Louis, Cr/prWm.Whitehead 
comdg. Navy Yard, Washington, < apt. R. W. 
Meade comdt. ; receiving-sliipDale. Com. Yates 
Stirling comdg. Navy Yard, Norfolk, Com. 
George Brown: receiving-ship Franklin, Capt. 
A.P.Cooke, comdg. Naval Station, Port Royal, 
Lieut. Chas. H.Lyman comdt. Naval Station, 
Key West. Com. J. K.Winn comdt. Navy Yard. 
Pensacola, Com. C. L. Huntington comdt. 
Navy Yard. Mare Island. Cal., Com, A. E K. 
Benham comdt.; receiving-ship Independ- 
ence, Capt. J. W. Philip comdg. 



FIFTY-FIRST CONGRESS. 



I!! I 



JFiftg'jFtrst Congress. 

Began March 4, 1889. Ends March 4, 1*01. 

SENATE. 

LEVI P. MORTON, Vice-Presldent, Presiding. 
Rfpublicans, 47; Democrats, 37. 



ALABAMA. 
John T. Morgan .......... Selma 

James L. Pugh ........... Eufaula 

ARKANSAS. 
James H. Berry ......... Bentonville 

James K. Jones. . . *. ..... Washington 

CALIFORNIA. 
George Hearst ........... San Francisco. 

Leland Stanford ........ San Francisco. . 

COLORADO. 
E.O.Wolcott .............. Denver ........... 1895 

Henry M. Teller .......... Central City ...... 1891 

CONNECTICUT. 



1S91 



1895 
1891 



1893 
1891 



Joseph R. Hawley ........ Hartford 

Orville H. Platt .......... Meriden 

DELAWARE. 
Anthony Higgins ........ Wilmington 

George Gray .............. Wilmington 

FLORIDA. 
Samuel Pasco ............ Jacksonville 

Wilkinson Call ............ Jacksonville 

GEORGIA. 
Alf red H. Colquitt ....... Atlanta 

Joseph E. Brown ......... Atlanta 

ILLINOIS. 
Shelby M. Cullom ........ Springfield 

Charles B. Farwell ...... Chicago 



1893 
1891 



1895 
1893 



1893 
1891 



1895 
1891 



1895 
1891 



INDIANA. 

Daniel S. Turpie Indianapolis lo 

Daniel W. Voorhees Terre Haute 1891 

IOWA. 

James F. Wilson Fairfield 1895 

William B.Allison Dubuque 1891 

KANSAS. 

Preston B. Plumb Emporia 1895 

Ji,hn J. Ingalls Atchisou 1891 

KENTUCKY. 

James B. Beck Lexington 1895 

Joseph C. S. Blackburn.. Versailles 1891 

LOUISIANA. 

Randall L. Gibson New Orleans 1895 

James B. Eustis New 'Orleans 1891 

MAINE. 

William P. Frye Lewlston 1895 

Eugene Hale Ellsworth 1893 

MARYLAND. 

Arthur P. Gorman... Laurel 

Ephraim K. Wilson Snow Hill 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

George. F. ffoar Worcester 

Henr>/ L. Davces Plttstield 

MICHIGAN. 

James McMillan Detroit 

F. B. Stockbridge Kalamazoo 

MINNESOTA. 

William D. Wuxhburn.. Minneapolis 

Cushtaan K. Davis St. Paul 

MISSISSIPPI. 

E. C.Walthall Grenada 

James Z. George Jackson 

MISSOURI. 

Francis M. Cockrell Warrensburg K.':; 

George G. Vest Kansas City IS'.l 



1893 

ISl'l 



1*95 
LS'.t:; 



is-.*:; 



MONTANA. 

A R< publican 1895 

A Republican 

NEBRASKA. 

Charles f, 3f undersoil.... Omaha 1895 

A. S. Paddock Beatrice 1893 

NEVADA. 

W. M. Stewart Virginia City 

John P. Jones Gold Hill 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

W lliam E. Chandler Concord . . . 

Henry W.Blair Plymouth 

NEW JERSEY. 

John R. McPherson Tersey City... 

Rufus Blodgett Long Branch 

NEW YORK. 

Frank Hiscock Syracuse 

William M. Evarts New York. . . . 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Matt W. Ransom Weldon 

Zebulon B. Vance Charlotte 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

Lyman R. Casey Jamestown... 

Gilbert A. Pierce Bismarck 

OHIO. 

John Sherman Mansfield 

Henry B.Payne Cleveland 

OREGON. 

J seph Dnlph Portland 

John H. Mitchell Portland 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

'Matthew S. Quay Beaver 

James Donald Cameron Harrisburg .. 
RHODE ISLAND. 



ism 

1891 



1SH5 

IS'.tl 



1R95 



1893 
1891 



1891 



1893 
1891 



1893 



1893 
1891 



Nathan F. Dixon Westerley 

Nelson W. Aldrich Providence . 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 

M. C. Butler Edgefield 

Wade Hampton Columbia 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

F. T. Pettigrew Sioux Falls.... 

Gideon C. Moody Dead wood 

TENNESSEE. 

IshamG. Harris Memphis 

William B. Bate Columbia 

TEXAS. 

Richard Coke Waco 

J. H.Reagan Palestine 

VERMONT. 

George F. Edmunds Burlington 

Justin S. Morrill Strafford 

VIRGINIA. 

John S. Barbour Alexandria ... 

John W. Daniel Lynchburg 

WASHINGTON. 

J. B. Allen. Walla Walla. . 

W. C. Squirt Seattle 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

JohnE. Kenna Kanawha 

C. J. Faulkner Martiusburg... 

WISCONSIN. 

Philetus Sawyer Oshkosh 

John C. Spooner Hudson 



1895 



1895 
1891 



1895 
1891 



1895 
1893 



1895 



1895 

is;.:; 



1893 

1891 



1895 

is.):; 



1893 
1891 



40 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


1 R H Clark 


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 
THOMAS B. REED, of Maine, Speaker. 
Republicans, 169. Democrats, 164. 
ALABAMA. 

Mobile S -Tnmpa TC PnhtV* 




2. Hilary A. Herbert*.... 
3. William C. Gates* 
4 Lewis W. Turpin 


..Montgomery. 
..Abbeville. 
. .Newbern. 


6. John H Bankhead* 


. .FayetteC. H. 


7 William H Forney* 




8. .Tnsp.nh Whpplpr* 


Wheeler 


1. W H. Cate 


ARKANSAS. 

..Joresboro. 4. John TT "Rnp-prs* 


Fort Smith 


2. C. R. Breckinridge* 
3. Thomas C. McRea* 


..Pine Bluff. 
. .Prescott. 


5. Samuel W. Peel* 


. .Bentonville 


)RNIA. 
4. William W. Morrow*... 
5. Thomas J. Clunie 
6. William Vandever* 
RADO. 
Silver Cliff. 
^TICUT. 
3. Charles A.Russell* 


..San Francisco. 
..San Francisco. 
.SauBuenaventura 

Killingly 


1. J. J. DeHaven 
2. Marion Biggs* 
3. Joseph McKenna* 


CALIF( 

. .Eureka. 
..Gridley. 
..Suisun. 


1. W. E. Simynds 
2 W L Wilcox 


COLO 

Hosea Townsend.. 

CONNE( 
..Hartford. 
Hartford 


4. FredMiles 
VARE. 
on* Dover. 


..Chapinville. 
Ocala 


1. Robert H. M. Davidson 
1 Rufus E Lester 


DELAT 
John B. Penningt 
FLO! 
'.Quincy. 
GEOI 
Savannah 


1IDA. 
2. R. W. Bullock 


IGIA. 
6. James H Blount* 




2. Henry G. Turner* 
3. Charles F. Crisp* 
4. Thomas W. Grimes*.... 
5 John D Stewart* 


..Quitman. 
..Americus. 
..Columbus. 
Griffin 


7. Judson C. Clements* 
8. Henry H. Carlton* 


..Lafayette. 
Athens. 


9. Allen D. Candler* 
10. George T. Barnes* 
?OIS. 
11. William H. Gest* 
12. Scott Wike 


..Gainesville. 
..Augusta. 

..Rock Island. 
.Pittsfield. 
..Springfield. 
..Bloomington. 
..Danville. 
..Newton. 
..Hillsboro. 


1. Abner Taylor 
2. Frank Lawler* 


ILLII 
..Chicago. 
. .Chicago. 


3. William E. Mason* 
4 George E Adams* 


..Chicago. 
Chicago 


13. William M. Springer*... 
14. Jonathan H. Rowell*... 
15. Joseph G. Cannon* 
16. George W. Fithian 
17. Edward Lane* 


5 A J. Hopkins* 


. . Aurora. 


6. Robert R. ffitt* 
7. Thomas J. Henderson*. 
8. C.A.Hill 


..Mount Morris. 
..Princeton. 
..Joliet. 


18. W. S. Forman 


..Nashville. 


9. Lewis E. Pay son* 
10 Philip S Post* 


..Pontiac. 
Galesburg 


19. James H. Williams 
20 G. W Smith 


..Carmi. 
..Murphysboro. 

Crawfordsville 


1 W F Parrott 


INDIANA. 
Evansville 8. R V Rronksliirp 


2 John H O'Neall*.. 


. .Washington. 


9. Joseph B. Cheadle* 
10. William D. Owen* 
11. A. N. Martin 


.Frankfort. 
. .Logansport. 
..Bh.ffton. 


3. Jason B. Brown 
4. William S. Holman* 
5. George W. Cooper 
6. Thomas M. Browne*... 
7. William D. Bynum*.... 

1. JohnH. Gear* 


..Seymour. 
..Aurora. 
..Columbus. 
..Winchester. 
. .Indianapolis. 
IOT 
. .Burlington. 


12. C. A. 0. McClellan 
13. Benjamin F. Shively*. . 

VA. 

7. Edwin H. Conqer* 
8 James P Flick 


..Auburn. 
..South Bend. 

..Des Moines. 
Bedford 


2. Walter I. Hayes* 
3. David B. Henderson*. . . 
4. J. H. Sweeney 
5. Daniel Kerr* 
6. John F. Lacey 


..Clinton. 
. .Dubuque. 
..Osage. 
. .Grundy Center. 
..Oskaloosa. 


9. Joseph R. Reed 
10. J. P. Dolliver 
11. Isaac S. Struble* 

SAS. 
5. John A . Anderson* 
6. E. J. Turner* 
7 Samuel R Peters* 


..Council Bluffs. 
.Fort Dodge. 
..LeMars. 

. .Manhattan. 
.Hoxie. 


1. Edmund N. Morrill*... 
2. Edward H. Funston*... 
3. Bishop W. Perkins*.... 
4. Harrrison Kelley 

1. W. J. Stone* 

2. w. T. Ellis :..:. 


KAN 

..Hiawatha. 
..Tola. 
. .Oswego. 
..Ottawa. 
KENT 
. .Eddyville. 
..Owensborough. 
..Franklin. 
. .Elizabethtown. 
..Louisville. 
. .Covington. 


CJCKY. 
7. W. P. C. Breckinridge* 
8. James B. MeCreary* 
9. Thomas H. Paynter 
10 John H Wilson 


.Lexington. 
..Richmond. 
..Greenup. 
Barboursville 


3. J. H. Goodnight 
4. A. B. Montgomery* 
5. AsherG. Caruth* 
6. John G. Carlisle* 


11. H. F. Finley* 

TANA. 
4. Newton C. Blanchard*.. 
5. C. J. Boatner 
6. S. M. Robertson 


.Williamsburg. 

..Shreveport. 
..Monroe. 
. .Baton Rouge. 


1. Theodore S.Wilkinson* 
2. H. Dudley Coleman 
3. Andrew Price 

. Thomas B. Reed* 
12. Nelson Ding ley, Jr.*.... 

1. Charles H.Gibson* 
2 Herman Stump . 


LOUIS 
..New Orleans. 
..New Orleans. 
..Thibodaux. 
MA 
.Portland. 
. .Lewiston. 
MARY 
..Easton. 
Belalren 


INE. 
3. Seth L. MiniKen* 
4. Charles A. Boutelle*. . . . 
LAND. 
4 H Stockbridge Jr 


..Belfast. 
..Bangor. 


5. Barnes Compton* 
6. Louis E. McC'omas* 


.Laurel. 
.Hagerstown. 


3. Harry Wells Rusk* 


..Baltimore. 





FIFTY-FIRST CONGRESS. 


41 


1. Charles S. Randall 
2. E.A.Morse 


MASSACI 
..New Bedford. 
..Canton. 
...Boston. 
Boston. 


IUSETTS. 
7. William Cogswell*.... 
8. r. T. Greenhalye 
9 John W Chandler 


...Salem. 
...Lowell. 
Brookline 


3. John F . Andrew 
4 Joseph H O'Neil 


W J H Walker 


Worcester 


5. N.P. Stinks 
6. Henry Cabot Lodge*... 

1. J. Logan Chipman* 
1 2. Edward P. Allen* 


..Waltham. 
..Nahant. 
MICH 
. .Detroit. 
..Ypsilanti. 


11. Rodney Wallace.. .... 
12. Francis W. Rockwell* 
IGAN. 
1 7. Justin R. Whiting*... 
8. Aaron T. Bliss 
9. Byron M. Cutcheon*. 
10 Frank W Wheeler 


...Fitrtiburg. 
...Pittstield. 

.. Saint Clair. 
...East Saginaw. 
...Manistee. 
West Bay City 




Jackson 


4 Julius C Burrows*.... 


. . Kalamazoo. 


5. Churl's E. Belknap 
i 6. Mark S. Brewer* 

1 1. Mark H. Dunnell 
2. John Lind* 
3 D S. Hall 


..Grand Rapids. 
..Pontiac. 
MINN] 
..Owatonna. 
..NewUlm. 
...Stewart. 


11. Sam M. Stephenson. . . 

iSOTA. 
4 S P Snider 


. .Menominee. 
Minneapolis 


5. S.G.Comstock 
5SIPPI. 


...Moorhead. 


1 John M Allen* 


MISSIS 
Tupelo 


2. James B. Morgan* 
3. Thomas C. Catchings*.. 
4. ClarkLewis 


..Hernando. 
..Vicksburg. 
..Cliftoiivfile. 


6. Thomas R. Stockd lie* 
7. Charles B. Hooker*... 

OURI. 
8. F. G. Siedringhaus... 
9. Nathan Frank 


. . .Summit. 
...Jackson. 

...St. Louis. 
...St. Louis. 
St Louis 


1. William H. Hatch* 
2. Charles H. Mansur* 
' 3. Alexander M. Dockery* 
i 4. R. P. C.Wilson 
5. John C. Tarnsey 
6 John T. Heard* 


MISS 
..Hannibal. 
..Chillicothe. 
..Gallatin. 
..PlatteCity. 
..Kansas City. 
..Sedalia. ' 


10 W M Kinsey 


11. Richard P Bland* 




12. William J. Stone* 
13. William H. Wade*.... 

U JnmP< P Wnlkff* 


...Nevada. 
... Springfield. 
Dexter 


7 Rich H Norton 


Troy 


1 W J Connell* 


MONTANA. 
T. H. Carter TTelpna. 


...Fremont. 

...Nashua. 

. ..Paterson. 
. . .Xewark. 


NEBR 
.Omaha. 


ASKA. 
3. George W. E. Dorsey*. 

ADA. 
Carson City. 
UPSHIRE. 
2. Owen C. Moore 
ERSEY. 
5. ( ' . D. 'Beckwith 
6. Herman Lehlbach* 


2 ff L Laws 


..McCook. 


1 . Alotizo Jfute 


NEV 
Horace F. Bartint 

NEW HA1 

.Fannington. 


1 C A Bergen 


NEW J 
. .Camden. 


2. James Buchanan* 
3. J. A. Geissenhainer... 
i 4 Sam Fowler 


..Trenton. 
.Freehold. 
Newton 


7. William McAdoo* 


...Jersey City. 


FORK. 
18. J. A. Ouackenbush 
19 Charles Tracy 


...Schaghticoke. 
\lbariy 


1 James W. Covert 


NEW 
..Flushing, L. I. 






i 3 WC Wallace 


Brooklyn 


20 John Sanford 




4 John M Clancy 


..Brooklyn. 
..Brooklyn. 
...New York. 
..New York. 


21 John H Moffitt* 




; 5. Thomas F. Mngner 
: 6. Charles H. Turner 
1 7 E H. Dunphv 


22 Fred Lansing 


Watertown 


23. James S. Sherman* 
24. David Wilber* 


...Utica. 
. . .Oneonta 


8. John H. McCarthy 


..New York. 
New York. 


25. James J. Belden* 


.. .Syracuse. 


26 \filton Delano* 




10. Francis B. Spinola* 
11 John Quinn 


..New York. 
..Hew York. 


27 S E.Payne 




23. Thomas S. Flood* 
29. John Raines 


...Elmira. 
...Canandaigua. 


12 Koswell P. Flower 


..New York. 


13 -l^hbel P Fitch* 


\ew York 


30 Charles S Baker* 


14. William G. Stahlnecker" 
ir>. 3f. n. St;rers 
1 1*;. John H. Ketcham* 
;17. Charles M. Knapp 

1. T. G. Skinner 
2. H. P. Cheatham 
3. C. W. McClammy* 
' 4 B H Bunn 


..Yonkers. 
..Middletown. 
..Dover Plains. 
.Deposit. 
NORTH C 
..Manley. 
..Henderson. 
..Scott's Hill. 
. .Rocky Mount. 


31. John G. Saioyer* 
32 John V Farquhar* 


...Albion. 
Buffalo 


33. JohnM.Wildey 
34. William G. Laidlaw*.. 
AROLIXA. 
(>. A.Rowland* 


. ..Cobden. 
...Ellicottsville. 

. ..Lumbarton. 
...Salisbury. 
. ..Wilkesboroujrh. 


7. JohnS. Henderson* ... 
8. William H. H. Cowles* 
9 H G Ewart 


j 5 John M Brower* 


. .Mount Airy. 


)AKOTA. 
Devil's Lake. 


. .Hillsborougb. 


L 

1. Benjamin Buttericorth* 
2. John A . Caldwell 
3 E S William** 


NORTH I 

. C. Hansborough . . 


OH 

..Cincinnati. 
..Cincinnati. 
Troy. 


10. 
12. Jacob J. Pugsley* 


13. Joseph H. Outluvait*-." 
14. Charles P. Wickluiin*. 
15. Charles H. Grosrenor* 
IS. James W.Owens 
17. Joseph J>. Taylor* 
!<. \Villiarn McKinley, Jr. 
19. EzraB. Taylor* 
20. HartinL. Sm^ser 
21. Theo. E. Burton 


...Columbus. 
...Norwalk. 
...Athens. 
...Newark. 
...Cambridge. 
*.. Canton. 
...Warren. 
..Wooster. 
. .Cleveland. 


4 S S Yoder* . .. 


. .Lima. 
..Tiffin. 
..Brvan. 
Hamilton. 
.Bellefontaine. 
Mount Vernon. 


5. George E. Seney* 
6. 37. M. Boothman* 
7. Henry L. Morey 


8. Robert P. Kennedy* 
2 William C Cooper* 


W F Havnes 


..Fremont. 
. .Portsmouth. 


11. Albert C. Thorn. 







4'J 



CHICAGO DAIIY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



1. Henry H. Binaham* Philadelphia. 

2. Charles O'Neill* Philadelphia. 

3. Samuel J. Randall* Philadelphia. 

4. William D. Kelley* Philadelphia. 

5. Alfred C. Harmer* Philadelphia. 

6. Smedley Darlinyton* West Chester. 

7. Robert M. Yardley* Doylestown. 

8. William Mutchler Easton. 

( .t. 1). M. Brunner Reading. 

10. M. Brosius Lancaster. 

11. J. A. Scranton Scranton. 

12. Edwin S. Osborne* Wilkesbarre. 

13. J. B. Reilly Pottsville. 

14. John W. Rife Middletown. 



OREGON. 

Binger Herman* Roseberg. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 



15. Myron B. Wright Susquehanna. 

Iti. Henry C. McCormick* AVilliamsport. 

17. Charles R. Buckalew Bloomsburg. 

18. Louis E. Atkinson* Mifflintown. 

lit. Levi Maish* York. 

20. Edward Scull Somerset. 

21. S. A. < raig Brooksville. 

22. John Dalzell* Pictsburg. 

23. Thomas M. Bayne* Bellevue. 

24. J. W. Hay Waynesburg. 

25. C. C. Townsend New Brighton. 

2ti. W. C. < ulbertson Girard. 

.Warren. 
.Cleartiekl. 



27. Lett-is F. Watson... 

James A. Kerr 

RHODE ISLAND. 

1. Henry J. Spooner* Providence. | 2. Warren 0. Arnold* Gloucester. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

.Orangeburg. | 5. John J. Hemphill* Chester. 

.Edgeneld. >. George W. Dargan* Darlington. 

.Abbeville. 7. William Elliott* Beaufort. 

4. W T llliam H. Perry* Greenville. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

O. S. Gifford Canton. [John A. Pickler Faulkton. 

TENNESSEE. 



1. Samuel Dibble* 

2. George D. Tillman" 

3. James S. Cothran" 



1. A. A. Taylor Johnson City. 

2. Leonidas C. Houk* Knoxville. 

3. H. f. Evans Chattanooga. 

4. Benton McMillan* Carthage. 

5. JamesD. Richardson.* ...Murfreesboro. 



6. Joseph E. Washington*. .Cedar Hill. 

7. W. C. Whitthorne* Columbia. 

8. Benjamin A. Enloe* Jackson. 

9. Rice A. Pierce Union City. 

10. James Phelan* Memphis. 

TEXAS. 

7. William H. Grain* Cuero. 

L. W. Moore*. .' La Grange. 



1. Charles Stewart* .......... Houston. 

2. W. H. Martin .............. Athens. 

3. C. B. Kilgore .............. Will's Point 

4. David B. Culbersou* ...... Jefferson. 

5. Silas Hare* ................ Sherman. 

6. Joseph Abbott* ........... Hillsboro. 

VERMONT. 
1. John W. Stewart* ......... Middlebury. | 2. William W. Grout*. 

VIRGINIA. 



9. Roger Q. Mills* Corsicana. 

10. Joseph D. Sayres* Bastrop. 

11. Samuel W. T. Lanham*..Weatherford. 



1. T.H.B. Brown* ........... Accomac C. H. 

2. George E. Bowden* ....... Norfolk. 

3. George D. Wise* .......... Richmond. 

4. E. C. Venable ............. Petersburg. 

5. Posey G. Lester ........... Floyd C. H. 



PaulC. Edmonds 

7. Charles T. O'Ferrall* 

8. W. H. F. Lee* ............. Burke's Station, 



H. J. A. Bud 

10. H. St. G. '. 



hanan 
Tucker. 
WASHINGTON. 

JohnL. Wilson Spokane Falls. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

1. JohnO.Pendleton Wheeling. I 3. John D. Alderson... 

2. William L. Wilson* Charlestowu. I 4. James M. Jackson. 

WISCONSIN. 



.Barton. 

.HalifaxC. H. 
.Harrisonburg. 



...WashingtonC.H 
...Lexington. 



1. Lucien B. Caswell* Fort Atkinson. 

2. Charles Barwig. Mayville. 

3. Robert M. La Follette*.., Madison. 

4. J. W. VanS haick Milwaukee. 



5. George H. Brickner Sheboygau Falls. 

TERRITORIES. 



Charles B. Clark* 

7. Ormsby . Thomas*.. 

8. Nils P. Haugen* 

9. Mir on H. McCord 



... Nicholas C. H. 
. ..Parkersburg. 

. ..Neenah. 
...Prairie du Chien. 
...River Falls. 
...Merrill. 



UTAH John T. Calne,* Salt Lake City. 
WYOMING Joseph M. Carey* Cheyenne. 



ARIZONA Marcus A. Smith,* Tombstone. 

IDAHO Fred T. Dubois* Blackfoot, 

NEW MEXICO Anth'y Joseph.* Ojo Caliente. 

Members of the Lth Congress re-elected to the List indicated by *. 

SENATORS (Alphabetically Arranged). 

Aldrich, N. W Rhode JsfandiCockrell, F. M Missouri Gibson, Randall L. . . .Louisiana 

Allen, J. B Washington Coke. Richard Te&is Gorman, Arthur P. ..Maryland 

Allison. William B Iowa Colquitt, Alfred H Georgia Gray, George Delaware 

Barbour, J. S Virginia Cullom. Shelby M Illinois Hale, Eugene Maine 

Bate, W. B Tennessee Daniel, John W Virginia Hampton, W South Carolina 

eck. James B Kentucky Davis C. K Minnesota Harris, Isham G Tennessee 

Berry, James H Arkansas Dawes, Henry ~L.Massachu setts Hawley, Jos. R Connecticut 

Blackburn. J. C. S....Kentucky\Dixon, N. F Rhode Island Hearst, Geo California 

Blair. H. W New Hampshire \)o\y\\. Joseph Oregon Higgins, Anthony Delaivnie 

Blodgett.Rufus New Jersey Edmunds. George F... FemMmtlHlseoek, Frank New York 

Brown, Joseph E Georgia Eustis, James B Louisiana] Hoar, George F. .Mussachusett 

Butler, M. C South Carolina Evarts, William M Xew York Ingalls. John J Kansas 

Call, Wilkinson RorfatatFarwell, Chas. B. Illinois Jones, James K Arkansas 

Cameron, J. D Pennxylrania Faulkner, C. J West Virginia Jones. John P Nevada 

Casoy. L. H North Dakota Frye. William P Maine Kenna, John E.. West Vi'ff nia 

Chandler.W. E..A"< to Hampshire George, James Z lftMi*ippf|Maiui0nou Chas. F.. .Nebraska 



FIFTY-FIRST CONGRESS. 43 


McMillan, James Michigan 
McPherson.John it.. New Jersey 
Mitchell. John H Oregon 
Moody, G. C S-tuth Dakota 
Morgan, John T Alabama 
Morrill, Justin S Vermont 
Paddock. A. S Nebraska 
Pasco, Samuel Florida 
Payne Henry B .... Ohio 


SENATORS. --Continued. 
Plumb, Preston B Knis^'s 
Pugh, James L Alabama 
Quay, M. S Pennsylvania 
Ransom, Matt W...V. Ci olin 
Reagan, J. II Texas 


Stockbridge, F. B. . . . Michigan 
Teller, Henry M Colorado 
Turpie, D. S Indiana 
Vance, Z. B North Carolina 


Vest, George G Missouri 


Sawyer, Philetus Wisconsin 


Voorhees, D. W Indiana 
Walthall, E. C Mississippi 
Washburn, W. J) Minnesota 
Wilson. E. K Maryland 
Wilson. James F '.Iowa 
Wolcott E O Colorado 


Spooner John C Wisconsin 


Squire, W. C }\'".-ilii //!.>-,/ 
Stanford, Leland California 
Stewart W M Vevada 


Pettigrew, F. T. . South Dakota 
Pierce, G. A Korth Dakota 
Platt, Orville H.... Connecticut 

Abbott, Joseph Texas 
Adams G E Illinois 


REPRESENTATIVES. 

Clark, Charles B. . . . Wisconsin 
Clark, R. H Alabama 
Clements, J. C Georgia 


Hatch, W. II Missouri 


Haugen, Nils Wisconsin 


Alderson.J. D... West Virginia 
Allen, Edward P Michigan 
Allen J M Mississippi 


Haves, Walter I Iowa 


Cobb, James E Alabama 
Cogswell, Wm ..Massai-hnsetts 
Coleman, H. D Louisiana 


Haynes, W. E Ohio 
Heard J T Missouri 


Anderson. C. L Mississippi 
Anderson, J. A Kansas 


Hemphill, J.J. . .South Carolina 
Henderson, D B Iowa 


Andrew, J F.. .Massachusetts 
Arnold W. O Rhode Island 
Atkinson, L. E. . . . Pennsylvania 
Baker, C. S New York 
Bankbead, John H... Alabama 
Danks N. P Massachusetts 
Barnes, G. T Georgia 
Bartine H F . ...Nevada 


Compton B Maryland 


Henderson, J. S N. Carolina 
Henderson, T. J niin ois 
Herbert, H. A Alabama 
Herman, Binger Oregon 
Hi 11, C. A.. Illinois 


Comstock S G Minnesota 


Conger, E. H Iowa 
Connell, W. J Nebraska 
Cooper, G. W Indiana 


Cooper W C Ohio 


nut R R nun 


Cothran, James S. .S. CaroUint 
Covert J W New York 


Holman, W. S 'Indiana 


Hooker. Charles K.. Mississippi 
Hopkins, A. J Illinois 


Barwig, C Wisconsin 


Cowles, W. II. H....3 r . Carolina 
Craig, S. A Pennsylvania 
Grain, W. H Texas 


Bayne, T. M Pennsylvania 
Beckwith, C. D New Jersey 
Belden, James J New York 
Belknap C E Michigan 


Houk, L. C Tennessee 
Jackson, J. M. ... \\~est Virginia 
Joseph, Anthony.. .New Mexico 


Crisp C F Georgia 


Culberson D B . Texas 


Bergen C A \eio Jersey 


Cu\bertson,W.C. .Pennsylvania 
Cummings, A. J NewYoj k 
Cutcheon, B. M Michigan 
Dalzell, John Pennsylvania 
Dargan, G. W S. Carolina 
Darlington, S Pennsylvania 
Davidson, R. H.M Florida 
DeHaven, J. J California 
Delano, Milton New York 
Dibble, S S Carolina 


Kelley, W. D Pennsylvania 
Kennedy, Robert P Ohio 


Biggs, Marion California 
BIngham, H. U... Pennsylvania 
Blanchard, N. C Louisiana 
Bland, R. P Missouri 
Bliss, A. T Michigan 


Kerr, Daniel Iowa 


Kerr, J. A Pennsylvania 
Ketcham, J. H New York 
Kilgore, C. B lexas 
Kinsey, W. M Missouri 
Knapp,C. M New York 
Lacey, J. F Iowa 


Blount J H Georgia 


Boatne'r, C. J Louisiana 
Boothman, M . M Ohio 


Boutelle, C. A Maine 
Bowden, George E Virginia 
Breckinridge, C. R Artansas 
Breckinridge,W C.P.Kentucky 
Brewer, Mark S Michigan 
Brickner, G. H \Visconsin 
Brookshire, E. V Indiana 
Brosius, M Pennsylvania 


LaFollette. R. M. ... Wisconsin 
Laidlaw, William G..New York 
Lane, Edward Illinois 


Dinglev, N., Jr Maine 
Docker y , A . M Missouri 
Dolliver, J. P Iowa 


Lanham, S. W T Texas 


Dorsey, G. W. E Nebraska 
Dubois, Fred S Idaho 
Dunphy, E H \ew York 


Lansing, F New York 
Lawler, F Illinois 


Laws, G. L 2febrank i 
Lee, W. H. F Virginia 
Lehlbach, H New Jersey 
Lester, P. G Virginia 


Dunnell, M. H Minnesota 
Edmunds, P. C Virginia 
Elliott, William.... S. Carolina 
Ellis, W. T Kentucky 
Enloe, Benj. J Tennessee 


Brower, John M -V. Carolina 
Brown, T. H. B Virginia 
Brown, Jason Indiana 
Browne, T. M Indiana 


Lester, R. E Georgia 


Lewis, Clark Mississippi 


Brunner, D. M.... Pennsylvania 
Buchanan J \ew Jersey 


Evans, H. C Tennessee 
Ewart, H. G North Carolina 
Farquhar, John M. ... New York 
Finley, H. F Kentucky 
Fitch. Ashbel P .Sew York 


Lind, John Minnesota 
Lodge, Henry G.Massachusetts 
Magner, T F New York 


Buchanan, J A Virginia 


Buckalew, C. R.. .Pennsylvania 
Bullock, R. W Florida 
Bunn, B. H .V. Carolina 
Burrows, J. C Michigan 


Maish, Levi Pennsylvania 
Mansur, Charles H . . .Missouri 
Martin, A. N Indiana 
Martin, Wm. H Texas 
Mason, William E Illinois 
McAdoo W New Jersey 


Fithian. George Illinois 
Flick, J. P Iowa 
Flood, Thomas S New York 
Flower R P \ew York 


Burton, T . E Ohio 


Butterworth B Ohio 


Bynum, W D Indiana 


Forman. W S Illinois 


McCarthy, J H New York 


Caine, J. T Utah 


Forney, W. H Alabama 
Fowler, S New Jersey 


McClamray, C. W.. N.Carolina 
McClellan, O. A Indiana 
McComas, L. E Maryland 
McCord, M . H Wisconsin 


Caldwell, J. A Ohio 
Campbell, F.I New York 
Candler, A. D Georgia 
Cannon, J G Illinois 


Frank. N Missouri 
Funston, E. H Kansas 
Gear, John H Iowa 


McCormick, H. C.Pennsylvania 
McCreary, J. B Kentucky 


Carey, J. M Wyoming 
Carlisle, J. G Kentucky 
Carlton, Henry H Georgia 
Carter, T . H M<m tana 
*Caruth, Asher G Kentucky 
Caswell, L B Wisconsin 


Geissenhainer.J. A. . New -Jersey 
Gest, William H Illinois 
Gibson, C. H Maryland 
Giffor.1. O. S South Dakota 
Goodnight. J. H Kentucky 
Greenhagle. F.T . Massach usetts 
Grimes, Thomas M Georgia 
Grosvenor, C. H Ohio 


McKinlev. W., Jr Ohio 


McMillan.B Tennessee 
McRea. Thomas C. . . .Arkansas 
Miles Fred Connecticut 


Catchings, T. C Mississippi 
Cate, W. H Arkansas 
Chandler, J. W. . Massachusetts 
Cheadle, Joseph B Indiana 
Cheatham, H. P .V. Carolina 
Chipman, J. Logan. . . Michigan 
Clancy J M \ew York 


Milliken, S L .. Maine 


Mills, R. Q Texas 


Grout, W. W Vermont 


Moffltt, JohnH Neic York 
Montgomerv, A. E... Kentucky ' 
Moore. L. W Texas i 
Moore, o. c .\v> Hampshire 
Morrv H L Ohio 


Hall, D.S Minnesota 
Hansborough, L.C...A'. Dakota 
Hare, Silas Te.rus 
Banner, A. C Pennsylvania 







CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



REPRESENTATIVES. -Continued. 

Morgan, J. B Mississippi] Richardson, J. D Tennes ee Taylor, Joseph D Ohio 

Morrill, E . N Kansas Rife. J . W Pennsylvasni Thomas, O. B Wisconsin 

Morrow, W. W California^ Robertson, S. M Louisiana Thompson, A. C Ohio 

Morse, E. A Massachusetts Rockwell, F.Vf.. Massachusetts Tilman, G. D S. Carolina 

Mutchler, W Pennsylvania Rogers. J. H - Arkansas Townsend, C . C. . I'en nsylvania 

Neidinghaus, F. G JUisso!m';Rowell. J. H Illinois Townsend, H Colorado 

Norton, R. H Missouri \Rowl&n&, A. M....2V. Carolina Tracy, C New York 

Newt, A New Hampshirelltusk, Harry Wells.. Maryland Tucker, H. St. G Virginia 

Gates. W. C Alabama Russell, Charles A. Connecticut Turner, C. H New York 

O'Donnell, J Michigan Sanford, J New York Turner, E. J Kansas 

O'Ferrall, C. T Virginia Sawyer, J. G New York Turner, H. G Georgia 

O'Neall. John H Indiana Sayers, J. D Texas Turpin, L. W Alabama 

O'Neill, C Pennsylvania Scranton, J. A... Pennsylvania Vandever, William. .California 

O'Neill, J. II Massachusetts Scull, Edward.. ..Pennsylvania Van Schaick, J. W... Wisconsin 

Osborne, E. S Pen nsylvania Seney, G. E Ohio Venable, E. C Virginia 

Outhwaite, J. H Ohio Sherman, James S...New York Wade, W. H Missouri 

Owen, W. D Indiana Shively, Benjamin F.. Indiana Wallace, R Massachusetts 

Owens. J. W Ohio Simmonds,W. E... Connecticut Wallace, W. C New York 

Parrott, W.F Indiana Skinner, T. G.. North Carolina Walker. J. H. ...Massachusetts 

Payne, S._E Neio York Smith, G. W Illinois Walker, James P Missouri 

E.. Tennessee 
Pennsylvania 

Pendleton,J. O..West Virginia Spinola, Francis B...New York\Whee\er',J........ '.'.'.'.'. Alabama 

Pennington, John K.Delaware Spooner, H. J Rhodelsland Whiting, Justin R Michigan 

Perkins, B. W Kansas Springer, W. M Illinois Whitthorne, Wash.C. Tennessee 

Perry, W. H South Carolina Stahlnecker, W. G X'ew York Wickham, Charles P Ohio 

Peters, S. R Kansas Stephenson, S. M Michigan Wike, Scott Illinois 

Phelan, James -ennessee Stivers, H Xew York Wilber, David New York 

Pickler, J. A South Dakota Stewart, C Texas\ Wilcox, F. W Connecticut 

Pierce, R. A Ten nessee Stewart, John D Georgia Wiley, J. M New York 

Post, Philip S Illinois Stewart. J. W Vermont Wilkinson. Theo. S.. Louisiana 

Price Andrew Louisiana Stockbridge, H Maryland Williams, E. S Ohio 

Pugsley, Jacob J Ohio Stockdale. Thos. R.Mississippi Williams, J. R IlLnois 

Quackenbush, J. A... .New Y^rk Stone, W. J. Kentucky Wilson, J. H Kentucky 

Quinn, J New For*! Stone, W. J Missouri Wilson, J. L Washington 

Raines. J X'ew York Struble. I. S Iowa, Wilson, R. P. C... .: ...Missouri 

Randall, C. S Massachusetts Stump, H Maryland\Wi\son, W. L West Virginia 

Randall, S. J Pennsylvania Sweeney, J. H Iowa Wise. G. D Virginia 

Ray, J. W Pennsylvania Tarnsey, J. C Missouri Wright,M. B Pennsylvania 

Reed, J. P Iowa Taylor, A Illinois Yardley, Rob. ^.Pennsylvania 

Reed, T. B Maine Taylor, A. A 7V?ne*see|Yoder, S. S '....Ohio 

Reilly, J. B Pennsylvania Taylor, E. B Ohiol 



rayue, tt. & jew xorx &mitn, <j. vv iinnois waiKer, James f 

Paynter, T. H Kentucky Smith, Marcus A Arizona Washington, Jos. E.. 

Payson, L. E Illinois Smyser, M. L Ohio Watson, L. F Pen 

Peel, S. AV Arkansas Snyder, S. P Minnesota Wheeler, F. W 



SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Chief Justice MELVILLE W. FULLER, Illinois, 1888. 

Justices S. F. Miller ____ Iowa .............. 18621 Horace Gray ........... Massachusetts ____ 1881 



Stephen J. Field ....... California ......... 1863 

Joseph P. Bradley ...... New Jersey ...... 18701 

........ 1877 I 



Samuel Blatchford ... 
L. Q. C. Lamar 
John M. Harlan ........ Kentucky ........ 1877 I David J. Brewer 

Clerk-J. II. McKenney, D. C ................ 1880 

Salaries: Chief Justice, $10.500. Justices, $10,000. Clerk, $6.000. 
Marshal J. M. \v right, Kentucky ......... $3,000 1 Reporter J. C. B. Davis, New York 

CIRCUIT COURTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

(Salaries of Circuit Judges, 86,000.) 



New York ........ 1882 

Mississippi ....... 1-^88 

Kansas ............ 1883 



$5,700 



FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice Gray, 
Boston, Mass. Districts of Maine, New Hamp- 
shire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island. Circuit 
Judge LeB. B. Colt, Bristol, R. I., July 5, 1884. 

SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Blatchford, New York City. Districts of Ver- 
mont, Connecticut, New York. Circuit Judges 
Wm. J. Wallace, Syracuse, N.Y., April 6, 1882; 
E. H. Lacomb, New York, May 26, 1887. 

THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Bradley, Newark, N. J. Districts of New Jer- 
sey, Pennsylvania, Delaware. Circuit Judge 
Wm. McKennan. Washington, Pa.. Dec. 22, 1878. 

FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Chief Jus- 
tice Fuller, Washington, D.C. Districts of Mary- 
land. Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, 
South Carolina. Circuit Judge Hugh L. Bond, 
Baltimore. Md.. July 13, 1870. 

FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 



Lamar. Districts of Georgia, Florida, Alabama, 
Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas. Circuit Judge- 
Don A. Pardee. New Orleans, La.. May 1.1, 1881. 

SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Vacant. Dis- 
tricts of Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky, Tennessee. 
Circuit Judge H. E. Jackson, Nashville.Tenn., 
Dec. 13, 1877. 

SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Harlan. Chicago, 111. Districts of Indiana. Illi- 
nois, Wisconsin. Circuit Judge Walter Q. 
Gresham, Chicago, 111., Dec. 9, 1884. 

EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Miller, Keokuk, Iowa. Districts of Minnesota, 
Iowa. Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, Nebraska, 
Colorado. Circuit Judge Vacant. 

NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Field, San Francisco, Cal. Districts of Califor- 
nia, Oregon, Nevada. Circuit Judge Lorenzo 
Sawyer, San Francisco, Cal., Jan. 10, 1870. 



UNITED STATES COURT OF CLAIMS. 

(Judge's Salary. $4,500.) 
Chief Justice WILLIAM A. RICHARDSOX, Massachusetts, 1835. 



Judges Chas. C. Nott... New York 1895 

Gieuni W. Scofleld. .. . Pennsylvania 1881 



Lawrence Weldon Illinois 1883 

John Davis DistrictColumbia 1885 



Chief Clerk Archibald Hopkins, Massachusetts. 1873. 



JUDICIAL. 45 


JTTDGES OF THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COTTRTS. 


DISTRICTS. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Date of 
Commission 


Sal- 
ary. 


ALABAMA-N. and Middle Dist... 
Sour hern District 
ALASKA 


John Bruce . . . 


Montgomery 
Mobile 
Sitka 
Little Rock 


Feb. 27, 1875 
Dec. 13, 188t 
Sept. 1. 1889 
June 30, 1864 
Mar. 24,1875 
Feb. 27, 1851 
Jan. 13, 1887 
Jan. 20, 1877 


$3.500 

a,. TOO 

3,000 
3,500 
3,500 
5,000 
3,500 


Harry T. Toulmin.. . 
J. S. Bugbee 
Henry C. Caldwell.... 
Isaac C. Parker 
Ogden Hoffman 
Erskine M. Ross 
Moses Hallett 
Nathaniel Shipman.. 
Leonard E. Wales 
Charles Swayue 
James W. Locke 
Wm. T. Newman.. . 
Emory Speer 
Henry W. Blodgett... 
Wm. J.Allen 
William A. Woods.... 
Oliver P. Shiras 


ARKANSAS Eastern District 
Western District 
CALIFORNIA-Northeru District 
Southern District 


Fort Smith 
San Francisco 
Los Angeles 
Denver 


COLORADO 


CONNECTICUT 


Hartford 


April 17,1873 
Mar. 20,1884 
May 17,1888 
Feb. 1. 1872 
Jan, 13, 1887 
Feb. , 1885 
Jan. 11. 1870 
April 18,1855 
May 2, 1883 
Aug. 14,1882 
Feb. 21, 1856 
Mar 10 1874 


3.500 

3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
31500 
4.01)0 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
4,500 
3,500 
3,5(10 ' 

3, 500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500! 
4,000 

4,' 000 

4,000 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 

3J500 
3,500 
3,500 

13 
!:i5 
W 

3.50o 
3.50Q 
3,50,, 
3.5' 


DELAWARE 
FLORIDA Northern District 
Southern District 
GEORGIA Northern District 
Southern District 


Wilmington 


Jacksonville.. . 


Key West 
Atlanta 
Savannah 
Chicago 


ILLINOIS-Northern District 
Southern District 
INDIANA 


Springfield 
Indianapolis. 


IOWA Northern District 


Dubuque 
Keokuk 


Southern District 


KANSAS 
KENTUCKY 


Cassius G.Foster.... 
John W Barr.. 


Topeka 


Louisville 
New Orleans 
Shreveport. . 


April 16, 1880 
Feb. 10, 1876 
May 18,1881 
Jan. 24, 1R82 
July 1, 1879 
Jan. 10, IST<) 
Mar. 19, 1875 
May 25,1886 
June 1, 1858 
May 1 1866 


LOUISI ANA Eastern District .... 
Western District 
MAINE..., 


Ed ward C. Billings... 
Aleck Boarman 
Nathan Webb 
Thomas J. Morris 
Thomas L. Nelson... 
Henry B. Brown 
Henry F. Severens.. 
Rensselaer R. Nelson 
Robert A. Hill 
Amos M. Thayer 
John F Phillips 


Portland 


MARYLAND 


Baltimore 


MASSACHUSETTS 


Worcester 
Detroit 


MICHIGAN Eastern District 
Western District 


Kalamazoo . 


MINNESOTA... 


St. Paul 
Oxford 


MISSISSIPPI-(Two Districts) .... 
MISSOURI Eastern District 
Western District. .. 


St. Louis 


Feb. 26, 1887 
June 25, 1888 
April 9,18(58 
July 26.1882 
July 27. IN* 
Oct. 18. ISM* 
May 4, 1882 
June 2, 1881 
March 9, 18(55 
Feb. 21,1882 
June 7, 1872 
Nov. 25,1873 
March20, 1883 
March 9, 1859 
Feb. 19, 1879 
Jan. 14, 1880 
Dec. 16. 18<4 
Jan. 13, lss7 
May 27. 1880 
June 17.1878 
April 5, 1884 
June 25, ISNS 
April 10, 1871) 
Mar. 16,1877 
Jan. 14, 1874 
March 3, 1883 
Aug. 3, 1861 
July 2, 1888 
)ct. 30. 1877 


NEBRASKA... 


Elmer S. Dundy 
George M. Sabm 
Daniel Clark 
E. T. Greene 


Falls City 


NEVADA. . 


Carson City 


NEW HAMPSHIRE.... 


Manchester . 


NEW JERSEY.. . 


Trenton. . . 


NEW YORK Northern District. . . 
Southern District 


Alfred C.Coxe 
Addison Brown 
Charles L. Benedict.. 
Augustus S. Seymour 
Robert P. Dick 
William R. Day 
George R. Sage 
Matthew P. Deady. . . 
William Butler 
Marcus W. Acheson.. 
George M Carpenter 


Utica 
New York City 


Eastern District 


N. CAROLINA Eastern District.. 
Western District 
OHIO Northern District. .. . 


Newbern 
Greensboro 
Toledo .. 


Southern District 


Cincinnati 
Portland 
Philadelphia 
Pittsburg 
Providence 


OREGON 


PENNSYLVANIA Eastern Dist. . 
Western District 
RHODE ISLAND . 


SOUTH CAROLINA 
TENNESSEE-E. and Middle Dists 
Western District 


Chas. H. Slmonton .. 
David M. Key 
ili S. Hammond 
Chauncey B. Sabin . . 
Thomas M. Maxey. . 
A. P. McCormick.... 
HoytH. Wheeler.... 
Robert W.Hughes... 
John Paul 


Charleston 
Chattanooga 


TEXAS Eastern District 
Western District. ... 


Galveston 
Austin 
Graham 
Jamaica 
Norfolk 
Harrisonburg.., 
Parkersburg 
Milwaukee 
Madison 


Northern District 
VERMONT 


VIRGINIA-Eastern District 
Western District 


WEST VIRGINIA .. 


John J. Jackson 
fames E.Jenkins... 
Romanzo E. Bunn. . . 


WISCONSIN Eastern District .... 
Western District 


SUBSIDI 

The following table shows the ar 
commerce in the form of subsic 
gove nments named for the year 1 
Countries. Amount.] C 
France .... $6 792 778 Ru 


ES PAID BY ALL 

nount of money pai 
ies, bounties, and fo 
888: 
ountries. At 
?sia 
gium 
stria-Hungary 
straiian colonies 
li 


NATIONS. 

d for the encourai 
r the transportatio 

nonnt.' Countries. 
454.;*),; United Stat 
430.127 ownshios) 
330,000 Norway and 
280,000 Guatemala. 
225,000 Island of To 
108,000! San Salvado 
US 0001 Bahama Isla 
'.o.(H0 Nicaragua.. 
72.000iHondiiras... 
.V, (10 Cn^ta Rira 


fement of fo 
i of mails b 

Am 
es (to our 

. 4 


reign 
y the 

ount. 

48,966 
41,655 
34,000 
25,000 i 
24,000 ! 
18,500 
lil.OOO 
12.500 
12,000 

s. 


Great Britain 4,269,8741 Bel 
Italy 3,503,035 Au 
Germany X 131 610| Au 


Sweden.. 


Argentine Republic... 3,000.000 Chi 
Brazil *1,700,000 Poi 
Spain l,571,035jTri 
Netherlands 775,191 Bai 
Mexico t758 000 Jan. 


bago 


tugal 
nidad 


nds 


badoes 


Canada 7300001 New /.palRnri 


Japan 500,000| 


on immigrants. fNot including bounty on immigrant 
is we paid S415,954 to foreign ships. 


*Not including *5,500,000 bounty 
JBesides th 



46 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



States Diplomatic ano Consular Scrbice. 



DECEMBER, 1889. 

Explanation E. E. an<* M. P., Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary; M. 
R., Minister Resident; M. R. and C. G., Minister Resident and Consul-General. 



COUNTRY. 



Argentine Republic.. 

Austria-Hungary 

Belgium 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Central America 

Chili 

China 

Colombia 

Corea 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 

Great Britain 



Representative. 



Location. \App" ted From Salary. 



J. R. G. Pitkin, E. E.& M. P 

F. D. Grant, E. E. & M. P 

E. H. Terrill.E. E. &M. R... 

T. H. Anderson, M. R. & C. G. 

R. Adams, Jr., E. E. & M. P. 

L. B. Misner, E. E. &M. P.. 

P.Egan,E. E.&M.P 

C. Denby, E. E. & M. P 

J. T. Abbott, E. E. & M. P 

H. A. Dlnsmore. M.R.&C.G. 

Clark E. Carr, M. R. & C. G. . 

Wbitelaw Reid, E. E.&M.P. 

W. W. Phelps, E. E. & M. P. . 

R. T. Lincoln, E. E. & M. P. . 

Greece A. L. Snowden, M. R. & C. G.. 

Hawaii (JohnL. Stevens, M. R 

layti ! Fred Douglass, M.ll.&C.G... 



'Buenos Ayres.iLouisiana 

Vienna ! New York. . . . 

Texas 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania 

California... 

Nebraska 

Indiana.... 

N.Hampshire 

Arkansas 

Illinois 

New York... 

New Jersey. 

Illinois.. 

Pennsylvania 



Brussels 

jLaPaz 

iRiode Janeiro, 
[Guatemala 

'Santiago 

Pekin 

Bogota 

Seoul... 



Italy 

Japan 

Liberia 

Mexico 

Netherlands 

Paraguay and Uruguay.. 

Persia 

Peru 

Portugal 

Russia 

Siam 



A. G. Porter, E. E. & M. P.. . 
J.F.Swift, E. E.&M. P 



E.E. Smith, M. R. & C. G.... 

~ S. Ryan, E. E.&M. P.... 

S. B. Thayer, E.E. & M. P. . . . 

George Maney, M. R 

E. S. Pratt, M. R. &C.G.... 

John Hicks, E. E. &M. P.... 

G. B. Loring, M.R.&C.G... 

,E. E.&M.P 

.T.Childs,M. R. &C. G.... 

T W Palmer E E & M P 
Sweden and Norway. .... I W.W.Thomas, Jr.,E.E.& M.P. 

Switzerland I J.D.Washburne,M.R. & C.G. 

Turkey JS. Hirsch, E. E. & M. P 

Venezuela !w. L. Scruggs. E. E. & M. P 



'aris 

Berlin 

London 

Athens 

Honolulu ... 



Maine. 



Portau PrincelDistColumbia 



Rome 

Tokei (Yedo). 

Monrovia 

Mexico 

The Hague..., 
Montevideo . , 
Teheran... 



. llndiana. 
.(California.... 
. N. Carolina.. 

.'Kansas 

.'Minnesota 
. Tennessee. .. 
'Alabama.... 



Lima ! Wisconsin. .. . 

Lisbon Massachus'ts. 

St. Petersburg 

Bangkok Missouri 

Madrid Michiean 

Stockholm Maine 

Berne Massachus'ts 

IConsta'tinople Oregon 

.'Caracas Georgia 



$7,500 

12,000 

7,500 

5,000 

12,000 

10,000 

10,000 

12,000 

7,500 

7,500 

5,000 

6! 500 

7,500 

5,000 

12,000 

12,000 

4,000 

12,000 

7,500 

7,500 

17', 500 
5,000 

12,000 
7,500 



7,500 



CONSULS-GENERAL AND CONSULS, AGENTS, AND CONSULAR AGENTS. 



PLACE. 



ARGENTINE REPUB- 
LIC Buenos Ayres.. . 
AUSTRIA-HUNGARY- 

Buda-Pesth 

Prague 

Trieste 

Vienna 

Brunn 

BARBARY STATES- 
BELGIUM Antwerp .' .' .'.' 

Brussels 

Charleroi 

Ghent 

Verviers and Liege 

BOLIVIA-La Paz 

BRAZIL Bahia 

Para 

Pernambuco 

Rio Grande doSul 

Rio de Janeiro 

Santos 

CHILI-Talcahuano 

Valparaiso 

CHINA Amoy 

Canton 

Chin Kiang 

FooChow 

HangKow 

Ningpo 

Shanghai 

Tien Tsin 

COLOMBIA, U. S. OF- 

Barranquilla 

Bogota 

Carthagena 



Roger C. Spooner 

James F. Hartigan 

Julius Goldschmidt 

Gustavus Schoeller 



W.R.Lewis 

John H. Steuart 

georgeW. Roosevelt., 
harles Van der Elst.. 



yarn*. 



State. 



Edward L. Baker 



'Illinois. 



Wisconsin .".! 
District of Columbia.. 
Wisconsin.. . . 



W. S. Preston 

Thomas H. Anderson. 

David N. Burke 

Robert T. Clayton 

Henry C. Borstel 

L. G. Bennington 

Oliver H. Dockery 



J. F. Van Ingen 

f. W. Romeyn 

W. S. Crowell 

Charles Seymour. : 

A. C.Jones 

John Tyler Campbell . 
Benjamin J\ Franklin. 

T. F. Pettus 

Joseph A. Leonard.... 
William Bowman 



JohnG. Waluer 

W. B. McMaster 



Pennsylvania. . . 
Pennsylvania... 
Pennsylvania... 



New York. 
Ohio. 



New York 

Georgia 

Maine 

West Virginia... 
North Carolina.. 



Massachusetts . 

Michigan 

Ohio 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

California 

Missouri 

Mississippi 

Minnesota 

Kentucky 



.Texas 

(New York... 



Salary. Fees ' 



$2,500 

Fees 
3,000 
2.000 
3,000 



2,000 
3.000 
2,500 

'i'.ooo 

1.500 
5.000 
1.500 
1.500 
2.000 
1.000 
(J.OOO 
1,500 
1 .000 
3.0(10 
3.300 
3.500 
3.500 
3.500 
3.500 
3000 
5.00(1 
3,500 

2,000 
2,000 



$2,463 

1,179 
13,034 

a, "79 
10.944 

1,6.57 

26 

2,403 



2,051 
3,172 



682 

1,885 
879 



57 



396 

535 

26 

5,92 J 
537 

5,922 
'i',920 



UNITED STATES DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE. 47 


CONSULS-GENERAL AND CONSULS, ETC. -Continued. 


PLACE. 


Name. 


State. 


Salary. 


Fees '89. 


Colon, Aspinwall 


Victor Vifquain 


Nebraska 


$3,000 
4,000 

4,000 
7,500 
2,000 

5, (< 00 
2 500 


$2,157 

727 

"'15 


Thomas Adamson 
Emory H. Taunt. 


Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania 
Arkansas 
Virginia 

Illinois. . . 


CONGO FREE STATE- 
Boma 


CORE A Seoul 
COSTA RICA San Jose. 
DENMARK AND DOMIN 
IONS Copenhagen... . 
St. Thomas, W. I 
ECUADOR Guayaquil. . 
FRANCE AND DOMIN- 
IONS Algiers. Af... . 


Hugh A. Dinsmore 
J. R. Wingfleld 

Clark E Carr 


M. A. Turner 
William B. Sarsby 

C T Grellet 


Arkansas 


495 
911 

5 ' 

8.81(5 


Mississippi 


3,000 

1,000 
2,500 
1 000 


California 


Horace G. Knowles... 


Delaware... 




Joseph H. Reading 




Guadeloupe, W. I 
Havre 


Charles Bartlett 
Oscar F. Williams 
Walter T. Griffin 
Edmund B. Fairfleld 
Charles I> Trail 


Maine.... 


1,500 
3,000 
Fees 
2,500 
2,500 
1,500 
1,000 
1,500 
6,000 
2,000 
Fees. 
2,000 
1,000 

3,000 

1,500 
2,500 
3,000 
4,000 
2,500 
1,500 
2,500 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,500 
2,000 
3,000 
2,500 
1,500 
2,000 
1,500 
2,500 
1,500 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
1,500 

1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
3,000 
Fees 

3|000 
1,500 
1.500 
5,000 
1,500 
2,000 
1,500 
1,500 
2,000 
1,500 
Fees 
2,000 
3,000 
2, Ml 10 
2,500 


45 
3.635 
1,369 
12,918 
4,289 

"'! 

61,347 
3.667 
1,257 
3,787 
360 

946 

3,031 
6,825 
9,370 
16,459 
4,685 
2,661 
2,031 
15,616 
4,781 
8,112 
5,508 
1,331 
7,412 
11,410 
2,927 
6,783 
2,665 
4,915 
2,168 
5,967 
12,738 
919 
3,290 

989 
604 
443 
870 
13,041 
707 
1,722 
9,000 
432 
23,975 
1,125 
1,047 
5,704 
3S3 
275 
753 
1,300 
2,943 
52 
1.967 
304 
] .855 
1.54'2 
7.488J 


New York 
New York .... 
Michigan 


Limoges 


Marseilles... 
Martinique, W. I 
Nantes 
Nice 


Maryland . 


W. A. Garesche 
H. A. Shackelford 
WilllamHarrison Bradley 
J. L. Kathbone. 


Missouri 
Pennsylvania 
Illinois 
California 
Pennsylvania 
New York 
Minnesota 
Xew York 


Paris 


Rheims 


S. H. Keedy 
Charles P. Williams 
Oscar Malmros 
Jacob L Doty 




St Etienne 


Tahiti. Soc. Islands 
FRIENDLY AND NAVI- 
GATORS' ISLANDS- 
Apia 






GERMANY- 
Aix la Chapelle 
Annaberg 


J. Russell Parsons, Jr 
Daniel B. Hubbard 
Adoph G. Studer 
W.H.Edwards 
Hugo M. Starkloff 


New York 
Massachusetts. . . . 


Iowa 


Berlin 


Ohio 
Mi-souri 












L Austin Spalding 


New York. 




H F. Merritt 


Illinois. 


Cologne . . . 


Wm . D. Warner 
Evans Blake 


South Carolina 
Illinois 
District of Columbia ... 
District of Columbia. . . . 
Ohio 


Crefeld 




Aulick Palmer.. . 


Dusseldorf 


D. J. Partello 
^rank H. Mason 
Dharles F. Johnson 


Frankfort 


Hamburg 
Kehl 


Ohio 


\ew Jersey 




Henry W. Diederich 
J. C. Monoghan 
lames H. Smith 
E. W. Mealey.. . 


Indiana. 




Rhode Island 
District of Columbia. . . . 
Maryland 


Mavence 


Munich 


Nuremberg 
Sonneberg 
Stettin 


Wm. J. Black 
Silas C. Halsey 
Andrew F Fay 


Delaware 


New J ersey 
Illinois 


Stuttgart 
GREAT BRITAIN AND 
DOMINIONS- 
Amherstburg, Can 
Antigua W I 


Edw. P. Crane 
Tosiah Turner 


Xew Jersey 
Michigan. 


Chester E. Jackson 
Fohn Darcy Connolly 
Sdward A. Dimmick 
Samuel G. Ruby 
JohnM Strong 


Wisconsin ... 


Auckland, N Z 


California 


Barbadoes, W. 1 


Massachusetts 
Iowa 
Xew York 


Belfast 
Belleville, Can 


Henry W. Beckwith ... 


Illinois 




lohn Jarrett 


Pennsylvania 


Bombay 




Bradford 


Tohn A.Tibbits.... 


Connecticut 


Bristol 
Brockville, Can 
Calcutta 


JohnD.Delille 
lohn O Bridges . . . 


Texas 
New York 


B. F. Bonham... 


Oregon 


Cape Town 


G. F. Hollis 


Massachusetts 


Cardiff 






Ceylon 
Charlottetown, P. E. I.. 


William Morey 


Maine 


Newton J. George 
William Monagnan 
A. A. Brown 


Tennessee 
Ohio 
New York 


Clifton Can 


Coaticook, Can JF. W. Roberts 


Maine 
Ohio 


Cork S.lohn J. Piatt 
Demerara !\\'m T Walthnii 


Mississippi 


Dublin 
Dundee 


Alexander J. Reid 
Arthur B. Wood 


Wisconsin 
New York 



48 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


CONSULS-GENERAL AND CONSULS, ETC. -Continued. 


PLACE. 


A'ame. 


State. Salary. 


Fees '89. 




James D. Reid 
James Whelan 
A. F. Dicksou 
tl. J. Sprague 
Lev! W. Brown 


New York.... 
New York 
Massachusetts 


$2,000 
1,500 
1,000 
1,500 
3,000 
1,500 
1,500 


$3,745 
1,094 
33 
347 
15,388 

3,108 

L691 
1 1,580 
1,467 
1,490 
2,415 
4,727 
1.787 

its 

"i 

21,007 
1,266 
4,669 
98- 
7 5 

187 

2,446 
43 
1,882 
1,356 

2,849 
1,307 

5 "l 

1,903 
52 
357 

2.259 
5,174 

i.8 

781 
1,635 
2,427 
1.317 
1,267 
4,438 
3,056 
10,762 
293 
1,567 
1,735 
3,021 
2.775 
537 
840 
1,732 
1,623 

, 588 

4,324 
1.-03 

; 155 
2 
i 2,00 
j 1,647 
2,211 
2.466 
2.625 
! 4,356 


Ft. Erie, Can 
Gaspe Basin, Can 
Gibraltar 


Massachusetts 




Ohio... . 


Goderich, Can 


li. S. Chilton 


District of Columbia. . . . 


Guelph, 'an 
Halifax N S 


J. U. Childs 
Wakefleld G. Frye 
Albert Roberts 
Oliver II. Simons 
L. Moore 


Maine 


3,500 
2,000 
5,000 
Fees 
1,500 
2,000 
2,000 
2,500 
6,000 
6,000 
1,500 
1,500 
3,000 

iM 

Fees 
2,000 
1,500 
2,500 
3,000 
1,500 
1,500 
2,000 
Fees 
1,500 
1,500 
2,000 
1,500 
1,500 
2,500 
1,000 
3,000 
1.500 
Fees 
1,500 
Fees 
2,000 
Fees 
1,500 
1,500 
Fees 
1,500 
2,000 
1,500 
2,00( 
Fees 
2,500 
1,000 
2,500 


Hamilton, Can 


Colorado 


Hull . 


New York 


Kingston, Can 
Kingston, Jam 


M. H. Twitchell 
Wm. G.Allen 
F II Wigfall 


Louisiana 


South Carolina 




Leith 


Wallace Bruce 
Thomas H. Sherman 
fohnC. New 
Hiram Z. Leonard 
John Worthington 
William F. Griunell 
James P Lesesne. 


New York 
District of Columbia 
Indiana 
Indiana 
New York 
New York... 
South Carolina 


Liverpool 


London, Eng 
London, Can 


Malta 




Melbourne 


Montreal, Can 


Charles L. Knapp 
Sellar Leishman 
T J McLain Jr 


New York 


Morrisburg 


New York 




Ohio 




Horace C. Pugh 
John L. McKim... 
Richard G. Lay 
G. C. Tanner 
Luther M Shaffer 


Indiana 
Delaware 
District of Columbia 


Nottingham 


Ottawa 
Fictou,N.S 


We^t Virginia 




Thomas T. Prentis 
R H Schooley 


Vermont 
New York . 


Port Rowan, Can. 


Port Sarnia, Can 
Port Stanley, Falk. Id. 
Pt.Stanley& St.Thoma's 
Prescott, Can 
Quebec, Can 
Sheffield 
Sierra Leone 


I S Farrar. ... 


Michigan 


Henry S. Lasar 
I C Ouiggle 


Missouri 




W.C.HaH 
T. W. Downs 
B. Folsom 
Judson A. Lewis 


Xew York 




New York 
Sierra Leone 






Jasper P Bradley 


W Virginia 








St. Helena 
St. Hyacinthe, Can 
St. John, N. B 
St Johns N F 


Jas,. B. Coffin 
Thomas E. Moore . . 


Massachusetts 


District of Columbia 


Mason D. Sampson 


N ew York 


t. Johns, Que 
t. Stephens, N. B 
Stanbridge, Can 


Henry C Fisk 




Edward C. Goodnow 
Willard Farrington 


Maine 
Vermont 


R. W. Dunlap 
Gilderoy W. Griffin 
Nicholas Smith 
Charles R. Pope 
M. H. Sawyer 




Sydney 
Three Rivers, Can 




New York 
Missouri 
Connecticut 


Trinidad 
Tunstall 
Turk's Island 


New York 




Xew York 


Robert J. Stevens 
Charles M Bolton 


California 






Wallaceburg, Can 
Windsor, Can 


I G Worden 


Michigan 


Fees 
1,500 
1.000 
1,500 
Fees 
Fees 
6,500 
Fees 

2,000 

4,000 
l.OtM 
5,000 

1,000 
2,00( 
Fees 
Feet 
1,500 
1,501 
1,5CM 
1,5<K 


JohnDevlin 


Michigan 


Windsor, N. S 
Winnipeg 


Edward Young 
.hnnes W. Taylor 
Walter T. Townshend... 
Dean F. Currie 
A. Loudon Snowden 
Edward Hancock 

J R Hosmer .... 


District of Columbia 


Woodstock N B 




Yarmouth, N.S 
GREECE Athens 


New York 
Pennsylvania 


GUATEMALA- 


New York 


HAWAIIAN ISLANDS- 




California 


HAYTl-Cape Haytien.. . 
Port-au-Prince 


' Stanislas Goutier 
Frederick Douglass 

William C. Burchard 


1'ennsvlvania 
District of Columbia.... 


HONDURAS- 
Ruatan and Truxillo . . . 




ITALY Castelamare 
Catania 


Vlf red M Wood 


New York 


Vincent Lamantia . 


Louisiana 
Illinois 


Florence 


Isaac R. Diller 






Leghorn 
Messina 


William T. Rice Massachusetts 
Wallace S. Jones Florida 



UNITED STATES DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE. 49 


CONSULS-GENERAL AND CONSULS, ETC. --Continued. 


PLACE. 


Name. 


State. 


Salary. 


Fees '89. 


Milan 


H. C. Crouch. 


New York 


$1.500 
1,500 
2,000 
3,000 

ffl 

3,000 
3,000 

4,000 

2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
1,500 
Fees 
2,500 
2,500 
2,000 
1,500 
3,000 
Fees 

1,500 
1,000 
Fees 
2,000 
Fees 

2.000 
2,000 

\m 

3,500 

1,500 
1,500 
5,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

6,500 

Fees 
2,000 
3.000 
Fees 

2,000 

Fees 
1,500 
6,500 
5,000 

Fees 
1,500 
1,500 
Fees 
2,500 
6,000 
1,500 
?,000 
3,000 
Fees 
2.500 

Fees 
l.OiK) 
Fees 
Fees 

2,000 
5,000 
1.500 

2,000 


$1,985 
1,956 
8,071 
537 
797 
10,151 
188 
4,691 

88 

74 
604 
375 
509 
1,543 
118 
964 
3,318 
332 
3,788 

4,545 
515 
1,774 
4,498 
170 

552 

2 


Naples . ... 


E. Camphausen 
Philip Carroll 
Augustus O. Bourn 
H. A. Johnson 
C. R. Greathouse 
J. M. Birch 


Pennsylvania 
New York 


Palermo 


Rome 


Rhode Island 


Venice 


District of Columbia . . . 
California 
West Virginia 
Delaware 

North Carolina 


JAPAN Kanagawa... . 


Osaka and Hiogo 
LIBERIA- 


Enoch J. Smith ers 
Ezekiel E Smith 


MADAGASCAR 
Tamatave 
MEXICO- Acapulco 


J. P Campbell 
Robert W. Loughery 
Alexander Willard 


California... 
Texas 


California 


Matamoras 




Merida 


E. H. Thompson 








Nuevo Laredo 
Piedas Negras 


Warner P Sutton 


Michigan 


Eugene O. Fechet 
W. R. Greathouse 
J. D. Hoff 


Michigan 


Louisiana 
New Jersey 


Vera Cruz 


MUSC AT-Muscat 
NETHERLANDS AND 
DOMINIONS- 
Amsterdam 


Louis S. Maguire 




David Eckstein 


Ohio 




Leonards. Smith 
Howard Ellis 
D. C. Van Romondt 

D. Bernard Macauley 
W. A. Brown 


Maine. 


Rotterdam 


New Jersey 
St. Martin 


St. Martin, W.I 
NICARAGUA 
Managua 
San Juan del Norte.... 
PARAGUAY- 
Aauncion 


New York 


Indiana 


FrankD. Hill 


Minnesota. . .. 


PERSI A -Teheran 
PERU Callao 
PORTUGAL AND DO- 
MINIONS 
Fayal Azores 


E Spencer Pratt 




Henry May Brent 

Samuel W. Dabney 
Thomas C. Jones 


District of Columbia 

Massachusetts 
Kentucky 


207 

101 
138 
743 

41 
5 

886 
133 

439 

47 

2 

342 

608 

"'i'98 

2,279 
4: :7 
393 
1,859 
1,055 
23,038 
1.400 
1,043 
787 

""1,472 

730 
809 
1,533 
1,686 

4,212 
1,256 
1,053 

1,860 


Funchal, Madeira 
Lisbon 
Mozambique, Africa. . . . 
Santiago, Cape Verde... 
St Paul de Loando 


Georue B. Loring 
Ernest W. Smith 
Henry Pease 


Massachusetts .... 


Massachusetts 
Massachusetts 


ROUMANIA- 


A. Loudon Snowden 




RUSSIA- 






T. E. Heenan 
John M. Crawford 
Joseph Rawicz 

Thoma.s T TunstalL 


Minnesota 
Ohio 


St. Petersburg 




SALVADOR - 
San Salvador 


Alabama 


SAN DOMINGO- 
Puerto Plata 


Thomas Simpson 


Rhode Island 


San Domingo 




SERVIA Belgrade 

Ip^Nl^D^iNiONS 
Baracoa Cuba 


A. Loudon Snowden..., 
lacob T. Child. 


3 ennsylvania 


Henry G Pryor 


Kentucky 




^rederick H. Sceuch 
Robert W. Turner 
fames M. Churchill 
H. A. Ehninger 










Maine 
New York 


Cienfugos, Cuba 


Ramon O. Williams 
Henry C. Marston 


New York 
Illinois 


Malaga 


Manila, Philippines.. .. 
Matanzas, Cuba 
Mavaguez P R 


Alex R Webb 


Missouri 


Frank H. Pierce 


New Hampshire 


Santiago de Cuba 
SWEDEN NORWAY 
Bergen, Norway 
Christiania, Norway 
Gothenburg, Sweden... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
SWITZERLAND 
Basle 


Otto E Reimer 




Frederick G Gade 


Norway 


ierhard Gade 


Norway 


Ernest A. Man 
Nere A Elf wing 


Florida 




George Gifford 
ohn D. Washburn 
loland J. Hemmick 
Lvell T. Adams 


Maine 


Massachasetts 




J ennsylvania 
New York 


Horgen 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



CONSULS-GENERAL AND CONSULS, ETC. -Continued. 



PLACE. 



St. Galle 

Zurich 

TURKEY AND DOMIN- 
IONS Bagdad... 

Beirut, Syria 

Cairo, Egypt *.. 

Constantinople 

Jerusalem, Syria 

Smyrna 

URUGUAY- 

Colonia 

Montevideo 

VENEZUELA 

Ciudad Bolivar 

LaGuayra 

Maracaibo 

Puerto Cabello 

ZANZIBAR 

Zanzibar 



Name; 



Wm. H. Robertson 

George L.Catlin..;.;.. 



John H. Haynes..;. . 

Erhard BiSsinger 

Eugene Schuyler 

Zachary T. Sweeney. 

Henry Gillman 

W.C. Emmet 



Benjamin D. Manton. 
Ed J. Hill... 



George F. Underbill.. 

W.S.Bird 

E. H. Plumacher 

Charles De Blanc.... 



Seth A. Pratt.. 



State. 



Salary. Fees '89. 



District of Columbia.. 
New Jersey 



Massachusetts ... 

New York 

New York 

Indiana , 

Michigan. 



New York 



Rhode Island 

North Carolina.. 



New York. 
Alabama . 



Tennessee . 
Louisiana.. 



Massachusetts. 



2, 500 
2.000 

Fee 

2,000 
5,000 
3,000 
2,000 
2,500 

Fees 
2,000 

Fees 
1,500 
2,000 
1,500 

1,000 



6,924 
2,799 



145 
246 

1,208 
92 

2,281 



1,473 

561 

625 

3.089 

1,442 

25 1 



FOREIGN LEGATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES. 



COUNTRIES. 



Name. 



Hank. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC 
AUSTRIA-HUNGARY 



BELGIUM. 

BRAZIL.... 

CHILI 

CHINA.,... 



COREA. 

COSTA RICA AND SAL- 
VADOR 

DENMARK 

ECUADOR 

FRANCE 



GERMANY 

GREAT BRITAIN. 



GREECE 

GUATEMALA 

HAWAII 

HAYTI 



HONDURAS. 
ITALY 



Senor Don V. G. Quesada 

SenorDon Erneste Bosch 

Chevalier Schmit von Tavera. . . . 

Eugene Bluhdorn 

Baron Paumgartten 

Mr. A. Le Ghait 

Count Gaston d' Arschot 

Senor J. G. do Amaral Valente 

Senor Don Emilio C. Varas 

Mr. Tsui Kwo Yin 

Mr. Pung Kwang Yu 

Mr. Wang Hung Ting 

Mr.Ye WanYong 

Senor Pedro Perez Zcledon 

Count de Sponneck 

Senor Don Jose M. P. Caamano 

M.Theodore Roustan 

M. leComte Maurice Sala 

Count von Arco Valley. 

Mr. A. von Mumm 

Sir Julian Pauncefote. 
Hon. Henry Edwards . 

Mr. Jean Gennadius 

Senor Don Fernando Cruz 

Mr. H. A. P. Carter 

Mr. Stephen Preston 

Mr. Charles A. Preston 

Senor Don Jeronimo Zelaya 

Baron de Fava 

Le Comte Albert de Foresta 



E. E. and M. P. 

l eC E. e fflL f p L 
Counselor of Legation. 



Secretary of Legation. 



JAPAN... 
MEXICO. 



NETHERLANDS 

NICARAGUA 

PERSIA 

PERU 

PORTUGAL 

RUSSIA 

SIAM 

SPAIN 

SWEDEN AND NORWAY 



SWITZERLAND 

TURKEY 

U. S. OF COLOMBIA 

VENEZUELA... 



Mr. Munemitsu Mutsu 

Senor Don Matias Romero 

Senor Don Cayetano Romero 

Mr. G. de Weckherlin 

Senor Don H. Gazman 

Hadji H. Ghooly Kahn 

Senor Don Felix C. C. Zegarra 

Baron d' Almeirim 

Mr. Charles de Struve 

Phya Montr! Surig a Wongse 

Senor Don Emilio de Muruaga.. . . 

Mr. John A. W. Grip 

Mr.Woxen 

Mr. A. de Claparede. 



E. E. and M. P. 
First Secretary of Legation. 
Secretary of Legation. 
E.E. andM.P. 

E. E. and M. P. 

M. R. and C. G. 

E. E. and M. P. 

E. E. and M. P. 

First Secretary. 

E. E. and M. P. 

Secretary of Legation. 

E. E. and M. P. 

Secretary of Legation. 

M. R. 

E. E. and M. P. 

E. E. and M. P. 

E. E. and M. P. 

Secretary of Legation. 

E. E. and M. P. 

E.E. andM.P. 

Secy, of Legation and Charge 

d' Affaires ad interim. 
E. E. and M. P. 
E. E. and M. P. 
First Secretary of Legation. 
E. E. and M. P. 
E. E. andM.P. 
E.E. andM.P. 
E. E. and M. P. 
Consul and Acting C. G. 
E. E. and M. P. 
E. E. and M. P. 
E. E. and M. P. 
E. E. and M. P. 
Secretary of Legation and 

Charge d' Affaires. 
E. E. and M. P. 



Mavroyeni Bey IE. E. and M. P. 

SenorDon Jose Marcelino HurtadoJE. E. and M. P. 

Mr. F. Mutis Duran I Secretary of Legation. 

Senor Don Nicanor Bolet Peraza.. Charge d'A ffaires. 



CLIMATOLOGY. 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE UNITED STATES. 

The following tables of average temperatures and rainfall, highest and lowest tempera- 
tures, and average number of cloudy days, based upon observations of fourteen or less years 
! at selected stations in the several states and territories of the United States, was compiled 
i from the records of the Signal Service for the Chicago Daily News Almanac by the United 
States Signal Office at Chicago, 111. 




s 



Year. 



SiSBa 8 8&t>: 

cobbbbb b c^bb^b coosncnb 



Minimum. 



-?. 



Year. 



.^ H - - ~ - <~ -T. 



- Cloudiness. 




verage of 

relrc }'<'<'(> 



A 

Tirelrc 



2g ggS283 






5S Fear. 



bbv-c 



bbbbbbbbbbbbbba3bbbbbbbbtobbbbbbb>-'bb I 









isss 









Average 



fraiS. P.-J. =.. 



jig.taoy.ja I ^V 



. 

Scale of to 



52 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



platforms. 



NATIONAL ELECTIONS OF 1888. 



Republican. 
Adopted at Chicago June 29, 1888. 

The republicans of the United States, as- 
sembled by their delegates in national con- 
vention, pause on the threshold of their pro- 
ceedings to honor the memory of their first 
great leader the immortal champion of lib- 
erty and the rights of the people Abraham 
Lincoln; and to cover also with wreaths of 
imperishable remembrance and gratitude the 
heroic names of our later leaders who have 
been more recently called away from our 
councils Grant, Gartield, Arthur, Logan, 
Conkling may their memories be faithfully 
cherished. 

We also recall with our greetings and with 
prayer for his recovery the name of one of 
our living heroes whose memory will be 
treasured in the history both of republicans 
and of the republic the name of that noble 
soldier and favorite cnild of victory, Philip 
H. Sheridan. In the spirit of those great lead- 
ers and of our own devotion to human lib- 
erty, and with that hostility to all forms of 
despotism and oppression which is the funda- 
mental idea of the republican party, we send 
fraternal congratulations to our fellow- 
Americans of Brazil upon their great act of 
emancipation, which completed the abolition 
of slavery throughout the two American con- 
ttoents. We earnestly hope that we may 
soon congratulate our fellow-citizens of Irish 
birth upon the peaceful recovery of home 
rule for Ireland. 

We reaffirm our unswerving devotion to 
the national constitution and to the indis- 
soluble union of the states; to the autonomy 
reserved to the states under the constitu- 
tion; to the personal rights and liberties of 
citizens in all the states and territories in the 
union, and especially to the supreme and 
sovereign right of every lawful citizen, rich 
or poor, native or foreign born, white or 
black, to cast one free ballot in public elec- 
tions and to have that ballot duly counted. 
We hold the free and honest popular ballot 
and the just and equal representation of all 
the people to be the foundation of ourrepub- 
lican government, and demand effective leg- 
islation to secure the integrity and purity of 
elections, which are the foundation of all 
public authority. We charge that the present 
administration and the democratic majority 
in congress owe their existence to the sup- 
pression of the ballot by a criminal nullifica- 
tion of the constitution and laws of the 
United States. 

We are unconditionally in favor of the 
American system of protection; we protest 
against its destruction, proposed by the pres- 
ident and his party. They serve the interests 
of Europe; we will support the interests of 
America. We accept the issue and confi- 
dently appeal to the people for their judg- 
ment. The protective system must be main- 
tained. Its abandonment has always been 
followed by general disaster to all interests 
except those of the usurer and the sheriff. 
We denounce the Mills bill as destructive to 
the general business, the labor, and the farm-, 
ing interests of the country, and we heartily 
indorse the consistent and patriotic action 
of the republican representatives in congress 
in opposing its passage. 

We condemn the proposition of the demo- 
cratic party to place wool on the free list, 
and we insist that the duties thereon shall 
be adjusted and maintained so as to furnish 
full and adequate protection to that industry. 



The republican party would effect all 
needed reduction of the national revenue by 
repealing the taxes upon tobacco, which are 
an annoyance and burden to agriculture, and 
the tax upon spirits used in the arts and for 
mechanical purposes, and by such revision 
of the tariff laws as will tend to check im- 
ports of such articles as are produced by our 
people, the production of which gives em- 
ployment to our labor, and release from im- 
port duties those articles of foreign produc- 
tion (except luxuries) the like of which can- 
not be produced at home. If there shall still 
remain a larger revenue than is requisite for 
the wants of the government we favor the en- 
tire repeal of internal taxes rather than 
the surrender of any part of our protective 
system at the joint behest of the whisky 
trusts and the agents of foreign manufact- 
urers. 

We declare our hostility to the introduc- 
tion into this country of foreign contract 
labor and of Chinese labor, alien to our civil- 
ization and our constitution; and we demand 
the rigid enforcement of the existing laws 
against it, and favor such immediate legis- 
lation as will exclude such labor from our 
shores. 

We declare our opposition to all combina- 
tions of capital organized in trusts or other- 
wise to control arbitrarily the condition of 
trade among our citizens; and we recom- 
mend to congress and the state legislatures 
in their respective jurisdictions such legisla- 
tion as will prevent the execution of all 
schemes to oppress the people by undue 
charges on their supplies or by unjust rates 
for the transportation of their products to 
market. We approve the legislation by con- 
press to prevent alike unjust burdens and 
unfair discriminations between the states. 

We reaffirm the policy of appropriating the 
public lands of the United States to be home- 
steads for American citizens ana settlers 
not aliens which the republican party estab- 
lished in 18t;2 against the persistent opposi- 
tion of the democrats in congress, and which 
has brought our great western domain into 
such magnificent development. The restora- 
tion of unearned railroad land grants to 
the public domain for the use of actual set- 
tlers, which was begun under the administra- 
tion of President Arthur, should be contin- 
ued. We deny that the democratic party has 
ever restored one acre to the people, but de- 
clare that by the joint action of republicans 
and democrats about fifty millions of acres 
of unearned lands orisrinally granted for the 
construction of railroads have been restored 
to the public domain, in pursuance of the 
conditions inserted by the republican party 
in the original grants. We charge the demo- 
cratic administration with failure to execute 
the laws securing to settlers titles to their 
homesteads, and with using appropriations 
made for that purpose to harass innocent 
settlers with spies and prosecutions under 
the false pretense of exposing frauds and 
vindicating the law. 

The government by congress of the terri- 
tories is based upon necessity only to the end 
that they may become states in the union; 
therefore, whenever the conditions of popu- 
lation, material resources, public intelli- 
gence, and morality are such as to insure a 
stable local government therein the people 
of such territories should be permitted as a 
right inherent in them to form for them- 
selves constitutions and state governments 
I and be admitted into the union. Pending the 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



53 



preparation for statehood all officers thereof 
should be selected from the bona-flde resi- 
dents and citizens of the territory wherein 
they are to serve. South Dakota should of 
right be immediately admitted as a state in 
the union under the constitution framed and 
adopted by her people, and we heartily in- 
dorse the action of the republican senate in 
twice passing bills for her admission. The 
refusal of the democratic house of repre- 
sentatives, for partisan purposes, to favor- 
ably consider these bills is a willful violation 
of the sacred American principle of local 
self-government and merits the condemna- 
tion of all just men. The pending bills in the 
senate for acts to enable the people of Wash- 
ington, Nortn Dakota, and Montana terri- 
tories to form constitutions and establish 
state governments should be passed without 
unnecessary delay. The republican party 
pledges itself to do all in its power to facili- 
tate the admission of the territories of New 
Mexico, Wyoming, Idaho, and Arizona to the 
enjoyment of self-government as states, such 
of them as are now qualified as soon as pos- 
sible and the others as soon as they may be- 
come so. 

The political power of the mormon church 
in the territories as exercised in the past is 
a menace to free institutions too dangerous 
to be long suffered. Therefore we pledge 
the republican party to appropriate legisla- 
tion asserting the sovereignty of the nation 
in all territories where the same is ques- 
tioned, and in furtherance of that end to 
place upon the statute books legislation 
stringent enough to divorce the political 
from the ecclesiastical power, and thus 
stamp out the attendant wickedness of po- 
lygamy. 

The republican party is in favor of the use 
of both gold and silver as money, and con- 
demns the policy of the democratic adminis- 
tration in its efforts to demonetize silver. 

We demand the reduction of letter postage 
to 1 cent per ounce. 

In a republic like ours, where the citizen is 
the sovereign and the official the servant, 
where no power is exercised except by the 
will of the people, it is important that the 

vereign the people should possess in- 
telligence. The free school is the promoter 
of that intelligence which is to preserve us a 
free nation; therefore the state or nation, or 
both combined, should support free institu- 
tions of learning sufficient to afford to every 
child growing in the land the opportunity of 
a good common-school education. 

We earnestly recommend that prompt ac- 
tion be 'taken by congress in the enactment 
of such legislation as will best secure the re- 
habilitation of our American merchant 
marine, and we protest against the passage 
by congress of a free-ship bill as calculated 
to work injustice to labor by lessening the 
wages of those engaged in preparing mate- 
rials as well as those directly employed in 
our ship-yards. We demand appropriations 
for the early rebuilding of our navy; for the 
construction of coast fortifications and mod- 
ern ordnance and other approved modern 
means of defense for the protection of our 
defenseless harbors and cities; for the pay- 
ment of just pensions to our soldiers; for nec- 
essary works of national importance in the 
improvement of harbors and the channels of 
internal, coastwise, and foreign commerce; ! 
for the encouragement of the shipping inter- 
ests of the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific states, 
as well as for the payment of the maturing 
public debt. This policy will give employ- 
ment to our labor, activity to our various 
industries, increase the security of our 
country, promote trade, open new and direct 
markets for our produce, and cheapen the 



cost of transportation. We affirm this 
to he far better for our country than the 
democratic policy of loaning the govern- 
ment's money without interest to "pet 
banks." 

The conduct of foreign affairs by the pres- 
ent administration has been distinguished by 
its inefficiency and its cowardice. Having 
withdrawn from the senate all pending trea- 
ties effected by republican administrations 
for the removal of foreign burdens and re- 
strictions upon our commerce and for its ex- 
tension into better markets, it has neither 
effected nor proposed any others in their 
stead. Professing adherence to the Monroe 
doctrine, it has seen with idle complacency 
the extension of foreign influence in Central 
America and of foreign trade everywhere 
among our neighbors. It has refused to 
charter, sanction, or encourage any Ameri- 
can organization for constructing the Nic- 
aragua canal, a work of vital importance to 
the maintenance of the Monroe doctrine and 
of our national influence in Central and 
South America, and necessary for the devel- 
opment of trade with our Pacific territory, 
witb South America, and with the islands 
and farther coasts of the Pacific ocean. 

We arraign the present democratic admin- 
istration for its weak and unpatriotic treat- 
ment of the fisheries question and its pusil- 
lanimous surrender of the essential privi- 
leges to which our fishing vessels are en- 
titled in Canadian ports under the treaty of 
1818, the reciprocal maritime legislation of 
1830, and the comity of nations, and which 
Canadian fishing vessels receive in the ports 
of the United States. We condemn the 
policy of the present administration and the 
democratic majority in congress toward our 
fisheries as unfriendly and conspicuously un- 
patriotic, and as tending to destroy a valu- 
able national industry and an indispens- 
able resource of defense against a foreign 
enemy. 

The name American applies alike to all 
citizens of the republic and imposes upon all 
alike the same obligation of obedience to 
the laws. At the same time that citizenship 
is and must be the panoply and safeguard of 
him who wears it, and protect him, whether 
high or low, rich or poor, in all his civil 
rights. It should and must afford him pro- 
tection at home and follow and protect him 
abroad in whatever land he may be on a law- 
ful errand. 

The men who abandoned the republican 
party in 1884 and continue to adhere to the 
democratic party have deserted not only the 
cause of honest government, of sound 
finance, of freedom and purity of the ballot, 
but especially have deserted the cause of re- 
form in the civil service. We will not fail to 
keep our pledges because they have broken 
theirs, or because their candidate has broken 
his. We, therefore, repeat our declaration of 
1884 to-wit: "The reform of the civil serv- 
ice, auspiciously begun under the republican 
administration, should be completed by the 
further extension of the reform system 
already established by law to all the grades 
of the service to which it is applicable. The 
spirit and purpose of the reform should 
be observed in all executive appointments, 
and all laws at variance with the object of 
existing reform legislation should be re- 
pealed, to the end that the dangers to free 
institutions which lurk in the power of offi- 
cial patronage may be wisely and effectively 
avoided." 

The gratitude of the nation to the defend- 
ers of the union cannot be measured by laws. 
The legislation of congress should conform 
to the pledges made by a loyal people, and 
be so enlarged and extended as to provide 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



against the possibility that any man who 1 
honorably wore the federal uniform shall 
become an inmate of an almshouse or de- 
pendent upon private charity. In the pres- 
ence of an overflowing treasury it would be 
a public scandal to do less for those whose 
valorous services preserved t^ie govern- 
ment. We denounce the hostile spirit shown 
by President Cleveland in his numerous 
vetoes of measures for pension relief and 
the action of the democratic house of repre- 
sentatives in refusing even a consideration 
of general pension legislation. 

In support of the principles herewith 
enunciated we invite the co-operation of 
patriotic men of all parties, and especially of 
all workingmen, whose prosperity is seriously 
threatened by the free-trade policy of the 
present administration. 

IThe following was added near the close of 
the convention:] 

The first concern of all good government is 
the virtue and sobriety of the people and the 
purity of the home. The republican party 
cordially sympathizes with all wise and well- 
directed efforts for the promotion of temper- 
ance and morality. 

The nominees of the convention were: For 
president, Benjamin Harrison of Indiana, 
and for vice-president, Levi P. Morton of 
New York. 

Anti-Saloon Republican. 
Adopted at Xeio York May 3, iS88. 

1. We regard the saloon as the common and 
malignant foe of civilization and humanity. 
It is wasteful, vicious, and hostile to good 
government. It degrades the individual, 
ruins the family, debauches our youth, is de- 
structive of Sunday as the people's day of 
rest, corrupts the ballot, fosters crime, and 
threatens the very existence of the republic. 
It has become a pernicious and demoraliz- 
ing power in politics municipal, state, and 
national and is therein intrusive and ag- 
gressive. As a public enemy it ought to be 
abolished. 

2. We have with great satisfaction wit- 
nessed the rapid growth of the anti-saloon 
sentiment in all parts of the country, as 
shown by constitutional amendments, legis- 
lative enactments, and by the fact that in 
thirty-four states and territories laws have 
been enacted requiring the giving of scien- 
tific instruction in public schools on the ef- 
fects of alcohol upon the human system. The 
public conscience is aroused on this subject 
and will be satisfied with nothing less than 
the suppression of this monstrous evil. The 
saloon is doomed and must go. 

3. Recognizing the practical difficulties of 
legislation and enforcement, we unite upon 
the broad ground of active hostility to the 
saloon without dictating methoas ot proced- 
ure. The people nave the right and should 
have the opportunity of deciding how and 
when the saloon shall be suppressed. It 
should be destroyed with the weapons that 
are most effective and available. 

4. As members of the republican party we 
are proud of its glorious past, rejoice in its 
present vigor, and have an abiding confi- 
dence that it will prove to be the agent of di- 
vine Providence for the destruction of the 
saloon as it was for the overthrow of slavery. 
The saloon is moral slavery. 

5. Speaking for an overwhelming majority 
of republican voters and good citizens, we re- 
spectfully but most earnestly ask our breth- 
ren of the national republican convention 
that is to meet in Chicago to incorporate in 
their platform of principles a declaration of 
hostility to the saloon as clear and emphatic 
as the English language can make it. We 



ask this because it is right. Right is might. 

6. We earnestly invite the active co-opera- 
tion of all friends of temperance in this plan 
of campaign, which has in it the promise and 
potency of the speedy overthrow of the 
saloon party in national affairs and the im- 
mediate crippling and ultimate extinction of 
the legalized liquor traffic. 

Resolved, That recognizing the fact that 
during the early history of the republican 
party, when it made the most glorious por- 
tion of its record, it had the enthusiastic sup- 
port of the best women of the land, and rec- 
ognizing the further fact that the help of all i 
good women is more needed in the warfare i 
against the saloon, we appeal to them to give i 
a hearty support to the republican party 
whenever and wherever it stands for protec 
tion of the home against the saloon. 



Democratic. 
Adopted at St. Louis June 7, iS88. 

The democratic party of the United States, 
in national convention assembled, renews | 
the pledge of its fidelity to the democratic ! 
faith and reaffirms the platform adopted by ! 
its representatives in the convention of < 
1884, and indorses the views expressed by 
President Cleveland in his last earnest mes- 
sage to congress as the correct interpreta- 
tion of that platform upon the question of 
tariff reduction, and also indorses the efforts 
of our democratic representatives in con- 
gress to secure a reduction of excessive tax- 
ation. 

Chief among its principles of party faith 
are the maintenance of an indissoluble union 
of free and indestructible states, now about 
to enter upon its second century of unexam- 
pled progress and renown; devotion to a 
plan of government regulated by a written 
constitution strictly specifying every granted 
power and expressly reserving to the states ! 
or people the entire ungranted residue of 
power, the encouragement of a jealous popu- 
lar vigilance directed to all who have been 
chosen for brief terms to enact and execute 
the laws and are charged with the duty of 
preserving peace, insuring equality, and 
establishing justice. 

The -democratic party welcomes an exact- 
ing scrutiny of the administration of the ex- 
ecutive power, which four years ago was 
committed to its trust in the election of 
Grover Cleveland president of the United 
States, and it challenges the most searching 
inquiry concerning its fidelity and devotion 
to the pledges which then invited the suf- 
frages of the people. During a most critical 
period of our financial affairs resultingfrom 
overtaxation, the anomalous condition of 
our currency, and a public debt unmatured 
it has. by the adoption of a wise and states- 
manlike course, not only averted disaster 
but greatly promoted the prosperity of the 
people. 

It has reversed the improvident and un- 
wise policy of the republican party touching 
the public domain, and has reclaimed from i 
corporations and syndicates, alien and do- 
mestic, and restored to the people nearly 
one hundred million acres of valuable land, 
to be sacredly held as homesteads for our 
citizens. 

While carefully guarding the interests of 
the people, consistent with the principles of 
justice and equity, it has paid out more for ! 
pensions and bounties to the soldiers and 
sailors of the republic than was ever paid be- 
fore during an equal period. 

It has adopted and consistently pursued a 
firm and prudent foreign policy, preserving 
peace with all nations while scrupulously 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



55 



maintaining all the rights and interests of 
our own government and people, at home 
and abroad. 

The exclusion from our shores of Chinese 
laborers has been effectually secured under 
the provisions of a treaty the operation of 
which hss been postponed by the action of a 
republican majority in the senate. 

Honest reform in the civil service has been 
Inaugurated and maintained by President 
Cleveland, and he has brought the public 
service to the highest standard of efficiency, 
not only by rule and precept but by the ex- 
ample of his own untiring and unselfish ad- 
ministration of public affairs. 

In every branch and department of the 
government under democratic control the 
rights and the welfare of all the people have 
been guarded and defended; every public in- 
terest has been protected, and the equality 
of all our citizens before the law, without re- 
gard to race or color, has been steadfastly 
maintained. 

Upon its record thus exhibited and upon 
the pledge of a continuance to the people of 
the benefits of democracy it invokes a re- 
newal of popular trust by the re-election of a 
chief magistrate who has been faithful, able, 
and prudent, and invokes in addition to that 
trust the transfer also to the democracy of 
the entire legislative power. 

The republican party, controlling the sen- 
ate and resisting in both houses of congress a 
reformation of unjust and unequal tax laws 
which have outlasted the necessities of 
war and are now undermining the abund- 
ance of a long period of peace deny to the 
people equality before the law and the fair- 
ness and the justice which are their right. 
The cry of American labor for a better share 
in the rewards of industry ia stifled with 
false pretenses, enterprise is fettered and 
bound down to home markets, capital is dis- 
couraged with doubt, and unequal, unjust 
laws can neither be properly amended nor 
repealed. The democratic party will con- 
tinue, with all the power confided to it, the 
struggle to reform these laws in accordance 
with the pledges of its last platform, in- 
dorsed at the ballot-box by the suffrages of 
the people. Of all the industrious freemen 
of our land, the immense majority, including 
every tiller of the soil, gain no advantage 
from excessive tax laws, but the price of 
nearly everything they buy is increased by 
the favoritism of an unequal system of tax 
legislation. 

All unnecessary taxation is unjust taxa- 
tion. It is repugnant to the creed of democ- 
racy that by such taxation the cost of the 
necessaries of life should be unjustifiably in- 
creased to all our people. Judged by demo 
cratic principles, the interests of the people 
are betrayed when, by unnecessary taxation, 
trusts and combinations are permitted to ex- 
ist which, while unduly enriching the few 
that combine, rob the body of our citizens by 
depriving them of the benefits of natural 
competition. Every rule of governmental ac- 
tion is violated when, through unnecessary 
taxation, a vast sum of money far beyond 
the needs of an economical administration- 
is drawn from tne people, the channels of 
trade, and accumulated as a demoralizing 
surplus in the national treasury. 

The money now lying idle in the federal 
treasury resulting from superfluous taxation 
amounts to more than $125,000,000, and the 
surplus collected is reaching the sum of more 
than $60,000,000 annually. Debauched by this 
immense temptation, the remedy of the re- 
publican party is to meet and exhaust by ex- 
travagant appropriations and expenses, 
whether constitutional or not, the accumu- 
lation of extravagant taxation. The demo- 



cratic policy is to enforce frugality in public 
expenses and abolish unnecessary taxation. 

Our established domestic industries and 
enterprises should not and need not be en- 
dangered by the reduction and correction of 
the burdens of taxation. On the contrary, 
a fair and careful revision of our tax laws, 
with due allowance for the difference be- 
tween the wages of American and foreign 
labor, must promote and encourage every 
branch of such industries and enterprises 
by giving them assurance of an extended 
market and steady and continuous opera- 
tions. In the interests of American labor, 
which should in no event be neglected, the 
revision of our tax laws contemplated by 
the democratic party should promote the 
advantage of such labor by cheapening the 
cost of necessaries of life in the home of 
every workingman and at the same time se- 
cure to him steady and remunerative em- 
ployment. 

Upon this question of tariff reform, so 
closely concerning every phase of our na- 
tional life, and upon every question involved 
in the problem of good government, the dem- 
ocratic party submits its principles and pro- 
fessions to the intelligent suffrages of the 
American people. 

The nominees of the convention were: 
For president, Grover Cleveland of New 
York; for vice-president, Allen G. Thurman 
of Ohio. 

Prohibition. 
Adopted at Indianapolis May 31, 1888. 

The prohibition party, in national conven- 
tion assembled, acknowledging Almighty 
God as the source of all power in govern- 
ment, do hereby declare: 

1. That the manufacture, importation, ex- 
portation, transportation, and sale of alco- 
holic beverages shall be made public crimes, 
and punished as such. 

2. That such prohibition must be secured 
through amendments of our national and 
state constitutions, enforced by adequate 
laws adequately supported by administrative 
authority, and to this end the organization 
of the prohibition party is imperatively de- 
manded in state and nation. 

3. That any form of license, taxation, or 
regulation of the liquor traffic is contrary to 
good government: that any party which sup- 
ports regulation, license, or tax enters into 
alliance with such traffic and becomes the 
actual foe of the state's welfare, and that we 
arraign the republican and democratic 
parties for their persistent attitude in favor 
of the licensed iniquity, whereby they op- 
pose the demand of the people for prohibi- 
tion and, through open complicity with the 
liquor cause, defeat the enforcement of law. 

4. For the immediate abolition of the inter- 
nal-revenue system, whereby our national 
government is deriving support from our 
greatest national vice. 

5. That, an adequate public revenue being 
necessary, it may properly be raised by im- 
port duties and by an equitable assessment 
upon the property and the legitimate busi- 
ness of the country, but import duties should 
be so reduced that no surplus shall be ac- 
cumulated in the treasury, and that the bur- 
dens of taxation shall be removed from 
foods, clothing, and other comforts and 
necessaries of life. 

6. That civil-service appointments for all 
civil offices chiefly clerical in their duties 
should be based upon moral, intellectual, 
and physical qualifications, and not upon 
party service or party necessity. 

7. That the right of suffrage rests on no 
mere circumstance of race, color, sex, or na- 



56 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



tionality, and that wherever from any cause 
it has been withheld from citizens who are of 
suitable age and mentally and morally qual- 
fled for the exercise of an intelligent bal- 
lot it should be restored by the people 
through the legislatures of the several states 
on such educational basis as they may deem 
wise. 

8. For the abolition of polygamy and the 
establishment of uniform laws governing 
marriage and divorce. 

9. For prohibiting all combinations of cap- 
ital to control and to increase the cost of 
products for popular consumption. 

10. For the preservation and defense of the 
sabbath as a civil institution without oppress- 
ing any who religiously observe the same on 
any other day than the first day of the week. 
That arbitration is the Christian, wise, and 
economic method of settling national dif- 
ferences, and the same method should, by 
judicious legislation, be applied to the 
settlement ot disputes between large bodies 
of employes and employers; that the aboli- 
tion of the saloon would remove tne bur- 
densmoral, physical, pecuniary, and social 
which now oppress labor and rob it of its 
earnings, and would prove to be the wise 
and successful way of promoting labor re- 
form, and we invite labor and capital to 
unite with us for the accomplishment there- 
of; that monopoly in the land is a wrong to 
the people, and public land should be re- 
served to actual settlers, and that men and 
women should receive equal wages for equal 
work. 

11. That our immigration laws should be so 
enforced as to prevent the introduction into 
our country of all convicts, inmates of de- 
pendent institutions, and of others physically 
incapacitated for self-support, and that no 
person should have the ballot in any state 
who is not a citizen of the United States. 
Recognizing and declaring that prohibition 
of the liquor traffic has become the dominant 
issue in national politics, we invite to full 
party fellowship all those who on this one 
dominant issue are with us agreed, in the 
full belief that this party can and will remove 
sectional differences, promote national unity, 
and insure the best welfare of our native 
land. 

The nominees of the convention were: For 
president, Clinton B. Fisk of New Jersey, 
and for vice-president, John A. Brooks of 
Missouri. 

Union Labor, 
Adopted at Cincinnati May 16, 1888. 

1. "While we believe that the proper solution 
of the financial system will greatly relieve 
those now in danger of losing their homes 
by mortgage-foreclosure and enable all in- 
dustrious persons to secure a home as the 
highest result of civilization, we oppose 
land monopoly in every form, demand the 
forfeiture of unearned grants, the limita- 
tion of land-ownership, and such other legis- 
lation as will stop soeculation in land and 
holding it unused from those whose necessi- 
ties require it. We believe the earth was 
made for the people, and not to enable an 
idle aristocracy to subsist through rents 
upon the toil of the industrious, and that 
"corners'' in land are as bad as "corners" in 
food, and that those who are not residents or 
citizens should not be allowed to own land 
in the United States. A homestead should be 
exempt to a limited extent from execution 
or taxation. 

2. The means of communication and trans- 
portation should be owned by the people, as 
is the United States postal system. 

3. The establisiiing of a national mone- 



tary system in the interest of the producers 
instead of the speculators and usurers, by 
which the circulating medium in necessary 
quantity and full legal tender should be 
issued directly to the people without the in- 
tervention of banks, or loaned to citizens 
Tn land security at a low rate of interest, 
relieve them from extortions of usury 



upoi 
To ] 

and enable them to control the money sup- 
ply, postal savings banks should be estab- 
lished. While we have free coinage of gold 



we should have free coinage of silver. We 
demand the immediate application of all the 
idle money in the United States treasury to 
the payment of the bonded debt, and con- 
demn the further issue of interest-bearing 
bonds either by the national government or 
by states, territories, or municipalities. 

4. Arbitration should take the place of 
strikes and other injurious methods of set- 
tling labor disputes. The letting of convict 
labor to contractors should be prohibited, 
the contract system be abolished in public 
works, the hours of labor in industrial es- 
tablishments be reduced commensurate 
with the increased production by labor-sav- 
ing machinery, employes be protected from 
bodily injury, equal pay given for equal 
work for both sexes, and labor, agricultural, 
and co-operative associations be fostered 
and encouraged by law. The foundation of 
a republic is in the intelligence of its citi- 
zens, and children who are drawn into work- 
shops, mines, and factories are deprived of 
the education which should be secured to all 
by proper leaislation. 

5. We demand the passage of a service 
pension bill to pension every honorably 
discharged soldier and sailor of the United 
States. 

6. A graduated income tax is the most 
equitable system of taxation, placing the 
burden of government upon those who are 
best able to pay, instead of laying it on the 
farmers and exempting millionaire bond- 
holders and corporations. 

7. We demand a constitutional amendment 
making United States senators elective by a 
direct vote of the people. 

8. We demand a strict enforcement of laws 
prohibiting the importation of subjects of 
foreign countries under contracts. 

9. We demand the passage and enforce- 
ment of such legislation as will absolutely 
exclude the Chinese from the United States 

10. The right to vote is inherent in citizen- 
ship, irrespective of sex, and is properly 
within the province of state legislation. 

11. The paramount issues to be solved in 
the interests of humanity are the abolition of 
usury, monopoly, and trusts; and we de- 
nounce the republican and democratic par- 
ties for creating and perpetuating these 
monstrous evils. 

The nominees of the convention were: For 
president, A. J. Streeter of Illinois; for vice- 
president, Charles E. Cunningham of Arkan- 
sas. 

United Labor. 

Adopted at Cincinnati May 16, 1H88. 
We, the delegates of the united labor party 
of the United States, in national convention 
assembled, hold that the corruptions of gov- 
ernment and the impoverishment of the 
masses result from neglect of the self-evi 
dent truths proclaimed by the founders of 
this republic, that all men are created equal 
and are endowed with inalienable rights. 
We aim at the abolition of the system which 
compels men to pay their fellow-creatures 
for the use of the common bounties of 
nature and permits monopolizers to deprive 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



57 



labor of natural opportunities for employ- 
ment. 

We see access to farming land denied to 
labor except on payment of exorbitant rent 
or the acceptance of mortgage burdens, and 
labor, thus forbidden to employ itself, 
driven into the cities. We see the wage- 
workers of the cities subjected to this un- 
natural competition, and forced to pay an ex- 
orbitant share of their scanty earnings for 
cramped and unhealthful lodgings. We see 
the same intense competition condemning 
the great majority of business and profes- 
sional men to a bitter and often unavailing 
struggle to avoid bankruptcy, and that while 
the price of all that Iab9r produces ever falls 
the price of land ever rises. 

We trace these evils to a fundamental 
wrong the making of the land on which nil 
must live the exclusive property of but a 
portion of the community. To this denial 
of natural rights are due want of employ- 
ment, low wages, business depressions, that 
intense competition which makes it so diffi- 
cult for the majority of men to get a com- 
fortable living, and that wrongful distribu- 
tion of wealth which is producing the 
millionaire on one side and the tramp on the 
other. 

To give all men an interest in the land of 
their country: to enable all to share in the 
benefits of social growth and improvement; 
to prevent the shutting out of labor from 
employment by the monopolization of nat- 
ural opportunities: to do away with the one- 
sided competition which cuts down wages to 
starvation rates; to restore life to business 
and prevent periodical depressions: to do 
away with that monstrous injustice which 
deprives producers of the fruits of their toil 
while idlers grow rich; to prevent the con- 
flicts which are arraying class against class, 
and which are fraught with menacing dan- 
gers to society, we propose so to change the 
existing system of taxation that no one shall 
be taxed on the wealth he produces, nor uny 
one suffered to appropriate wealth he does 
not produce by taking to himself the in- 
creasing values which the growth of society 
adds to land. 

What we propose is not the disturbing of 
any man in his holding or title, but by taxa- 
tion of land according to its value, and not 
according to its area, to devote to common 
use and benefit those values which arise 
not from the exertion of the individual but 
from the growth of society, and to abolish all 
taxes on industry and its products. This in- 
creased taxation of land values must, while 
relieving the working farmer and small 
homestead-owner of the undue burdens now 
imposed upon them, make it unprofitable 
to hold land for speculation, and thus throw 
open abundant opportunities for the em- 
ployment of labor and the building up of 
homes. 

We would do away with the present unjust 
and wasteful system of finance, which piles 
up hundreds of millions of dollars in treasury 
vaults while we are paying interest on an 
enormous debt; and we would establish in 
its steady a monetary system in which a legaf- 
tender circulating.medium should be issued 
by the government without the intervention 
of banks. 

We wish to abolish the present unjust and 
wasteful system of ownership of railroads 
and telegraphs by private corporations a 
system which, while failing to supply ade- 
quately public needs, impoverishes the 
farmer, oppresses the manufacturer, ham- 
pers the merchant, impedes travel and com- 
munication, and builds up enormous fort- 
unes and corrupting monopolies that are be- 
coming more powerful than the government 



itself. For this system we would substitute 
government ownership and control for the 
benefit of the whole people instead of pri- 
vate profit. 

While declaring the foregoing to be the 
fun tamental principles and aims of the 
united labor party, and while conscious that 
no reform can give effectual and permanent 
relief to labor that does not involve the 
legal recognition of equal rights to natural 
opportunities, we, nevertheless, as measures 
of relief from some of the evil effects of 
ignoring those rights, favor such legislation 
as may tend to reduce the hours of labor, to 
prevent the employment of children of ten- 
der years, to avoid the competition of cpn- 
vict labor with honest industry, to secure the 
sanitary inspection of tenements, factories, 
and mines, and to put an end to the abuse of 
conspiracy laws. 

We desire also to so simplify the procedure 
of our courts and diminish the expense of 
legal nroceedings that the poor therein may 
be p aced on an equality with the rich, and 
the long delays which now result in scandal- 
ous miscarriages of justice may be pre- 
vented. 

Since the ballot is the only means by which 
in our republic the redress of political and 
social grievances is to be sought, we es- 
pecia ly and emphatically declare for the 
adoption of what is known as the Australian 
system of voting, in order that the effectual 
secrecy of the ballot and the relief of can- 
didates for public office from the heavy ex- 
penses now imposed upon them may pre- 
vent bribery and intimidation, do away with 
practical discriminations in favor of the rich 
and unscrupulous, and lessen the pernicious 
influence of money in politics. 

We denounce the democratic and repub- 
lican parties as hopelessly and shamelessly 
corrupt, and, by reason of their affiliation 
with monopolies, equally unworthy of the 
suffrages of those who do not live upon pub- 

th 



lie plunder; we therefore require of those 
who would aci with us that they sever all 
connection witn both. 

i support of these aims we solicit the co- 
ration of all patriotic citizens who, sick of 



In su 
ope 

the degradation "of politics, desire by consti 
tutional methods to establish justice, to pre- 
serve liberty, to extend the spirit of frater- 
nity, and to elevate humanity. 

The nominees of the convention were: For 
president, Robert H. Cowdrey of Illinois, and 
for vice-president, W. H. T. Wakefield of 
Kansas. 

Equal Rights. 
Adop'ed at Des Moines May 15, 18*8. 

Resolved, That while we do not espouse the 
cause of woman's rights or man's rights dis- 
tinctively and separately as such, we judge it 
best in the present formative state or public 
opinion, and as a proper balancing in the 
present, in view of the past, to put a woman's 
name at the head of the ticket. 

Resolved, That history having demon- 
strated the fact that women in all ages have 
proven capable, in isolated instances, of 
leading armies, conquering cities, and ruling 
nations, and believing that we have such a 
one among us to-day, a woman with scope of 
vision, intellectual vigor, and executive abil- 
ity equal to the task; one possessing, more- 
over, from a long residence at the capital and 
extensive travel, a thorough acquaintance 
with the state, conditions of our country, 
and with the magnates of its chosen mascu- 
line rulers, and who, comprehending the 
abuse of our times, with quick intuitions 
grasps the remedy; a woman who has stormed 
the redoubts of legal practice and prejudice 



58 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



and fought her right of way to stand and 
plead the people's cause before the bar 
of our highest courts; upon whose benign 
brow is set the signet of an infinite womanly 
sympathy, blended with favor. 

Resolved, That we place her name at the 
head of the equal-rights ticket, believing 
Belva A. Lockwood its most fitting expo- 
nent and leader. 

Believing that the disfranchisement of 
women has much to do with the growing in- 
fluence of crime in the nation, we, the 
women of America, by their representatives 
here assembled, do pledge ourselves that if 
our party and candidates come into power 
equal rights shall be meted out to all 
citizens, without regard to sex or color a 
fair ballot and an honest count. 

We shall ask congress to pass an enabling 
act giving the women of this nation the right 
to vote in all election precincts of the United 
States, as women are citizens, amenable to 
the laws and liable to taxation. 

That the settlement of estates shall be the 
same in the courts of joint property, and in 
the case of .the death of the wife her heirs 
shall receive the same consideration as those 
of tbe husband, without consulting his inter- 
ests. In case of the death of the husband 
the wife shall be administrator and guar- 
dian of her children without any process of 
law. 

We pledge ourselves to the cause of tem- 
perance and are in favor of arbitration by 
international commission instead of the 
sword, although under the circumstances of 
the late war our union soldiers and sailors 
were inspired by the purest patriotism and 
principles of right. And we will demand of 
congress to pension them each and every 
one if they need help. 

That we urge measures to be taken to stop 
the immigration of the scum of Europe and 
Asia to our shores, and that we protect our 
workingmen from cheap foreign labor by 
protecting our home markets and manufact- 
urers. 

That land owned by foreign" landlords and 
wealthy corporations be heavily taxed to 
support the government and put sugar and 
lumber on the free list. And abolish taxes 
on whisky and tobacco, as it makes the gov- 
ernment a partner in their excessive use 
the evil of tne century. 

That in our candidates, Belva A. Lock- 
wood and Albert H. Love of Philadelphia, 
we have every confidence in their ability, 
integrity, and firmness in carrying out these 
grand and glorious principles. 

The nominees of the convention were: For 
president, (Mrs.) Belva A. Lockwood of 
Washington. D. C., and for vice-president, 
Albert H. Love of Pennsylvania. Mr. Love 
declined and Charles S. Welles of New York 

was substituted. 

American. 
Adopted at Washington Aug. 15, 1888. 

Believing that the time has arrived when a 
due regard for tiie present and future pros- 
perity of our country makes it imperative 
that the people of the United States of 
America should take full and entire control 
ot'their government, to the exclusion of rev- 
olutionary and incendiary foreigners now 
seeking our shores from every quarter of 
the world, and recognizing that the first and 
most important duty of an American citizen 
is to maintain this government in all attain- 
able purity and strengtu, we make the fol- 
lowing declaration of principles: 

Resolved, That all law-abiding citizens of 
the United States of America, whether na- 
tive or foreign born, are political equals 



I (except as provided by the constitution), and 
| all are entitled to and should receive the full 
protection of the laws. 

Whereas, There are seventeen states in 
this union wherein persons are allowed to 
vote at all elections without being citizens 
of the United States; and, whereas, such a 
systems tends to place the management of 
the government into the hands of those who 
owe no allegiance to our political institu- 
tions; therefore, 

Resolved, That the constitution of the 
United States should be so amended as to 
prohibit the federal and state governments 
from conferring upon any person the right 
to vote unless such person be a citizen of 
the United States. 

Resolved, That we are in favor of foster- 
ing and encouraging American industries of 
every class and kind; that the issue of "pro- 
tection" versus "free trade" is a Iraud and 
a snare. The best "protection" is that 
which protects the labor and life-blood of 
the republic from the degrading competi- 
tion with and contamination by imported 
foreigners; and the most dangerous "free 
trade" is that in paupers, criminals, com- 
munists, and anarchists, in which the bal- 
ance has always been against the United 
States. 

Whereas, One of the greatest evils of un- 
restricted foreign immigration is the reduc- 
tion of the wages of American workingmen 
and workingwomen to the level of the un- 
derfed and underpaid labor of foreign coun- 
tries. Therefore, 

Resolved, That we demand that no immi- 
grant shall be admitted into the United States 
without a passport obtained from the Ameri- 
can consul at the port from which he sails; 
that no passport shall be issued to any pau- 
per, criminal, or insane person, or to any 
person who, in the judgment of the consul, 
is not likely to become a desirable citizen of 
the United States; and that for each immi- 
grant passport there shall be collected by the 
consul issuing the same the sum of one hun- 
dred dollars ($100), to be by him paid into the 
treasury of the United States. 

Resolved, That all persons not in sympa- 
thy with our government should be prohib- 
ited from immigrating to these United States. 

Resolved, That the naturalization laws of 
the United States should be unconditionally 
repealed. 

Resolved, That the soil of America should 
belong to Americans; that no alien non-resi- 
dent snould be permitted to own real estate 
in the United States, and that the realty pos- 
sessions of the resident alien should be lim- 
ited in value and area. 

Resolved, That we favor educating the 
boys and girls of American citizens as me- 
chanics and artisans, thus fitting them for 



the places now filled by foreigners, who sup- 
ply the greater part of our skilled labor, and 
thereby almost entirely control the great 



industries of our country, save, perhaps, 
that of agriculture alone; and, that our boys 
and girls may be taught trades, we demand 
the establishment and maintenance of free 
technical schools. 

Resolved, That universal education is a 

necessity of our government, and that an 

I American free-school system should be 

! maintained and preserved as the safeguard 

of American liberty. 

| Resolved, That no language except the En- 
glish shall be taught in the common schools 
supported at the public expense. 

Whereas, Unemployed population is the 

' greatest evil that can befall any nation, s,nd 

I in this country it cannot be eliminated by 

European methods, such as extra police and 

i standing armies; therefore, 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



Resolved, That the surplus in the treasury 
should be devoted to the material improve- 
ment of our coast and frontier defenses and 
the construction of an American navy in 
American workshops by American labor. 

Resolved, That we demand the enactment 
of a law which shall require all persons hav- 
ing charge in any way, in any department, 
bureau, or division of the government to 
forthwith dismiss from the public service all 
persons employed in or about any such de- 
partment, bureau, or division, in any way or 
manner, who are not citizens of the United 
States by nativity or by having fully com- 
pleted their naturalization papers by due 
process of law; that no person shall be ap- 
pointed to or hold office or place in the service 
of the United State who is not a citizen of 
the United States, either by having fully 
completed his naturalization and taken out 
his final papers by due form and process of 
law or who is not a citizen of the United 
States by nativity. 

Resolved, That after the year 1898 it shall 
be required of every voter, before he exer- 
cises the right of suffrage, to be able to read 
the written or printed constitution of the 
United States in the English language and to 
write his own name upon the register, to 
show that he is fitted to share in the admin- 
istration of the government of the republic. 

Resolved, That we recognize the right of 
labor to organize for its protection, and by all 
lawful and peaceful means to secure to 
itself the greatest reward for its thrift and 
industry; and we believe in sovernmental 
arbitration in the settlement of industrial 
differences. 

Resolved, That we are in favor of such 
legislation by congress as will re-establish 
the American marine. 

Resolved, That no flag shall float over any 
public building municipal, state, or national 
in the United States except the stars and 
stripes. 

Resolved, That we reassert the American 
principles of absolute freedom of religious 



worship and belief; the permanent separa- 
tion of church and state; and we oppose the 
appropriation of public money or property 
to any church or institution administered by 
a church. We maintain that all church prop- 
erty should be subject to taxation. 

Resolved, That the presidential term shall 
be extended to six years and the president 
shall be ineligible for re-election. 

Resoived. That the American party de- 
clares that it recognizes no north, no south, 
no east, no west, in these United States; but 
one people, pledged to our liberty and our 
independence. 

The nominees of the convention were: For 
president, James L. Curtis of Connecticut, 
and for vice-president, J. R. Greer of Ten- 
nessee. Mr. Greer declined and D. P. Wig- 
ginton of California was substituted in his 
place after the convention adjourned. 

Industrial Reform, 

Adopted at Washington Feb. 22, 1888. 

Whereas, It is possible to secure manj 

needed reforms under a correct financial and 

industrial system; therefore, 

Resolved, By the industrial party, in na- 
tional convention assembled at the city of 
Washington, D. C., on the 22d day of Feb- 
ruary, 1888: 

1. That the government shall provide full 
legal-tender money sufficient in volume to 
meet the requirements of the people. 

2. That the secretary of the treasury shall 
immediately redeem all public interest- 
bearing bonds. 

3. That all banks of issue shall be abol- 
ished. 

4. That the privilege of voting is inherent 
in citizenship and the right to vote should 
be accorded to women. 

The nominees of the convention were: 
For president, Albert E. Redstone of Cali- 
fornia, and for vice-president, John Calvin 
of Kansas. 



STATE ELECTIONS OF 1889. 



Iowa Republicans. 

Adopted at Des Moines Aug. 15, 1889. 
Resolved, That the republican party of 
Iowa, in convention assembled, congratulates 
the country on the restoration of the party 
to power in the federal government. We in- 
dorse the administration of President Harri- 
son as eminently wise, loyal, and just. We 
favor a liberal construction of the oension 
laws, and such further legislation asVill se- 
cure to the old soldier his just dues from a 
government he has faithfully served and 
which he has enriched by his sacrifice. 

2. That we demand of congress the protec- 
tion of American industry when it does not 
foster trusts or trade conspiracies, and we 
demand the same protection for farm prod- 
ucts that is given to the products or the 
labor of other classes. 

3. That we reaffirm the principle and policy 
of state railway regulation. We favor main- 
taining equality among all localities and indi- 
viduals, and we oppose the granting of favor 
to one class of citizens denied the others. 
And, should experience demonstrate the ne- 
cessity, we favor such changes in the law as 
should be made in the interests of right and 
justice to all. We urge upon congress the 
absolute prevention of rebates and discrimi- 
nations on railways, which foster monopolies 
and prevent competition. 

4. That it is the duty of the state and feder- 
al governments to enact and execute laws to 
punish trade conspiracies, trusts, and com- 



bines, designed to limit the production of the 
necessaries of life, unnaturally disturb and 
raise prices, and interfere with the natural 
course of trade, and which injuriously divert 
trade and traffic from the cities and towns 
of Iowa to commercial centers outside of 
our bordjers. 

5. That we reaffirm the past utterances of 
the republican party of Iowa upon prohibi- 
tion, which has become the settled policy of 
the state, and upon which there should be no 
backward step. We stand for the complete 
enforcement of the law. 

6. That we extend a hearty welcome to the 
four new states which have been so long 
knocking at the door of the union, and we 
congratulate them on republican success, 
whereby their admission into the sisterhood 
of states was so happily achieved. 

7. That we deplore the loss of life on our 
railways and the dangers attending so many 
of our citizens engaged in railway employ- 
ment, and we urge upon the legislature to 
take such practical steps as will secure all 
possible protection to this class of our people. 

8. That we favor the establishment of courts 
of arbitration for the settlement of differ- 
ences between corporations and organized 
labor. 

9. That we profoundly sympathize with the 
bona-flde settlers on the Des Moines river 
lands, and we express the hope that in the 
end they will be made secure in the rights to 
which they are entitled. 

10. That we earnestly indorse the eminently 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



wise, vigorous, and courageous administra- 
tion of Gov. Larrabee. and we approve his i 
policy that all laws shall be fearlessly and 
honestly enforced. 

Iowa Democrats. 
Adopted at Sioux City Sept. is, 1889. 

The democracy of Iowa, in convention as- 
sembled, indorse the declaration of princi- 
ples made by the democracy of St. Louis in 
1888. We renew our opposition to the uncon- 
stitutional policy of nigh tariff taxation, 
which robs the many to enrich the few, lays 
its heaviest burdens on the farmer, the me- 
chanic, and the day laborer, gives no return 
through any channel to those whom it daily 
robs, and fosters trusts, which are the legiti- 
mate results of our present tariff system, and 
we denounce the fallacy of the republican 
state platform of Iowa that a high tariff is or 
can be any protection to the farmer. 

Resolved, That we favor the Australian 
system of voting.tothe end that we may have 
an honest ballot, uncontrolled by bribery or 
employers. 

Resolved, That we recognize the doctrine 
of state and national control of railroads and 
other corporations, and approve the same as 
an efficient means of protecting the people 
against unjust, discriminating, and oppress- 
ive rates. 

Resolved, That in the interest of true tem- 
perance we demand the passage of a care- 
fully guarded license-tax law, which shall 
provide for the issuance of licenses in towns, 
townships, and muncipalities of the state by 
vote of the people of such corporations, and 
which shall provide that each license and an- 
nual tax of $500 be paid into the county treas- 
ury; and such further tax as the town, town- 
ship, or municipal corporation shall pre- 
scribe, the proceeds thereof to go to the use 
of such municipalities. 

Resolved, That we also arraign the repub- 
lican party for changing the pharmacy laws 
of the state, by which a great hardship was 
worked to honorable pharmacists and upon 
all the people requiring liquors for the actual 
necessities of medicine. 

Resolved, That while we demand that all 
honorably discharged union soldiers who 
were injured in the line of duty or who are 
unable by reason of age or infirmities to 
support themselves shall receive liberal pen- 
sions and the special care of the government, 
we denounce as an insult to every brave 
soldier, and as making the pension roll a roll 
of dishonor, the decision of the present na 
tional administration that "the dishonor- 
able discharge of a soldier from the serv- 
ice of the United States is no bar to a pen- 
sion." 

Resolved, -That we honestly invite the co- 
operation of all persons, irrespective of 
former party affiliations, who approve of the 
foregoing resolutions to unite with us in the 
election of an executive and legislature who 
will carry out these principles. 

Iowa Prohibitionists. 
Adopted at Cedar Rapids June 6, 1889. 

The prohibition party of Iowa, in conven- 
tion at Cedar Rapids, June t>, 1889. submit to 
the consideration of the people of this com- 
monwealth the following platform of prin- 
ciples: 

1. We acknowledge Almighty God as the 
source of ali power in human government. 
' 2. The manufacture, importation, exporta- 
tion, transportation, and sale of alcoholic 
beverages shall be made public crimes and 
be prohibited and punished as such. 

3. Such prohibition must be secured through 
amendments of our national and state con- 



stitutions, enforced by adequate laws sup- 
ported by administrative authority: and to 
this end the organization of the prohibition 
party is imperatively demanded in both state 
and nation. 

4. Any form of license, taxation, or regula- 
tion of the liquor traffic in the state or nation 
is contrary to good government. 

5. Believing in civil and political equality 
of the sexes, that none should be taxed with- 
out representation, that the right of suffrage 
rests on no mere circumstance of race, color, 
nationality, or sex, and that the ballot in the 
hands of woman is her right for protection 
and would prove a powertul ally for the 
abolition of the liquor traffic, we favor and 
demand the submission of the question of 
equal suffrage to a popular vote. 

6. We declare for the preservation and de- 
fense of the sabbath as a civil institution, 
without oppressing any who religiously ob- 
serve the same on any other than the first 
day of the week. 

7. Arbitration is the Christian, wise, and 
economical method of settling national dif- 
ferences, and the same method should by judi- 
cious legislation be applied to the settlement 
of disputes between employes and employers; 
that the abolition of the saloon would largely 
remove the burdens moral, physical, pecun- 
iary, and social which now oppress labor 
and rob it of its earnings, and would prove to 
be the wise and successful way of promoting 
labor reform; and we invite labor and capital 
to unite with us for this end. 

8. We firmly oppose all monopolies and 
trusts, either by individuals or corporations, 
which unjustly oppress the toiling masses, 
whether railroads, telegraph lines, land syn- 
dicates, oil or express companies, or unjust 
tariffs. 

9. Our immigration laws should be so en- 
forced as to prevent the introduction into our 
country of all convicts, inmates of dependent 
institutions, and others physically inoipac- 1 
itated for self-support; and we invite to our [ 
shores subjects of all other governments who I 
come with a view of becoming loyal American 
citizens. 

10. We favor the adoption of the Australian 
method of conducting elections. 

11. We favor such a change in the national 
constitution as shall enable us to elect our 
president, vice-president, and United States I 
senators by direct vote. 

12. We take this occasion to express our joy I 
and thanksgiving to God that He has raised 
up that noble army of women known as the 
Woman's Christian Temperance union. We 
revere the name of that greatest woman of 
our day? Frances E. Willard, to whom is com- 
mitted the leadership of this grand organiza- ! 
tion. "For God and Home and Native Land," 
we realize that the aim of this white-ribbon 
army is the same as that of the prohibition 
partv, and we grasp the right hand of fellow- 
ship which they extend to us, with solemn 
vows to be that power in the politics of this 
nation which shall cause the divine reforms 
begun in the crusade to become a permanent 
reality in our government. 

Iowa Union Labor. 
Adopted at Den Jfoines Sept. 5, 1889. 
The union labor or greenback party of Iowa 
speaks again as it has spoken before. It will 
never surrender! It will reorganize in 
every county and renew the battle against [ 
the modern Philistines who rule to ruin. The I 
policy so long pursued by the republicans 
and Adopted by the democrats during their 
late administration of contracting the cur- 
rency of the country and locking up in cel- 
lars one-third of ail the money in the United 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



(51 



States to inflate the value of every dollar 
and every debt has demoralized prices until 
our f armers,manufacturers,and business men 
are being driven into trusts or bankruptcy. 
This policy has been hid behind a mock 
tariff war. While forcing the country through 
a financial hell it is entertained by a cease- 
less wrangle about tariff" taxes. The green- 
backers have faithfully and constantly 
warned the country that the present distress 
would follow the financial crimes of its 
rulers. 

We indorse the national union labor plat- 
form adopted at Cincinnati last year. 

We pledge the people of Iowa that if we 
can obtain the power we will 

1. Amend the United States constitution so 
as to give the people the right to elect United 
States senators by direct vote, and thus es- 
tablish popular, instead of corporate, govern- 
ment. 

2. We will call in President Cleveland's free 
loan to the banks of $60,000,000. We will pay 
the public debt at its face, as we have a right 
to under the constitution and laws,thus using 
the hundreds of millions of money now locked 
up and saving the annual tax of nearly $50,- 
000,000 for bondholders. We will supply enough 
money to piace business upon a cash basis, in- 
crease prices,and enable debtors to save their 
homes. We will further loan money upon 
farms and otber good security as cheap as 
bondholders now get it from the United 
States treasury and on as long a time. 

3. We will condemn and purchase the rail- 
roads, telegraph lines, and other means of 
commerce, or build new systems and operate 
them at cost, instead of charging all the 
traffic will bear. Until this can be done na- 
tionally we will reduce railroad fare to 2 
cents a mile on all first-class railroads, and 
reduce official salaries in proportion to the 
increase in the value of money, and reduce 
the legal rate of interest. 

4. We will reclaim all unearned land grants 
and protect settlers from speculators by a 
graduated land tax. 

5. We will re-establish the income tax. 

6. We will adopt the Australian ballot sys- 
tem. 

7. We will enforce the laws of Iowa against 
the rich as well as the .poor and put down 
such open rebellion as flourishes now in parts 
of the state and is winked at by traitors in 
office. 

8. We will secure the industrial education 
of every neglected child, so as to prepare 
them for useful lives instead of the peniten- 
tiary. 

9. We will make the soldier's nKmey during 
the war equal in value to that paid the bond- 
holder. We will protect honest miners and 
other workingmen from the humiliation of 
being forced to sign away their rights in an 
iron-clad contract as a condition of labor. 

Michigan Republicans. 
Adopted at Detroit Feb. 21, 1889. 

Resolved, By the Republicans of Michigan, 
in convention assembled, that we congratu- 
late the country upon the magnificent victory 
achieved by the republican party at the last 
general election, and rejoice at the conspicu- 
ous part taken by our own commonwealth in 
redeeming the National administration, both 
executive and legislative, from democratic 
control. 

Resolved, That we send greeting to our suc- 
cessful leader, Benjamin Harrison, presi- 
dent-elect, whose lofty character and broad 
statesmanship distinguished him as an ideal 
candidate, assuring him of our unwavering 
confidence and pledging our hearty support 
in the duties soon to be assumed. 



Resolved, That we reaffirm the principles 
adopted by the republican party in state and 
national conventions, upon which the last 
great victory has been achieved, and that we 
pledge anew our fidelity to such principles. 

Michigan Democrats. 
Adopted at Grand Rapids Feb. 28, 1889. 

The democratic party of Michigan, proud 
of the lofty statesmanship and rugged hon- 
esty of its national administration under 
Grover Cleveland, and of the maxims of lib- 
erty it has promulgated in the past, with firm 
reliance on the honesty and integrity of the 
people and unfaltering faith in the ultimate 
success of true policies of government, ap- 
peals to the people in support of the follow- 
ing declaration: 

Equal rights for all men and special privi- 
leges for none. All laws should aim to con- 
fer the greatest good on the greatest number, 
and no law ought to be enacted for the special 
benefit of any class of citizens to the injury 
of others. 

It is the duty of the state to guard the bal- 
lot-box from the influence of corruption and 
fraud, and we memorialize the legislature to 
enact all necessary laws to secure a free and 
uncorrupted ballot and a fair count. 

The democracy of Michigan congratulate 
the Hon. Charles Stewart Parnell and his 
worthy co-laborers for home rule for Ireland, 
upon his triumphant vindication from the 
calumnious charges of the infamous Tory 
Times and its more infamous abettors, the 
Tory government of Great Britain. 

Michigan Prohibitionists. 
Adopted at Lansing Feb. 27, 1889. 

The prohibitionists of Michigan, in conven- 
tion assembled, congratulate their party up- 
on the splendid showing made in the last 
campaign by the friends of the American 
home against the American saloon. After 
one of the most exciting campaigns that our 
country has ever witnessed we find ourselves 
not only in the field with ranks unbroken and 
colors flying but even with substantial ad- 
vances all along the line, more thoroughly 
convinced than ever that ours is the only 
possible solution of the problem connected 
with the liquor traffic and confident of its 
final triumph. 

Conscious of the righteousness of our 
cause, we hereby declare our unwavering al- 
legiance to the national prohibition party, re- 
affirming the principles of that party as em- 
bodied in the national platform of 1888. 

Resolved, That we are unalterably opposed 
to any law which legalizes the traffic in intox- 
icating beverages in any portion of our state 
or nation, by whatever name such law may 
be known. 

Resolved, That the interests of our repub- 
lic demand such ballot reforms as will insure 
to every voter an absolutely secret and hon- 
estly counted ballot. 

Montana Republicans. 
Adopted at Anaconda Aug. 23, 1889. 
The republicans of Montana, assembled for 
the first time in their history to nominate can- 
didates for state officers, salute their fellow- 
citizens of the United States in gratitude for 
their recognition of the right of this people to 
be admitted to an equal footing with the origi- 
nal states, to be henceforth forever an integral 
part of the American union. Mindful of the 
duties and dignities of such high companion- 
ship, we pledge all the people of Montana to 
patriotism and moderation inaction, fortitude 
in disaster, serenity in peril, and magnanimi- 
ty In victory. Grateful to all their countrymen 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



for the achievements of the past, the renown | fare of Montana aie hospitably entertained 
and felicities of the present, and the promise by an administration that manifests toward 
of the future, the republicans of Montana are | the great new west a spirit of continental 
inspired with a high purpose to contribute to I statesmanship. 

the excellence ot the institutions of their I We especially indorse, as worthy of all 
country, whose wisdom and beneficence are commendation, the administration of Ben- 
alike the pride and promise of cur civilization. ' jainin Harrison, president of the United 
We congratulate our three sister states now 
stepping with us into high political estate up- 
on the sober and courageous spirit in which 
they are accepting their new duties and re 
sponsibilities. We share with them the de 



States, for his unswerving patriotism in pur- 
pose, his wisdom in action, his deference to 
our aspirations f of home government, his de- 
Bire to augment the rewards of labor and en- 

. terprise. and his abiding determination to 

termination to perform ncfcly and well the protect the interests and honor of the repub- 



labors which statehood imposes, that in so lie throughout the world. We declare anew 



marked a degree has characterized them in 
the work of preparation. 

We affirm that the democratic party is not 
worthy of the confidence of a patriotic people. 

To prove thi-s let facts be submitted in can- 
dor to our countrymen. 

It has surrendered the rights of American 
citizens on land and sea to Great Britain, at 
the same time treating weaker nations with 
undignified and overbearing insolence. 

It has shown its inability to deal in a spirit 
of genuine Americanism with complications 
arising in defiance of our citizens abroad. 

It has neglected and refused to encourage 
our merchant marine. 

It has manifested its hostility to the veter- 
ans of our wars by grudgingly and ungra- 
ciously granting only such pensions as public 
indignation could extort. 

It has sought to debase the workingman of 
America by subjecting him to an unjust com- 
petition with foreign toil. 

In a large part of the union it has made citi- 
zenship a mockery and the ballot a delusion 
and a snare. 

Throughout the republic its purposes are 
mischievous and its influence malign. 

Toward the people of Montana it has ex- 
hibited a spirit of venomous malignity. 

Its president could not await his accession 
to official power until he sought to depreciate 
silver, which is one of our great industrial 
products. 

It visited upon our citizens an odious system 
of espionage, and revived a perverted con- 
struction of an obsolete law to harass them 
with causeless prosecutions. 

It sought to set aside patents to farms and 
mines after they had been obtained in strict 
conformity to law. 

It exhausted the resources of ingenuity in 
the invention of technicalities to embarrass 
the acquisition of titles to homesteads and 
mining claims. 

In shameless violation of its delusive 
pledges it Imported officers from other states 
to rule over us. 

It worked the utter demoralization of our 
postal service. 

It retarded inexcusably the survey of the 
public domain within our borders. 

It placed in imminent peril the industries 
of mining and grazing and aimed a deadly 
blow at the interests in which the prosperity 
of all our people are vitally involved. 

In happy contrast to all these crimes against 
our people, we point to the present republican 
administration, affirming that it has reversed 
this hostile and unpatriotic history and has 
brought itself into harmony with all the prac- 
tical, intt'llectual, and moral impulses of this 
enterprising and loyal people. Among the 
results which it has thus vouchsafed to us, the 
privileges conferred upon citizens respecting 
the public domain are easy of attainment,titles 
are made secure, vast sums of money have 
been added to the value of our fleeces and 
minerals, labor is insured of a generous re- 
ward, the unjust exemption from duties of 



that the chief purpose of the republican 
party, second only to the preservation of the 
union and the intrenchment of our liberties, 
is the protection of our industries, the eleva- 
tion ot American labor, and the just compen- 
sation of the workingman. 

While we welcome to our mountains and 
valleys all honest immigrants who are willing 
to assume the responsibilities and discharge 
the duties of American citizens, yet we urge 
upon our senators and representatives in 
congress to use all their influence in so modi- 
fying our immigration laws as to prevent the 
influx of the criminal and pauper classes of 
Europe, who become a menace to our free in- 
stitutions and a burden to the honest indus- 
tries of our country. 

We pledge those who shall represent us in 
the conerress of the United States to maintain 
as standards of value the precious metals 
that have been recognized as such from the 
beginning of historic time. 

We recognize that the welfare of Montana 
demands the maintenance of the existing du- 
ties on wool, lead, and copper. 

We denounce the democratic majority in 
the late constitutional convention for hav- 
ing for no other cause than a narrow parti- 
sanship ousted the officers of the several 
counties of the territory before the expira- 
tion of the term for which they were chosen 
under provision of law. 

We ask for such legislation as will subject 
to taxation property not exempt by our law, 
other than that of the United States, that 
may be located upon military and Indian 
reservations within the boundaries of the 
state. 

We call upon our senators and representa- 
tives to put forth their utmost exertions for 
the reduction of the Indian reservations in 
Montana to the narrowest possible limits that 
may be found consistent with the duties of 
the general government toward the several 
tribes. 

We commend to the suffrages of the voters 
of Montana the nominees of this convention 
in the assurance that they are men of unim- 
peachable integrity, thorough capability for 
the duties to which they are respectively as- 
signed, and unswerving fidelity to the princi- 
ples of the party of union,justice,and progress. 

We appeal to the people of Montana in 
entering upon the enjoyment of their polit- 
ical rights to identify themselves with the 
party organized to protect and defend the 
liberties our fathers won, to save and extend 
the noble republic they created; the party 
with a history which is equally the history of 
this nation; the party that has met and con- 
quered the greatest emergencies that ever 
confronted valor and statesmanship; the 
party that has accomplished a national pros- 
perity heretofore unknown to the pages of 
human history; the party to which alone can 
be intrusted the welfare and honor of the 
American republic. 

Resolved, That the administration of Ben- 
jamin F. White has been faithful to the great 

foreign lead is in hopeful process of reform, interests of Montana and entitles him to the 
a iid all policies conducive to the material wel- 1 lasting gratitude of his countrymen. 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



Montana Democrats. 
Adopted at Helena -Aug. 27, 1889. 
The democratic party Of Mdntana, in state 
convention assembled; on behalf of the peo- 



any revisions of tue tariff we pledge the! Votes 
Of out Senators and representatives to care- 
fully guard the welfare of Montdna afld se- 
cure the highest value to the prdducfc of our 
flocks; Our herds, our farmsj our forests, and 
' 



pie of the territory return their grateful our mines; . 
thanks to the members of the democratic We favor the frete and unlimited coinage of 
party in the congress of the United States silver as of gold, and we arraign the repub- 
for formulating and carrying to a successful I lican party as the persistent enemy of silver, 



conclusion the measure which admits Mon 
tana and three of her neighboring territories 
to the union of states. We regret that in con- 
sequence of the opposition of the republican 
party in congress it was necessary to sacri- 
fice the rights of a sister territory against 
which this opposition was ostensibly directed, 
although, in fact, it was to the entire measure, 
which was inspired by the desire to postpone 
the whole matter until the advent of the ad- 
ministration of President Harrison, who was 
himself the principal opponent in the senate 
of the bill to admit Montana in the year 1886. 

We denounce the republican majority in 
the last legislature for refusing to memorialize 
congress in favor of, and the republican 
press of the territory and the delegate-elect 
to congress for their opposition to and criti- 
cism of, the admission bill,which deserved the 
hearty support of all our citizens. The course 
of these republicans was wanting in patriot- 
ism, subordinated the interests of the people 
of Montana to considerations of party ad- 
vantage, and evinced a disposition to keep 
the spoils of their recent victory at the ex- 
pense of the hopes of the state. 

We indorse the principles of the demo- 
cratic party and pledge ourselves to the task 
of maintaining them by all honorable and 
lawful means. It is a matter of pride that our 
party has always carefully guarded the liber- 
ties of the people by the enactment of wise 
laws, and has so enforced them as to preserve 
to all equal and exact justice. Experience 
shows and history demonstrates that the suc- 
cess of the democratic party will insure a 
more careful and economical expenditure of 
the people's money, a more wise selection of 
public servants, and an administration freed 
from the charges so often made that monopo- 
lies and trusts receive more consideration un- 
der t"he laws than the rights of individuals. 

We go before the people with a record for 
the wise government and economical admin- 
istration of tire finances of the territory of 
Montana from the beginning, of which we 
maybe justly proud. We have maintained 
the blessings of good government, and by 
wise and liberal laws have secured the settle- 
ment, development, and welfare of the terri- 
tory. We have guarded its treasury against 
schemes of plunder and extravagant salaries 
and expenditures, and at the end of twenty- 
five years left it not only free from debt but 
with a surplus of $140,000 in the treasury ,which 
the reckless and extravagant enactments of 
the first republican legislature will have well 
nigh dissipated by the time of our admission 
as a state. We pledge ourselves to the resto- 
ration of the practices of economy so neces- 
sary in the government of a new and strug- 
gling commonwealth. 

We repudiate the allegation that the demo- 
cratic party favors free trade. Revenue for 
the needs of the government must be raised 
by a tariff on imports, but the duty should be 
so adjusted that every section and every in- 
dustry shall enjoy equality under the law, 
that trusts and monopolies shall be prevented, 
labor protected, and industries encouraged. In 
common with all the American people, we de- 
mand such a revision of the tariff as will do 
away with unnecessary taxation, prevent a 
dangerous and demoralizing surplus, reduce 
the cost of the necessaries of life while afford- 
ing perfect protection to American labor. In 



which was demonetized while that party was 
in full possession of every branch of the 
government. 

We cordially approve of the course of the 
Hon. J. K. Toole, who, as a delegate in con- 
gress from this territory, strenuously sought 
to compel an enforcement of the existing law 
whereby lead in combination with gold or 
silver should pay the duty provided by law, 
and we deprecate the action of a republican 
judiciary committee of the senate which made 
his efforts unavailing by reporting adversely 
upon a resolution looking to that end. We 
demand of the honorable secretary of the 
treasury a prompt decision touching this 
question, which involves the interests of the 
lead-producing districts of the west. 

We arraign the republican party for the 
violation of its pledges to the people in fail- 
ing to carry out the spirit and principles of 
civil-service reform in its administration of 
the government. Perverted views of public 
duty on the part of the federal executive 
have led to a lowering of tone in the entire 
civil service of the country from the high 
standard to which it was elevated by the late 
democratic administration; offices have been 
bestowed for private 
public good everywhere made su 
personal or family demands. 

The failure of the administration to enforce 
the Chinese exclusion act is not in accord- 
ance with the platform on which President 
Harrison was elected but is quite in keeping 
with his expressed opinions and his votes in 
the senate. 

We believe it unwise on the part of the 
government of the United States to attempt 
any speculation out of the timber in Montana 
by selling the same to its consumers, but be- 
lieve that in the end more can be realized out 
of it by allowing the people to use the same 
without stint and free of charge, and thus 
facilitate the growth and development of 
the country. 

The republican party in this territory, 
though always in a minority, have ever 
sought to obtain ascendency by depriving the 
people of a free and full election. In this 
nature were the test oaths proposed by re- 
publican leaders in the early days to disfran- 
chise portions of the people. Of such nature 
is the registry law passed at the last session 
of the legislature. Although ostensibly 
framed to secure a fair election it is ingen- 
iously contrived to practically disfranchise 
large numbers of our citizens residing in 
places remote and difficult of access. We 
favor the enactment of such laws as will se- 
cure pure elections and throw all possible 
safeguards around the ballot. In towns and 
populous districts registration is a check 
against repeating and fraud; but we submit 
that the present law seems to have been 
framed to throw every impediment in the 
way of lawful electors. 

The thanks of the people of Montana are 
due and are hereby tendered to the Hon. 
Joseph K. Toole for his able and successful 
efforts in behalf of the enabling act, whereby 
the people of Montana at this time are about 
to enter upon the enlarged sphere of Ameri 



hip gu 
several states of the union. 



can citizens 



aranteed to citizens of the 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



Nebraska Republicans. 
Adopted at Hastings Oct. 10, 1889. 

We, the republicans of Nebraska, in conven- 
tion assembled, indorse the administration of 
President Harrison and reaffirm our faith in 
the doctrines of the republican party as enun- 
ciated in the Chicago platform of 1888, and 
pledge to the administration our hearty sup- 
port. 

We congratulate the new states of North 
and South Dakota, Washington, and Montana 
on their advent into the union under the fos- 
tering influences of a republican administra- 
tion, and welcome them to the sisterhood of 
states. 

We commend the policy of the administra- 
tion in the cultivation of closer relations with 
our sister nations of the new world. 

The republican party, pledged to the cor- 
rection of abuses in the past, will in the future 
relax no effort to enforce its theory that all 
corporations are the servants,not the masters, 
of the people, and renew those pledges for the 
future. 

We commend the action of congress in its 
efforts to redeem the arid lands of the west- 
ern territories by a national system of irriga- 
tion. 

We commend the action of congress in pass- 
ing the disability pension bill no soldier, 
whether disabled in the service or elsewhere, 
should be permitted to end his days in a 
poor-house and condemn theinterposition of 
any statute against the protectors and pre- 
servers of the nation in their old age. 

We condemn any theory of states' rights 
which shall be held to prevent the govern- 
ment from protecting all its citizens in the en- 
joyment of all their civil and political rights. 



Nebraska Democrats. 
Adopted at Omaha Oct. 15, 1889. 

As democrats and as representatives of an 
exclusively agricultural commonwealth we 
denounce and protest against the protective- 
tariff policy of the republican party, which 
makes the United States the most excessively 
taxed country in Christendom; which makes 
the rich richer and the poor poorer; which, by 
law, makes farming unprofitable in every 
state and territory of the union by artificially 
lifting the prices of all the farmer has to buy, 
and enormously reducing the prices of all he 
has to sell by destroying Tiis natural markets. 

We denounce and protest against appro- 
priations to irrigate desert lands, because the 
farmers of the United States should not be 
further taxed to create competition for their 
farms and themselves. We have already 
enough arable land to glut a home market, 
and put therein nearly all farm products at 
prices below the cost of production. Until 
the tariff taxes are taken off the farmer can 
stand no such hostile legislation, such decree 
of forage upon existing farms, such requisi- 
tion for the creation of his own competitors. 

We denounce as a perversion of the legis- 
ative power the sugar-bounty law enacted 
at the last legislature, which seeks to bestow 
upon private corporations money raised by 
taxation,under the plea of encouraging home 
ndustries. We also condemn such legisla- 
tion as an illegal interference with interstate 
commerce and an application of the protect- 
ive principles to state government. 

We regard with interest the present session 
of the Pan-American congress, called to- 
gether by a democratic administration, and 
hereby express the hope that the attention of 
delegates from abroad may not be called to 
the official utterances and literature of the 
republican party, lest they be convinced that 
our national wealth and greatness are due to 



the decadence of foreign commerce and be 
led to follow our example and exclude our 
products from the South American republics. 

We denounce and protest against subsidies, 
either of public lands or public moneys, to 
steamship lines, railway companies, or to any 
other private corporation. We protest against 
the loan of the public credit or to the exten- 
sion of any loan already made to either the 
Central Pacilic, the Union Pacific, or any 
other railroad company. 

We demand that the government shall en- 
force payment of corporations in default, as 
it does of individuals, by due process of law. 
Let their property be sold, when the mort- 
gages become due, to the highest bidder. 
Then the roads can be capitalized for less 
money, fixed charges be reduced, and more 
reasonable transportation rates secured. 

Believing that the object of government is 
best attained by giving to the individual the 
largest liberty consistent with public safety, 
we regard with distrust the various forms of 
sumptuary legislation and accept a well-reg- 
ulated and carefully guarded license law as 
the most practicable solution of the liquor 
question. 

We are opposed to all class legislation, 
state or national, and protest against the en- 
couragement or discouragement of special 
industries by law, believing that such matters 
can be safely left to the good sense of the 
people. 

We commend the democratic utterance of 
Corporal Tanner, late commissioner of pen- 
sions, that "the affidavit of a private soldier 
shall be worth as much as that of a commis- 
sioned officer," but we protest against the 
prevalent abuses of tha pension bureau,which 
threaten to swamp not only the public reve- 
nue but likewise all common-sense distinc- 
tions between honorably discharged soldiers 
and deserters; between disabilities incurred 
in the service and those contracted since; be- 
tween worthy veterans who in old age need 
their country's help,and exuberantly healthy, 
robust gentlemen of independent means 
whose patriotic pride should scorn to accept 
that help. 

We denounce as fraudulent the pensions for 
chronic diseases drawn by men who at the 
same time secure and carry policies of life in- 
surance. No good government will fail to pen- 
sion a soldier who has contracted a disabling 
chronic disease in its service. No good life- 
insurance company can or will insure a per- 
son known to have chronic disease. But good 
government and good life insurance should 
jointly take effective care that the pension/or 
having a chronic disease and the policy for 
not having a chronic disease be not issued to 
the same man. Either the pension or the pol- 
icy in such cases is a swindle. Both cannot be 
honest. Therefore, we demand an elimina- 
tion of all fraudulent pensioners from the 
rolls, so that deserving soldiers may thus en- 
hance their security for the just debt which 
the government righteously owes to them. 



Nebraska Prohibitionists. 
Adopted at Lincoln Aug. 21, 1889. 

The prohibition party of Nebraska, in state 
convention assembled,acknowledge Almighty 
God as the Supreme Being of the universe, 
heartily indorse the platform and principles 
enunciated by the national prohibition party 
in convention at Indianapolis in 1888. 

The recent purchase of numerous extensive 
breweries by an English syndicate that already 
owns nearly all the saloons in Great Britain 
and Ireland, with the avowed purpose of like- 
wise controlling the saloons of America, and 
through them the politics of America, ren- 
ders ten fold greater the culpability of him 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



who fails to identify himself at once with a 
political party that declares in unmistakable 
terms its undying hostility to this kind of 
foreign domination through the agency of the 
criminal classes. This demonstrates the fore- 
sight and correct position of the prohibition- 
ists in demanding and working for national 
constitutional prohibition. We arraign the 
republican party of Nebraska for its double- 
dealing and treachery to the cause of the 
people of this state, as made manifest in the 
dual submission bill which passed the last 
legislature, submitting the prohibitory amend- 
ment to avoid political wreck, and at the 
same time submitting the license amendment 
without petition, thus indicating to every re- 
publican partisan that the defeat of prohibi- 
tion is to be accomplished in the interest of 
republican distillers, breweries, and saloon- 
keepers, who, in turn, are to remain loyal to 
the party of high license. 

We pledge the unanimous support of the 
prohibition party press and political machin- 
ery to the pending prohibitory amendment, 
and demand of the republican party and party 
press that they no longer deceive the people, 
but take position either for or against prohibi- 
tion, that all may know on which side the 
party machinery is being used. 

We recognize in the Nebraska Non-Partisan 
Amendment league an organization that may 
greatly assist in carrying the amendment, and 
while we believe they err in not antagonizing 
every party and candidate for office who op- 
poses the amendment, nevertheless we com- 
mend their ardor and evident sincerity and 
bid them godspeed. 

We favor the complete enfranchisement of 
women. 

As the Australian ballot system embodies 
the best protection to the voter in his rights, 
therefore we urge its speedy adoption. 

We favor a national eight-hour working law. 

We declare opposition to all trusts and mo- 
nopolies, of which the liquor traffic is the 

We rejoice in the wonderfully wide and pure 
work of that godly sisterhood the Woman's 
Christian Temperance union and commend 
its bold and well-managed attack upon the 
stronghold of legally entrenched vice. 

We hold the saloons largely responsible for 
the alarming increase of the desecration of 
the sabbath and as the training school of an- 
archy. Its riotous disregard of Sunday law in 
Cincinnati and other cities, defying state and 
municipal authority, is full evidence of their 
set purpose to violate the order and sanctity 
of the day. Believing that the wage-earner is 
worthy of his hire, and believing that the 
largest revenue to the saloon co'mes through 
the laboring classes, and believing that the 
saloon thus stands in the way of the elevation 
and advancement of labor, therefore we in- 
vite the wage-earners of every class to join 
our party in its war against this greatest and 
most conscienceless monopoly the world has 
known. 

We favor governmental control of railroads 
and telegraph lines. 

As a platform of principles can only become 
practical through a party pledged to their en- 
forcement, therefore we urge every one op- 
posed to the saloon and its attending evils to 
unite with the prohibition party, the only 
party committed to the adoption of the amend- 
ment and its enforcement thereafter. 



North Dakota Republicans. 
Adopted at Fare/a Aug. 23, 1V>9. 

Resolved, That as republicans of North Da- 
kota, in convention assembled, we reaffirm 
the platform of principles enunciated by the 
national republican convention assembled in 



Chicago in June, 1888, and heartily indorse the 
administration of President Harrison; that 
we hail with unfeigned pleasure the near ap- 
proach to statehood; and in this our first 
state convention, with that in view, we con- 
gratulate the republican party of North Da- 
kota upon its thorough organization and the 
happy blending in its ranks of our native and 
foreign-born citizens, of whatever nationality 
or previous political opinions, into one har- 
monious union with the great national repub- 
lican party; a party which secures to the emi- 
grant his homestead, his pre-emption, or his 
tree claims, and welcomes him to a heritage 
such as no other government can ofl'er; a 
party which stands for American honor.po wer, 
progress, and prosperity; which demands 
ample remuneration for labor and full secu- 
rity to capital; which advocates pure, true, 
popular government, moral, intellectual, and 
material development, and the comfort and 
sanctity of the American home. 

That we fully and unreservedly recognize 
agriculture as the paramount material inter- 
est of North Dakota; that there should not 
and reasonably cannot be any antagonism be- 
tween this and the commercial, manufactur- 
ing, mechanical, or other interests, because 
all these are inseparably identified with the 
great central agricultural interest and depend 
upon its prosperity for their own success. We 
therefore declare it to be the duty, as it 
should be the pleasure, of all men who may 
be placed in public position by the people of 
North Dakota to oppose every unjust en- 
croachment of corporations or trusts upon 
the rights or interests of the farmers, and to 
so administer the government in all its 
branches as will be best conducive to the wel- 
fare, the prosperity, and the advancement of 
our agricultural people. 

That we are uncompromisingly in favor of 
the American system of protection by such 
properly regulated import duties upon foreign 
products as will stimulate every industry and 
protect the wages of our vast army of labor 
against the unfair competition of the serfs of 
Russia, the ryots of India, the coolies of 
China, and the pauper labor of other nations. 

That we honor that grand army of men who 
followed Grant, Sherman, and Sheridan until 
permanent and enduring peace was estab- 
lished by their victories and sacrifices, and we 
are in favor of granting equitable and liberal 
pensions to all honorably discharged soldiers 
and sailors, and that the flags stay where they 
are. 

That we view with pride our educational 
facilities, the flourishing condition of our 
common schools, colleges, and university, 
and we demand that the grand inheritance of 
land provided for their maintenance in per- 
petuity shall be guarded with zealous care. 

The republican party, viewing with un- 
feigned regret the growing evil of intemper- 
ance in our land, declares itself in sympathy 
with all well-directed efforts calculated to sup- 
press the vice; that we cordially approve the 
wsidom of the constitutional convention in 
providing for the submission to a vote of the 
people of the question of prohibition in ac- 
cordance with the expressed wish of the 
organized temperance associations of North 
Dakota, and in the event of its adoption by 
the people pledge ourselves to a strict en- 
forcement of the laws and to enact such 
legislation as may be necessary to that end. 

Resolved, That the watchword of the re- 
publican party of North Dakota should be 
economy in the management and conduct of 
the governmental offices of the new state. 

That this convention of delegates assem- 
bled advise and recommend a conservative 
course in making appropriations for the 
purpose of building public institutions, in 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



order that during the period of financial de- 
pression in the state nothing be done to in- 
crease the burden of taxation on the people. 

North Dakota Democrats. 

Adopted at Fargo Aug. 29, 1S89. 

The democratic party of the state of North 
Dakota, in convention assembled, renews the 
pledge of its fidelity to the democratic faith 
and reaffirms the platform adopted at the 
last democratic national convention; and it is 
hereby 

Resolved, That we recognize the people as 
the source of all power in the state and favor 
only such a system of laws as shall preserve 
to them the greatest personal liberty; and we 
are unalterably opposed to granting any priv- 
ileges or passing any sumptuary laws which 
shall bind the people against their will with- 
out the right to change. 

Resolved, That we pledge the democratic 
party of the new state to maintain in all its 
integrity the universal and inalienable right 
of the people to mold a state wherein the 
golden mean of justice and equality in shar- 
ing the burdens and blessings of free govern- 
ment between all classes alike, whether pro- 
ducers, consumers, or capitalists, shall be pre- 
served. 

Resolved, That we favor such measures as 
shall correct the present inequalities in taxa- 
tion, direct and indirect, whereby the toiler of 
field and workshop is despoiled of the chief 
portion of his earnings, and pledge our best 
efforts to correct the wrongs which have been 
the outgrowth of many years of republican 
extravagance and corruption in office. 

Resolved, That, agriculture being the chief 
interest of North Dakota, it is the duty of the 
new state to guard closely the prosperity of 
our farmers and to meet in ajl respects their 
wishes. We further pledge our representa- 
tives and senators in congress to labor to this 
end, and especially to urge the importance of 
changing the government policy in the im- 
provements of our rivers so that by locks, 
dams, and canals the surplus waters of the 
wet season may be stored and utilized for ag- 
riculture and commerce. 

Resolved, That, our people being mainly 
producers of grain and consumers of articles 
of manufacture, it is to their interest that the 
present high protective tariff, the creature of 
corporate greed and monopoly, be so modified 
and reduced that all imports be levied strictly 
within constitutional limits and according to 
the Jeffersonian rule, preventing both extor- 
tion and extravagance. We pledge our repre- 
sentatives and senators to labor for the cor- 
rection of these evils in our system of 
taxation. 

Resolved, That, we are in favor of the abso- 
lute repeal of all customs duties on lumber, 
salt, binding twine, and on all raw material 
entering into the manufacture of farm ma- 
chinery and household utensils, and on all the 
necessaries of life, so that while our farmers 
and laborers are compelled to to compete 
with the pauper labor of Europe and the 
ryots of India in the growing and sale of the 
products of the soil they shall not be com- 
pelled to purchase in the artificial markets of 
high protection. 

Resolved, That we express our gratitude to 
that army of noble patriots whose heroic ef- 
forts and" loyalty preserved the union and in- 
sured perpetual liberty, dignity, and prosper- 
ity to the people of the United States, and 
recommend all necessary legislation looking 
toward their relief and comfort. 

South Dakota Republicans. 
Adopted at Huron Aug. 29, 1889. 
Resolved, That as republicans of the state 



! of South Dakota, in our first convention as- 
sembled,we reaffirm the principles enunciated 
in their platform by the national republican 
convention assembled in Chicago in June, 1888, 
and we most heartily indorse the administra- 
tion of President Harrison and Gov. Mellette. 
We hail with unfeigned pleasure the privi- 
leges of statehood soon to be ours,and we con- 
gratulate the republican party that they hold 
those principles in which all industries can 
find true protection and in which all citizens, 
without regard to nationality, can harmonize; 
and we congratulate our people that through 
the power of these principles they have now 
their rights of homestead, pre-emption, and 
timber claim in our public lands restored to 
them. 

We favor those laws which give full remu- , 
neration to labor and secure capital in its 
rights. We recognize agriculture, mining,and 
manufacturing as the paramount material in- 
terests of our state, and we deprecate any law | 
which separates these from the commercial i 
and industrial interests of our people, as we I 
are dependent upon the harmony of all these | 
great interests for our success. We, there- 1 
fore, declare it to be the duty as it should be : 
the pleasure, of all men placed in office by the 
people to oppose any unjust encroachments 
of corporations or trusts upon the rights of 
any of our citizens, and to so administer the 
government in all its branches as will con- 
duce to the welfare and advancement of all 
our people. 

We view with pride our educational facili- 
ties, the flourishing condition of our public ) 
schools, colleges, and universities, and we de- 
mand that our school lands be jealously 
guarded. 

We honor our old soldiers and favor liberal ! 
pensions to all those who hold an honorable ' 
discharge. We also favor wise and liberal | 
provisions for the care and maintenance of , 
all who are needy and disabled. 

We most heartily sympathize with the Irish j 
people in their desire for home rule. 

We heartily favor the American system of I 
protection such properly regulated import ! 
duty on foreign produce as will stimulate 
every industry and will fully protect our vast 
army of workmen against the unfair compe- 
tition of criminal and pauper laborers of the , 
old world. 

We most heartily welcome to our fellow- 1 
ship the people who have come to us from 
foreign lands to find a home in this the 
country of their adoption, intending to ren- 
der due respect to its laws. 

We favor the enactment of such laws as 
will protect the citizen in the free exercise 
of his right of suffrage and will insure fair 
and honest elections. 

We favor the equal and just taxation of 
property. 

Recognizing the pernicious influences of the ( 
traffic in intoxicating liquors upon every in- 
terest of our commonwealth, we favor na- 
tional and state prohibition of such traffic 
and the adoption of the article of our con- 
stitution relating thereto, and the enactment 
and enforcement of such laws as will make 
the same effective. 

The great agricultural interests of Dakota 
demand that they should be protected, fos- 
tered, and guarded with jealous care and 
such laws enacted as will secure equitable 
rates of transportation allowing no unjust 
discrimination against sections or individ- 
uals. AVe favor the improvement of the great 
waterways of the northwest so as to bring 
close competition in the carrying trade. We 
favor a warehouse law which will give every 
farmer a free market for his produce and 
which will not leave him at the mercy of an 
elevator or railroad combination. 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



We advise and urge prompt and liberal ac- 
tion on the part of the state and nation to- 
ward the establishment of a comprehensive 
system of irrigation for such portions of our 
state as would be benefited thereby. 

We favor the establishment of a bureau of 
labor and statistics, that we may have accu- 
rate information in regard to the education, 
moral and financial conditions, and needs of 
the laboring masses. We also favor the pro- 
hibition by law of the employment of chil- 
dren under 16 years of age in mines, shops, 
and factories. 

We favor the election of railroad commis- 
sioners and giving them ample authority by 
statute for the protection of the people 
against exorbitant rates and unjust discrim- 
ination, and we favor such a system of rail- 
road inspection and supervision as will pro- 
mote the convenience and safety of the 
people. 

We view with alarm the dangerous en- 
croachments of the numerous trusts forming 
all over our land, and demand the enactment 
of stringent laws, state and national, declar- 
ing the formation of all trusts and combina- 
tions for the purpose of controlling or en- 
hancing the price of any of the necessaries of 
life unlawful and contrary to public policy, 
and providing for their suppression and the 
punishment of all parties implicated therein. 

South Dakota Democrats. 

Adopted at Huron Sept. 5, 1889. 

The democratic party of South Dakota,in its 
first state convention assembled, pledges its 
loyalty to the democratic faith as expressed 
in the national democratic platform of 1888, 
and indorses the views expressed by Presi- 
dent Cleveland in his last annual message to 
congress relative to tariff reduction. 

We pledge ourselves to continue the battle 
for tariff reform until the present unjust and 
unnecessary war tariff is reduced and the 
cause of the people is triumphant. 

We tender our sympathy to the suffering la- 
boring men of the country, who in the past 
few months have been driven from employ- 
ment by the merciless exactions of protected 
monopolies, unholy trusts, and heartless com- 
bines. 

We congratulate the people of South Dakota 
that we are soon to take our place in the sis- 
terhood of states and upon the opening to 
settlement of nearly eleven million acres of 
rich agricultural lands, both accomplished un- 
der democratic administration. 

We are opposed to constitutional prohibi- 
tion now demanded by the republican party 
of South Dakota, and favor in its stead a well- 
regulated license law, which is accented by 
the democracy of the country as the best 
method of controlling the traffic in intoxicat- 
ing liquors and lessening the evils of in- 
temperance. 

We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the 
various labor organizations and to the farm- 
ing community in their efforts to improve 
their social and financial condition, and we 
pledge ourselves to assist them by every 
means within our power to accomplish these 
ends. 

We acknowledge the great debt of gratitude 
the nation owes to the heroes of the late war, 
and we declare in favor of just, liberal, and 
equitable pension laws. 

We declare in favor of minority representa- 
tion and urge all fair-minded tax-payers to 
support the articles of our constitution relat- 
ing thereto as a particular protection against 
the evils of vicious legislation. 

We are in sympathy with the Irish people 
in their efforts to attain home rule and look 
to the day when they shall be a free people. 

We heartily extend the right hand of fel- 



lowship to all people of foreign lands who 
come to our new state with the Intent to be- 
come true and loyal citizens. 

We arraign the republican party of Dakota 
for extravagance and mismanagement in con- 
ducting the affairs of the territorial govern- 
ment; that party has always had exclusive 
control of the law-making power of the terri 
tory. Our bonded indebtedness has been in- 
creased over $600,000 within the past three 
years and public institutions established not 
actually needed at this time. 

Our revenue has exceeded $500,000 per an 
num, which was ample to meet all necessary 
expenses of territorial government. Notwith- 
standing this fact and the further fact that 
property is taxed to the full limit allowed by 
law, a deficiency has been created within the 
last six months, and the new state of South 
Dakota will suffer the humiliation of entering 
the union with a deficiency in its treasury of 
nearly $200,000 under the present republican 
misrule. This deficiency will necessarily be 
increased over $200,000 per annum in excess of 
all possible revenue receipts and over the lim- 
ited indebtedness allowed by our state consti- 
tution. A swarm of clerks were employed by 
the last legislature equal in number to the 
members of both houses, and these extrava- 
gant and unnecessary appropriations were 
made without a due investigation as to the 
actual needs of the territory and over the 
veto of thedemocratic governor. 

Washington Republicans. 
Adopted at Walla Walla Sept. 4, 1889. 
As the delegates of the republicans of 
Washington, in convention assembled, we 
congratulate our fellow-citizens upon the suc- 
cess of the republican party in securing the 
admission of our commonwealth into the 
union in spite of the strenuous and long- 
continued opposition of the democracy, 
whose leaders feared that the addition to the 
voting strength of the nation of the free and 
progressive commonwealth of the northwest 
would render of no avail the terrorism and 
fraud by which a free expression of political 
opinion in the southern states is prevented, 
and by which the democratic party hopes 
again to secure control of the national gov- 
ernment. In thus congratulating our fellow- 
citizens, we urge all independent voters to 
unite with us in support of the party to 
which the admission of Washington into the 
union is due and in rebuking the party which 
has always opposed the political progress of 
the northwest. 

We heartily commend the wise and states- 
manlike administration of President Harri- 
son, which, by the pursuit of a vigorous and 
consistently American policy in dealing with 
affairs at home and abroad, has already en- 
deared itself to the people, and WH invite a 
comparison of the acts of this administra- 
tion with those of the recent administration, 
whose foreign policy consisted in bullying 
weak nations and truckling to strong ones, 
and whose domestic policy was well set forth 
"n a free-trade-message, pension vetoes, and 
an order for the return of the rebel flags 
captured by the soldiers of the union. 

The many resources of Washington require 
the fostering care of protection for their 
speedy development. The doctrines enunci- 
ated at Chicago in June, 1888, by the national 
ublican party received the indorsement of 
: people of Washington by nearly eight 
'Usand majority. With renewed faith in their 
truth we emphatically affirm those cardinal 
principles and again commend them to the 
electors of Washington for their approba- 
tion. We fully realize that in order to be 
efficacious in the highest degree a protective 
tariff must be subject to frequent revision. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



but we Insist that such revision must be made 
by the friends of protection, and not by its 
enemies. 

We reject the fallacious idea that a tariff 
should be levied for revenue only and de- 
nounce the democratic party for its recent at- 
tempt to force into full -competition with the 
pauper labor of Europe and Asia the intelli- 
gent American workingmen employed in more 
than one hundred lines of industry. 

We assert that the republican party alone 
stands between the workingmen of Washing- 
ton and absolute free trade in all the impor- 
tant products of the commonwealth, and in- 
vite the workingmen to unite with us in send- 
ing to congress men who are friends and not 
enemies of American labor; practical men, 
and not theorists; protectionists, and not free- 
traders. 

We believe that the debt of gratitude which 
the nation owes to the soldiers, sailors, and 
marines who saved the union is too great to 
be repaid, and we are heartily in sympathy 
with all legislation which has for its object a 
recognition of the services or an alleviation 
of the sufferings of these grand men who car- 
ried the flag to victory. 

We favor liberal appropriations for the im- 
provement of our rivers and harbors, for irri- 
gation and the reclamation of our desert 
lands, for the erection of coast defenses, and 
for the creation of a navy in keeping with the 
strength and greatness of the American peo- 

We favor also any well-directed legislation 
which has for its object the restoration of the 
American merchant marine to a position in 
which it will command its due share of the 
carrying trade of the world. 

We pledge the co-operation of our congres- 
sional representatives with those of the state 
of Oregon to secure the speedy opening of the 
Columbia river to navigation. 

We are opposed to the formation of trusts 
or combinations whose object is to raise ab- 
normally the prices of the necessaries of life, 
and we believe that it is the duty of the gov- 
ernment to prevent the formation of such 
combinations by all needful legislation. 

We recognize it as a duty of the government 
to stand between the people and the unjust 
use of corporate power, and to this end we be- 
lieve in the policy of regulation of railroads 
and other corporations by law. 

We demand the rigid enforcement of the 
Chinese exclusion act, and heartily favor 
such other legislation as may be deemed nec- 
essary in order to put a final and effectual I 
stop to the immigration of all who are unfit ' 
for American citizenship and unable to com- 
prehend the fundamental principles of our 
government. 

We believe it to be the duty of the state to 
provide a rigid system of inspection of mines 
and factories, in order that the health and 
lives of employes shall not be needlessly en- 
dangered. 

We recognize the right and duty of labor to 
organize for its own protection, and heartily! 
sympathize with every movement which has j 
for its object the moral, material, or intel- 
lectual advancement of any of our fellow- 
citizens. 

We indorse and reiterate the declaration in 
the last national platform that "the first con- 
cern of good government is the virtue and j 
sobriety of the people and the purity of the ! 
home. The republican party heartily sym- 
pathizes with all wise and well-directed ef- 
forts for the promotion of temperance and 
morality." 

We are in favor of a liberal expenditure of 
public money to the end that the people may 
have cheap and ample postage facilities. 

We favor the speedy adjustment of the ' 



vexed land question, and pledge our dele- 
gation in congress to use every effort to pro- 
tect the settlers in their rights and to favor 
the forfeiture of all unclaimed land grants. 

We favor the adjustment by the national 
government of the claims presented by the 
pioneers of Washington because of losses sus- 
tained by Indian depredations. 

We favor such legislation with regard to 
the tide and school lands as will best protect 
commerce and will insure the largest possible 
educational fund to the state. 

We favor the opening to settlement of all 
Indian reservations in the state, having a due 
regard for the rights of the Indians. 

Believing in the will of the majority, we in- 
dorse the action of the constitutional conven- 
tion in submitting to the electors as separate 
articles the subjects of prohibition and wom- 
an suffrage. 

We heartily indorse the administration of 
Gov. Miles C. Moore. 

In conclusion, we invite the voters of this 
new state to cast their lot with the party 
which saved the union, and not with tha't 
which sought to destroy it; with the party 
which freed the slave,and not with that which 
strove to weld his shackles more firmly; with 
the party which upheld the credit of the na- 
tion, and not with that which favored repudi- 
ation and dishonor; with the party which 
cares for the widows and orphans of the sol- 
diers of the union, and not with that which 
makes light of their services and insults their 
memory; with the party which stands for pro- 
tection to American labor, and not with that 
which is marshaled under the banner of free 
trade; with the party which secured the ad- 
mission of Washington into the union.and not 
with that which bitterly opposed the exten- 
sion to our people of the ordinary rights of 
citizens; with the party which represents the 
principles of Washington, Hamilton, Web- 
ster, Clay, Lincoln, Garfield, and Grant, and 
not with that which represents the principles 
of Cobden on the one hand and Calhoun and 
Davis on the other. 

The republican party invites all who favor 
honesty in government, freedom in thought, 
and progress in national welfare. 

Washington Democrats. 
Adopted at Ellensburg Sept. 10, 1&3. 

The democratic party of Washington, by its 
representatives in convention assembled, does 
declare: 

We unqualifiedly approve the administra- 
tion of President Cleveland, and we congrat- 
ulate the country upon the prosperity enjoyed 
under it and upon the reforms inaugurated 
by this true apostle of democracy, and we 
approve the declaration of principles made 
by the national democracy in St. Louis in 1S88. 

The sums of money to meet the regular an- 
nual expenses of the government, building 
and maintenance cf the navy and other great 
national works.and the payment of vast appro- 
priations for pensions requires a revenue of 
such enormous proportions that we believe a 
tariff for these objects wisely made and adjust- 
ed will afford "all the protection needed by 
deserving industries of the country; and we 
arraign the republican party for organizing a 
tariff to foster unnecessary monopolies, to 
oppress the weak and struggling industries, 
and so as to tax the great laboring masses for 
the enrichment of plutocracy and monopo- 
lists in order that the "fat" may be fried out 
of them with which to ruu the party's cor- 
rupt national campaigns. 

We arraign the republican party for its du- 
plicity and violence toward the laboring 
masses in the last national campaign, by 
which it cajoled, hoodwinked, and coerced 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



many of them into support of its ticket, 
through the medium of falsehood as to the 
democratic policy and intentions, by pay en- 
velopes and other nefarious devices, and by 
frauds and tricks; and we denounce pluto- 
crats and monopolists who control the poli- 
cies and destinies of the party for their bad 
faith toward their deceived victims dis- 
played immediately after election day, when 
an almost universal reduction of wages or 
discharging of workingmen was made 
throughout the mining and manufacturing 
districts. 

Standing on the verge of statehood and 
about to assume the manifold duties and re- 
sponsibilties of state government, among 
the important issues before the people at 
this election are those to secure an hon- 
est and economical administration of state 
and county governments and the most 
perfect management and care of valu- 
able school and other lands of the state. 
A thorough and efficient system of free 
common schools is necessary for the well- 
being of the state, and it is our duty to 
preserve inviolate the school fund afforded 
by the munificent grant of school lands made 
by the general government in the enabling 
act. 

The constitution of the state should be a 
non-partisan document; therefore the people 
ought to be left free to pass on the constitu- 
tion for the state of Washington without the 
influence of political parties. 

It is the duty of the legislature of the state 
to enact such laws as shall fully insure and 
protect the rights of the laborer and wage- 
earner and to encourage and foster the best 
business interests and productive industries 
in the state. 

We demand the enactment by the legisla- 
ture of laws so regulating the opening, work- 
ing, and inspection of mines that the ventila- 
tion and safety thereof may be secured and 
the lives of miners protected. 

The Chinese exclusion act, known as the 
Scott law, is a democratic measure which, 
properly enforced, solves the vexed question 
of Chinese immigration, and we condemn the 
construction of that law by the present re- 
publican administration by which its bene- 
ficial effects are destroyed and the laws nuli- 
fled. 

We regard trusts in whatever form organ- 
ized as the legitimate result of our present 
tariff, and we demand the repeal or readjust- 
ment of all such tariff taxes as enable them 
to extort from the people exorbitant prices 
for the products they control. 

The democratic party of this state demands 
an appropriation by the general government 
of sufficient funds to speedily open the 
great Columbia river to navigation from one 
side of the state to the other, and pledges its 
representatives in congress, if elected, to labor 
to that end, and condemns the dilatory and 
wasteful course of the republican party with 
respect thereto. We demand the improve- 
ment by the general government of Gray's 
harbor and other harbors and waterways of 
the state and the early establishment of all 
necessary coast defenses. 

We condemn the policy inaugurated under 
republican rule by which vast areas of the 
public domain, the heritage of the people. 



I were granted to corporations, and landed mo- 
I nopohes thereby established. We demand 
i that all such grants heretofore made, not 
earned in strict accordance with the granting 
! acts, be restored to the public domain, and 
i that they be opened to entry and settlement 
in small holdings by actual settlers under the 
public land laws of the United States; con- 
firming, however, to actual residents of the 
state the title to lands purchased by them in 
good faith; and we heartily indorse the action 
to that end taken by the democratic majority 
in the house of representatives, and we de- 
nounce the obstructive action in the republic- 
an senate in defeating the righteous measures 
of the democratic house, and we especially 
arraign the republican party of this territory 
for it vacillating, inconsistent, and insincere 
course upon this subject. 

The allotment of lands in severalty to In- 
dians is a democratic policy, and, properly 
pursued, will result in the opening of large 
tracts of land now embraced in Indian reser- 
vations in this state; and we pledge our rep- 
resentatives in congress to the support of 
such a policy and the speedy restoration of 
all unnecessary portions of such lands to set- 
tlement under the land laws of the United 
States. 

We favor the passage of just laws in con- 
formity with and for the purposes of carrying 
into effect the provisions of section 18 of arti- 
cle XII of the proposed state constitution in 
relation to charges for passengers and 
freight, and that such laws shall fully protect 
the people from oppression and discrimina- 
tion and be at the same time just and fair to 
the capital invested in transportation enter- 
prises, and provide for the speedy adjust- 
ment of all differences between such cor- 
porations and the people. 

While we recognize the patriotism and de- 
votion to public duty of the great mass of 
republican voters, we declare that the repub- 
lican party of the state is controlled and dom- 
inated by professional politicians and ex-fed- 
eral officers intent on gaining office to such an 
extent as to imperil the best interests of the 
state in its formative period and inimical to 
the most perfect and safe management of the 
state's valuable property and other interests. 
We demand the enactment by the legisla- 
ture of rigid laws by which the security and 
purity of the ballot may be secured and main- 
tained. 

We denounce as unworthy the representa- 
tions of a party professing to be respectable 
the falsification of history contained in 
the first declaration of the republican state 
platform concerning the admission of Wash- 
ington into the union, and we call on the peo- 
ple to repudiate a party whose representatives 
deliberately go before them with a willfully 
false statement in their platform. We declare 
that it is insulting to the intelligence of the 
people to make such a declaration in the face 
of the facts that Washington was wrested 
from British possessions by democratic cour- 
age, statesmanship, and diplomacy; that it 
was first organized as a political division by a 
democratic administration; that the bill for 
the admission of all the new states was formu- 
lated by a democratic committee, passed by a 
democratic house, and promptly signed by a 
democratic president. 



The Irish mile is 2,240 yards. 
The Swiss mile is 9,153 yards. 
The Italian mile is 1,766 yards. 
The Scotch mile is 1,984 yards. 
The Tuscan mile is 1,808 yards. 
The German mile is 8,106 yards. 
The Arabian mile is 2,143 yards. 
The Turkish mile is 1,826 yards. 



MILES. 

The Flemish mile Is 6,869 yards. 
The Vienna post mile is 8,296 yards. 
The Roman mile is 1,628 or 2,025 yards. 
The Werst mile is 1,167 or 1,337 yards. 
The Dutch and Prussian mile is 6,480 yards. 
The Swedish and Danish mile is 7,341.5 yards. 
The English and American mile is 1,760 
yards. 



70 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



STATE AND TERRITORIAL GOVERNMENTS. 






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POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 71 


political Committees. 




1888 TO 1892. 




STATE. 


NATIONAL REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters NEW YORK CITY. 
Chairman, M. S. QUAY. 
Treasurer, W. W. DUDLEY. 
Secretary, J. S. FASSETT. 


NA TIONAL DEMO CRA TIC. 
Headquarters NEW YORK CITY. 
Chairman, CALVIN S. BRICE. 
Treasurer. CHARLES J. CAXDA. 
Secretary, S. P. SHEERIN. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Alabama 
Arkansas 
California 
Colorado 
Connecticut. . .. 


Wm. Youngblood 
Powell Clayton 
M. H. De Young 
W. A. Hamill 
S. Fessenden 
D. J. Layton 
John K. Russell 
F. F. Putney 


Birmingham 
Eureka Springs.. 
San Francisco 
Georgetown 
Stamford 
Georgetown 
Oluste 
Hardaway 
Chicago 


Henry D. Clayon, Jr. 
S. P. Hug..es 
M. F. Tarpey 


Eufaula. 
Little Rock. 
Alameda. 
Denver. 
Seymour. 
Wilmington. 
Monticello. 
Savannah. 
Chicago. 
Indianapolis. 
Davenport. 
Leavenworth. 
Hartford. 
Boyce. 
Bath. 
Laurel. 
S. Framingham. 
Lansing. 
St. Paul. 
Columbus. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
Virginia City. 
Franklin. 
New Brunswick. 
New York City. 
Weldon. 
New York City. 
Portland. 
Erie. 
Providence. 
Charleston. 
Memphis. 
Houston. 
Montpelier. 
Alexandria. 
Clement Point. 
Milwaukee. 
Prescott. 
Deadwood. 
Washington. 
Boise City. 
Deer Lodge. 
Silver City. 
Park City. 
Port Townsend. 
Cheyenne. 


Charles S. Thomas.. 
; Carlos French 
John H. Rodney 
Samuel Pasco. .. . 


Florida 


JohnH. Estill 


Illinois 


George R. Davis 
John C. New 
J. S. Clarkson 


Erskine M. Phelps.. 
S. P. Sheerin 
J.J. Richardson 
C. W. Blair 
H. D. McHenry 
James Jeffries 
Arthur Sewall 
A.. P. Gorman 


Indiana 


Indianapolis 
DesMoines 
Troy 
Lexington 
New Orleans 
Augusta 




Cyrus Leland, Jr 
Wm. C. Goodloe 
P. B. S. Pinchback.. 
J. M. Haynes 


Kentucky 
Louisiana 


Maine 
Maryland 
Massachusetts.. 
Michigan 


James A. Gary 
Henry S Hyde 


Baltimore 




Charles D. Lewis 
O. M. Barnes 
Michael Doran 
C. A. Johnston 
John G. Prather 
J. E.Boyd 
R. P. Keating 


John P. Sanborn 


Port Huron 
Minneapolis 
Jackson. 


Minnesota 


Robert G. Evans 
James Hill 


Mississippi. 
Missouri 
Nebraska 
Nevada 


Chauncey I. Filleyl. 
W.M.Robinson 
E. Williams 
E. H. Rollins.. . 


St. Louis 
Madison 
Virginia City 


New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New York 
North Carolina. 
Ohio 


Dover 


A. W. Sulloway 
MilesRoss 


G. A. Hobart 
J. S. Fassett 
W. P. Canady 
A L Conger 


Paterson 


Elmlra 


Hermann Oelrichs . . 
M. W. Ransom 
Calvin S, Brice 
A. Noltner 


Wilmington 
Akron 
Portland 
Beaver Ct.House. 
Providence 
Columbia 
Eluntington 
jalveston 
Brattleboro 
Petersburg 
Wheeling 
Milwaukee 
Nogales 


Oregon 
Pennsylvania. . . 
Rhode Island... 
South Carolina.. 
Tennessee 


Jonathan Bourne,Jr. 
M. S. Quay 


William L. Scott.... 
f. B. Barnaby 
?. W. Dawson 
R. F. Looney 


Thomas W. Chace... 
E. M. Brayton 
W. W. Murray 
N.W. Cuney 
G. W. Hooker 
James D. Brady 
N. B. Scott 
Henry C. Payne 
George Christ 
A. C. Mellette 
P. H. Carson 
George L. Shoup 
Charles S. Warren... 
W. L. Rvnerson 
j R McBride 


Texas 
Vermont 


0. T. Holt 
Hiram Atkins 
JohnS. Barbour 
William M.Clements 
Fohn L. Mitchell 
\. C. Herndon 
William R. Steele... 
William Dickson 
John W.Jones 
A. H. Mitchell 
G. Gordon Posey 
William M. Ferry.... 
J. A. Kuhn 
Wm. L. Kuykendall.l 


Virginia 
West Virginia.. 
Wisconsin 
Arizona 
Dakota 


Watertown 
Washington 
Salmon City 
Butte City 


Dist. Columbia. 
Idaho 
Montana 
New Mexico 
Utah 
Washington 
Wyoming 


L,as Crusus 
Salt Lake City... 
81ympia 
heyenne 


T. H. Cavanaugh... 
J. M. Carey ! 


NATIONAL PROHIBITION. 
Headquarters CHICAGO. 
Chairman SAMUEL DICKEY. Vice- Chairman A. A. STEVEXS. 
Secretary J. B. HOBBS. 


STATE. Name. 'Residence. STATE. Name. 


Residence. 


Alabama L. 
L. 
Arkansas Tl 
J. 
California.... Ri 
Je 
Colorado W 
W 


F. Whitten.. Birmingham.... Connect 
C. Coulson... Scottsboro 
los. J. Rogers Searcy 'Dakota 


icut.. Geo. P. Rogers 
A. Morehouse 
D. R. Grover.. 
MrsH M Barkei 
e W. N. Brown. 
J. J. Boyce 
innbia S. H. Walker. 
iGeo. A. Hilton. 


New London 
Danbury 


Huron 
Fargo 
Wyoming 
Laurel 
Washington 
Washington 


L. Palmer... Little Rock... . 
r.T.B.Stewart San Francisco... Delawai 
sse Yarnell . . Los Angeles. ... 
. C. Stover.. Fort Collins.... Dis. Col 
. R. Fowler.. Canyon City.... 1 



72 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES. -Continued. 



STATE. 



Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa.... 



Kentucky.... 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland .. .. 
Massachus'ts. 

Michigan 

Minnesota 
Mississippi . . . 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 



Name. 



R. J. Morgan... 
S.H. Cummings 
Sam W. Small.. 
A. A. Murphy.. 
Mrs. N. Buck.. 
C. J. Godsman. 
J. G. Evans.... 

J. B.Hobbs 

S. J. North 

S. Johnson 

Jas.Mickelwait. 
V. G. Farnham. 
MrsC.H.SUohn 
AM.Richards'n 
G. W Ronald.. 
Wm. ^athews. 
Jas.W. Bodley. 
W.H. Goodale. 
N.F.Woodbury Auburn. 



Residence. 



W. F. Eustis 
Wm. Daniel.... 
W. F.Harmon. 
E. H. Clapp.... 



B.F. Sturtevant Jamaica Plains 



John Russell... 
Samuel Dickie. 
J. P. Pinkham.. 
Hugh Harrison 
Gambrell. 



ug 
. B. 



Dr.J.A.Hackett Jackson 



W. H. Craig.... 
Wm. C.Wilson. 
MessinaBullard 
David Wilson.. 

|A. G Wolfenbarger 

[George Scott. . . 



Orlando. 

Lawley. 

Atlanta 

Barnesville. 

Leinston. 

Malad City. 

Onarga. 

Chicago. 

Milford. 

Indianapolis. 

Hillsdale. 

Akron. 

Beloit. 

Lawrence. 

Louisville. 

Louisville. 

New Orleans. 

Baton Rogue. 



Dixfleld. 
Baltimore. 
Centerville. 
Boston. 



Milton. 

Albion. 

Minneapolis. 

Minneapolis. 

Jackson. 



Kansas City. 

St. Louis. 

Helena. 

Bdzeman. 

Lincoln. 

Sutton. 



STATE. 



N.Hampshire 
New Jersey . . 
New York.... 
New Mexico.. 
N.Carolina... 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania. 
Rhode Island. 
Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Wash. Ter 
West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



J.M. Fletchei.. 
B.C. Babcock.. 
C. L. Parker... 
W.H.Nicholson 
H. C. Bascom.. 
W. T.Wardwell 
S. W. Thornton 
H. Newberry... 
D.W.C.Benbow 
Edwin Shaver.. 
B. S. Iligley... 
J. A. Dickson.. 
J. G. Warner... 
J.W.Webb .... 
A. A. Stevens. . 
Wm.M. Price.. 
H.S.Woodw'rth 
J. W. Williams. 
James A.Tate. . 
J. W. Smith... 
E. L. Dohoney. 
J. B. Cranflll .. 
Rev.F.Barnett. 

T. F. Day 

C.W.Wyman. 
Clinton Smith. 
Jas. W. Newton 
R. H. Rawlings 
R. S.Greene... 
S. T. Dimmick. 

Frank Burt 

T. R. Carskadon 
S. D. Hastings. 
E.W. Chafin... 
Mrs. Hicks 



Residence. 



Nashua. 

Claremont. 

Perth Amboy 

Haddonflcld. 

Troy. 

New York. 

Denver, Col. 

Albuquerque. 

Greensboro. 

Salisbury. 

Youngstown. 

Ashtabula. 

Portland. 

lalem. 

'yrone. 
-Mttsburg. 
Providence. 
Providence 
Milligen. 
McKenzie. 
Paris. 
Waco. 
Ogden. 

American Fork. 
Brattleboro. 
Middlebury. 
Staunton. 
Profflt. 
Seatrle. 
Tacoina. 
Man.iington. 
Keyser. 
Madison. 
Waukesha. 
Laramie City. 



STATE . 



NATIONAL UNION LABOR. 
Headquarters CHARLESTON, W. VA. 
Chairman J. W. GOSHORN. 
Secretary ROBERT SCHILLING. 



Name. 



Residence. 



NA T10NAL UNITED LABOR. 
Headquarters CINCINNATI, O. 
Chairman WILLIAM B. OGDEN. 
Secretary ALFRED S. HOUGHTON. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut. . . 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

New Jersey 

New York 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania.. 
Rhode Island.. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

West Virginia 
Wisconsin 



Pollock Barber. . . 
John A. Ansley... 

J. W. Hine 

.T.W. Harlan 

H. C.Baldwin... . 

C. L. Parkes 

W.W. Jones 

M. C. Rankin 

W. H.Robb 

W.J.Vincent 

W. R. Fox 

Vacant 

A. A. Reaton 

Vacant 

Vacant 

Ben Calvin 

Vacant 

Charles Nolan 

D. M. McCord.... 

Vacant 

Joel I. White 

Charles Jenkins... 
G. N. Fairchild... 
Vacant 

E. F. Brown 

J. E. Martin 

S. H. Piersall 

. Robert Schilling.. 



Magnolia 

Prescott 

San Jose 

Denver 

Naugatuck... . 
Douglassville . 

Camargo 

Terre Haute . . 
Creston. 



Clay Center... 
Covington 



Rockland 



St. Charles... 

St. Louis 

Ord 

Jamestown... 

Inodes 

Mount Allen. 



Knoxville 

Fort Worth.. 
Parkersburg. 
Milwaukee. . 



Vacant 

Vacant 

Vacant 

Charles G, Buck... 

Robert Pyne 

Vacant 

I John L. Townsley. . 

! Vacant 

(Vacant 

!C. A. Henrie.... 
|W B. Ogden. ... 

! J.J. Sullivan 

Vacant 

J. H. Ralston 

E. M. Chamberlin . 

J. F. Duncan 

John McCarthy.. .. 

J. F. Dempsey 

Frank Kennedy 

T. B. Usher 

Edward McGlynn.. 
A. S. Houghton. .. 

J. F. Kelly 

P. A. Capelle , 

Vacant 

Vacant 

Vacant , 

Vacant 



Denver. 
Hartford. 

!| Chicago. 



Topeka. 
Newport. 
New Orleans. 

Hyattsville. 

Boston. 

Detroit. 

Minneapolis. 

St. Louis. 

Omaha. 

Union Hill. 

New York City. 

Cincinnati. 

Pittsburg. 

Providence. 



POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 



7:5 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES. --Continued. 



NATIONAL AMERICAN PARTY. 

Headquarters NEW YORK. 

Chairman ISAAC SHARP, Washington, D. C. Secretary A.. J. BOYER, Washington, D. C. 

The committee is not yet appointed. 



CHAIRMEN OF STATE COMMITTEES. 



STATE. 



REPUBLICAN. 



Name. 



Address. 



DEMOCRATIC. 



Name. 



Address. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut.. . 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi.... 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

X. Hampshire., 
New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina. John B 
North Dakota. . 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania... 
Rhode Island.. 

uth Carolina. 

uth Dakota.. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia.. 
Wisconsin 



R. A. Moseley. Jr.. 
Powell Clayton.... 

W. H. Dimond 

H. A. W. Tabor.... 

BrastusS. Day 

James Pennewill... 

L. A.Barnes 

A. E. Buck 

James S.Martin.... 
James N.Huston... 

. B. Pray 

Henry Booth 

Wm. J. Landram 

P. F. Herwig 

T.H. Manley 

Daniel E. Conkling. 

/. O. Burdett 

George H. Hopkins. 

Stanford Newell 

J.M.Matthews 

Chauncey I. Filley.. 

A. J. Seligman 

L.D.Richards 

E.D.Boyle 

J. H. Gallinger 

Garret A. Hobart 

John N. Knapp 

John B. Eaves 

E. C. Gearey 

A. L. Conger. 

T. L. Barin 

W.H.Andrews 

A. K.Goodwin 

E. M. Brayton 

C.T. McCoy...... 

Joseph R. Dillin 

1. C. DeGress 

Carroll S. Page 

E. Bowdin. 



J. F.Gowey , 

W. J. W. Cowden..., 
Henry C. Payne 



Talladega 

Little Rock 

San Francisco... 

Denver 

Hartford 

Dover, 



Gainesville...,.., 

Atlanta 

Salem 

Connersville 

DesMoines 

Topeka 

Lancaster 

New Orleans 

Augusta 

Baltimore 

Hingham 

Detroit 

St. Paul 

Winona 

St. Louis 

Helena 

Fremont 

Virginia City 

Washington, D.C. 

Paterson 

Auburn 

Raleigh 

Fargo 

Akron .. 

Portland 

Meadville 

Providence 

Columbia 

Aberdeen 

Nashville 

Austin 

Hyde Park 

Petersburg 

Olympia., 

Wheeling 

Milwaukee.... 



Henry C. Tompkins. Montgomery. 

James H. Harrod Conway. 

W. D. Engli sh I San Francisco. 

Charles S. Thomas. . Denver. 

Clinton B. Davis Hartford. 

William Stevens Seaford. 

W. D. Chipley Pensacola. 

Robert L. Berner Forsyth. 

JohnC. Campbell... Chicago. 
Charles L. Jewett... Indianapolis. 
J. J. Dunn Dubuque. 



James M. Galloway. 



Topeka. 



M. C. Alf ord (Lexington. 



John S. Lanier 

S. S.Browne 

Stevenson Archer. . . 

P.A.Collins 

I. M. Weston 

James W. Lawrence 

R.C.Patty 

C.C. Maffitt 

A. C. Logan 

James E. North 

R. P. Keating 

Charles F. Stone 



Allan L. McDermott Jersey City. 



E. Murphy.. 
Spier Whittaker.il 
W. C. Leistikow 

James E. Neal 

Asahel Bush 

E. P. Kisner 

Hugh J.Carroll... 

James F. Izlar 

Zack T.Hundley.. 
Thos. L.Williams. 
N. Webb Finley... 

Hiram Atkins 

B. B. Gordon 

A.N.Marion 

T.S.Reily 

Ellis B. Usher 



Clinton. 

Portland. 

Baltimore. 

Boston. 

East Saginaw. 

Minneapolis. 

West Point. 

St. Louis. 

Helena. 

C9lumbus. 

Virginia. 

Concord. 



Troy. 

Raleigh. 

Fargo. 

Hamilton. 

Salem. 

Hazleton. 

Pawtucket. 

Orangeburg. 

Huron. 

Nashville. 



Tyler. 
Mo 



ontpelier. 
Alexandria. 
Walla Walla. 
Wheeling. 
Milwaukee. 



PROHIBITION. 



STATE. 



Name. 



Address. 



STATE. 



Name. 



Address. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut. . 

Dakota 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 
Massachus'ts. 
Michigan 



J. T. Tanner 
W. D. Mathews. 
Geo.F. Morris 
A.W. Brazee.. 
John B. Smith 
R. B. Hassell. 
W. N. Brown. 
I. M.Auld.... 
A. A. Murphy 
L. C. Pitner. . 
John Ratliff.. 

D. W. Wood 

A.M.Richardson 
Wm. Mathews.. 

J. N. Pharr 

N. F. Woodbury 
W. L. McCIeary. 
M.H.Walker... 
Albert Dodge... 



Athens 

Clarksville 

San Francisco, 

Denver 

New Britain... 

Redfleld 

Wyoming 

Orlando 

Atlanta 

Chicago 

Marion 

'Kingsley 

i Lawrence 

! Louisville 

Berwick 

Auburn 

Baltimore 

Westborough. 
Detroit 



| Minnesota 

II'&jri^M*aA*ftVkJ 



J. P. Pinkham... 

W. C. Black 

A. F. Smith 

Nebraska George Scott 



iMississi 
Misso 



ssippi. .. 
un 



l|X.Hampshire. 

New Jersey.. 

New York.... 

N.Carolina... 

lOhio 

I Oregon 

j Pennsylvania 

iRhode Island. 
ijTennessee. .. 

iiTexas 

'! Vermont 



J.M.Fletcher... 

C.L.Parker 

F.E.Baldwin... 
D.W. C. Benhow 
H. A.Thompson 

C. W. Brown 

A. A. Stevens... 
H.S.Woodwroth 
G.W. Armistead 
W.D.Jackson... 
W.P.Stafford... 



Virginia M. M. Sibert.... 

West Virginia D. D. Johnson.. 
Wisconsin. ... T. C. Richmond. 



Minneapolis. 
Jackson. 
Kansas City. 
Sutton. 
Nashua. 
Perth Amboy. 
Elmira. 
Greensboro. 
Westerville. 
Portland. 
I Tyrone. 
Providence, 
i Nashville. 
Waco. 

'St.Johnsbury. 
Harrisburg. 
Parkersburg. 
Madison. 



74 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


CHAIRMEN OF COTTNTY COMMITTEES. 
ILLINOIS. 


COUXTY. 


REPUBLICAN. 


DEMOCRATIC. 


Name. 


Address. 


Name. 


Address. 


Adams . 
Alexander ... 


W. H. Keath.... 


Quincy 


C. S. Hearn 


Quincy. 
Cairo. 
Greenville. 
Belvidere. 
Mount Sterling. 
Princeton. 
Hardin. 
Lanark. 
Virginia. 
Champaign. 
Taylorville. 
Marshall. 
Louisville. 
Carlyle. 
Charleston. 
Chicago. 
Robinson. 
Toledo. 
Sandwich. 
Clinton. 
Tuscola. 
Naperville, 
Paris. 
Albion. 
Effingham. 
Vandalia. 
Paxton . 
Benton. 
Canton. 
Shawneetown. 
Carrollton. 
Morris. 
McLeansboro. 
Carthage. 
Elizabethtown. j 
Biggsville. 
Cambridge. 
Watseka. 
Carbondale. 
Newton. 
Mount Vernon. 
Jerseyville. 
Galena. 
Vienna. 
Aurora. 
Kankakee. 
Yorkville. 
Galesburg. 
Waukegan. 
Dttawa. 
Lawrenceville. 
Woosung. 
'ontiac. 
jincoln. 
)ecatur. 
Carlinville. 
Sdwardsville. 
Salem. 
..acon. 
lavana. 
Metropolis. 
Macomb. 
Woodstock. 
Jloomington. 
Petersburg. 
Aledo. 
Waterloo, 
lillsboro. 
acksonvllle. 
Sullivan. 
Rochelle. 
Peoria. 
Pinckneyville. 
Monticello. 
Pittsneld. 
Golconda. 


N. B. Thistlewood 
IM. B. Chittenden 
! Robert Parkhill 
J.C. Rickey 


[Cairo 
Greenville 
Belvidere 


IA. B.Gibson 


Valle Harold 


Boone 
Brown 


George W. Murch 
'John J. Teefey 


Mount Sterling. 
Princeton.. . 


Georcrfi W. Stone. . . 


'John H. Bryant .. 


Calhoun George A. Williams 


Hardin 
Mount Carroll 


'J.C. Harrison 
F T Oldt 




Dr. L. M.Sims 
iL. S Wilcox 


Beardstown 
Champaign.. .. 
Taylors vllle 
Marshall 


A. A. Leeper 


Champaign . . 
Christian 
Clark 


i Thomas Kent 


A. Crooker 


IH. P. Shumway .... 
S. D. Quick 
W.R. Whitman 
G. Van Hoorbeke 
J. J. Beal 
Jonas Hutchinson 
;E. E. Newlin 
iF. Tossey 
Eugene Randall 
William Fuller. . 


Dr.W. L. Athon 


Clay 
Clinton. 


E. B.Elrod 
J.W.Maddux 
C. E. Wilson 
W. J. Campbell 
Arthur Dixon 
Charles Hanker 
John Syme 


Flora 
Carlyle 
Mattoon 
Chicago 
Robinson 
Toledo 
Sycamore 
Clinton 


Coles... 


Cook 


Crawford 
Cumberland. . 
DeKalb 
DeWitt 


W. F. Calhoun... 


Douglas 
DuPage 
Edgar 


F. M. Friend .... 


Tuscola 
Naperville 
Paris 
Albion 


John Fairbairn, Sr 
Peter Thompson 


Dr.J. A. Bell 
J. W. Howell.....' 
Frank Coles 
Virgil Wood . 


H. S. Tanner 
'John Curtiss 


Edwards 
Effingham.... 


J. A Arnold 


W.M. Folger 


Vandalia 
Paxton 
Benton. . 


>H. D Smith 


Ford 
Franklin 
Fulton 


F.L. Cook 
Charles A. Aiken 
John Matthewson 
S.M.Smyth 
E. A. Doolittle 
J.C.Carf 
J. H. Miller 


J. C. Dunham 
I W. R.; Browning 


Astoria... 


D. Abbott 


JGallatin 
Greene 


Shawneetown.. 
Carrollton 


D. M. Kinsall 


H.T. Rainey 


Grundy 
Hamilton 


Morris 
McLeansboro... 
Carthage 
Elizabethtown 
Oquawka 
Cambridge 
Watseka 
Carbondale 
Newton 
Marlow 
Jerseyville 
Galena 
Vienna 
Aurora 
Chebanse... . 


i P. A. Armstrong 


i William Hamill 
iWm.C. Hooker 
L. H. McKernan 
T.N.Baird 
Robert Fleming 
W. H.Harry 
Wm. A. Schwartz 
H.K. Powell 
A. C. Tanner 
J.M. Page 
A. L. Camming 
T. B. Powell 
Philip Schickler 
iTruman Huling 


Hancock 
Hardin 


D. Ed Mack 


George Morris . 


Henderson.... 
Henry 


E. A. Hail 
A.R. Mock 
R W Hilscher 
E J. Ingersoll 
C.M.Davis 
Dr. J.H.Newtpn 
George W. Ware 
Joseph Tippett 
W.A.Looney 
John H. Hodder 


Iroquois 


Jasper ... 
Jefferson 
Jersey 
Jo Daviess... 
Johnson 
Kane 


Kankakee . . . 
Kendall 
Knox 
Lake 
LaSalle 
Lawrence. ... 
Lee 


A. B. Chase 
R.W.Willett 
E.W.Welch 
W.C.Upton 

Thomas C. Fullerton.. 
Harrison T. Combs. 


Yorkville 
Jalesburg 
Waukegan 
Ottawa 


L.J.Jeter 
A. J. Ostrander 
A. J. Denison 
W. W. Taylor 
S.W. Mclntosh 
John T. McGrath 
j j pierson 


S. H. Bethea 
Oscar F. Avery 
Joseph Hodnett 
M. F. Kanan 


Dixon 
Pontiac 


Livingston. . . 


Ed Lynch . 


Macon 


Decatur 
Carlinville 
Alton 
Salem 
Lacon 
Havana 
Metropolis 
Macomb 
Woodstock. . . . 
Bloomington. . . 
Petersburg 
Aledo 
New Design.. .. 
Hillsboro ! 
Jacksonville ... 
Sullivan 
Oregon 
Peoria i 
Pinckneyville.. 
Monticello ' 
Pittsneld ; 
Golconda ; 


R.E. Pratt 
T L Shirley.. 


Macoupin 
Madison 
Marion 
Marshall 
Mason 


Thomas Rinaker 


Dr.W. A. Haskell 
J. D. Telford 
G. F. Blackstone 
James M. Ruggles 
J.T.Willis 
William H. Hainline... 
G K Bunker 


E C. Springer 


A. C. Feltman 


iW. B. Whiffen 
! J. A. Mallory 
|C. L. V.Mulkey 
H. R. Bartleman 
George L. Shirwood . 
William Hill 
Robert Braden 


Massac 
McDonough. 
McHenry.... 
McLean 
Menard 
Mercer 
Monroe 
Montgomery 
Morgan 
Moultrie 
Ogle 


John A. Sterling 


W.R. Parks 
John McKinney, Jr 
Isaac Tolin 
Charles O. Brown 
James T King 


Martin Boyd 
Wm. H. Horine, Sr.... 
E.Douglas 
O P Thompson.. 


James L. Thayer 
H. R. Lason 
Will O.Clark 
Dr. H. P. Huntsinger. . 

P T* T^PVB 


I. J.Martin 
William M.Taylor 
Edward Hine ' 


Peoria 
Perry 
Piatt 


Charles D. Kane 
F V Dilatush 


Pike (C. P. Chapman 
Pope James A. Rose 1 


E. F. Binns . 
John R. Smith 



POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 



7.") 



CHAIRMEN OF COUNTY COMMITTEES. 
ILLINOIS. CONTINUED. 



COUNTY. 



Pulaskl 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Kichlaud 

Kock Island. 

Saline 

Sangamon . . 
Schuyler. ... 

Scott 

Shelby 

Stark 

St. Clalr 

Stephenson . 

Tazewell 

Union .... 

Vermilion... 

Wabash 

Warren 

Washington. 

Wavne 

it 



E.W. McClelland. 

J. B. Albert 

jThomasGant 

'R. N. McCauiey... 

Howard Wells.... 

D. B. Grattan 

W. W.Tracy ! 

Lester Gordon j 

Henry Sanuerson 

W.C.Headen | 

R. J. Dickinson j 

J. A. WillougKby | 

iH. C. Burchard i 

|K. S.Conklin I 

R. B. Stinson ! 

W. R. Jewell 

R. S. Gordon ; 

R. J. Grier ! 

O.P. Hallam | 

E. Bonham.. 



Mound City L. D. Stophlct Mound City. 

Florid ij. H. Seaton Hennepin. 

New Palestine. 
Olney 



Address. 



Xante. 



Address. 



" -* u**i.w*J UDLOUUUUlUt 

John T. McBride IShtloh Hill. 

Wm. Bowen Olney. 

Kock Island. ... G. W. Vinton Rock Island. 

Galatia Is. L. Cheeiiey 'Harrisburg. 

B. F. Caldwell j Springfield. 

John S. Stutsnian ;Rushville. 



Theodore Trowly ....... 



Wh 

Whiteside.. 

Will 

Williamson... . _. 

Winnebago... George S. Roper 

Woodford Dr. E. A. Wilcox 



O. Woods 
IE. W. Willard 
John H. Duncan ........ 



Springfield. 

Rushville.... 
Winchester.. 
Shelbyville.. 

Toulon , 

Belleville..., 

Free port 

Pekin 

Anna 

Danville. 



Mount Carmel. 

Monmouth 

Nashville 

airfield 



Enfleld 

Morrison 

Joliet 

Marion 

Rockford 

Minonk... 



L>. C Liel) 

W. B. Townsend... 



Winchester. 
Shelbyville. 
Bradford. 



H. Phenix 

James D. Baker Belleville. 

Fred J. Kunz Freeport. 

W. R. Curran IPekin. 

W. C. Lence i Jonesboro. 

George R. Tilton Danville. 

Samuel Seitz Mount Carmel. 

George R. Barbour i Monmouth. 

Peter Zeigel Nashville. 

Adam Rinard Fairfleld. 

Hugh McCullough Carmi. 



A.. J. Jackson 

I. W. D'Arcy 

J. H. Dennison 



Morrison. 
Joliet. 



j.xa. jjt;iiiiiuii [Marion. 

Paul J. Schuster ! Rockford. 

W.S.Gibson JE1 Paso. 



COUNTY. 



Adams 

Bond 

Boone 

Brown 

Bureau 

_alhouu 

Carroll 

3ass 

hampaign.. 
Christian 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Coles 

Cook 

Crawford 

umberland. 

DeKalb 

DeWitt 

Douglas .... 

)uE J age 

Sdgar. 

3d wards 

Sffingham... 

Fayette 

Ford 

franklin .... 

'"'niton 

[Jallatin 

Jreene 

Jrundy 

Hamilton 

Hancock , 

lenderson.. 

Henry 

"roquois 

Jackson 



PROHIBITION. 



Address 



H. S. Wells ;Quincy 

Wm.N.Donnell. Greenville .. 



J. G. Stevens jBelvidere | Livingston... 



R. L. Steed Mt. Sterling.. 

Wm. C. Trimble. Princeton 

A. C. Wilson.... Batchtown.... 

Conrad Lamp ... Lanark 

S. H. Peteflsh.... Virginia 

J. B.McKinley.. Champaign.... 

J. A McElroy... Pana 

Levt vv atson Westfield 

J. Billings Flora 

C. C. Dray ton... 
John S. Sargent. 

). A.Van Fleet... Chicago. 
Jas.L.BuchananiDuncanville . 

I. D. Borden. f 

J.E. Atwood. 
J. E. Diehl... 

D. N. Boyce... 
Wm. King.... 



COUNTY. 



. Lawrence.... 
Lee . . . 



Trenton . 
Hut ton. 



A. Easton 

ijas. Cresson 

(Henrv B. Kepley 

Wm. Page 

'Frank Stoner 
Dr. P. S. Pope.. 
John Hughes 

H B. Shunts 

O. L. Eiwarrls.... 
C os. A. W alley. 

J. II. Wilson 

C.Worden 

M.Tion McKim.. 
iL.D. Holmes .... 



Jasper 

Jefferson 
Jersey.... 
Jo Daviess.. 

Johnson 

Kane 

Kankakee. . 

Kendall 

Knox 

Lake 

LaSalle.... 



Rev. J. G Evans Onnri'a 



D. B. Thomas 

J. W. Jloney.... 

.. Silas Downer 

,|C. W. E-ios. 



Greenup. 

D-iKaio 

Kenney 

Tuscola 

Naperville.... 
Paris 



Albion 



Logan 

Macon 

Macoupin ... 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Mason 

McDonough.. 

McHenry 

McLean 

Menard 

Mercer 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 

Morgan 

Moultrie 

Ogle 

Peoria 

Perry 

Piatt 



PROHIBITION. 



Name. 



John H. Penner. 
W. H.Tibbies... 
Wm. S. Estes.... 

Frank Hoblit 

D L. Bunn 

; N. Challacomb.. 

|L C.Keown 

W.M. Finley.... 
H. A. Groveland 

'Lafe Swing 

! T. J. Price. 

IW. H. Beick 

ijas Thompson.. 
IP. Artie 



Lawrenceville 

Steward. 

Pontiac. 

Lincoln. 

Decatur. 

Challacomb. 

Edwardsville. 

Salem. 

Varna. 

Mason City. 

Macomb. 

Woodstock. 

Bloomington. 

Petersburg. 

Aledo. 

Waterloo. 



A.1 U 1 W 1 J l icll/U 

Effingham... . Pike 

Long Prairie.. 1 1 Pulaski 

Hend'n Stat'ni P,utnam 

Benton I Randol ph 

Richland 

Rock Island.. 

Sangamon 

SchuyJer 

Scott 

Shelby 

Stark 

. Clair 

^tephenson.. 

Tazewell 

Union 

Vermilion 

Wanash 

Warrpn 



. C. Pepper 

IJ. Hobbs 

John A. Allen. .iLitchfield. 
Ralph Reynolds 

Geo. Hoke 

J. P.Wayland.. 

D. Sheen 

S E Evans 

David Meyer... 



Table Grove .. 
Shawneetown 

Greenfield 

Morris 

McLeansboro. 

Carthage 

Disco 

Gah 



Mur^hvsboro 

Newton 

Mt. Vernon.. 



, .Jprspyville ... 

! Geo. Richardson. ,W.<rr<Mi ,,...., 

IG. B. Boomer. .. j Buncombe .... iWashington. 
i.T. G Brown Batavia |l * r hite 



Kankakee ..... Whiteside ____ 

Bristol ........ iWill ........... 

Onei<la ......... Williamson.. 

. A. Hinekley. Waukogan.... Winnebago.. 

N. KiHiourn ..... Ottawa ........ Woodford.... 



.1. C. Mateer ____ 
Robt. S Hopper. 
A. D. Metcalf.. 



Chas. A. Hughes Griggsville. 
T.W.Hanes Villa Ridge. 



H. Gardner 

P. B. Gault 

E. F. Houser. .. 
A. Williams.... 
Edmund Miller. 
Dr. J.N. Speed. 
A. C. Palmer.... 
John F. Killam. 

J. M. Jones 

Wm. Little 

T. D.Wilcoxon. 

C. A. Barton 

W.Rose 

A. G. Copeland. 
W. H. Hughes.. 

*. C. Hogan 

Tames A. Watts 



Sullivan. 
Stillman Val'y 
Peoria. 
DuQuoin. 
Bement. 



Hennepin. 

Sparta. 

Olney. 

Moline. 

Rochester. 

Rushville. 

Winchester. 

Tower Hill. 

Lafayette. 

Marissa. 

Freeport. 

Bradley. 

Anna. 

Danville. 

Mt. Carmel. 

Monmouth. 

Nashville. 



W. H.Carner ... Carmi. 
F.E.Andrew*.. Sterling. 
H. E. Baldwin... ! Jo let. 
W. M. Davis.... Marion. 
John W. Hart. . Rockford. 
. J.M. McCuIlogh. Cazenovia. _ 



76 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEES. 
ILLINOIS. 



DISTRICT. 



REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters CHICAGO. 
Chairman JAMES S. MARTIN. 
Decretory DANIEL SHEPARD. 
Treasurer J. L. WOODWARD. 



Members. 



Address. 



DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters CHICAGO. 
Chairman JOHN C. CAMPBELL. 
Secretary W . J. MIZE. 
treasurer J AS. S. EWING. 



Members. 



Address. 



1st.. 
2d.. 



7th.. 
8th.. 
9th.. 
10th. 
llth. 
12th. 
13th. 
14th. 
15th. 
IHth. 
17th. 
18th. 
19th 
20th. 



Pliny B. Smith 

Henry Westerfield. 

B. A. Eckart 

S. B. Raymond 

Walters. Frazler.. 
M.Jones. 



Charles Bent 

. C. Duffy 

E. A. Wi cox 

Frank Hitchcock . . . 
H. F. McAllister... 

J. H. Coates 

Samuel Bivens 

E. D. Blinn 

H. Clark... 



Ed Ryan. 

H. M. Minor 

Thomas B. Needles. 

James S. Martin 

P. T. Chapman 



Chicago 

Shicago 
hicago 

Chicago 

Aurora 

Warren 

Morrison 

Piano 

Minonk 

Peoria 

Oquawka 

Winchester 

Havana 

Lincoln 

Mattoon 

Lawrenceville. 
Sullivan... 

Nashville 

Salem 

Vienna 



George M. Haynes.. 

J. C. Strain , 

J. Gaynor , 

S. B. Chase 

R. M. Botsford , 

W. O. Wright. . . . 

W. H. Mesenkop 

J. C. Campbell 

J.E.Ons 

N. M. Gish 

Delos P. Phelps 

John Jones 

T. W. McNeely 

W. J. Mize 

W. B. Brinton 

George N. Parker 

J. H. Baker 

J. W. Coppinger 

W.Watson 

T. F. Bouton , 



Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Elgin. 

Freeport. 

Princeton. 

Streator. 

Lacon. 

Peoria. 

Monmouth. 

Carrollton. 

Petersburg. 

Chicago. 

Tuscola. 

Robinson. 

Sullivan. 

Alton. 

Mt. Vernon. 

Jonesboro. 



PROHIBITION. 
Headquarters CHICAGO. 
Chairman L,. C. PITNER. 
Secretary J. W. NICHOLS. 



Members. 



Address. 



UNITED LABOR (Executive Board). 
Headquarters CHICAGO. 
Chairman R. H. COWDRET. 
Secretary J. L. TOWNSLEY. 



Elis Johnson 

Mrs. L. S. Rounds 

J. N. Wheeler 

J.W.Hart 

W. H. Tibbies 

David Samuels 

James McGrew , 

D. H. Gray 

J. C. Pepper 

W.T. Smith 

O. P. Pratt 

R. E. Cormack 

Leroy Taylor 

H. B. Kepley 

H. C. Lanterman 

T. S. Marshall 

J. C. McReyuolds 

A. D.Ellison 

Dr. E. Bebee 

James Lament . 

D. E. Holmes 

M. E. Cornell 

F. M. Grant 

MaryE. Metzger 

Sam Woods 

R.' R. Linl^ . .'.'.'.'.'.'.'. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. 

S.E. Evans 

Hale Johnson 



Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Geneva. 

Rockford. 

Ashton. 

Marseilles. 

Kankakee. 

Elmwood. 

Aledo. 

Pittsfleld. 

Taylorsville. 

Camargo. 

Mt. Carmel. 

Effingham. 

Edwardsville. 

Salem. 

Marion. 

Marengo. 

Elizabeth. 

Rockford. 

Galva. 

Yorkville 

Canton. 

Moline. 



Members. 



R. H. Cowdrey. 
J. L. Townsley. 
John Bagley... 
M. J. Rowan 

P. Higgins 

James McCormick. 



Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
J W. Harlan Chicago. 



Address. 



iQuincy. 
Chall 



hallaeomb. 
Ewing College. 
DuQuoin. 
Newton. 







UJVTCLV LABOR (Executive Board^. 
Headquarters CHICAGO. 
Chai>manJ. H. RANDALL. 
Secretary JOHX M. FOLEY. 


Members. 


Address. 


J H. Randall 


Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Decatur. 
Carmago. 
Bloomington. 


J. M. Foley 


John Lindsay 


W. W. Jones 


Z Waters 





INDIANA. 



DISTRICT. 



REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters INDIANAPOLIS. 
CWnJ. N. HUSTON, Connorsvllle. 
Secretary JOHN I. DILLE. 
Treas u rer WM . W A LL ACE . 



Members. 



Address. 



DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters INDIANAPOLIS. 
Chairman CHAS. L. JEWETT. 
Secretary E. MARSH 
Treasurer J. P. FRENZEL. 



Members. 



Address. 



Frank B. Posey Petersburg . . 

T. H. Adams Vincennes..., 

Thos. C. Batcheler . . Vernon 



E. P. Richardson Petersburg. 

Mason J. Nibiack. .J Vincennes. 
Geo. W Baxter i Jeffersonville. 



(Form 1.300. 
DEMOCRATIC STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE. 

JANUARY 1, 189O. 

HEADQUARTERS, CHICAGO. 

Chairman J. C. CAMPBELL. 

Secretary .... .... GEO. M. HAYNES. 

Treasurer VV. B. BKINTON. 



Dist. 
1. 


Member. . Address. 
Peter \lcOum Chicago. 


Dist. 
11. 


Member. Address. 
Jno M. Potter Rock Island 


:I '.'.'.. 

4. ... 

r>. . 
r>. 


J. C Strain " 
John Gay or . . " 
. . S. B. ( h'ase " 
R. N. Bottsford ..Elgin. 
\V. 0. Wright.... Freeport. 


12. 
13. ... 
14. ... 
15. ... 
16. 


W. H. Hinnchsen..Quincv- 
. . . J. D. Wright Petersburg!!. 
.Theo. Nelson... .Decatur. 
S. L.Woodsworth..Arcola. 
G. N.Parker Kohinson. 


s! '.'.. 

9. ... 
10 


W.II.Messenkopp.Princeton. 
J. C. Campbell. ..Streator. 
...D. 0. Taylor Kankukee. 
S. Y. Thornton. ...Canton. 


17. ... 
18. ... 
19. ... 
20 


. .J. H. Baker Sullivan. 
...J. W. Coppenger. .Alton. 
. . . Walter Watson . . . Mt. Vernon . 
T. F. Bouton J mesbcro. 



AT LARGE. 



J W. Richards Chicago. T. W. Neeley, Petersburgh. S. P. Cummings, Canton. 

John Powers " D. P. Phelps, Monmouth. W. B. Brinton, Tuscola. 

Gco. M. Havnc:. " 



78 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEES. 
ILLINOIS. 



DISTRICT. 



REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters CHICAGO. 
Chairman JAMES S. MARTIX. 
decretory DANIEL SHEPARD. 
Treasurer J. L. WOODWARD. 



DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters CHICAGO. 
Chairman JOHN C. CAMPBELL. 
Secretary W. J. MIZE. 
'treasurer JAS. S. EWING. 



Mr 

j. : 
w. 

Da 
Jar 




J^llllTVUUU. 

Aledo. 
Pittsfield. 
Taylorsville. 
Camargo. 
Mt. Carmel. 
Efflngham. 
Edwardsville. 
Salem. 
Marion. 
Marengo. 
Elizabeth. 
Rockford. 
Galva. 
Yorkville 
Canton. 
Moline. 
8uincy. 
hallaeomb. 
Ewing College. 
DuQuoin. 
Newton. 


M. J.KC 

P. Higg 
James I 
J. W. H 




J C Pepper 




IPS 


Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 


W T Smith 




tfcCormlck 


O P Pratt 






R. E. Cormack. 






Leroy Taylor... 
H. B. Kepley 




UNION LABOR (Executive Board^ 
Headquarters CHICAGO. 
Chai/manJ. H. RANDALL. 
Secretary JOHN M. FOLEY. 


H. C. Lantermar 
T. S. Marshall.. 
J. C. McReyi.old 
\ D Ellison 






S ' 












Members. 


Address. 


D E Holmes 




M. E. Cornell .. 
F. M. Grant 
MaryB. Metzge 






J. H. R 
J. M. Fc 
John L 
W. W. 
Z.Wat< 


indall . 


Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Decatur. 
Carmago. 
Bloomlngton. 






)ley 


N Challacomb 




ndsay 


R R Link 




loiies 








Hale Johnson... 






INDIANA. 


DISTRICT. 


REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters INDIANAPOLIS. 
Ch'nJ. N. HUSTON, Connorsville. 
Secretary JOHN I. DILLE. 
Treasurer Vtjo.. WALLACE. 


DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters INDIANAPOLIS. 
Chairman CHAS. L. JEWETT. 
Secretary- -E. MARSH 
Treasurer J. P. FRENZEL. 


Members. Address. 


Members. Address. 


1st 

2d 


Frank B. Posey Petersbu 
T. H. Adams Vincenne 
Thos. C. Batcheler . . Vernon. . 


rg 
s 


E. P.Richardson Petersburg. 
Mason J. Nibiack. . . I Vincennes. 
Geo. W Baxter i Jeffersonville. 


3d 





POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 77 


STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEES. 
INDIANA. CONTINUED. 


DISTRICTS. 


REPUBLICAN. 


DEMOCRATIC. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


Ith 


M R Sulzer 


Madison 
Columbus 


F S Swift 


Brookville. 
Columbus. 
New Castle. 
Greenfield. 
Newport. 
Lebanon. 
Monticello. 
Huntington. 
Fort Wayne. 
Plymouth. 


>th 


J I Irwin 


P. H. McCormack. . 
D. W. Chambers.. . . 
Epnraim Marsh 
Jas. C. Sawyer 
Israel Curry 
J.W.Stewart 
John J. Young 
G.W. Long 
Daniel McDonald.. . 


th 


L. D. Stubbs 
D. M. Ransdell 
John H. Burford 
J. A. Swoveland 
E. D. Crumpacker... 
Johnl. Dille 
Wm. Bunyan 
L. W. Royse 


Richmond 
Indianapolis... . 
Crawfordsville. . 
Tipton 


th 


h 


h 


Ith 


Valparaiso 
Huntington 
Kendallville 
Warsaw 


ah 
2th 
3th 


I) 

, DISTRICT. 
8 

4 


PROHIBITION. 
Headquarters Ixui AW APOLIS. 
Chairman JOHN RATLIFF, Marlon. 
Secretary -W. B. HALE, Indianapolis. 


UNION LABOR. 
Headquarters INDIANAPOLIS. 
CA'w M. C. RANKIN, Terre Haute. 
Secretary T. J. SHARP, Indianapolis. 


Members. 


Address. 


. Members. 


Address. 


5f": 


W.M. Land... 
N. F. Gill 


Princeton 
Ireland 
Charlestown 
Lawrenceburg... 


Moses Smith 
C. J. Smoot 
Jas. D. Hudson 
F. J. Lindley 


Evansville. 
Glendale. 
North Vernon. 
Foltz. 
Franklin. 
Star. 
Indianapolis. 
Gessie. 
Jamestown. 
Monticello. 
Bluffton. 
Fort Wayne. 
Plymouth. 




W. F. Ferrier 


s h:v:::::: 


A. G. Tebbs 


h 


George Smith 


10h... 


W. A. Spurgeon 
J. B. Jacques 
T. E. Baliard 
Aaron Walker 
D. L. Overholzer.... 
William Lenfesty... 
B. B. Fowler.... 


Muncie 
Indianapolis 
Crawfordsville.. 


C. A.Ging 
T. .Sharp 
J. R. Johnson 
D H Shockley ... 


h 

j 


loth 


Logan sport 
Marion 
Fort Wayne 
Milford 


J.C. Smith 
W. P. McMahon 
D. B. Cary 


r th... 


c "th".. 


5h 


S.J. North 


A. C. Harris 


IOWA. 


DISTRICT. 


REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters Ws MOINES. 
Chairman G. B. PRAY, Des Moines. 
Secretary C. M. JUNKIN. 


DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters DES MOINES. 
Chairman J. J. DUNN, Dubuque. 
Secretary THOMAS H. LEE, Red Oak. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st 


C. M. Junkin 
J. M. Campbell 
Edgar Pickett 


Fairfleld 
Muscatine 
Waterloo 
New Hampton... 
Cedar Rapids 
Ottumwa 
Indianola 
Mt. Ayr 
Stewart 
Boone 
Storm Lake 


Charles D. Fuller 
Sam Cohn 
J. J. Dunn 
M. J. Carter 
John Baum 
J.E. Seevers 
J. B.Elliott 
W E Lewis 


Fairlieid. 
Muscatine. 
Dubuque. 
Ossian. 
Garrison. 
Oskaloosa. 
Knoxville. 
Chariton. 
Red Oak. 
Fort Dodge. 
Sioux City. 


2d 


3d . . 


4th 




5th 
6th 
7th 
8th 
9th 


William Buchanan.. 
W. D. Howard 
T. J. Anderson 
J. F. Wall 
P. L. Seevers 
J. A. McCabe 
E. E. Mack 


Thomas H. Lee 
G. W.Hyatt 
G.B. Healy 


10th 


llth 


DISTRICT. 


PROHIBITION. 
Headquarters DES MOINES. 
Chairman D.W. WOOD. 
(Secretary HARMON COOK. 


UNION LABOR. 

Chairman L. H. GRIFFITHS. 
Secretary Vf . H. ROBB. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st 


J. L. Scott 


New London 
Davenport 
Dubuque, 
Mason City 
Cedar Rapids.... 
( )sk!tloosa. . . 


Jacob Geiger , 


Atlantic. 
Maquoketa. 
Dubuque. 
Nashua. 
Marlon. 
Ottumwa. 
W interact. 
Creaton. 
Bear Grove. 
Lehigh. 
Castana. 


2d 
3d 
4th ... 


E. W. Brady 
J.T.Adams 
H. G. Parker 
Malcolm Smith 
O S. Morrow... 


J. W. Fleming 
Kobert Hay 


L. H. Weller 
L. T.Wood 
(). C. Graves.... 


5th 


i ( th 


7th... ... Harmon Cook DOS Molnes Ezra Brownell 
8th A. S. Bailcv ("larinda VV. H. Robb 


9th L. W. Tulleys Counc 1 Bluffs.... Richard Hopkins 
1 'th S. H. Taft jHumboldt Silas G. Goss 
llth I). W. Wood iKlngsley B. F. Roe 



78 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEES. 
MICHIGAN. 


DISTRICT. 


REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters DETROIT. 
Chairman GEORGE H. HOPKINS. 
Secretary- H. C. TILLMAN. 


DEMOCRATIC. 
HeacHrttartersEAST SAGINAW. \ 
Chairman 1. M.WESTox, G'd Rapids. 
Secretary- FRANK H. THOMAS. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st 

( 2d 


Henry W. Duffleld. .. 
Charles Wright 
T. S. Applegate 


Detroit 


D. J. Campau 
J. W. Flynn 
Charles S. Gregory. 
Charles Humphrey. 
William H. Porter.. 


Detroit. 
Detroit. . 
Drxtrr. 
Adrian. 
Marshall. 
Hickory Corners. 
Dailey. 
Sturgis. 
Ionia. 
Allegan. 
St. Johns. 
Fowlerville. ' 
Mar.ette. 
Mount Clemens. 
East Saginaw. 
St. Louis. 
Manistee. 
Cadillac. 
Caro. 
Alpena. 
Traverse City. 
Ishpeming. 


Detroit 
Adrian 


;3d 
4tn 

5th 




D. B. Ainger 
W.H. Withington.. 
T. F. Giddings 
A.B.Copley 
G "W.Webber..."!.? 


Charlotte 
Jackson. 


Kalamazoo 
Decatur 
Ionia 


C. H. Kimmerle 
Charles J. Lockwood 
T B Preston 


6th 


Wm. Alden Smith... 
Charles F. Kimball.. 
Otis Fuller 


Grand Rapids . 
Pontiac 
St. Johns 
Richmond 
Port Huron . . 
Stanton 
Saginaw 
Mukegon 


A. E. Calkins 


J. H. Fedewa 
Frank G. Rounsville 
Robert Willis 
George M. Crocker. . 
George H. House 
Stiles Kennedy 
R R Blacker 


7th 


William H. Acker.... 
A. R. Avery 
N. J. Brown 
F. C. Stone. . 


8th 
9th 


tfewcomb McGraft.. 
Z. Broox Martin 
E. T. Carrington 
D.C. Page 


10th 


Reed City 
Bay City 


L.J.Law 
Frank H.Thomas.... 
George J. Robinson.. 
H.C.Davis 
G.W. Hayden 


llth 


Petoskey 


Thomas T. Bates.... 
H. O. Young 


Traverse City 
Ishpeming 


DISTRICT. 


PROHIBITION. 
Headquarters DETROIT. 
Chairman A. DODGE.Fowlerville. 
Secretary-TV. W. WISE, Lansing. 


UNION LABOR. 
Headquarters LANSING . 
Chairman J. M. POTTER. 
Secretary FRANK M. FOGG. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st 


C. P. Russell.. 
J. B. Stevens 


Detroit 
Detroit 
Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 
Charlotte 


Ed S. Greece 


Detroit. 
Detroit. 
Hillsdale. 
Camden. 
Assyria. 
Jackson. 
Three Rivers. 
Mendon. 

Lansing. 
Howell. 
Grindstone City. 
Lapeer. 
Saginaw City. 
Midland. 
Manistee. 
Muskegon. 
Arenac. 
Bay City. 
Allegan. 
Iron Mountain. 


2d 


JohnM. McPhee.... 
Charles E. Finch 
J.B. Hubbell 
A. B. Kent 


G. p. Waring 


i3d 


B. J. Conrad 
D.P. Sagendorph.... 
\ G Bi*uce 


4th 


Albion 


G F Wilson 


H. I. Allen 


Schoolcraf t 
Dowagiac 


George DeLong 
George Osborne 


5th 


H. S. McMaster 
A. O. Crozier 
Dr. Milton Chase 
Alfred Wise 


Grand Rapids .... 
Otsego .... 


6th 




Lansing 
Pontiac . .. 


Frank M. Fogg 
Arthur E. Cole 


7th 


James Houston 
Robert King 




8th 
9th 






James E. Mapes 
Joseph Sanders 
William Bolton 
i Wm. Baumgardner. . 
Dr. Jos. Lamoreaux. 
Lawrence McHugh. . 
John Sharp 


H.W. Parker 
Newell Leonard 
E. S. Palmieter 
George R. Malone. . . 
J. Van Zolemberg 
S. A. Lane 
George H.Cobb 
Rev. D. B.Johnson.. 


Owosso 
St. Louis 
Hart 


10th 


Big Rapids.. 


Petoskey 
Vassar 
Traverse City 
Menominee 


llth 


George LaFleur 
P. H. Burns 




MINNESOTA. 


REPUBLICAN. DEMO CRA TIC. 
Headquarters ST. PAUL. Headquarters-Si:. PAUL. 
Chairman STANFORD NEWEL. Chairman JAMES W. LAWRENCE. 
Secretary JOEL P. HEATWOLE. Secretary JOHN LANDBERG. 


Members, Address. Members. 


Address. 


1 Stanford Newe 
Joel P. Heatwt 
I). M. Clougli. 
E. G. Potier .. 
C. B. Buckman 
!F. G. Ingersoll. 
E. G. Swansiro 
Allen J. Greer. 


1 , St Pau 


1 James 
eld M. W.( 
polis Dan W 
polis ! E. C. St 
apids Williai 

i IH c s 


W. Lawrence 
ilenn 
Lawler , 
riuger 


Minneapolis. 
Minneapolis. 
St. Paul. 
Hastings. 
St. Paul. 
Winona. 
Minneapolis. 
Faribault 
Mankato. 
Fergus Falls. 


le Northfl 


.... Miniiea 


Minnea 
SaukR 
St Pau 


a Hamm 




m. . . ... Duluth 


C. M. F 

ity Stephe 


oote 
n L. Crocker 
fau 
Shea 


Lake C 


VVinflnr 


n A. R. P 
nt "Martin 


IF A Day Fairmo 



POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 



79 



STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEES. 
MINNESOTA. CONTINUED. 



REPUBLICAN. 



Members. 



Address. 



DEMOCRATIC. 



Members. 



Address. 



g. F. Potter La Crescent. 
. J.Knox Aitkin 

D. W.Bruckart St. Cloud.... 

C. Klinkert Arlington.... 

W.M. Liggett Benson 

H. E. Cooke ICrokston 

John J. Rhodes (Hastings... 



A. Blanchard jNew Ulm.... 

J.W. Reynolds 'Herman 



i William T. Bonniwell 

iM. Mullen 

jW. H. Harries.... 

R. N. Marble 

A. E. Aarness , 

A.M.Becker 

William Anglim 

A.G. Broker 



Hutchinson. 

New Ulm. 

Caledonia. 

Duluth. 

Montevideo. 

Adrian. 

Crookston. 

Wadena. 



P H. O'Hara Graceville. 



PROHIBITION. 
Headquarters MINNEAPOLIS. 

Chairman J. P. PINKHAM. Secretary GEORGE F. WELLS. 

Treasurer W '. J. DEAN. 



Members. 



Address. 



Members. 



Address. 



J.P. Pinkham 

George F. Wells 

W.J. Dean 

J. T. James 

S.J.Turnblad 

D.Morgan 

T. 8. Reimstead 

C.N. McLaughlin 



Minneapolis... 
Minneapolis... 
Minneapolis... 

Excelsior 

Minneapolis.. . 
WestSt. Paul. 
Minneapolis... 
Owatonna 



A. B. Quin by Winona 



T. P. Grout 

H. F Meyer 

William Johnson. 
M. W. Skinner.... 
Martin Mahony... 

I A. P. Peterson 

A. A. Stone 

; Peter Ebeltoft.... 



Luverne. 
Le Sueur. 
Atwater. 
Northfleld. 
St. Paul. 
Minneapolis 
Morris. 
Lake Park. 



FARM AND LABOR. 

Headquarters ST. PAUL. 

Chairman ERIC OLSON. Secretary NELS GRANBERG. 



Members. 



Address. 



J. A.Johnson. 
J. McVeigh.... 
C. H. Roberts. 



.St. Paul 

. (Minneapolis 

.(Rochester 



Members. 



G. C. Chamberlain 

Ole Johnson 

F. A. Porter 



Address. 



Northflc.d. 
Litchfleld. 
'Center City. 



MONTANA. 



COUNTIES. 



REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters HELENA. 
Chairman A. J. SELIGMAN. 
Secretary J. W. HATHAWAY. 



Members. 



Address. 



DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters H ELENA. 
Chairm'in A. C. LOGAN. 
Secretary LEON A. LECROIX. 



Members. 



A ddress. 



Beaverhead 

Cascade 

Choteau 

Custer 

Dawson 

Deer Lodge 

Fergus 

3allatin 

Jefferson 

Lewis andClark 

Madison 

Meagher 

Missoula 

Park 

Silver Bow 

Yellowstone 



J.E.Morse 

I John H. Falrfield.... 
Thos. A Cumming.. 

j Sam uel Gordon 

Henry E. Day 

N. .1. Bielenberg 

'Frank E. Smith 

John Potter , 

P. B. Ingalls 



Dillon 

Great Falls 

Fort Benton ! 

Miles City I 

Glendive t 

Deer Lodge 

Lewiston 

Moreland 

Placer j 



Coi 



John T. Connor 

Max Watterman 
Charles S. Marshall. 

C. H. Talcott 

William Thompson. 
Paul McCormick 



Virginia City | 

W. Sulphur Spr's! 

Missoula I 

Livingston ' 

ButteCity 

Junction City 



n Bray 

Paris Gibson 

C. E. Conrad 

L.C.Dear 

G. R. Tingle 

Sylvan Hughes. .. 
Granville Stuart . 
Walter Cooper.... 

John Schriner 

A. C. Logan 

H. Schnelhauser.. 
W. H. Southerlin 
John R. Higgins.. 

J. R. Savage 

G. M. Stapleton... 
L. B. Williston 



Dillon. 
Great Falls. 
Fort Benton. 
Miles City. 
Glendive. 
Anaconda. 
Lewiston. 
Bozeman. 
Boulder. 
Helena 
Virginia City. 
W. Sulphur Spr's 
Missoula. 
Livings' on. 
Butte City. 
Billings. 



80 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEES. 
NEBRASKA. 


REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters LINCOLN. 
Chairman L. D. RICHARDS, Fremont. Secretary- V? '. M. SEELY, Bennett. 


DISTRICTS. 


Members. 


Address. 


1 DISTRICTS.! Members. 


Address. 


1st.... 


H. C. Wootham.. 
Church Howe 
F. E. McMillen... 
O. Teft 
Alex. Lavertv.... 
W. F. Peshel 
M. S.Lindsey 
E. M. Stenberg... 
C. C. McNish 
Solomon Draper.. 
Lorin Clark 
A. C.Jones 
D. A. Holmes 
Geo. G. Bowman.. 
Thomas Carlon.. 
A. Barlow 
H. H. Andrews... 


Pawnee City. 
Auburn. 
Nebraska City. 
Avoca. 
Abhland. 
Omaha. 
Omaha. 
Omaha. 
Wisner. 
Niobrara. 
Albion. 
Blair. 
Norfolk. 
Columbus. 
O'Neill. 
Chadron. 
Calloway. 


15th 
ItJth 


J. H. Ayer . . . 
R. A.Julian 
Walter R. Bacon. 
C.E.Brady 
W. C. Hartman.... 
C.J.Daubach.... 
John Wilson 
B. P. Suver 


Ord. 
Kearney. 
Grand Island. 
Fullerton. 
Staplehurst. 
Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 
Beatrice. 
Crete. 
Endicott. 
York. 
Fairfleld. 
Blue Hill. 
Bloomington. 
Hastings. 
Indianola. 


2d 


3d 


'17th .. 


4th 

5th .. 


18th 
19th . . . 


6th 
7th ... 


20th 


21st . 


22d .. 


H. M. Wells 


8th... 


23d 
24th... 


H.C. Dawson 
T.E. Sedgwick... 
J.M.Farley 
John S. Hoover. . 
J. P. A. Black.... 
W. A. Dilworth... 
John B. Lamborn 


9th... 


10th 
llth 
12th 
13th 


25th 
26th 

27th... 


14th. . 


28th 


15'h 


DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters OMAHA. 
Chairman A OHN A. MCSHANE. Secretary C. S. MONTGOMERY. 


DISTRICT. 


Members. 


Address. 


DISTRICT. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st 
2d 


G. P. Marvin 
Robert Glegg 
James Devenney. 
M. T. Connor 
Charles J. Heffley 
R. B.Wallace.... 
G.I. Bluehdorn... 
J. V.Wolfe 
W. B. Shryock.... 
Euclid Martin.... 
J. J. O'Connor.... 
N.J. Sheckell.... 
J.E.Campbell.... 
E. H. Clark 
N. W. Smails 
H. Gilkerson 
J. J. Sullivan 
Matt Miller 


Beatrice 
Falls City. 


7th 
8th 


J.C.Crawford.... 
H. E. Bonesteel.. 
W. W. Cones 
F. M. McGivern.. 
R. B. Wahlquist.. 
A. F.Moore 
J.W. Ferguson... 
R. 8. Proudflt 
W. H. Platt 


West Point. 
Niobrara. 
Pierce. 
Stanton. 
Hastings. 
Bloomington. 
Minden. 
Guide Rock. 
Grand Island. 
St. Paul. 
Greeley Center 
Albion. 
Kimball. 
Ogalalla. 
Kearney. 
Broken Bow. 
Benkleman. 
McCook. 
Beaver City. 
Champion. 
Valentine. 
Hay Springs. 
Hemingsford. 
O'Neill. 


Tecumseh 


Auburn 


Lincoln 


3d 


Factoryville.... 
Nebraska City.. 
Lincoln 
Louisville. ...... 


9th 


Omaha 


10th 
llth 


C.E.Forbes 
P.H.Barry 
B. R. Ansttne 
H. H. Robinson.. 
J. G. Watts . 


4th 


Omaha 


Tekamah 
Papillion 
Blair 
Fremont 


W. L.Greene 
R. E.Martin 
L. J. Vollers 
E. C. Ballew 
J. T. McClure 
R. A. Ewing 
Robert O. Fink. . . 
EdH. Holden.... 
C. A. Burlew 
O F Biglin 


5th 
6th 


Wahoo 
Columbus 


David City 
Nelson 
Dorchester 
Fairbury 
Geneva 
Osceola 


12th 


?:5&fe::::: 

J. D. Hubble 
JohnChristiancey 
G.W.West 
E.W. Hurlbut.... 
Thomas Smith. . . 
Ed P. Smith 




McCool Junct.. 
Seward 




PROHIBITION. 
Headquarters LINCOLN. 
Chairman H.O-X. GEORGE SCOTT. Secretary R. A. HAWLEY. 


COUNTIES. 


Members. 


Address. 


COUNTItS. 


Members. 


Address. 


Adams 
Antelope. . 


C. L.Jones 
A. J. Leach 


Hastings. 
Oakdale. 
Ulysses. 
Weeping Water 
B^airfleld. 
Oakland. 
Gothenburg. 
North Bend. 
Omaha. 
Emerson. 
Geneva. 
Franklin. 
Beatrice. 
Evina. 
Grand Island. 
Ragan. 


Holt 


W. C. Evered 
Robert Christian. 
L. C. Chapman... 
R. H. Mason 
H.E.George 
Dr. H. J. Cole.... 
Albert Fitch, Jr. . 
M. 1. Brower 
C. A. Thompson.. 
Wm. Saunders.... 
MaxE.Bittner... 
8. S. Quick 
. E. Smith 
Charles Alley.... 
Geo.Terwilliger.. 
0. S. Haskell.... 


O'Neill. 
Fairbury. 
Tecumseh. 
Creighton. 
Lincoln. 
Norfolk. 
Central City. 
Fullerton. 
Hardy. 
Unadilla. 
Osceola. 
Indianola. 
Wahoo. 
Crete. 
Seward. 
Ord. 


Jefferson... 
Johnson... 
Knox 


Butler 
Cass 
Clay . . 


C. P. Reynolds... 
S. D. Fitchie 
J. T. Hopper 
Charles Snygg 
Jonas Adling 
D. M. Strong 
J. Phipps Roe... . 
E. E. McQuilin . 
T.J. Beals 
H. Whitman 
E. M.Hill 
Will Ingles 
J. S. Hehdricks... 
M.G.Wilcox 


Lancaster. 
Madison... 
Merrick.... 
Nance 
Nuckolls 
Otoe 
Polk 
Red Willow 
Saunders... 
Saline 
Seward 
Valley 


Cuming... . 
Dawson... . 
Dodge 
Douglas. 
Dixon 
Flllmore.. . 
Franklin.. . 
Gage 
Garfleld... . 
Hall.... 


Harlan 



POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 



81 



STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEES. 
NEBRASKA. CONTINUED. 



UNION LABOR. 
Headquarters STROMSBURG. 

Chairman 1. D. CHAMBERLAIN. Secretary- M. H GOLTRY. 

Treasurer A. COLEMAN. 



Members. 



Address. 



Members. 



Address. 



I. D. Chamberlain 

M. H. Goltry 

A. Coleman 

J. W. Edgerton 



Stromsburg 

Arlington 

Stromsburg.... 
South Omaha . . 



NT. D. Hubbard. 

O.K. Hall 

H. S. Aley 



Beatrice. 
Pawnee City. 
Grand Island. 



NORTH DAKOTA. 



DISTRICTS. 



REPUBLICAN, 
ffeadquar ersYAHGO. 
Chairman E. C.GEAREY, Fargo. 
RtcretaryW. B. PATTIN. 



Members. 



Address. 



DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters FARGO. 
Chairman W. C. LEISTIKOW. 
Secretary MARTIN RYAN. 



Members. 



Address. 



1st... 

2d.... 

3d... 

4th... 

5th... 

6th... 

7th... 

8th... 

9th... 
10th... 
llth... 
12th... 
13th... 
14th... 
15th... 
16th... 
17th... 
18th... 
19th... 
20th... 
21st... 
22d.... 
23d.... 
24th... 
25th... 
26th... 
th... 
_^th... 
29th... 
30th... 
31st... 



Judson LaMoure < Pembina 

E. T.Thompson. ...i St. Thomas 

Wallace H. Douglass Towner 



D. W. Driscoll 

W. H. Fellows 

William Budge 

~. B. Winship 



Graf ton 

Larimore 

Grand Forks. 
Grand Forks. . , 



F. D. Hartson 

J. E. Thacker 

Jacob P. Birder 

D.C.Moore.... 



. u. YV insuip iLrraiiu rurits. . . 

. T. Kingman Hillsboro 

O. W.Francis Fargo 

H. J. Rowe Castleton 

W. J. Hawk Buffalo 

J. H. Miller Wahpeton 

J. D. McKenzie Milnor 

P. H.Rourke Lisbon 

John M.Dennett.... Oriska 

J. J. Wamberg Hope 

H. H. Lampman Lakota. 

I Wm. F. Winter Langdon 

C.F.Wilbur Rolla.. 

!H. U.Thomas 

"John A. Percival 
Wallace Galehouse. 

O.H.Hewitt 

Waldo M. Potter 

T. F. Marshall 

Dr. T. R. Streeter... . 

Asa Fisher 

E. H. Thursby 

J.L.Colton , 

I A. M. Packard Mandan 

I J. T. Scott i Dickinson 



Minnewaukan... 
Devil's Lake.... 

n 

wn 

LaMoure 

Oakes 

Williamsport... 

Bismarck 

Towner 

Burlington 



R. B. Hill. 

R. W. Cutts 

W. R. Bierly 

JohnDeGroat .... 

E.E.Cole 

W. Strehlow 

. Durbey 

George P. Garred., 
Frank Miksche.... 
John M.Allen 

. Parkhouse 

reorge A. Luce 

S.J.Phillips 

J. K.Glick 

Thomas C. Flynn.. 

:. E.Mather 
A. Burnett, 

A. C. Sanford 

G. A. LeVert 

N.B.Wilkinson... 

F.M.Isham 

F. S. Corwin 

Joseph Hare 

Charles T. Taylor.. 

J.B. Roark 

J.M.Turner 

William Ray 



Pembina. 

Hamilton. 

Park River. 

Grafton. 

Inkster. 

Grand Forks. 

Grand Forks. 

Hillsboro. 

Fargo. 

Casselton. 

Buffalo. 

Wahpeton. 

Ransom City. 

Lisbon. 

Valley City. 

Hope. 

Lakota. 

Langdon. 

St. John. 

Minnewaukan. 

Devil's Lake. 

Sykeston. 

Jamestown. 

LaMoure. 

Ellendale. 

Steele. 

Bismarck. 

Bottineau. 

Minot. 

Mandan. 

Dickinson. 



SOUTH DAKOTA. 



REPUBLICAN. 
Headqua rte rs AB E RDE E N. 
Chairman C. T. McCoy. 
Secretary W. B. STERLING. 



DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters HURON. 
Chairman ZACK T. HUNDLEY. 
Secretary F. M. CRAIN. 



Members. 



Charles T. McCoy 

W.M. Smith 

W. B. Sterling 

W.C.Allen 

H. C. Sessions 

J. E Diamond 

R. S. Southgate 

J. L. Turner 

D. W. McFadden 

Frank Alexander 

E.F.Conklin 

F.P.Phillips 



Address. 



Members. 



Aberdeen. 
jPlankinton. 
Huron. 
Groton. 
IColumbia. 
jBrookings. 
Kimball. 
Springfield. 
Ouster City. 
Mound City. 
Clark. 
Watertown. 



. H. Freeman 

. M. I ii man 

C.J. B.Harris 

S. W. Treesh 

J. V. Conklin 

D. Dwyer 

A.J.Yorker 

D. H. Gaughen 

George W. Matthews.. 

W. D. Stites 

W. W. Goddard 

T. J. Ryan 



Address. 



Elk Point. 

Vermilion. 

Yankton. 

Scotland. 

Canton. 

Hurley. 

Freeman. 

Wheeler. 

Armour. 

Sioux Falls. 

Sioux Falls. 

Salem. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEES. 
SOUTH DAKOTA. CONTINUED. 



Members. 



J. N. Hornbeck 

Eugene Huntiugton. 

Frank Lecocq 

T. C. Peterson 

A. M. Bowdle 

E. F. Hewett 

H. B. Chamberlain... 

J. H. Smith 

D. B. Milam.... 



G. E. Foster. 
J. E. Hippie. 
E. O. Parker. 



0. T. Dye. 

J. C Gipson , 

C. B. Kennedy , 

R. E. Grimshaw 

Walter Smead 

1. R. Crow 

W. M. Cuffltt 

D. B. Dudley , 

J. W. Banbury , 

D. D. Holdridge 

N. E. Phillips 

M. R. Kenefeck 

George Rice 

D.H.Clark 

A. J. Pruitt 

D. Eastman 

J. E. Whiting 

C.T.Howard. 

E. W. Foster 

V. P. Thielman 

H.H.Blair 

R. J. Gamble 



Address. 




Rapid City. 
Gettysburg. 



Wilmot. 

Artesian. 

Redfleld. 

FranKfort. 

Parker. 

Elk Point. 

Yankton. 



Members. 



J. F.Wickham 
. M. Hammer. 

U. D. Bartow 

W. S.Duncan 

M. E. Cogley 

ohn Fitzgerald 

. Gass , 

lonnor Cooney 

.W. Whitney 

R. W. Hayes 

ndrewColliton.... 

, H. Bradford 

.T. Hundley 

J.J.Smith 

L.G. Jeffries 

|B. C. Ash 

I.J.Eales 

R. B. Coddington. . . 

J. R. Fonger 

Ben Harvey 

J.E.Dore 

S. A. Keenan 

H.C.Walsh 

Dr. F. M. Grain 

Henry S. Volkmar . 

W. G. Ashton 

T. B. Davis 

I saac Pearson 

FredB. Smith 

J. F. Rowins 

J. K. Sechler 

S. V.Arnold 

S. P. Hardenbrook., 

O.K. Stablein 

W. A. McClaran.... 

Ben Bear 

Wesley Alexander.. 
Chauncy S. Wood... 
Thomas E. Harvey. 

Douglas Sayre 

L. B. Reno 

A.A.Powell,.... 



Address. 



Alexandria. 

Mitchell. 

Plankinton. 

Chamberlain. 

Flandreau. 

Madison. 

Howard. 

Woonsocket. 

Wes'ngt'n Spr. 

Duncan. 

Elkton. 

Lake Preston. 

Huron. 

Miller. 

Highmore. 

Pierre. 

Gettysburg. 

Blunt. 

ary. 

astlewood. 
Watertown. 
Clark. 
Redfleld. 
Doland. 
Millbank. 
Wilmot. 
Andover. 
Aberdeen. 
Hecla. 
Britton. 
Faulkton. 
Roscoe. 
Leola. 
Bangor. 
Mouhd City 
Deadwood. 
Lead City. 
Rapid City. 
Sturgis. 
Minnesola. 
Buffalo Gap. 
Oelrichs. 



WASHINGTON. 



COUNTIES. 



REPUBLICAN. 
Headq uar ters OL YM p I A . 
Chairman JOHN F. GOWEY. 
Secretary O. A. BOWEN. 



Members. 



Address. 



DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters WALLA WALLA 
'Chairman A. M. MARION. 
Secretary- M. KAUFMAN. 



Members. 



A ddress. 



Adams 

Asotin 

Chehalls 

Clallam 

Clarke 

Columbia 

Cowlitz 

Douglas. 

Franklin 

Garfleld 

Island 

Jefferson 

King 

Kitsap 

Kittitas 

Klickitat 

Lewis 

Lincoln 

Mason 

Okanogan 

Pacific 

Pierce 

San .luan....:. 



S.A.Weils 

E. Baumeister 

J. W. Divilbliss 

L. Davis 



Scott Sweatland.... 

J. A. Kellogg 

C. Callahan 

John Robb 

W. P. Gray 

P. D. Oliphaut 

Jerome Ely 

J.E.Clark 

J. H.McGraw 

E.G.Ames 

W.H.Hair 

C. S. Rinehart 

J.R. Welty 

H. W. Fairweather. 
W. H. Kneeland.... 

J. W. Romaine 

A.E.King 

Thomas L. Nixon.. . 
Jasper Severnay . . . 



Ritzville 

Asotin City 

Montesano 

Dunginess 

Vancouver 

Dayton 

Kalama 

Waterville 

Pasco 

Pomeroy 

Oak Harbor 

Port Townsend. 

Seattle 

Pt. Gamble 

Ellensburgh 

Goldendale 

. Chehalis 

. Sprague 

.Shelton 

.'ConconulJy 

.Illwaco 

.Tacoma 

.'Friday Harbor.. 



A. Coffey 

J.O'Keefe 

William H.Blair.... 

D. Mclnnis 

William H. Johnson 

J. E. Edmiston 

James B. LaDu 

W. H.Anderson 

Fred Krutzman 

R.E.Wills 

Walter Crockett 

William Donovan.... 
Harvey E. Shields.. 

Phillip Wist 

M. J. Maloney 

I. C. Darland 

T. W. Newland 

C.C.Mays 

David Shelton 

M. G. Barney 

Joseph A.Whealdon 



D. P.Lewis 

IE. D. Warvas.... 



Richville. 

Asotin. 

Montesano. 

Port Angeles. 

Vancouver. 

Dayton. 

Mt, Coffin. 

Waterville. 

Pasco. 

Pomeroy. 

Couperville. 

Port Townsend. 

Seattle. 

Port Madison. 

Ellensburg. 

Goldendale. 

Chehalis. 

Davenport. 

Shelton. 

Conconully. 

Oysterville. 

Tacoma. 

Friday Harbor. 



POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 83 


STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEES. 
WASHINGTON. CONTINUED. 


STATE. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


Skagit 


E K. Matlock. .. . 


Mount Vernon... 
Cascades 


Frederick Pape 
Geo ge H. Stevenson 
J. R. Winn 
G. H. McGuyre 
J.B. Slater 
F.I. Blodgett 
J.D.Howard 
A.M. Marion 
H. G. VanReypen... . 
W. J. Hamilton 
Samuel Vincent 


Mt. Vernon. 
Cascades. 
Snohomish. 
Spokane Falls. 
Colville. 
Olympia, 
Cathlamet. 
Walla Walla. 
Whatcom. 
Colfax. 
North Yakima. 


Skamania 
Snohomish 
Spokane 


A. R. Tozier 
E. C. Ferguson 


i Snohomish 


W. M. Ridpath 


iSuokane Falls... 
iColville 


Stevens 
Thurston 
Wahkiakum... 
Walla Walla... 
What com 
Whitman 
Yakima 


R. H. Manly 
J. F. Gowey 
H. H. Montgomery.. 
William Kirkman... 
Will D Jenkins 


Olympia 
Cathlamett 
I Walla Walla 


C. P. Chamberlain... 
W. F. Prosser 


Pampa 


i Prosser. . . . 






WISCONSIN. 


DISTRICT. 


REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters MILWAUKEE. 
Chairman HENRY C. PAYNE. 
Secretary W '. A. NOWELL. 


DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters MILWAUKEE. 
C A' n ELLIS B. USHER, LaCrosse. 
Secretary J. E.WRIGHT, Baraboo. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st 


F.W. Starbuck Racine 
George Grimm Jefferson 
James T. Green iFond du Lac 
E. D. R. Thompson.. 'Oconomowoc 
W.S. Main Madison 


J. E. Dodge... 
R. B.Kirkland 
H.W. Sawyer 
F. B. Hoskins 
J. S.Gallagher 


Racine. 
Jeflerson. 
Hartford. 
Fond du Lac. 
Gratiot. 
Madison. 
Milwaukee. 
Milwaukee. 
Port Washington 
Chilton. 
Appleton. 
Portage. 
LaCrosse. 
Mauston. 
Eau Claire. 
Arcadia. 
Wausau. 
Chippewa Falls. 


2d 


3d 
4th 


C.H.Baxter 
Ernst Demin.... 


Lancaster 
Milwaukee 
Milwaukee 
Green Bay 
Chilton 


.1. L. O'Connor 
G. W. Forth 
Ed Keogh 


5th 


John Toohey 


G. Kuestermann. . . . 
George D. Breed.... 
A. B. Whitman 
R. L. D. Potter 
NelsR. Nelson 
John Kellogg 


H. B. Schwlnn 
Theo. Kersten 
Rush Winslow, 
W.S. Stroud 
Joseph Tuteur 
W. C.Brawley 
V.W.James 
S. Richmond. 


6th 


Appleton 


7th 
8th 
9th 


Wautoma 
LaCrosse 


Reedsburg 
Millston 


T.B. Mills 
H. E. Tickner 
Ole R. Olson 
W. H. Mylrea 


West Superior... 


L Marchetti 


Wausau 


J. A. Taylor 


DISTRICT. 


PROHIBITION. 
Headquarters MADISON. 
Chairman- T. C. RICHMOND 
Secretary J. B. SMITH. 


UNION LABOR. 
Headquarters MILWAUKEE. 
Chairman ROBERT SCHILLING. 
Secretary F.W. BOCK. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st 


Robert Fargo 
C. M. Blackman 
O.H.Crowe 
Canfleld Marsh 
Warren Howard.... 


Lake Mills.... 
Whitewater 
Beaver Dam 
Rosendale .. . 


William Paul 


Racine. 
Fond du Lac. 
Lancaster. 
Milwaukee.^ 
Wrightstown. 
Menasha. 
LaCrosse. 
Neillsvllle. 
Marinette. 


2d 

3d 


Spencer Palmer 
George B. Ward 
Robert Schilling 
George W. Stickles.. 
L. G. Arnold 


Albany . 


4th 


L. Abrams 


Bloomington 
Milwaukee 


E. W. Drake 


5th 


W. R. Nethercutt.... 
C. W. Lomas 


Milwaukee 


Fort Howard.... 
Fort Howard.... 
Poynette 


6th 


H. McDonald 
L.M. Squire 
W. W. Race 


7th 


Omro 


M.M.Haley 


G. Freeman 
R. B.Griggs 
G. 1. Constance 
Charles Alexander.. 
Rev.W.P.Sutherland 
R. H.Churchill 


Richland Center. 
Baraboo 


8th 


George L. Lloyd 
Alex. D. Colburn 


Cumberland 
Eau Claire 
Marinette 
Marinette 


9th 




THE NATIONAL CAPITAL. 

The seat of government of the United from July 2, 1778, to June 30,1783; at Princeton, 
Stateswas established as follows: At Phila- N. J., June 30, 1783, to Nov. 20, 1783; Annapolis, 
delphia from Sept. 5, 1774, until December, Md., Nov. 26, 1783. to Nov. 30. 1784: at Trenton, 
1776; at Baltimore from Dec. 20, 177B, to March, N. J.. from November, 1784, to January, 1785; 
1777; at Philadelphia from March 4, 1777, to at New York from Jan. 11, 1785 to 1790; then 
September, 1777; at Lancaster. Pa., from Sept. the seat of government was removed to 
27, 1777. to Sept. 30. 1777; at York, Pa., from Philadelphia, where it remained until 1800, 
Sept. 30, 1777, to July, 1778; at Philadelphia since which time it has been at Washington. 



84 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



Cttril Hist. 



City Government. 



CITY OF 



Mayor De Witt C.Cregier,d.$7,000 

Private Secretary Thos. J. O'Neill, cf.. 2,500 

City Clerk Franz Amberg, r.. 3,500 

Deputy City Clerk J.R.B. Van Cleave,r. 2,500 

Comptroller Wm. J. Onahan, d.. 5,000 

Treasurer Bernard Roesing,d25.000 

Corporation Counsel.. .JonasHutchinson,d 6,000 

City Attorney Geo. F. Sugg, d .... 5,000 

Prosecuting Attorney. John A. May, d 4,000 

Special Assessment 

Attorney F. E. Halligan. d. .. 3,000 

City Physician Richard J. Piper, d. 2,500 

Supt. House of Correc- 
tion Chas. E. Felton, d . . 4,000 

Supt. Schools Geo. Howland 4,000 

School Agent C.C. Chase, d 1.100 

City Sealer Louis Adams, d Fees 

Fire Marshal D. J. Swenie 4,500 

Supt. of Police F.H. Marsh, d 4,500 

Gas Inspector Joseph Schofleld.d. 2,400 

Oil Inspector Charles 8. Crain,d. Fees 

Boiler Inspector P. J. Tierney, d Fees 

Health Commissioner. S. Wickersham, d. 4,000 
Commissioner Public 

Works Wm. H. Purdy, d. .. 5,000 

Supt. Special Assess- 
ment H.J.Jones, d! 3,500 

Supt. Streets L. E. McGann, d. . . . 3,(XX 

Supt. Sidewalks James O'Brien, d... 1,500 

Supt. Sewers O. H. Cheney, d 3,000 

Comr. of Buildings.... John M. Dunphy.d. 4,000 
Supt. Alarm Service... J. P. Barrett 3.000 



City Collector F. A.Hoffman,Jr.,d. 4,000 

City Engineer W. R. Northway, r. 5,000 

Supt. WaterDept H. E. Hamilton, d.. 3,000 



fev. 

Ill 
IV.. 
V... 



CHICAGO. 

Board of Aldermen. 
Republicans, 37; Democrats, 31. 

. . W. P. Whelan Arthur Dixon. 

..Frank C. Vierling... John Summer jield. 

. .Anson Gorton L. B. Dixon. 

. .John W. Hepburn. ..MB. Madden. 

JohnS. Oehmen T. C. HicKey. 

VI E. P. Burke Wm. J. O'Brien. 

VII William J. Murphy . . William A. Love. 

VIII Frank J. Dvorak George P.Bunker. 

IX E. F. Cullerton Joseph E. Bidwell. 

X Simon Wallner Thos. McEnerny. 

XI Walter M. Pond .... William D. Kent. 

XII James L. Campbell. D. W. Mills. 

XIII... .James A. Landon John W. Lyke. 

XIV.... Herman Weinhardt.Philip Jackson. 

XV Michael F. Bowler. .Michael Ryan. 

XVI.. .John C.Horn August J.Kowalski. 

XVII. .J. N. Mulvihill Philip Young. 

XVIII.. J/adzson R. Harris.. Isaac Homer. 

XIX John Powers J. McCann. 

XX OttoHage Daniel Long. 

XXI... .John McGillen Joseph H. Ernst. 

XXII.. .Ed. Muelhoe.fer Thomas D. Burke. 

XXIII.. J. J. McCormick.. . .Daniel R. O'Brien. 
XXIV. ..James S. Dunham. J. H. Tiedemann. 
XXV. . ..F. M. Chapman. ...Michael Keck. 

XXVI.. .B.F.Weber P.F.Hayes. 

XX VII.. J/". J. < onway D. B. Fonda. 

XXVIII.Michael Lucas.... Thomas Kelly. 
XXIX... Thomas Gahan.... P. N. Noonan. 

XXX.... Joseph Pauly John Kenny. 

XXXI . . E. J. Noble Geo. F. McKnight. 

XXXII. W. R, Kerr W. C. Kinney. 

XXXIII.P. J. Gorman Charles Jockisch. 

XXXIV-James Chasey John O'Neill. 



COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 

Probate Judge. J C. Knickerbocker $7,000 Clerk Circuit Court. Henry Best $3,000 

County Judge, R. Prendergast 7,000 * ' 

Judges Superior Court, H. M. Shepard, J. 

P. Altgeld,Kirk Hawes, Elliott Anthony, 

Egbert Jamieson, each 7,000 

Judges Circuit Court. Murray F. Tuley. 

L. C. Collins, R. S. Tuthill, Frank Baker, 



A. N. Waterman, Geo. Driggs, J. S. Grin- 
nell.O. H. Horton, R. W. Clifford, each. 7,000 
Judges Appellate Court, Thomas Moran, 

J. E.Gary, Gwynn Garnett. each 7,000 

State's Attorney, J. M. Longenecker 6,600 

County Attorney, Edgar Terhune 5,000 

County Physician T. W. Heuchling 2,500 

Superintendent of Schools. A. G. Lane. 

Coun ty < lerk, Henry Wulff 2.000 

Chief Clerk, S. W. Riderberg 2,000 

Clerk of County Court, Henry Wulff 3,000 

Chief Deputy, Henry Esdohr 2,000 

Clerk Superior Court, P. McGrath 3,000 

Chief Clerk. James J. Healey 2,000 



Clerk Appellate Court, John J. Healey. . . . 
Deputy, J. H. ~ 



Sutherland 



Clerk Criminal Court,]. H.Gilbert 3,000 

Principal Deputy, Henry F. Stephens 2 r 

Chief Clerk, &. V.Lee.... 

Clerk Probate Court, ThomasW. Sennott.. 

Chief Clerk, Charles George 

Recorder of Deeds, John Stephens 

County Treasurer, George R. Davis 

Principal Normal School, F. W. Parker 

Sherijf.G. R. Matson 

Chief Deputy, W. H. Gleason 

Jailer, Conrad Folz 

County Commissioners City, 3. C.Schu- 
bert, M. M. Hayes, Geo. Edmanson, 
Jacob Stiner.Andrew B. Bonner, James 
T. Kelly, Herman Lieb. P. F. Maloney, 
Isa Monheimer, J. W. Reilly. Country, 
0. D.Allen, Geo. Struckman.J. M Green, 
H. C. Senne,N.A. Cool. President, Geo. 
Edmanson; per day, $5.00. Clerks, D. D. 
Healey, Ed.Northam,O.W. Nash, Frank 
Sheridan 2,500 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 



Executive Department. 

Gov., JosephW. Fifer, R., McLean County$6,000 
Private Secretary, H. G. Reeves. 
Lieut.-Gov., L. B. Ray, R., Grundy County. 1,000 
Sec. of State, 1. N. Pearson, JK.,McDonough 3,500 

Chief Clerk, H.W. Gash 2,500 

Auditor, C.W. Pavey, R., Jefferson County. 3,500 

Chief Cler't,W.H. Henkle 2,500 

Treas., Chas. Becker, R., St. Clair County. 3,500 
Sup. of Pub. Jnst'n., Richard Edwards, R., 3,500 
Att'y-Gen.,Georee Hunt, /?.,Edgar County. 3,500 
Adjt.-Gen., J. W.Vance, J?.. Edgar County. 
State Bd. Pub. Health, J.~H..Ra.uc\\,Sec.,R., 3,500 



State Bd. Pub. Char's, 
Bu. Labor Stat.,John 



<\H. Wines Sec.,/?. 3,500 
Lord Sec.. R 2,500 



State Bd. Pharmacy, C.W. Day Secretary, R. 
Bd. Live-Stock Com/rs, C. P. Johnson Sec... R. 



Terms 



Supreme Court Judges-Salary $5, OUU.EI 

Joseph M . Bailey Stephenson 1897 

Jacob W. Wilkin Vermilion 1897 

John Schofleld Clark 1897 

David J. Baker Alexander 1897 

Alfred M. Craig Knox 1891 

Simon P. Shope Fulton 1894 

Benjamin D. Magruder. . Cook 1897 

Reporter Norman L. Freeman. 
Clerks Northern Grand Division, A. H. Taylor. 
Southern Grand Division. J. O. Chance. 
Central Grand Division, E. A. Snively. 
Terms of Court Northern Grand Division, 
OTTAWA; March and September. Southern 
Grand Division, MOUNT VERNON; May and 
November. Central Grand Division, SPRING- 
FIELD; January and June. 



CIVIL LIST. 



Canal Commissioners. 
(Salary $5.00 a day.) 

John Ames Streator. 

Louis Hutt Chicago . 

C. E. Snively Canton. 



Board of Live-Stock Commissioners. 
(No compensation. ) 

Hiram McChesney Chicago. 

J. M. Pearson Godfrey. 



Edwin Watts. 

Railroad and Warehouse Commissioners. 
(Salary $3,500.) 

John R. Wheeler Chicago. I W. L. Crim Frankfort. 

Isaac N. Phillips Bloomington. I Chief Grain Inspr., P. B. Price, Chicago. $3,000 



County. 

Adams 

Alexander. . 

Bond 

Boone 

Brown 

Bureau 

Calhoun 

Carroll 

Cass 

Champion.. 
Christian.... 
Clark 

lay 

linton 

Coles 

Cook 

Crawford.... 
Cumherl'nd. 

DeKalb 

DeWitt 

Douglas 

DuPage 

Edgar 

Edwards 
Effingham .. 

Fayette 

Ford 

Franklin.... 

Fulton 

Gallalin 

Greene 

Grundy 

Hamilton.... 
Hancock 

Hardin 

Henderson.. 

Henry 

Iroquois 

Jackson 

sper 

Jefferson 

Jersey 

JoDaviess.. 

Johnson 

Kane 

Kankakee.. 

Kendall 

Knox 

Lake 

LaSalle . ... 
Lawrence... 

Lee 

Livingston.. 

Logan 

Macon 

Macoupin 
Madison 

Marion 

Marshall.... 

Mason 

Massac 

McDonough. 
McHenry 

McLean 

Menard 

Mercer 

Monroe 

Montgom 'ry 

Morgan 

Moultrie 



OFFICIAL LIST OF ILLINOIS COUNTY OFFICERS FOR 1890. 

County Seat. County Clerk. Circuit Clerk. State's Attorney. 

Quincy Willis Hazlewood... George Brophy Oscar P. bonney. 

Cairo Sidney B. Miller.... Edmund S. Dewey. . William N. Butler. 

Greenville Samuel Adams Daniel B. Evans Wm. A. Northcott. 

Belvidere Charles M. Keeler.. . Adelbert C. Fassett. Robert W. Wright. 

Mt. Sterling... Wilson M.Reid Frank Orr.. 



Princeton Stephen G. Paddock M. H. Peterson 

Hardin Charles A.Watson Francis I. Bizarllioi 

Mt. Carroll.... Egbert T. E. Becker John S. Grove 

Virginia John F.Robinson... Finis E. Downing. 

. Urbana Jas. S. McCullough. William G. Brown. 

Taylorville Charles Whitmer. .. Joseph R.Edmonds 



Alexander Hedrick. 



Marshall.. 
Louisville. 

Carlyle 

Charleston 



Sycamore . . 
Clinton 
Tuscola 
Wheaton .. 
Paris 
Albion 
Effingham . 
Vandalia.... 



M. P. Murray. 
JohnH. Marshall. 
J. M. Longenecker. 



R. B'letcher Helm. 
Milton Ellsworth.. 
Keefer Laufman. . 
Charles Emerson.. 

John Le Crone 

Rodney Kelley 



Richard M. Skinner. 
T.J.Selby. 
Ralph E. Eaton. 
Reuben R. Hewitt. 
Lewis H. Smyers. 
Joseph C. Creighton. 

John Brooks J.S. Montgomery. . Thomas L. Orendorff. 

Wm. Brissenden John Marvin Harvey W. Shriner. 

Louis El wang H. A. Niehoff 

John S. Goodyear... John R. Hamilton. 

Chicago Henry Wu Iff. Henry Best 

Robinson Thomas S. Price JohnCollins Enoch E. Newlin. 

Toledo Henry W. Tippett... Ebenezer Stewart... Wm. H. McDonald. 

Cassius M. Conrad.. Daniel Dustin CharlesG. Faxon. 

Stephen K. Carter.. William O. Rogers.. William Booth. 

Daniel A. Conover . James K. Breeden. 
Albert H. Wiant.... John H. Batten, Jr. 

Henry E. Rives Frank P. Hardy. 

George P. Biggs Halbert J. Staren. 

James L. Gillmore.. Rufus C. Harrah. 
Benj. F. Williams. . . James M. Albert. 
John F. G. Helmer. France L. Cook. 

Benton T.P.Harrison". William B.Webb.... Thos. M. Mooneyham 

Lewistown.... Perrin H. Snively... William M. Fike Rinsey Thonu 

Shawneeto'n.. Silas Cook John R. Boyd 

Carrollton John Jones Thomas J. Raffety 

Morris ;.. Newman Perkins... Joseph H. Pettit _ 

McLeansb'ro.. JohnJudd Joseph H. Dpchurch Isaac H. Webb. 

Carthage John F. Scott Thomas F. Dunn.. . Frank Halbower. 

Elizabethto'n. Thomas R. Wooley. John C. Oxford H. Robert Fowler. 

Oquawka G. F. Wm. Froelich. Harry T. McAllister Ranseldon Cooper. 

Cambridge.... Frank G. Welton.... Lewis H. Patten.... T. E. Milchrist. 

SylvanusC.Munhall Alonzo F. Goodyear. 
Robert W. Watson. . Richard T. Lightfoot. 

Isaiah Stewart Charles A. Davidson. 

William A. Davis... William H. Green. 
Jesse I. McGready.. A. A. Goodrich. 

John C. O'Neill Thomas H. Hudson. 

Francis B.Thacker.. Robert M. Fisher. 
Frank G.Hanchett. 
William R. Hunter. 
Avery N. Beebe... 

Josiah Gale 

William M. Ragan 



Paxton MertonDunlap 



Wm. R. McKemon. 
Thomas Hernshaw. 
Samuel C.Stqugh. 



Watseka Benjamin *\ Price 

Murphysboro.. JohnR. Kane 

Newton H. K. Powell 

Allen C. Tanner... 

Daniel J. Murphy. 

William Rippen. . . 

James W. Gore 

Arthur M. Beaupre. Charles A. Miller 

Wm. F. Kenaga.. .. J. Frank Leonard. 

William Hill 

Albert J. Perry... 

Lewis C. Dorsett. 

Ottawa". Patrick Finlen.. . . 

Lawr'nceville Francis M. Adams 

Dixon 

Pontiac 

Lincoln C. M. Knapp . 

Decatur George P. Hardy. 



Mt. Vernon . 
Jerseyville . 

Galena 

Vienna 

Geneva 

Kankakee... 
Yorkville.... 
Galesburg . . 
Waukegan... 



Albert M. Sweetland. 
John J. Tunnicliffe. 
Charles T Backu 



Carlinville.... Wm. B. Dugger... 

Edwardsville. Henry Riniker 

Salem Samuel J. Smith. 

Lacon James C. Law 

Havana Wm. M. Gansen.. 

Metropolis Samuel Atwell... 

Macomb Charles W. Dines 

Woodstock William Avery... 



Henry Johnson George W. W. Blake 

David R. Fish K. P. Snyder. 

Jas. H. Thompson. . Ira W. Lewis C.B.Morrison. 

Ivin Wait James A. Hoover... H. H. McDowell. 

. E. F. L. Rantenberg Samuel L. Wallace. 
EdmistonMcClellan Isaac R. Mills. 



.. Robert Hagnauer.. 
.. Thomas F. Meagher 

.. John B.Wright 

.. William M.Duffy... 
.. Elijah P. Curtis.... 

.. C.S.Churchill 

. Webster P. Morse.. 

Bloomington . Robert Maxton James H. Leaton. . . 



. Benjamin B.Olbert.. Frank W. Burton. 



G. F. McNulta. 
Charles E. Jennings. 
E. D. Richmond. 
T. N. Mehan. 
Douglas W. Helm. 
George D. Tunnicliff. 
Adelbert B. Coon. 
Edwin H. Miner. 



Petersburg A. W. McGeachin... T.C.Bennett Charles Nushaum. 

Aledo Charles C. Wordin.. William McManus.. James M. Brock. 

Waterloo Paul C. Brey John Wiesenborn... W. H. Horine, Jr. 

Hillsboro B. A. Hendricks John Fath William Pearman. 

Jacksonville.. John C. Williams John F. Clark Charles A. Barnes. 

Sullivan Charles Shuman S.W.Wright John E. Jennings. 



86 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


County. County Seat. 
Ogle Oregon H 


County Clerk. Circuit C 
enry P. Lason Charles M. i 
imes E. Pillsbury.. Francis G.I 
falter S. D. Smith.. Charles H. 
ndrew L. Rodgers. Robert Hu( 
irgil A. Grimes George W. 
enn V. Travillion. . H. Clanaha 
.D. McClelland.... Benjamin I 
mos T. Purviance. Jefferson D 
ouis Dudenbostel. Wallace Sn 
Von Gunten, Jr.. . Thomas Tip 
ichard Donaldson. George W. ( 
imes H. Pearce Thos. Y. Re 
swis Dorlin Edward Cat 


lerk. State's Attorney. 
iale Delos W. Baxter, 
klinor John M. Niehaus. 
Roe Charles D. Kane. 
Igen James Hicks. 
Archer.. W.E.Williams. 
Q David G. Thompson, 
j. Ulm... Lewis M. Bradley, 
urley.... James E. Taylor, 
ook R. E. Sprigg. 
pit Jasper 1. Montray. 
iamble . Patrick O'Mara. 
ynolds . Albert W. Lewis, 
ill Noah H. Turner, 
amery. . David H. Glass, 
nson... . Hiram B. Kelley. 
3raham. Wm. B. Townsend. 
ey John E. Decker, 
cott Martin W. Schaefer. 
rady Oscar E. Hean. 
raid Gurdon F. Saltonstall. 
Peak.... William C. Moreland. 
rger. ... H. P. Blackburn, 
arvey. M. H. Mundy. 
ankin.. Edward Macdill. 
r ernor.. Charles T Moore. 
Lay Frank B. Hanna. 
niliams. Prince A. Pearce. 
futile... Walter Stager. 
)hl Edward C. Akin, 
errine. . Jesse Bishop, 
ke Charles A Works 


Peoria Peoria J 
Perry. . . Pinckneyville V 


Piatt Monticello A 
Pike Pittsfleld V 


Pope.. Golconda P 
Pulaski Mound City... E 
Putnam Hennepin A 
Randolph Chester L 


Richland. Olney J. 


Rock Island. Rock Island... R 
falina Harrisburg . . . J* 
angamon... Springfield L 
Schuyler.... Rushville M 
Scott Winchester... B 


arkBogue N. S. Montg 
3n.T. Bradley John T. Joh 
f red F.Allen Thomas H.< 
avid J. Walker James Kinn 
lilip Rheim Edward J . S 
ez. Poffenberger.. William I. E 
)uis Schurman John Fitzge 
Henry Hilboldt... WillitmH. ] 
alter C. Tuttle.... Martin J. Ba 
aac F. Price George C. E 
m. H. Sexton George C. R 
snry F. Renter... Thomas J. \ 
M. Brock Samuel H. I 
R. Kuykendall George R. V 
Jwin W. Payne Lauren E. 1 
enry H. Stassen .. Henry R. P< 
mes C. Mitchell... Nimrod G. F 
arcus A. Norton.. Lewis F. La 
hn Leys J. O. Irving. 


Shelby Shelbyvllle... A 
Stark Toulon . D 


t. Clair Belleville P 
tephenson . Freeport H 
Tazewell.. Pekin L< 


Union Jonesboro .... J. 
Vermilion .. Danville \V 
Wabash Mt. Carmel.... Is 
Warren Monmouth W 
Washington. Nashville H 
Wayne Fairfield F 
White Carmi J. 
Whiteside .. Morrison E 
Will Joliet H 


Williamson Marion Ja 


Winnebago. Rockford M 
Woodford... Metamora Jo 

STATE LEGIS 


Thomas Kennedy. 


LATTIRE -1889-1890. --Alphabetically Arranged. 
SENATE. 


Bacon, Cftas. H* Lockport 
?acon George E * Paris 


Greenwood, C. F.*... Water man 
Griswold C A Fulton 


Monahan, James* Chicago 
Newell M L Minonk 


assilt M M Peoria 


Hadley. W. F. L*. .Edwardsville 
Hagle, Dios C .... Flora 


Pierce John H * Kewanee 


Berry O f , Carthage 


Reavill,Andrew J.*. .Flat Rock 
Rheinhardt, Joseph* Peru 


Bogardus, Charles* Pax ton 
Brink F E. W Hoyleton 


Hamer, Thomas Vermont 


Higbee, Harrv Pittsfleld 
Hogan, Daniel*.... Mound City 
Humphrey, John* Orland 


Rickert, J. W Waterloo 
Secrest, Conrad Watseka 
Seiter, Henry* Lebanon 


BURKE, R. M.* Chicago 
Campbell, 3&s.~R.*McLeansboro 
Chapman, T. S.* Jerseyville 
Crawford, C. H.* Chicago 
Dean G W * A.dams 


Johns, William C.* Decatur 
Karraker, D. W Jonesboro 
Kerrick, T. C Bloominrjton 
Knopf, Ph Hip.* Chicago 
Lewis L. Lehman Mattoon 
Leeper, A . A Virginia 


Sheets, B. F.i Oregon 
Shumway, H. P. . . . Tavlorsville 
Shutt,William ~EA*. Spring fteld 
Stephenson.L.B.*. ...Shelbyville 
Stratton, A.M.*. . Mou-i.tVernon 
Thomas, H.H.^ Chicago 
Washburn, E. A.* Princeton 
Wiles, R. H Freeport 
Yost, John* Elba 


Eckhart B A * Chicago 


Evans, H. H.* Aurora 
Frisbie, W. J Bushnell 
Fuller, Chas. E* Belvidere 
Garrity, M. F.* Chicago 
Gibbs, George A.* Chicago 


NacMillan, Thos. C.*.. Chicago 
Matthews, M.W. Urbana 
McDonald, E. L. ..Jacksonville 


HOUSE. 


Allen, Charles A.* . . . Hoopeston 
Allen, Henry W.*....Kirkwood 
Allen, Sylvester Oxrille 


Cooley, Orrin P.* Oneida 
Cox, W. H. Grand Detour 


Hayes, S. C Chicago 


Hill, J. A Sharpsburg 


Crafts, Clayton E.* Austin 
Craig I B Mattoon 


Hill, R. H Boody 


Anderson, J. O Oquawka 
Baker George S. Chicago 




Crawford, W.F.*. . Taylor Ridge 
Crossett.Dwight Court /'i ml 
Davis, Robert H.*.. . Carrollton 
Delashmutt.W.G. .Martinsville 
Dixon, Sherwood Dixon 
Doolittle, E. A Carrollton 
Ecton, George F* Chicago 
Eddy, John* Bloomington 


Hunt Daniel D * DeKalo 


Ball, Jonas T Toluca 
Bartelson, H. R Macomb 
Blair E K Waverly 


Hunter, David* Rockford 
Hunter, J.W Herman 


Hurst, E.W Rock Island 
Ireland, R. M. Elgin 


Bowler, W. H O' Gallon 
Bradshaw, Benj. H.... Compton 
Bray, Levi T Lanark 
Breeden, Richard G,*. Tennessee 
Brokoski, F.A.* Chicago 
Brown, J. A Monticello 
Browne, Edgar $>.*.... Mendota 
Buchanan, J. A T .... Chicago 


Johnson, W. L. R Buckley 


Jones, Wiley E .*... Spring field 
Keller, D. P Macon 


Enstow D C McVey 


Kinney, James* Peoria 
Kent, W. E Chicago 
Kretzinger, Wm. H.*. . .Latham 
Kunz, Stanley H Chicago 
Lacy, Royal R Elizabetown 
Lee, Milton Rossvitle 
Lester, A.J. Spring fleld 
Loysdon, Perry Hushrille 
Lyon.CharlesM. .McLeansboro 
Lyman, W. II Chicago 
Mahoney, Joseph P.*. . Chicago 
Marshall, T. A Keilhsburq 
Martin, S. H Carmi 
Matthews, A. C Pittsfteld 


Farmer, W. M Vandalia 
Farrell, James B..*.... Chicago 
Fisher, Hendrick V.*... Geneseo 
Ford, John S.* Chicago 
Fowler, J. M. Marion 
Getman, J M . Chicago 


Buckley, William Chicago 
Carmody, H. P Chicago 


Carstens, John Nokomis 


Chott, QuidaJ Chicago 


Gill, J. B Murplysboro 
Gould, Edfton Bone Gap 
Graham N. R Wheaton 
Green, Reed Cairo 
Gregg, Hugh C Elba 
Hart. John M.* Eden 


Cochennour, J. S Olney 
Cochran, W. G Lovington 
Coen, Peter A Washburn 


Cole, Walter Marshall 


Combs, J.A Mulberry Grove 
Converse, Albert L,*. Springfield 


Hawley, E. S Dundee 



ILLINOIS LEGISLATURE. 87 


McCali P Spring Valley 


Partridge,Ch s.A*. . Waukegan 
Pepoon, George W.* Warren 
Phillips, F. B Bel eville 
Pike, Ivory H Bloomvnjton 
Pollard, O. W* Dicight 
Prince, George W....Galesburg 
Pugh, John W Mason City 
Quinn, James F Chicago 
Ramey, Thomas T Brooks 
Ramsey R N Carlisle 


Stinson, R. B . Anna. 


McClanahan, J. P. Alexis 
McCreery, W. T Huntsville 
McDonald,! Hardin 


Stookey, D. B Cramer 
Stoskopf, M t'reeport 


Sullivan, Thomas, Jr Akin 


McDowell' A. S Clayton 
McElligott, Thos. G.*. . Chicago 
McGee J P .Tuscola 


Til ford. Malt Dix 


Terpening, H. L Cropsey 


McLaughlin, D* Braidwood 
Merritt, Thomas E.* Salem 
Meyer, John* Chicago 
Mieure,W.H.H. .Lawrenceville 
Miller, Jacob Chicago 


Tilton, George R Danville 
Toicse, W. A Carlinville 
Trench, James P.* LaSalle 
Tyler, Ira* Richfteld 
Updike P. B. Litchfleld 


Reynolds, S A.* Chicago 


Rice, Eugene* Camargo 


Miller. James H* Toulon 
Monaghan. J. L Chicago 
Mooney, W Braidwood 


Rice, Thomas J Tamaroa 
Ross, David Oglesby 


Walker, J. R . Columbia 


Walsh, James Chicago 
Wells, Albert W.* Quincy 
White, John W.* Tampico 
White. John W Vermont 
Whitehead E J Austin 


Schneider, John J*..Eflingham 
Schuwerk, W. TA....Evansville 
Scudamore. J.B Wayne City 
Simpson, Robert Rockford 
Sloan. WilliamG.*. .Harrisburg 
Smiley, Sam C O'Fallon 
Smith J A Chatsworth 


Morrasy, Anthony* Sheffield 
Morris, Free P Watseka 
Myer, N J Ocoya 


Myers, J C Clinton 


Williford, E. L Old Ripley 
Will'ett, R.W. Yorkville 
Wilk, William F. Chicago 
Wilke Fred Beech er 


O'Donnell, J. A Chicago 


< 'glevee W H Clinton 


O'Toole J J Chicago 


South worth, G. S Woodstock 
S arks, David R Alton 
Spitler, Frank Sullivan 


Paddock D. H Kunknkee 


Williams, W. G Newton 
Wisner, F. J . Chicago 


Padon, Henry H Troy 
Parker, I. A. J Vienn > 




*Membera of the last Legislature. tMembers of former Legislatures. Republicans in 
italics Democrats in roman. 


VOTE ON 


ILLINOIS STATE LEGISLATOES-1888. 

(Members elected in italics.) 
SENATE. 


Districts. 
2. Chas. H.Crawford, R.. 16,679 
J. J. Hanahan,t7..<iZ>..14,410 
George Scoville, Ind.. 105 
Sheldon Leavitt, P.... 625 
4. Thos. C. MacMillan, R. 9,201 
Thos. A.Cantwell.Z>.. 8,040 
E. S. Yeoman, P 381 
6. Horace H. Thomas, R. . 12,557 
George F. Sugg, D 12,265 
Henry Rieke, P 449 
M. O'Sullivan, U. L 1 
John Wittenboin, L. . . 123 
8. C. E. Fuller, R 8,272 
A.J.Dimson,Z) 2,171 
H. Herman,/) 1,827 
A. D. Ellison, P. 894 
Elijah M. Haines,D... 84 
10. B. F. Sheets, R... ... 9,200 


Districts. 
John Furguson, D 4,759 
C M Baker P .. 616 


Districts. 
J. B. Mayfleld, P 362 
Jos. Hemmingway, L.. 61 
34. J. M. Ruggles, R 5,948 
A. A Leeper, D 7812 


19. C. A. Griswo d, R 8,208 
A.A.Wolfersperger.D. 4,914 
U. C. Roe. P. ... .602 


S. D. Masters, P 331 
36. Jacob Freidlich, R.... 4,274 
Henry Higbee, D 6, 131 
Thomas Barton, U.L.. 949 
R. L. Steed, P 220 


20. R. D. Dickinson, R... 6,357 
M. L. Newell, D 7.517 
A C Price, P ... 383 


B.C. Sloan, U. L 91 
22. Thomas Hamer, R 10,465 
Inman Blackaby, D.... 7,866 
E. H. Snedaker, P..... 539 
24. 0. F. Berry, R 7,330 
W. C. Williams, D.. .. 6,588 
Thomas Whitehall, I,.. 719 
Fayette Doud, P. 357 
26. M. M.Bassitt,R 7,417 
G. B. Foster, D 6,670 
S S Glasgow L 115 


38. M.L. Keplinger.R.... 7,468 
E. L. McDonald, D 8,392 
Ralph Reynolds. P. ... 599 
40. R. F. Bennett, R 6.007 
H. P. Shumway, D.... 6,666 
Henry Funk, U. L 192 
Orlando Butt, P 516 
42. A. F. Watts, R 5078 


E. F. W. Brink, D 5,263 
W. W. Hutchins.P.... 434 
44. D. C. Hagle,R 6,902 
James M. Campbell,!). 6,330 
F.J. Barber, P 201 
46. H. H. Howard, R 6,373 
J. R. Campbell,!) 7,499 
48. W. P. Hubberton, P... 380 
W W. Fisher, R. &L. 5,2*>7 
J. W. nicker t, D 6,046 
I. N. East, P.... . 309 
60. J. S. Hartman, R 6,158 
D. W. Karraker, D 6.564 
H. M. Deitrich, U. L. . . 317 


J. C. Seyster, D 4,382 
J. E. Countryman, P.. 1,076 
12. R H Wiles it ... 8,847 


D R Sheen P 245 


27. W.J.Fris ie, R 5,864 
F. Quimby.D 5,204 
D. Reese, P. ... .531 


F. T. Oldt, D 7,514 


Z. T. Livingood, P 1,076 
14 H S Evans R 7385 


28. T C Kerrick R 7 707 


John Stewart R 5 009 


E. E. Donnelly, D 5,895 
W. G. Anderson, P. ... 712 
30. M. W. Matthews, K . . . . 9,291 
F. M. Shonkweller.D.. 7,984 
J.B. McKinley, P 632 
32. T.L.McGrath, R 7,086 


J Van Patten D 3 577 


A.J. Chittenden,.... 109 
B. Loveless, P 691 
16. Conrad Secrist, R 7,339 
J.W.Robinson, D 5,436 
D. L. Parker, P. 560 


E. Tolbott, D 6,965 


18. Charles Bogardus, R. 6,129 


HOUSE. 


Districts. 
1. John M. Getman, R. . 7354 
John S. Ford, R 7524 
James Walsh, D 11650 
Jas. O'Connor, Ud.L . 4413 
Wayland Winte, P. . 468 
John Brown, L 149 
F. E. Stanley. Ind. R. 3833 
2. Jas. N.Buchanan,lt .24437 
B.E.Hoppin,R 239o8 
James J. O'Toole, D.. 24143 
Michael J. Kelly, D.. .16820 
Zach.T. Root, Ind.R. 2013 
Win. P. Wright, L.... 842 
J. Cuthbertson. S 927 


Districts. 
3. F. A. Brokoski,R.... 8912 
George F. Ecton, R.. . 9418 
William Buckley, D. . 8703 
Isaac Abrahams, D.. 7909 
H. S. Bryan, P. 1527 
Patrick Dun n,L 249 
J. B. Biel, Soc 46 


Districts. 
5. J. L. Monaghan, R... 14932 
Joseph P.Mahoney, ZU0475 
F. J. Wisner, D 11787 
W. E. Burns, U.L... 2 
Leo P. Dwyer.tfa.Z.. 1510 
M. J. Rowan, (Soc 457 
J.M.Christian, P..... 162 
6. George S. Baker, .R... 18725 
Jacob Miller, R 19634 
Michael J. Dwyer, D.. 1686 
James H. Farrell, D. 31278 
Chas. Raymond, U.L. 1834 
T. Z. Magarrell, L... 2267 
7. E. J.Whitehead, R. . . .14381 


4. John Meyer, R 12659 
Quida J. Chott. R 12936 
James F. Quinn, D. . .12342 
Matthew Murphy, D. 10567 
John H. Chapman, P. 2314 
Thos. H. Ling, Un.L.. 1161 
Cornelius Hegg, L.... 146 



88 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


Districts. 
S. A . Reynolds, R 14838 
C. E. Crafts, D 18047 
Luther Bixby, P. 1864 
Isaac Greenacre, L.. . 389 
8. Chas. A. Partridge, R.ltftt 
G. S. Sout/iworttt,R..inUa}4 
Elijah M. Haines, D. . 7072 
Daniel Flavin,/) 6913} 
E S. Wells. P. 2550 


Districts. 
G. W. Prince, R 15450}* 


Districts. 
37. E. A. Doolittle, R 13339 
Robert H. Davis, D. . . 9561 
Sylvester Allen, D 9836 
0. L. Edwards, P.... 503 
Foster R. Hawk, U.L. 1274}*, 
38. W. A . Towse, R 21936}* 
E. K. Blair, D 12403^ 


J. W. Hunter, D 15308 
N.W.Burneson,Z).<fcZ. 9(07 
J.L. Barrick, P 1505 
28. L. M. Sawyer, R . . . .11797 
David Ross, R 12066^ 
Edgar S. Browne, D..118K% 


J. P. French, D 12939 
H. S.Gilbert, P 1863W 
24. J. P. McClanahan,R.V\f^:^- 
J. O. Anderson, R ... .10s50} 
T. A. Marshall, D.... 10436}* 
J. W. McElhiney, D.. 95!<0 " 
S. V. Elliott, L 339 
P. M. Carnahan,P. .. 1143 
25. James H. Miller, R... 8591 
Peter Me Call, R 9447k> 
A. A. Morrasy,D 8236 
A.Bourke, D 6489 
F. Langworthy, P. 1541 
26. John M. Hart, R 10175 
Wm. Rowcliff, R 9924 
James E. Kinney, D. .10tU9 
David B. Stookey, Z>..110o9} 
Dan Thorpe, L . 500 


D. C. Enslow, D 12443}$ 
N. A. Carrington, P. 2125}* 
39. A . J. Lester, R 18215}$ 
Wiley E. Jones, D.... 10551}$ 
Albert L. Converse, D. 10141 
R. H. Patton, P. 3809 


9. Wm. F. Wilk, R HtiSl 
Samuel C. Hayes, P... 10342 
Jos. A. O'Donnell, D. 18769 
Charles G. Dixon, P.. 1991 
James H.Hammel, L. 343 
10. David Hunter, R 147a5 
William H. Cox, R. . . .12177 
Rob Simpson, D 12409V* 
James Lament, P. .... 45(51 
11. William E. Kent, R. .11658 
Thos.G.McElligott, ZU0892 
Henry P. Carmody,D. 9045 
Frank Goebel, R .6351 
BryanConwayj7id.Z>. 6098 
Robert Swallow, L... 1952 
G. F.Rohrbach, U.L. 566 
12. Levi T. Bray, R 13105}* 
Geo. W. Pepoon,R...1338Q}4 
M Stoskopj D 21247}* 


40. John Carstens,R 16979 
J. A. Hill,D 10004}* 


P. B. Updike, D 10737}$ 
J. W. McElroy, U. L. 834 
Arthur Ware, P 1677 
41. D. H. Sparks, R 8114 
T. T. Ramey,R 8267}$ 
Z B Job D 7'>60 


H. H. Padon, D 7492 
B.H. McKinney, P.. 656 
IA. S. Saccomie, L.... 439 
42. M.TenEycke.tf 6882 
J. A. Combs. R 7782^ 
R. N. Ramsey. D 8225^ 
E. L. Williford,D.... 7168 
C. O. Drayton,P 1504 
43. Matthew Til ford, R ... 16058 
Thos. E. Merritt, D. . .11761 
W. M. Farmer, !>.... 100C5 
J.Cockrell, U. L 3379 
A. C. Webb, P.... 119% 


J. E. Austin, P. 604^ 
27. Henry W. Allen. R.. 9020^ 
R. G. 1)reeden,R 8729^ 
H. R. Bartelson, D.. .11086 
William Hanna, P.... 5929^ 
28. I.H.Pike,R 11209^ 
L. S. Terpeninq,R... 11427 
John Eddy, D 16306 
James Thompson, P. 3877^ 
29. W.H.Kretzinaer,R. 9834^ 
D. P. Keller, R.. 10454 


D. W. Bond, P. 2918 
18. P. A. Sundelius, R.... 9833 
Stanley H. Kunz, D.. 8648 
William H.Lyman,D. 7077 
John J. Furlong, D. . . 6064 
W. Carnes, L 587 
John Wilson, P 169 
H. Edwin C. Hawley, R. .13669}^ 
Charles Curtis, R 7265 
R. M. Ireland, R 11620^ 
N. R. Graham, D 12760 
George Minot, U. L... 2605 
C.J.Schultz,P. 2371 
16. Dan McLaughlin, R.. 9250H 
Fred Wilke,R......... 9873 
W. Mooney, D 7854 
Simon Miller,/) 7590 
Rob Patterson, P. .... 1036^ 
16. W. L. R. Johnson, R. .12083 
Dan H. Paddock, R. . . 9674} 
F. P. Morris, D 13507}| 
Ed E. Day, P. 4696 


44. Edson Gould, R 10208^ 
J. B. Scudamore, R. . .10324 
H. H. Moore, D 9324^ 
John S. Cochennour,D. 9735}* 
N. Sidwell, U.L ..... 560H 
G. W. Morrill. P..... 585^ 
45. W.Cole,R 17243J*. 
W. G. Williams, D. . .10161 
W. G. Delashmutt,D.lV283 
John Garrison, U. L. . 374^ 
James Rawson,P. ... 531 
46. C.M.Lyon,li 19148 
W. H. H. Mieure, D. .11772}$ 
S. H. Martin, D 11466 
J. R. McMurry, P.... 963}* 
47. J. B. Messick, R 76>6}* 
Sam C. Smiley, R 9462}* 
W. H. Bowler, D 8481 
F. B. Phillips, D 87S8J*. 
J.L. Lupton, U. L,., 2690 
W. K. Lyon, P 334 
8. J. R. Walker, R. , . 15416)* 


Pat Ryan, D 9147 
R. H. Hill,D 10691 


Alex. M. Caldwell, P. 2630^ 
80. J. A. Brown, R 13-19 
W. H. Off levee, R 13957 
J. C. Myers, D 16752 
F. M. Pell, D 7294} 
John Cuppy, U. L.... 507 
. V. J.Gallion, P 1725 
81. Charles A. Allen, 7?. .13638 
Milton Lee, i< 13809 
G. R, Tilton, D 21996 
J.N. McCabe, U. L.. 1019 
John Vincent, P. 1892}^ 
82. S.F. Wilson, R. 999t%> 
Eugene Rice,R 11115 
J P Me Gee D 10352 


17. Daniel D. Hunt,R....mi2% 
R W Willett R 11732 


D Crossett, D 11486J4 


8. W. Johnson, P. .... 3072} 
R W Reed, L 711 


/. B. Craig, D 10343 
L. C. Bentley, P. .... 1120 
33. W. G. Cochran, /?.... 16301 
F. H. Spitler, D 12414}$ 
J. J. Schneider, D 12316 
A. L. Kellar, P. 1119}$ 
34. Perry Logsdon, R 17330 
W. T. McCreary, D. .11563 
J.W.Pugh,D 11682}* 


18. O W Pollard, R 8951 


J.N. Myers, R 9007 
J, A. Smith, D 9324 
J. E Crammond, D. . . 5517^ 
J. F. Stoner, P. 1717 
19. Benj.H.Bradshaw,R.\fflQ& 
John W. White, R 107S6H 
S. Dixon, D 14638 
D. N. Foster, P. 1939 
20. P A Coen, R 9998^ 


W. M. Schuwert, D... 8813& 
T. J. Rice, D 8866 


T. Moody, U.L 1061 
S. McKee Jr.,P 996 
George Frick, Ind. R. 335} 
19. William G. Sloan, R. .11025}* 
R. R. Lacy, R 10985^ 


J. G. Mitchell, L 21 
S. H. Peterflsh, P.... 991}$ 
W. H. Pilcher 308 
85. A . S. McDowell, R. . . .17881^ 
A . W. Wells, D 10919}$ 
H. S. Wells, P. 1211 


H. C. Gregg, D 18498 
50. -R. B. Stinson, R 17309 
R. Green, D 9540 
J. B. Gill, D 10246}^ 
John M. Smith. U.L.. 2160 
51 Thos. Sullivan. Jr., R. 10390 
J. M. Fowler, R 10884}*, 
I. A. J.Parkr, Z).... 13786 
John Hull, U. L 421 
C. A. Baine, Jr.,P... 727% 
S. J. Moon, F. Al 3194 


W H. Ambrose, R,.... 8850 
J.L.Ball,D 11018 
J, W. White, D 10988^ 
J.M.M'Cullough,Z<tP. 2060}^ 
21. W. F. Crawford, R. . .13612}$ 
HendrickV. Fisher, R. 13754 
E. W. Hurst, D 18192^ 
G. A. Metzgar, P. . . .. 1923 
22, OrrinP. Cooley, R... 15352^ 


Ira Tyler D 10230}* 


36. A. C. 'Matthews, R.. 12708}* 
John J. Teefey, D 8813}i 
John McDonald, D... 9230 
M. D. Sharpless.P... 1034}$ 
W. F. Hess, U. L S912 


FOREIGN IMMIGRATION SINCE 1875, BY FISCAL YEARS. 


Years, Number. \\ Years. Number. 


Years. Number. 


1875 227 498 


1880 . 457,257 


1885 395 346 


1876 169 986 


1881 669 431 




1877 141,857 

1878 138 469 


1882 788 ( f*>2 


1887.... 4'.t0.10<) 


1F83 603322 1888 546889 


1879 177.826 


1884 518,592 1889 444,427 



SENATORIAL DISTRICTS OF ILLINOIS. 



SENATORIAL DISTRICTS OF ILLINOIS, 

With political standing since 1882. In the table of Representatives Is shown the number of 
Republicans only. But except as noted there are two Democrats In each where 1 is placed 
anyone where there is a 2 placed. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Ninth, Tenth, and part of Eleventh Wards .................. 

Towns of Lake and Hyde Park and part of Eighth Ward. 
First, Second, and Third Wards and part of Fourth ....... 

Twelfth Ward and parts of Sixth and Seventh . ............ 

Seventh Ward and parts of Sixth and Eighth ................ 

Eighteenth Ward and part of Sixteenth and Lake View and 
Evanston ...................................................... 

All towns in Cook County except four above named ........ 

Lane, McHenry, and Boone Counties ......................... 

Thirteenth and part of Fourteenth Wards .................. 

Winnebago and Ogle Counties .................................. 

Fifth and part of Sixth Wards ............................. .... 

Jo Daviess, Stephenson, and Carroll Counties ................ 

Seventeenth Ward and parts of Fourteenth and Sixteenth 

Kane and DuPage Counties 

Will County 

Kankakee and Iroquois Counties 

DeKalb, Kendall, and Grundy Counties 

Livingston and Ford Counties 

Whiteside and Lee Counties 

Marshall, Woodford, and Tazewell Counties 

Rock Island and Henry Counties 

Knox and Fulton Counties .......... .' 

LaSalle County 

Hancock, Henderson, and Mercer Counties 

Bureau, Stark, and Putnam Counties. 

Peoria County 

Warren and McDonough Counties 

McLean County 

Logan and Macon Counties ____ . 

hampaign, Piatt, and De Witt Counties 
Vermilion and Edgar Counties 



Douglas, Coles, and Cumberland Counties 
Moultrie, Shelby, and Effingham Counties 



, , .................... 

Mason, Menard, Cass, and Schuyler Counties ................ 

Adams County ................................................. ... 

Brown, Pike, and Calhoun Counties ........................... 

Scott, Greene, and Jersey Counties ........................... 

Macoupin and Morgan Counties ............................... 

Sangamon County ............................................... 

Christian and Montgomery Counties .......................... 

Madison County .................................................. 

Bond, Clinton, and Washington Counties ..................... 

Fayette, Marion, and Jefferson Counties ..................... 

Jlay, Richland, Wayne, and Edwards Counties .............. 

lark, Jasper, and < 'rawf ord Counties ........................ 

Hamilton, White, Wabash, and Lawrence Counties ......... 

St. Clair County .................................................. 

Monroe, Randolph, and Perry Counties ....................... 

Saline, Gallatin, Hardin, Pope, and Massac Counties ....... 

Jackson, Union, and Alexander Counties .................... 

Franklin, Johnson, Williamson, and Pulaski Counties ...... 



SENATOR. 



REPRESEXTA 
TIVES. 



*Also 1 D. and 1 U. L. tAlso 1 U. L. JAlso 1 D. and 1 Pro. 1 U. L. and 2 D. I Also 1 U. L. 



What Men Should Weigh. 

Five feet one inch should be 120 pounds. 
Five feet two inches should be 126. 
Five feet three inches should be 133. 
Five feet four inches should be 136. 
Five feet five inches should be 142. 
Five feet six inches should be 145. 
Five feet seven inches should be 148. 
Five feet eight inches should be 155. 
Five feet nine inches should be 162. 
Five feet ten inches should be 169. 
Five feet eleven inches should be 174. 
Six feet should be 178. 



What a Woman Should Weigh. 
Five feet in height. 100 pounds. 
Five feet one inch, 106 pounds. 
Five feet two inches, 118 pounds. 
Five feet three inches, 119 pounds. 
Five feet four inchs, 130 pounds. 
Five feet five inches, 138 pounds. 
Five feet six inches, 144 pounds. 
Five feet seven inches, 150 pounds. 
Five feet eight inches, 155 pounds. 
Five feet nine inches, 163 pounds. 
Five feet ten inches, 16'J pounds. 
Five feet eleven inches, 176 pounds. 
Six feet, 180 pounds. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



public JBebl .Statement. 



December 1, 



INTEREST-BEARING DEBT. 

Bonds at 4^ per cent $124,413,000.00 

Bonds at 4 per cent 639,531,100 00 

Kef und'g certificates. 4 per cent. 111,650.00 

Navy pension fund at 3 per cent. 14,000 000.00 
Pacific R. R. bonds at 6 per cent 64.623,512.00 

Principal $ 842 679.2K2.00 

Interest. . . , 8,62,,798.00 



Total $ 851,304,060.00 

Debt on which inter'thas ceased 
since maturity: 

Principal $1,847,225.00 

Interest 152,037.00 

Total... 



DEBT BEARING NO INTEREST. 

Old demand and legal-tender 

notes $346,737,458.00 

Certificates of deposit 10,140,000.00 

Gold certificates 123,483,119.00 

Silver certificates 276,794,386.00 

Fractional currency, less $8,375,- 
934 estimated as lost or de- 
stroyed 6,914,132.00 

Principal $764,069,095.00 

TOTAL DEBT. 

Principal $1,608,595,583.00 

Interest 8,776,836.00 



Total $1,617,372,419.00 

Less cash items available for re- 
duction of debt 421,042,227.00 



Less reserv* 
tion of U. J 



held for redemp- 
i. notes $100,000,000.00 



Total $521.042.227.00 



Total debt, less avail'ble cash 

items $1,090,330,191.00 

Net cash in treasury 40.249,187.00 

Debt less cash in treasury 
December 1, 1889 $1,056,081,004.00 

CASH IN THE TREASURY 

Available for reduction of the debt: 
Gold held for gold certificates 

actually outstanding $123,483,119.00 

Silver held lor silver certificates 

actually outstanding 276,794,386.00 

U. S. notes held for certif 's of de- 
posit actually outstanding 10,140,000.00 

Cash held for matured debt and 

interest unpaid 10,624,061.00 

Fractional currency , 661.00 

Total available for reduction 

of the debt $421,042,227.00 

RESERVE FUND. 
Held for redemption of U. S. 

notes, acts of Jan. 14, 1875, and 

July 12, 1882 $100,000.000.00 

Unavailable forreduction of thedebt: 

Fractional silver coin $22,133,430.00 

Minor coin 102.39IJOO 



Total $22,235,82o.OO 

Certificates held as cash 33,697,264.00 

Net cash balance on hand 40.249,187.00 

Total cash in the treasury.. . $617,224,505.0 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COOK COUNTY. 

September 1, 1889. 



KIND OF BONDS. 



Date of 
Bonds. 



When Due. 



Amount. 



Seven p< r cent War Bonds 

Seven per cent Fire Bonds 

Seven per cent Graceland Cemetery Improvement Bonds 

Seven per cent Graceland Cemetery Improvement Bonds 

Five per cent Court-House Bonds 

Four and one-half per cent Refunding Bonds 

Four per cent Funding Bonds 

Four per cent Refunding Bonds, from 1 to 20 years. $50,000 
each year 



May 1, 1865 May 1, 1890 
May 1,1872 May 1,1892 
May 1,1872 May 1 ~ 
May 1,1872 May 1 
Feb. 1,1879 Jan ' 



,1892 
'. 1, 1899 

May 1, 1880 May 1, 1900 
- 1885 May 1, 1905 



May 1, 
Mar.l, 



950,000 



Total bonded indebtedness $5,184,500 

Less sinking fund 111.216 

Balance $5,073,284 



0NDED DEBT OF CITY OF CHICAGO. 



Sewerage 4^ per cent bonds $489,500 

Sewerage 4 per cent bond 845,000 

River improvement 7 per cent bonds. 2.ti08,000 

Water Y per cent bonds 3,340,000 

Water 6 per cent bonds 132,000 

Water4 percentbonds 150,000 

Water 3.65 per cent bonds 333,000 



Six percentbonds $186.000 

Seven percentbonds 99,000 

Four per cent bonds 843,500 

Bridewell 7 per cent bonds 150,000 

Tunnel 7 per cent bonds 694,000 

City hall 7 percent bonds 298,000 

School 7 percent bonds 616,000 

School 4 per cent bonds 489,500 

Sewerage? percentbonds 1,288,000 Total $12,561,500 

There are past due bonds still outstanding, for which money is on deposit in the American 
Exchange National bank of New York city to meet payment when presented, as follows: 

Municipal $10,000 

Sewerage 2,000 

Water 1.500 

Total $13,500 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



lection Returns. 

POPULAR VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 




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92 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


VOTE OF STATES AND TE 
ALABAMA. 
COUNTIES. ,-PRES.,1888-,-GOVERNOR,lS86-s 

(66.) Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. Pro. 

Harrison. Cleveland. Bingham. Seay.Tanner. 

Autauga ... 519 893. . 1 1781 
Baldwin 547 3724.. 253 873 10 
Barbour.... 452 530.. 688 5160 10 
Bibb 657 I960.. 27 1754 1 
Blount 375 873.. 27 2840 40 
ullock 465 716.. 9 2191 24 
Butler.... 1347 1905.. 757 2601 1 
Calhoun.... 938 2680.. 667 3077 1 
Chambers.... 1593 2115.. 959 2881 
Cherokee 333 1686.. 30 2550 21 
Chilton 437 1101.. 182 1527 1 
Choctaw 629 1389.. 4 925 - 
Clarke 1235 1556.. 858 1765 
Clay 376 1278.. 247 1845 
Cleburne.... 276 940.. 2 1770 4 
Coffee..., 7 1124.. 1865 
(Olbert.... 1315 1274.. 1431 1252 5 
Conecuh 748 1347.. 607 1339 
Coosa 739 1329.. 1744 2 


RRITORIES BY COUNTIES. 
Clarke's majority 4,489 


2d Dist. Hilary A. Herbert, Dem 14,041 
Charles W. Buckley, Rep 7 '203 


Herbert's majority 6833 


3d Dist. William C. Gates, Dem 13,347 


A. W.Harvey, Rep 2,8<',9 


Oates's majority 10 478 


4th Dist. Lewis W. Turpin, Dem 18.778 
J. V. McDuffle, Hep.. 5625 


Turpin's majority 13,153 
5th Dist. James E. Cobb, Dem 12,597 


Julian H. Bineham,.Rep 6,861 


g'bb's majority 5 736 


St. JohnH. Banxhe. d. Dem 16.521 
William C. Hanlan Rep . . 7,849 


Bankhead's majority 8,672 
~th iMst. William H. Forney, Dem 17,704 
J.D. Hardy, Rep 8,265 
George F Gaith j r Ind 1 004 


Forney's plurality 8,439 


8th Dist. Joseph Wheeler Dem . 13,091 


John B. McCl. llan. Rep 8,770 
Wheeler's majority 4,321 
PRESENT STATE GOVERNMENT. 
Governor, Thomas Seay ; Secretary of State, 
Charles C. Langdon; Treasurer, John L. Cobbs: 
Auditor, Cyrus D. Hogue; Attorney General, 
Thomas N. McClellan; Commissioner of Agri- 
culture, R. F. Kolb; Superintendent of In- 
struction, Solomon Palmer all Democrats. 
LEGISLATURE. 
. 1888-9 . 1886- 7 , 
Sen. Ho.J.Bal. Sen. Ho.J.Bal. 
Democrats 32 91 123.. 32 83 115 
Opposition 1 8 9.. 
"Independents .. 1 17 18 
Vacancy 1 1.. 


CoTineton .. 50 1058.. 15 1179 - 
Crenshaw. 197 1923.. 38 2152 
Cullman* . 350 920.. 290 11H9 2 
Dale .... 15 12U6.. 4 2051 42 
Dallas 2090 5302.. 6096 - 

gfSe.v::::: S S: i*S 5 


SSSffi 1 "- 8! iffi: 1 S It 

Fayette . 315 864.. 1573 2 

S$$a u ~-" "J !tJ :: * & 1 
IK"'"" i3?l ffl:: "8 8S -5 


Henry...'. . 22 1947.. 3975 3 


Jackson 1022 2304.. 1203 2628 25 
Jefferson 3001 5503.. 1688 3176 39 
Lamar *4o lloo. . 
Lauderdale.. H20 1637.. 980 1963 7 
Lawrence 1457 1449.. 1928 1759 24 
L* 1432 1991.. 1522 2680 8 
Limestone"" H83 1489.. 966 2119 89 
Lowndes 1468 2105.. 3753 1496 

Ma^on ..::::: 268 931.. 2029 1035 5 


Total 33 99 132.. 33 100 133 
*Include all who were elected against the 
regular Democratic nominees, nearly all of 
them being Democrats who ran on local differ- 
ences. 
ARIZONA. 
, DELEGATE , 

COUNTIES. 1888. 1886. 1884. 
1 10) Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. 

Wilson. Smith. Bean. Smith. Bean. Head. 

Apache 283 552. 325 585.. 510 745 
Cochise 602 1071. 512 1209.. 1222 1127 
Gila 107 326. 216 298.. 263 189 
Graham 156 743. 266 578.. 648 365 
Maricopa.. 492 1498. 677 862.. 720 726 
Mohave.... 221 249. 292 224.. 323 211 
Pima 633 891. 728 836.. 982 722 
Final.. 178 687. 380 409.. 391 357 
Yavapai.... 1116 1430. 938 1194.. 1523 1055 
Yuma 164 239. 138 160.. 165 98 


Madison 2595 2136.. 2090 2830 48 
Mareneo 1933 3426.. 585 4124 - 
Marfon 273 721.. 6 1412 12 
Marshall 248 1166.. 48 2527 14 
Mobile 2542 3119.. 1672 3006 27 
Monroe"" 767 1445.. 39 1205 - 
Montgomery" 2966 37l2.. 832 6127 14 
Morgan . 507 "W.. 454 1867 33 
Perry 790 2729.. 83 3541 2 
Piokens"" 17 1326.. 3117 2 
Pike 890 2623.. 654 2963 13 


Randoir>'h"" 733 1023.. 410 1293 12 
Russell 1088 1970.. 6 1967 9 
Shelby 1037 162(5.. 954 1881 31 
St riair"" 640 1489.. 70 1702 28 
Sumter 810 21)60.. 11 1203 - 
Talladeea'" 2179 1983.. 1490 2002 17 
TalHDOOsa" 751 2385.. 98 2992 3 
Tuskaloosa " 1057 2214.. 549 3268 19 
Walker 1047 1126.. 872 949 8 
Washington.: 2i7 508.. 40 815 
Wilrox 607 4811.. 4493 
KTton""" 323 220.. 130 190 


Total... 3852 7686. 4472 6355.. 6747 5595 
Majorities 3834. 1883.. 1152 
Percent... 33.39 66.61. 41.16 58.84. . 54.66 45.33 
Whole vote 11,538 . 10,827 . . 12,312 
LEGISLATURE. 
, 1890. , 1888. , 
Council. Ho. Council. Ho. 
Republicans 8 11.. 3 17 


Democrats 4 13. . 9 7 
ARKANSAS. 

COUNTIES. - PRES., '888 . ^Gov.,1886^ 
(75) Rep. Dem.Pro. U. . Rep. Dem. Wh'l* 

Harrison.Cleve'd.Fisk. Stwetcr.Uresz.Hu-.'lies.Cun'g'm 

Arkansas.. 943 903 12 151. 827 1061 3 
Ashlev 800 1089 - . 912 1125 
Baxter 310 709 7 53. 272 7H> 164 
Benton.. . 1108 3059 55 234. 242 3422 37 
Boone... . 609 1373 8 66. 502 1554 55 
Bradley. . 1C>5 770 73. 234 730 46 
Calhoun . 306 560 1 55. 209 518 1 
Carroll.. . 1044 1500 - 276.. 615 1106 448 


Total 56197 117320. . 37116 144737 576 
Plurality 61123.. 107821 
Percent 32.27 67.38.. 20.75 79.24 
Scattering-... 583 .. 576 
Total vote.... 174100 .. 182429 
At the state election in August, 1888, Seay, 
Dem., was elected Governor by 155,963 votes to 
44,770 for Ewing, Rep. 
FOR REPRESENTATIVES IX CONGRESS. 

1st Dist Richard H Clarke Dem 11594 


T. H. Thweatt,tfep 7,105 



ELECTION 


RETURNS. 93 


Harriaon.CleT'd. Fuk.StreeterGngK.HughesCun'g'in 
Chicot 1621 211 .. 1675 268 


FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS, 1888. 
1st Dist. W. H. Cate, Dem 15576 


Clark 1212 1787 21 64.. 714 1371 177 


L. P. Featherston, U. L 14,228 


Cleburne.. 22 483 3 265.. 10 491 358 


2d Dist. C. R. Breckenridge, Dem 17,857 
J M Clayton Rep 17011 


Cleveland.. 339 991 15.. 321 974 217 


3d Dist. T. C McRae, Dem ... 20046 


Columbia... 662 1610 70. . 683 1712 167 


J. A. Ansley, U L... 13553 


Conway 1280 1360 10 65.. 1824 1423 158 


4th Dist.J. H. Rogers, Dem.... 20448 


Craighead.. 217 1200 147.. 192 1512 130 


I. McCracken, U. L.... ...14.933 




5th Dist S W Peel Dem 15 649 


Crittenden. 1855 310 . . 1805 459 23 
gross 416 566 54.. 442 794 40 


E. P. Watson, Ind. Dem 5,004 


alias 425 676 22 35.. 292 623 69 
Desna 1281 372 -.. 1394 tW 10 
Drew .. .. 1065 1211 1 1.. 1131 1376 
Faulkner... 760 1239 12 506.. 762 1242 871 
Franklin... 777 2125 27 120.. 787 2392 129 
Fulton 272 873 29 195.. lt>2 97 196 
Garland.... 987 1196 - 60.. 976 1482 98 
Grant.... . 152 702 65.. 125 748 158 
Green 214 1153 235.. 118 1589 73 


LEGISLATURE. 
. 1889-90 1887-8 
Sen. Ho.J.Bal.Sen. Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans... 2 11 13.. 2 14 16 
Democrats 30 69 99.. 30 73 103 
Whel - 33 
Independents. .. 4 4 
Greenbackers . .. 1 1 


Hempstead 1840 1685 2 172.. 1833 1892 198 
HotSprings 274 944 4 154.. 181 907 247 
Howard.... 359 1241 2 344.. 121 905 143 
In'pend'ce. 324 1789 36 1220.. 500 2098 515 
Izard 378 1187 7 68.. 109 1115 453 
Jackson.... 842 1555 5 82.. 876 1185 739 
Jefferson... 5363 1855 6 18.. 3926 1189 82 
Johnson.... 503 1419 16 314.. 419 1223 1029 
Lafayette.. 473 304 61.. 29 252 35 
Lawrence.. 427 1416 10 154.. 309 1681 54 
Lee 1539 9o2 13.. 704 1805 24 
Lincoln .... 1189 755 4 3.. 1112 858 4 
LittleRiver 630 605 1 27.. 685 641 56 
Logan 1034-1799 7 120.. 634 1738 945 
Lonoke . . . . 1043 1469 4 84.. 913 1552 335 
Madison... 1163 1337 13 90.. 1045 1213 69 
Marion.. .. 296 838 1 69.. 284 910 153 
Miller 1015 1164 21 65.. 1029 1015 15 


Union Labor. .. 15 15.. 
CALIFORNIA. 

COUNTIES. PRESIDENT, 1888-- ^-Gov., 1886 
(52.) Rep. Dem. Am. Pro. Rep.Dem.Pro. 

Harrison. Clevel'd.Curtis. Fik. Swift. BarclettRussell 

Alameda.. 8840 5693 300 359.. 5514 3882 280 
Alpine 53 27 -.. 59 25 - 
Amador... 1373 1429 11 79.. 1298 1375 95 
Buttee.... 2191 2215 4 127..13o 11'67 100 
Calaveras. 1441 1305 2 12.. 1254 1231 18 
Colusa 1116 2010 9 41.. 880 1702 86 
C'tra Costa 1518 1177 10 53. . 1251 1147 83 
DelNorte. 244 294 24 14.. 244 290 43 
El Dorado. 1350 1456 1 61.. 1231 1403 106 
Fresno 2461 2822 18 173.. 1101 1740 147 
Humboldt 2772 2014 53 75.. 1877 1474 421 


Mississippi. 603 529 5.. 837 1134 1 
Monroe. .. 1167 784 6 15.. 1105 640 490 
M'tgomery. 161 806 1 2.. 168 698 83 
Nevada..:.. 609 1025 11 642.. 562 1048 850 
Newton 559 367 6.. 479 342 393 
Ouachita... 1165 1303 1 67.. 1077 1301 63 
Perry .. 180 384 116.. 242 447 229 
Phillips 2123 789 .. 2451 1098 
Pike.. ...... 83 664 1 334.. -- 521 686 


Inyo 437 273 21 13.. 336 283 5 
Kern 910 1229 32 24.. 525 828 10 
Lake 731 867 3 27.. 592 804 31 
Lassen.... 488 535 2 16.. 443 484 5 
LosAng'l's 13805 10110 83 1 264. . 5489 5064 797 
Marin 936 801 17 16.. 681 577 12 
Mariposa.. 526 657 3 1.. 441 630 6 
Mend'cino 1711 2012 14 90.. 1219 1552 102 
Merced.... 773 973 32 19. 639 939 81 


Poinsett... 119 402 21.. 79 533 29 
Polk 126 785 3 73.. 31 692 159 
Pope . 321 1660 4 691.. 295 1574 1262 


ModOC 552 679 1 4*5.. 4C.4 636 60 
Mono 347 215 10 9.. 425 257 9 
Monterey. 1875 1866 8 113.. 131)3 1444 106 


Prairie 603 761 15 165.. 574 796 652 
Pulaski 4446 2873 15 24. .3434 5051 357 
Randolph.. 249 1606 6 45.. 116 1909 84 
Saline..;. .. 377 967 8 66.. 301 834 590 


Napa 1763 1492 13 42.. 1323 1340 52 
Nevada.... 2167 1917 7 95.. 2186 1792 121 
Placer 1761 1547 6 50.. 1665 141? 67 
Plumas.... 648 570 3 9.. 666 577 6 


Scott 4'.7 1031 2 .. 179 1273 196 




Searcy 500 462 2 61. 533 458 196 
Sebastian 1543 2573 9 4. 12i'i6 2668 68 
Sevier . . 176 965 3 167.. 133 861 244 
Sharp. .. . 115 913 2 407.. 127 1049 273 


SanBenito 664 797 2 90.. 532 702 202 
S.Ber'dino 3059 2389 8 263.. 1481 1508 205 
San Diego. 4H61 3188 11 322..13..2 1159 240 
San Fr'isco 25708 28674 437 -..1.^7517449 235 


St Francis 923 838 1 248.. 909 951 143 
Stone 76 462 10 82.. 69 686 167 
Union... . 70 1247 1 231.. 972 1317 94 
VanBuren. 209 547 84.. 217 457 400 
Washingt'n 1969 3199 82 44.. 1887 2730 50 
White.. .. 550 1948 45 249.. 371 1132 1726 
Woodruff.. 1021 1236 2 192.. 1109 1289 53 
Yell 471 1663 7 398.. 396 1467 534 


S.Joaquin 2829 2821 44 28>..2U6 2651 424 
S.L.Obispo 1689 1584 5 121.. 1212 1196 106 
San Mateo 1121 973 1 14. . 920 740 25 
S.Barbara 1684 1565 8 161.. 1174 1134 201 
S.Clara.... 4457 3972 93 402.. 3501 307i) 337 
S. Cruz.... 1998 1750 1 193.. 1362 1189 244 
Shasta 1490 1395 2 51.. 1298 1227 52 
Sierra 1004 689 2 .. 924 575 25 


Total 58752 85962 614 10613 .54070 90850 19169 
Plurality... 27210 .. 17411 
Per cent... 37. 61 55.19 .39 6.80. .33.00 55.31 11.69 
Total vote. 155941 .. 163,889 
*The organization is known as the "Agri- 
cultural Wheel," and is understood to be 
composed of farmers alone. In some coun- 
ties the Wheel elected all the county officers 
and member to General Assembly in 1886. 

VOTE ON STATE OFFICERS, 1889. 


Solano 2231 2162 9 94.. 1957 2047 115 
Sonoma... 3293 3392 93 154.. 2631 2699 224 
Stanislaus 903 1317 5 91.. 596 1086 70 
Sutler 722 698 1 53.. 661 653 81 
Tehama 1181 1290 2 34.. 931 1039 15 
Trinity ' * 489 4 2.. 463 469 2 
TulareV . 2275 2636 3rt 244.. 1475 1905 225 
Tuolumne 854 U56 7 55.. 782 1115 66 
Ventura... H07 906 2 41.. 721 634 44 
Yolo... 1350 1580 2 91. .1196 1408 157 
Yuba 1130 1169 48 41.. 1043 1129 69 


Judges S P Hughes, J ^em 51,700 


Total 124816 117729 1591 5761 84318 84970 6432 


W E Hemingway Dem 52 431 


Plurality 7087 652 


M H Sandels Dem 52925 


Per cent 49 62 46 83 -63 **29' 43 24 43 75 3 29 


C E Mitchell Rep ... 41615 


Scatter'g 1442 " ' 


W F Hill Ind . .. 40962 


Total vote 251 339 . 187 947 







94 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



O'Donnell, Ind., in 1886 received 12,227 votes 

for Governor. 
FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS, 1888. 

1st JHst. J. J DeHaven. Rep 19,345 

Thomas L. Thompson, Dem 19019 

W. D. Reynolds, Am 428 

Scattering 1 

2d Dist. Marion Biggs, Dem 19,064 

John A. Eagon, Rep 17,9*1 

8. M. McLean, Pro 913 

Scattering 113 

3d Dist. Joseph McKenna, Rep 19,913 

Ben Morgan Dem 14,633 

S. Solon Holl, Am 338 

W. W. Smith. Pro 657 

Scattering 9 

4th Dist. W. W. Morrow, Rep 14,217 

Robert Ferral,Dewi 13,624 

Frank A. Pixley, Am 173 

Scattering 84 

5th Dist. Thomas J. Clunie, Dem 20,276 

T. G. Phelps, Rep 20,225 

Scattering 941 

6th Dist. -William Vandever, Rep 35,40o 

Reel B. Terry, Dem 29,445 

J. G. Miller, Pro 2,371 

A. Daggett, Am 150 

Scattering 259 

LEGISLATURE. 

, 1889-90 . 1887-8 

Sen. Ho. J.Bal. Sen.Ho.J.Bal. 

Republicans 18 37 55.. 14 41 55 

Democrats 22 43 65.. 26 39 65 

COLORADO. 

COUNTIES.-. PRES., 1888 > ,-Gov., 1886-, 
(42.) Rep. Dem.Pro.Lab. Rep.Dem.Pro. 

HMTison.Cleve'd.Fisk.Streetfr.Meyer.AdamsFUhb'k 

Arapahoe... 11545 8320 448 99.. 5335 5732 537 



Archuleta... 127 77 .. 
Bent 1,338 1074 73 109. 



73 

273 568 - 



Boulder... . 1638 1176 122 42.. 704 1220 357 
Chaffee 1277 941 47 7.. 904 924 



Clear Creek. 1236 



Conelos. 
Costilla.... 

Custer 

Delta 

Dolores. ... 
Douglas 

Eagle 

Elbert 

El Paso 
Fremont . . . 
Garfleld 

Gilpin 

Grand 

Gunnison.. 
Hinsdale .. 
Huerfano.. 
Jefferson... 

Lake 

La Plata . . . 



B S I 

574 374 6 



96 16.. 967 740 1] 



5. 

1.. 543 

257 239 28 60.. 158 

140 103 - 

385 307 36 

604 400 3 

784 578 16 
2164 1281 127 - 
1128 767 106 256 
1110 820 30 



453 713 

501 194 
!91 
!31 

-.. Ill 86 
3.. 235 219 
-.. 376 359 
-.. 217 210 
- . . 745 611 

824 657 130 

456 452 16 



1110 

953 688 98 55.. 908 570 99 



162 



1.. 



82 

904 617 18 83. 

156 116 

750 674 27 

767 91 



Larimer 1323 769 154 

Las Animas. 2655 2785 65 

^' n 'S 8 I? * 

508 372 21 



109 71 2 

782 790 63 

119 116 5 

1.. 527 523 8 

5.. 607 646 141 

2415 57 .. 2171 2749 34 

553 578 11 



849 774 10 



734 

764 588 



15., 
9 35., 
5 



638 723 327 
773 1500 8 



.. 

.. 338 274 9 



439 702 
509 474 



1525 1217 34 5.. 787 776 15 



Montrose 
Ouray .... 

Park 

Pitkin 

Pueblo".'.'.".".". 2280 2038 68 72.. 1011 1579 81 
Rio Grande. 453 261 15 8.. 325 270 li 
Routt 3ti6 219 2 -.. 141 133 

Saguache 592 428 5 .. 317 361 8 
o , o. 454 4U 2 

380 470 - 

485 492 2 



San Juan.... 392 287 

San Miguel. 540 378 _ 

Summit .... 701 557 

Washington 8^0 ,505 42 

Weld 1492 1036 164 



32.'.' 1242 1318 382 



Total 50774 37567 2191 1266. .26816 29234 2710 

Plurality.... 13207 .. 2418 

Percent 55.31 40.92 2.47 1.38. .45.46 49.70 4.70 

Total vote .. 91798 . . 58760 



FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS. 

Hosea Townsend, nep 50,620 

Thorn as Macon, Dem 37.725 

John Hipp, Pro 2,355 

R. A. Southworth, L ..1309 

Scattering tf 

STATE OFFICERS ELECTED 1888. 

Governor Job A. Cooper, Rep. 

Treasurer W . H. Brisbane, Rep. 

Secretary of Stare Jones Rice, Rep. 

auditor L. Schwanbeck, Rep. 

Att rney General S. W. Jones, Rep. 

Superintendent of Schools Fred. Dick, Rep. 

Judges Supreme Court T. D. Hoyt, Rep., long 

term; V. A. Elliott, Rep., short term. 
Regents of ti e University- C . R. Dudley and 
S. A. Griffin, Reps. 

LEGISLATURE. 

1889-90 1887-8 , 

Sen.Ho.J.Bal. Sen. Ho. J.Bal. 

Republicans 6 43 49.. 18 25 43 

Democrats 6 20 26.. 8 23 31 

Independents.... .. 1 l 

CONNECTICUT. 

COUNT'S, PRES., 1888 . . Gov., 1886- , 
(8) Rep. Dem.Pro.Lab. Rep. Dem. Pro. 

Harrrieon, Cleve'd.Fisk.Str'ter.Lounsb'y.Clevel'd. Forbes. 

Fairfl eld. 14934 15251 622 41.. 11106 10756 559 
Hartford. 15549 14984 805 43...11871 13125 806 
Litch field 6080 5790 468 16. . 4954 5408 447 
Middles'x 4363 3613 271 4.. 3379 3048 387 
N.Haven. 19003 22113 973 100.. 14087 15461 1013 
N.London 7726 7582 570 33. . 6064 6193 749 
Tolland . . 2734 2402 235 . . 2188 2046 294 
Windham 4195 3185 290 3. . 3270 2600 318 
Total.. ..74584 74920 4234 240. .56920 58818 4691 
Plurality. 336 1898 

Per cent. .48.44 48.66 2.10 .15.. 46.18 47.72 380 
Tot' I vote 153978 . . 123221 

VOTE ON STATE OFFICERS. 1888. 

Governor Myron Y. Bulkeley, Rep 73,659 

Lazon B. Morris, Dem 75,074 

Hiram Camp, Pro 4,631 

Andrews, L b 263 

Lieut. -Gov. S. E. Merwln, Rep 75,165 

J. S. Kirkham,Dem 74,146 

N. Babcock, Pro , 4,339 

Soper, Lab 283 

S-.c. of titaten. J. Walsh, Rep 74,153 

H. A. Bishop, Dem 74,973 

T. L Pease, Pro 4,377 

Vallette, Lab 287 

Treasurer E. S. Henry, Rep 74,531 

J. G.Martin, Dem 74,658 

G. W. Keis, Pro 4,396 

White, Lab 284 

Comptroller J . B . Wright, Rep 74,352 

N . Staub, Dem 74,773 

E. Manchester, Pro 4,374 

Brzeinski, Lab 291 

FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS, 1888. 

1st Dist.-W. E. Simonds, Rep 18,255 

R. J. Vance, Dem 17 442 

F. G. Platt, Pro . 997 

H. S. Frye,Lab 34 

2d Dint. -H. W. Lines, Rep 24,161 

F. W. Wilcox. Dem 24,959 

E. P. Angus, Pro l 155 

D. W. Ventris, Lab ... ' 10 
SdDist.Ch&s. A. Russell, Rep 11710 

S. H. Hall, Dem ...10,982 

J. A. Rockwell, Pro 848 

4th, Dist. Frederick Miles, Rep 21.003 

E. W. Seymour, Dem 20,977 

E.Z. Ellis, Pro 1,091 

LEGISLATURE. 

1889 , , 1888 . 

Sen.Ho.J.Bal. Sen. Ho. J.Bal. 

Republicans 17 152 169.. 14 138 152 

Democrats 7 96 103.. 10 109 119 

Independents..,. 1 1. . 2 2 



ELECTION RETURNS. 95 


DELAWARE. 

COUNTIES PRES., '88 > --GOVERNOR, '86-^ 
(3) Rep. Dem,. Pro. Rep. Dem. Pro. 

Harrison. Cleveland. Fiak. Pjle. Bien. Hoffeclcer. 

Kent.. 2797 3969 101 3408 1781 


Atlomty- General W. B. Lamar. 
Comptroller W . D. Barnes. 
Treasurer Frank J. Paris. 
Supt.of S.holsA.J. Russell. 
Comr. of Agricultu e L. B. Wombwell. 


New Castle 6130 8463 192. . 141 6466 3423 
Sussex 4046 398.2 107.. -- 4068 2o31 


E. Maxwell. L. H. MitchelJ 
All Democrats. 

FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 
IstDist. Benjamin Rep 9,717 


Total.... 12973 16414 400.. 141 13942 7835 
Plurality.. 3441 .. 5966 
Percent. .43.54 55.47 1.34.. 63.65 38.34 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS. 


R. H. M. Davidson, Dem 19,824 


2d Dist. Goodrich, Rep 16,817 


R. W. Bullock, Dem 20,012 




LEGISLATURE. 
- 1889-90 . , 1887-8 . 
Sen. Ho. J.Sal. Sen.Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans 5 9 14.. 8 24 32 
Democrats 27 59 86.. 20 49 69 
Independents.... .. 4 3 7 

GEORGIA. 

COUNTIES. < PRES., 1888 . ^-PRES'84-s 
Rep. Dem. Pro. Rep. Dem. 

fltrrison. Cleveland. Fisk. Blame. Cleve'd 

Appling ... 219 531 5 345 503 


Charles H. Register,' Pro 387 


LEGISLATURE. 

1889-90 , , 1887-8 . 
Sen. Ho. J.Sal. Sen. Ho.J.Bal. 
Democrats.... 7 7 14.. 9 21 30 
Republicans.. 2 14 16.. 

FLORIDA. 

Jo UNTIES. , PRES. 1888 , PRES. '84^ 
(45.) Rep. Dem. Pro. Rep. Dem. 

IIarnjon.CleTeland.Fisk. Bliine-Clereland. 

Alachua 1415 2031 -.. 2091 1737 
Baker . . 155 375 167 337 


Baker 43 346 -.. 424 
Baldwin 271 403 7.. 108 533 
Banks 210 807 14 164 500 


Bartow 290 916 84.. 584 1035 
Berrien 11 721 4.. ?2 673 
Bibb 1121 2215 119 857 1727 


Bradford 3U) 1000 10 . 327 961 


Brevard 244 454 24.. 110 306 
Calhoun 94 294 -.. 138 200 
Citrus... 107 479 32.. 


Brooks 580 828 13 713 7ti8 


Bryan 12 214 1 ' 239 253 


Clay... 483 557 2.. 315 500 


Bulloch 42 1061 2.! 75 773 
Burke 248 684 .. 558 


Columbia... 976 1037 5.. 963 1048 


Dade 45 94 27 40 


DeSoto. 210 683 




Duval 2706 1388 1 . 3387 1888 


Camden 317 188 5.. 363 170 
Campbell 321 778 1.. 335 665 
Carroll 349 1710 55 499 2058 


Escambia... 1630 1956 . . 1861 1896 


Franklin.... 334 346 2.. 216 276 


Gadsden 239 1493 .. 881 1048 


Catoosa 106 428 21.. 114 443 
Charlton 58 113 2.. 27 194 


Hamilton 355 741 .. 560 659 
Hernando 226 389 6 . 270 1040 
Hillsboro 654 1667 53 . 353 1257 


Chatham 1355 3920 57 1747 3144 


Chattahoochee 22 145 .. 328 445 
Chattooga 180 638 2.. 191 793 
Cherokee 459 1575 19.. 140 8ti5 
Clarke.... 660 801 6 . 765 778 


Holmes 31 550 . 74 397 


Jackson 1119 1875 . . 1136 1420 
Jefferson 1186 1197 .. 1525 774 
Lafayette 28 565 .. 48 383 
Lake 910 1278 44 


Clay 284 554 1.. 295 367 


Cla ton 224 604 .. 279 505 
Clinch 115 435 4 68 429 


Lee 70 243 


Leon ... 188 1314 . 2196 833 


Cobb 391 1143 28 536 1372 


Levy. .. 456 657 3.. 337 654 


Coffee 110 294 4 30 225 


Liberty 78 163 .. 94 * 161 
Madison 179 723 590 558 


Colquitt 4 225 2.. 402 
Columbia 397 6.. 39 151 
Coweta 990 1476 6.. 1326 1489 
Crawford 26 442 1.. 159 304 
Dade 89 465 3 159 450 


Manatee 172 422 1.. 216 670 
Marion 1828 1896 33 2007 1494 


Monroe 1158 1123 4 . 906 887 


Nassau 911 958 . 902 761 


Dawson 340 513 11.. 59 287 
Decatur 482 1287 892 816 


i Orange . . 1515 1813 95. . 1160 1867 


Osceola.... 230 423 .. 


DeKalb 313 1021 13.. 450 1025 
Dodge 406 496 12.. 434 476 
Dooley 386 787 1.. 158 879 
Dougherty 222 815 5.. 100 317 
Douglas 151 493 4.. 205 458 
Early 288 467247 410 


Pasco 91 614 1 


Polk 357 1315 1 62 754 


Putnam 1336 1146 31 1168 1094 


St Johns 1024 1033 8 . 514 725 


Santa Rosa 423 799 11.. 471 804 


Sumter.... 309 782 .. 524 1125 


Echols 43 150 5.. 91 183 
Effingham 189 362 14.. 148 369 
Elbert 11 774 24.. 39 885 
Emanuel 30 658 1.. 181 784 
Fannin 692 374 6.. 442 282 
Fayette . 204 690 1 246 578 


Suwanee 786 999 6 776 978 


Taylor 39 326 134 209 


Volusia 1135 990 33.. 813 878 
Wakulla ... 206 314 . 169 375 


Walton 430 541 16 304 482 


Washington 231 509 -.. 230 318 


Floyd 585 1145 18.. 863 1654 


Total 26657 39561 423 28034 317OT 


Forsyth 209 1579 12.. 137 557 
Franklin 121 606 32.. 221 R59 
Fulton 2164 2750 233.. 925 1939 
Gilmer 543 556 22 14" 373 


Plurality 12904 .. 3738 
Percent 39.98 59.36 .63.. 46.81 53.06 
Scattering .. 72 
Total vote 66641 .. 59,872 


Glascock 45 290 .. 29 251 


STATE OFFICERS ELECTED IN 1888. 

Governor Francis P. Fleming. 
Secretary of State John L. Crawford. 


Glynn 582 601 29.. 659 437 
Gordon 119 852 36.. 126 885 
Greene 714 80S 16.. 832 755 
Gwinnett 186 2004 23.. 146 1094 
Habersham.... 188 830 9.. 125 534 



98 


CHICAGO 


DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


Hall 


Harrison. Cleveland. 
274 2170 

177 596 
93 493 
633 1030 
80 674 
188 629 
512 1136 
466 949 
31 245 
506 2180 
177 588 
130 816 
124 379 
443 531 
222 839 
405 178 
708 477 
446 


Fisk. Blaine.Cleve'd 

42.. 259 1242 
1.. 124 642 
9.. 530 
13.. 859 1197 
21.. 171 701 
6.. 325 818 
25.. 694 933 
3.. 433 1300 
.. 36 300 
12.. 411 1082 
..436 428 
5. . 477 610 
13.. 5 284 
2.. 319 498 
9.. 226 621 
1.. 499 435 
15. 841 472 
1. 385 
17. 598 648 
13. 145 366 
1. 650 661 
. 259 589 
1. 337 752 
-. 195 423 
. 769 204 
11. 1107 1464 
. 115 
7. 57 497 
1. 326 435 
1. 500 1243 
13. 189 457 
4. 602 676 
15. 240 668 
16. 590 1951 

l! 315 434 
2. 60 492 
8. 221 689 
2. 338 298 
2. 197 460 
45. 684 908 
27. 415 607 
2. 288 983 
1. 519 
1. 42 159 
9. 5 229 
19. 447 669 
28. 1945 3293 
6. 225 508 
. 301 406 
5. 246 1037 
20. 623 691 
1. 207 684 
3. 726 1186 
5. 1331 907 
4. 263 418 
2. 252 645 
14. 440 773 
32. 120 477 
1. 278 541 
17. 289 290 
2. 147 165 
7. 463 1209 
4. 164 268 
1 . 176 377 
1. 374 778 
12.. 248 770 
21.. 324 1017 
17.. 179 365 
3. . 142 521 
1*.. 939 1083 
13.. 199 449 
-..261 353 
6.. 53 317 
62.. 570 883 
3.. 43 397 
15.. 785 
3.. 289 625 
31.. 178 420 


An election for State officers was held Nov. 
2, 1887, there being only a Democratic ticket. 
For purposes of comparison the Presidential 
vote of 1884 Is taken, there having been no 
contested election since. 

VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS 1888. 

Governor John B. Gordon, Dem 121,999 


i Hancock 


Haralson 
Harris 
Hart.... 


Heard 


Henry 


Houston 
Irwin . 


Sec. State-Nathan C. Barnett, Dem 122,384 
Compt.-Gen.-WWi&m A.Wright, Dem... 122,336 
Treasurer Robert U. Hardeman, Dem .123,032 
AtVy-Gen. Clifford Anderson.Z>em 120,803 

FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS, 1838. 

1st FHst Rufus E Lester Dem 11 736 


Jackson 
Jasper 
Jefferson 


Johnson 
Jones 


Laurens 
Lee 


Liberty 


Floyd Snelson, Rep 5J16 


Lincoln 
Lowndes 


2d D'ist Henry G Turner Dem 11 000 


643 767 
317 440 
320 683 
144 583 
94 543 
3 389 
673 192 
452 991 
9 170 
56 895 
433 650 
466 1420 
178 480 
210 506 
199 524 
611 1107 
398 788 
156 380 

185 592 
788 368 
198 366 
514 1030 
450 587 
298 1107 
511 
122 327 
43 386 
327 594 
113 808 
280 568 
233 355 
243 1161 
448 1039 
139 662 
652 940 
389 575 
200 391 
102 543 
123 559 
234 493 
228 673 
838 1465 
277 275 
435 1242 
157 299 
440 547 
345 977 
260 718 
235 767 
186 & 
100 545 
572 1351 
137 317 
290 
494 
837 
73 357 

m S 

179 547 


No opposition. 
3d Dist. Charles T. Crisp, Dem . 9,254 


Lumpkin 
Macon 
Madison 


Peter O. Gibson, Rep 3130 


4th Dist Thomas W Grimes Dem 9 7 > )8 


; Marion 
McDuffie 
Mclntosh 
Meriwether.... 
Miller... 


Marlon Bethune, Rep.'. 4,'l25 


5th Dist. John D. Stewart, Dem .10.962 


George S Thomas Rep ' 5 032 


6th Dist James H. Blount, Dem . 8,934 


No opposition. 
7th Dist. Judson C. Clements, Dem 9,051 


Milton..., 


; Mitchell 
Monroe 


Z. B. Hargroves, Rep 3,204 


8th Dist Henry H Canton Dem 7 408 


Montgomery... 
Morgan 
Murray 
Muscogee 
Newton 
Oconee 


E T Fleming Rep 2 226 


9th Dist Allen D Candler, Dem 11,326 


Thaddeus Plckett, Ind ... 9846 


loth Dist. George T. Barnes, Dem 6,577 


Judson W. Lyoh, Rep 797 


LEGISLATURE. 

1888-89 1887-8 
Sen. Ho. J.Bal. Sen. Ho. J.Bal. 
Republicans... 1 3 4 .. 2 10 12 
Democrats 43 172 215 .. 39 150 189 
Labor .. 1 5 6 


'< Oglethorpe..... 
! Paulding 
IPickens 
i Pierce 


Pike 


f Polk . 


! Pulaski 
Putnam 
i Quitman 


Independents.. .. 2 10 12 

IDAHO. 

COUNTIES. CONST'N. ^-DEL. 1888.-^ 
(16) *Rep. Dem. ^Eep. Rep.Dem 

For. Against Duhois. HawTej.Buck. 

Ada 1331 443. 1008 661 


i Habun 


' Randolph 
: Richmond 
iRockdale 
i Schley 


. Screven 


jSpaldlng 
i 8tewart 
Sumter 


Alturas 290 51. 1613 1133 
Bear Lake 44 39 82 532 


Talbot 


Birighain 716 171 731 635 


Taliaferro 
attnall 
ay lor 
Telfair 


Boise 539 80. 478 371 
Cassia 1:30 92. 201 213 
Caster 498 33 563 234 




; Terrell 
Thomas 
' Towns 


Idaho 199 137 255 365 58 


Kootenai 1032 24 269 278 66 


Latah 2523 117 341 237 864 


1 Troup 
! Twiggs ... 


Lemhi 890 30. 494 269 - 


Union; 
i Upson 
Walker 


NezPerce 112 103. 49 155 431 
Oneida 278 95 253 87 


Owyhee 388 37. 301 171 
Shoshone 1811 *>1 1033 737 35 


Walton 


1 Ware 


Washington 442 173. 433 326 4 


Warren 

! Washington.... 
! Wayne 
Webster . 
White 


Total .. ,. 12398 1773. 8151 6404 1458 


Plurality 10625 . 1747 
Percent 87.42 12.58. 50.9039.99 9.11 


Total vote 14184 . 16013 

* Anti-Mormon and Anti-Annexationlst. 
tDivisionist and Annexationist. 

LEGISLATURE. 

. 1890. v 1888. . 
Council. Ho. 


1 Whitfleld 
Wilcox 
! Wilkes... 


Wilkinson 
Worth 


Total 


40496 100499 1 
60003 
28.34 70.32 1 
136 
142939 


308. .47692 94653 
46961 
97.. 33.22 65. 94 
1198 
.. 143543 


Plurality 


' Scattering 
Total vote 




Independents .. 1 



ELECTION RETURNS. 


97 


COUNTIES. 
(102.) 


ILLINOIS. 

- PRESIDENT, 1888 . GOVERNOR, 1888 , 
Rep. Dem. Pro. U. L. Rep. Dem. Pro. U.L. 

Harrison. Clereland. Fisk. gtneter. Fifer. Palm.r. Harti. Jones. 


STATETREAS..'86-s 

Rep. Dem. U.L.Pro. 

Tanner. Ricker.Budlone.Austin ! 


Adams 


6088 


7196 


287 


72.. 


6049 


7289 


249 


55.. 


3951 


5391 


5 


231 


Alexander 


2014 


1544 


8 


77.. 


1965 


1599 


8 


69.. 


1469 


1189 


203 


7 


Bond 




1276 


212 


8.. 


1657 


1324 


ias 


6.. 


1559 


1*56 




233 


Boone 


2100 


495 


175 


13 . 


2087 


516 


172 


9.. 


1926 


367 


9 


172 


Brown 
Bureau 


4070 


1616 
3487 


iff 


202.. 
135.. 


952 
4056 


1640 
3575 


a 


189 . 


820 
3156 


1431> 
2539 


38 
33 


24 
271 


Calhoun 


589 


939 


18 


35.. 


582 


956 


18 


34.. 


393 


963 




25 


Carroll 


2644 


1329 




1.. 


2633 


1356 


144 


1.. 


1930 


725 


_ _ 


217 i 


Cass 


1527 


2073 


107 


29.. 


1533 


2096 


88 


17.. 


1101 


1868 





211 


Champaign 
Christian 


5104 
2863 


4103 
3360 


286 


61.. 

179.. 


5106 
2878 


3387 


311 

264 


48.. 
170.. 




3220 
2461 


73 
172 


250 i 
3031 


Clark 


2418 


2686 


73 


48.. 


2418 


2707 


61 


47.. 


2120 


2356 




99 


Clay 


1714 


1655 




81.. 


1702 


1684 


40 


76.. 


1686 


1683 


o 


50 


Clinton 
Coles 
Cook 


1413 
3424 

85307 


2187 
3286 
84491 


2577 


12.. 
28.. 
303.. 


1409 
3415 

82963 


2208 

R 


48 
115 

ism 


*: 

741.. 


1097 
3125 
43266 


1969 
3054 

26887 


,j 


i 

1496 


Crawford 


1794 


2006 


24 


14.. 


1783 


2010 


as 


9.. 


1668 


1818 


15 


41 


Cumberland 


1539 




108 


15.. 


1542 


1800 


81 


12.. 


1390 


1618 


6 


144 


DeKalb 


3971 


1793 


384 


14.. 


3969 


1819 




13. 


3084 


1059 




399 


DeWitt 


2041 


1976 


108 


60.. 


2032 


2018 


93 


47.. 


1930 


1839 





104 


Douglas 


2143 


1875 


151 


53 . 


2138 


1896 


135 


35 . 


1925 


1749 


4 


103 


DuPage 


2357 


1615 


191 


3.. 


2376 


1621 


iao 


2.. 


1686 


1092 




213 


Edgar 


3107 


3169 


167 


9.. 


3103 


3188 


155 


6.. 


2903 


3069 


71 


179 




























Effingham 


1484 


2539 


88 


9.. 


1482 


2549 


80 


7.. 


1127 


1783 


2 


112 


Fayette 


2264 


2760 


102 


7.. 


2255 


2782 


93 


8.. 


2167 


2385 


2 


58 


Ford 


2113 


1208 


187 


11.. 


2117 


1S39 


169 




1612 


720 




157 


Franklin 


1613 


1704 


56 


23.. 


1616 




37 


13.. 


1449 


1637 





41 


Fulton 
Gallatin 


4948 
1380 


4965 
1801 


281 

as 


120.. 
46.. 


4945 
1374 


1813 


s 


84.. 
53.. 


4254 
1240 


4393 
1579 


192 


236 
12 


Greene 


2072 


3237 


88 


140.. 


2070 


3290 


59 


110.. 


1718 


2403 





61 


Grundy 


2164 




276 


123.. 


2157 


1531 


252 


116.. 


mm 


1997 


as 


155 




























Hancock 


3560 


3911 


229 


68 ! 


3569 


3969 


199 


&:: 


3196 


8582 


71 


173 


Hardin 


631 


769 


7 


1 


632 


766 


4 


2.. 


511 


689 




4 


Henderson 


1342 


897 


65 


16.. 


1342 


905 


61 


14.. 


1162 


770 


i 


114 


Henry 


4431 


2363 


364 


50. 


4448 


2411 


320 


30.. 


3437 


1579 


128 


287 


Iroquois 


4101 


2350 


322 


7.. 


4125 


3368 


285 


4.. 


3105 


2364 




273 


Jackson 


2725 


2790 


139 


146.. 


2688 


2874 


104 


125.. 


2368 


233tf 


229 


101 


Jasper 
Jefferson 


1554 
1981 


2105 
2378 


81 
75 


73.. 
150.. 


1540 
1973 


2130 
2424 


Z 


68.. 
126. 


1234 
1584 


1747 
2075 


23 
6 


91 
65 


Jersey 


1400 


1972 


96 


I.. 


1384 


2013 


71 


1.. 


1174 


iaso 




133 


Jo Daviess 


2728 


2719 


185 


64.. 


2720 


2763 


164 


49 . 


2411 


1991 


97 


150 




























Kane 


7572. 


4386 


582 


147.. 




4503 


531 


117.. 


4203 


1743 


1601 


663 


Kankakee 


3219 


2101 


244 


32.. 


3232 


2140 


244 


32.. 


24o4 


1546 


3 


203 


Kendall 


1809 


724 


256 


25.. 


1808 


761 




18.. 


1454 


644 


39 


228 


Knox 


5450 


2885 


277 


232.. 


5476 


2963 


225 


162.. 


4662 


2570 


209 


228! 


Lake 


2790 


1718 


209 




2787 


1728 


202 




2298 


1462 


1 


167! 


LaSalle 
Lawrence 


8006 
1635 


8313 
1609 


573 
111 


109.. 
14.. 


8044 
1635 


8349 
1620 


So 5 


88.. 
13.. 


6180 
1467 


6517 
1520 


165 


a i 

79 


Lee 


3364 


2488* 


192 





33fiO 


2525 


161 





2856 


2003 





165 


Livingston 


3914 


3691 


425 


27.. 


3947 


3719 


371 


24.. 


3267 


913 


8 


239 i 


Logan 


2604 


2919 


246 


20.. 


2612 


29,' 6 


239 


23.. 


2313 


270St 


21 


347 i 


Macon 


4084 


3789 


601 


54.. 


4074 




526 


47.. 


3500 


2941 


34 


643 i 


Macoupin 


4070 


4703 


373 


93.. 


4090 


4787 


2K7 


46.. 


3426 


8591 


462 


275 


Madison 


5485 


5175 


215 


85.. 


5429 


5262 


19* 


65.. 


5005 


4507 




249 


Marion 


2165 


2492 


172 


235.. 


2185 


254!j 


153 


287.. 


1858 


2262 


454 


271 


Marshall 


1613 


1697 


99 


7.. 


1613 


1714 


82 


6.. 


1584 


1582 




52 


Mason 


1555 


2114 


111 


16.. 


1572 


2125 


96 


7.. 


13C.3 


1886 





75 


M assac 


1430 


799 


26 




1531 


806 


19 





1382 


746 





18 


1 McDonough 


3176 


3125 


264 


69.. 


3i80 


3167 




46.. 


21)39 


2v)39 


138 


22o 


Me enry 




2002 


322 


1. 


3363 


2028 


301 


1.. 


2363 


15% 




228 




7708 


5935 


694 


35.. 


7805 


5929 


579 


21.. 


5477 


8799 


8 


652 ! 


Menard 


1292 


1648 


96 


90.. 


1308 


1679 


68 


71.. 


1153 


1596 


85 


113 


Mercer 


2349 


1804 


126 


60.. 


2347 


18* 


106 






1400 


195 


10) 


Monroe 


1237 


1698 


8 


1 . 


1198 


1738 


6 


1.1 


1033 


1855 


14 


3 


Montgomery 


2875 


3607 


268 


49.. 


2875 


364'i 


330 


43. 


2116 


8IO 


166 


247 


Morgan 


3426 


3643 


221 


87.. 


3426 


3719 


158 


67. 


3203 


H446 




1S8 1 


Moultrie 


1430 


1752 




16.. 


1454 


1764 


49 


14. 


1142 


138R 





122 


Ogle 


4135 


2255 


309 


5 . 


4149 


2290 


262 


2. 


3146 


1640 


8 




Peoria 


6677 


7476 


215 


115.. 


6691 


7473 


7110 


107. 


5491 


6396 


155 


288 


j Perry 


1616 


1661 


138 


157.. 


1641 


1700 


113 


150. 


1678 


1514 


42 


138, 


Piatt 


2174 


1939 


102 


11.. 


2173 


1951 


90 


10. 


1978 


1700 


4 


76 


! Pike 


2820 


3592 


227.- 


628.. 


2884 


3694 


156 


540. 


2599 


3414 


i;tf 


17.; 


Pope 


1646 


911 


15 


21.. 


1642 


915 


16 


23. 


1343 


584 




4 


Pulaski 


1515 


812 


43 




1506 


826 


41 




1371 


654 





7 


Putnam 


580 


516 


65 





586 


513 


58 





558 


480 


1 


76 


Randolph 


2494 


2646 


156 


102.. 


2471 


2689 


142 


98. 


2374 


2539 




158 


Richland 


1541 


1625 


86 


5.. 


1532 


1651 


73 


2. 


1371 


1586 




124 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



Harrison.Clevrland. Fisk. Streeter. 

Rock Island 4584 3644 256 87.. 

Saline 2104 1864 65 33.. 

angamon 6436 7148 681 56.. 

Schuyler 1610 1994 92 18.. 

Scott : 1125 1408 25 40.. 

Shelby 2521 3988 302 125.. 

Stark 1359 826 119 47.. 

St. Clair 5932 6188 116 700.. 

Stephenson 3484 3429 300 18.. 

Tazewell 2926 3426 126 54.. 

Union 1346 2367 49 38.. 

Vermillion 6247 4621 314 109.. 

Wabash 1084 1336 110 .. 

Warren 2708 2016 294 28.. 

Washington 1991 1747 181 31.. 

Wayne 2334 2394 37 102.. 

White... 2230 2889 70 54.. 

Whiteside 3843 2453 384 34.. 

Will. 6357 5257 312 26.. 

Williamson 2347 2019 54 72.. 

Winnebago 5086 2176 621 76.. 

Woodford... 1812 2410 165 60.. 



Fifer. Palmer. 

4552 3771 

2117 1877 

6288 7397 

1618 2018 

1117 1435 

2539 4056 

1369 872 

5855 6223 

3481 3450 



1314 2434 

4697 



Harts. Ji 

222 ; 

37 ; 

570 



728. 
17. 



271S 

1976 1773 

2325 2424 

2236 2904 

3836 2514 

6322 5339 

2343 2058 

5083 2322 

1824 2440 



253 
105 
107 
280 
121 



274 80. 

97 .. 

255 16. , 

167 30. 

28 105., 

61 44., 

337 12. . 

272 20. , 

42 58. 
59. 



45. 



Tanner. 

3623 
1847 
5245 
1376 
1090 
1546 
1233 
4552 
2992 
2692 
1016 
5100 
1076 
2428 
1907 
2239 
1536 
2528 
5318 
2317 
2576 
1379 



Rickcr.Budlong. Austin 

2160 1465 199 



1701 

5952 

1796 

1296 

2VT9 
785 

4395 1760 

2865 - 283 

3010 25 137 

1757 110 4 
16 292 
38 



32 
567 

2 55 
15 22 

- 430 
22 134 



3700 
1262 



1818 42 333 
1fi89 
8 



237 1 
2327 

1167 

4262 222 
1110 



1808 - 



15 

124 
25 503 

142 

16 7 
577 934 

171 



Total 370473 348378 21695 

Plurality 22195 

Percent. 49.55 46.58 2.81 . 

Scattering 140 

Total vote :... 747676 

VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS, 1888. 

Lieut-Gov. Lyman B. Ray, Rep 371,166 

A. J. Bell, Dem 348,221 

Joseph L. Whitlock, Pro 21,075 

John M. Foley, Lab 7,499 

Sec. of State Isaac N. Pearson, Rep 371,773 

N. D. Ricks, Dem 346,478 

J.R. Hanna, Pro 21,461 

L. W. Robertson, Lab 7,685 

Auditor C. W . Pavey, Reo 370,492 

Andrew Welch, Dem 347,666 

Uriah Copps, Pro 21,319 

G. W. Collins, La> 7,645 

Treasurer Chas. Becker, Pep 369,881 

F. A. Hoffman, Dem 348,866 

J. W. Harts.Pro 21,416 

N. Barnett, Lab 7,441 

AtVy- Gen'lGeo. Hunt, Rep 371,294 

J. B. Creighton.Dem 347,168 

F E. Andrews, Pro 21,423 

John M. Dill, tab 7.772 

The Banking Law For 380,945 

Against 130,772 

Trustees of State University elected were: 

Alexander McLean, Francis McKay, Samuel A- 

Ballard, and Oliver A. Harker,all Republicans. 

FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 



7090. . 367860 355313 18915 

.. 12547 
.95.. 49.15 47.60 2.52 

748452 



363..27f)680 240864 35832 19766 

.. 35816 
.85.. 48.41 42.01 6.25 3.25 

573181 



1st Dis*. Abner Taylor, Rep 

J. F. Todd, Dem 22,697 

H. S Taylor, Pro 981 

T. L. Laramie, Lab 145 

Id Dist.D F. Gleason, Rep and U. L. . .12,969 

Frank Lawler, Dem 19,051 

F J. Sibley, Pro 142 

3d Dist. W. E Mason, Rep 23,671 

M. R. Freshwater, Dem 21,295 

G. G Davis,P,o 734 

F. Stauber, U. L 937 

4thDist.-Geo E. Adams, Rep 22,273 

J R. Taylor, Dem 19,755 

L. D Rogers, Pro and Lab 353 

H D.Loyd, U. L 39 

5th Dist. Albert J . Hopkins, Rep 20,077 

James Herrington, Dem 10,018 

J.M. Strong, Pro 1,765 

6th Disk-Robert H. Hitt, Rep 18,139 

R. M. Cook, Dem 11,903 

Geo. Richardson, Pro 1,659 

7th Dis'. T. J Henderson, R p 16,380 

O . G. Lovejoy, Dem 1 1 ,341 

A. M. Hansen,Pro 1,185 

8thDist.-C A. Hi]l,J?ep 20,596 

L. W. Brown, Dem 17,454 



J. L.Reber.Pro 1,661 

J McLauchian, U. L 324 

BthDist. L E. Payson,7?ep ...16,871 

H. W. Snow, Dem 14,490 

M. C. Smith, Pro 1,345 

R. E Wiley, Lab 74 

10th Dist. P. S. Post, Rep 18,824 

N. E. Worthington, Dem 16,166 

J. H. Sedgwick.JLaft 804 

1th Dist.W . H . Gest, Rep 19,657 

W. H Prentiss, Dem.andLab 17,580 

J. W. Mcln tosh, Pro 1,109 

12th Dist. W. H. Collins, Rei> 16,628 

Scott Wike, Dem 21,938 

J. H.Rives.P o 905 

L. N. Wise, U. L 1,106 

13th Dist. Charies Kerr, Rep 18,450 

W. M. Springer, Dem 21,364 

L. Llnny, Pro 1,520 

John Alsburg.I/aft 260 

14th Dist. J. H. Rowel 1, Hep 18,570 

B. Stewart, Dem. and U. L 16,740 

A. F. Smith, Pro 1,745 

l:thDist.J. G. Cannon. R p 19,897 

R. L.McKinley,Dem 17,204 

J. A. Sheldun, Pro 1,095 

A. C. Barton, U.I, . 189 

16t Dist. Edwin Harlan, Re > 17,037 

Geo. Fithian, Dem 17,742 

H.Johnson, Pro 684 

F. Ratcliffe, U. L 315 

17th Dist.J. J. Brown, / ep 14,775 

Edw. Lane, Dem 19,385 

J. L. Douthill, Pro 1,187 

18th Dist. Jehu Baker. Rep 16,151 

W. S. Forman, Dem 16,167 

W. W. Edwards, Pr ... . 652 

G. Wickline, U. L . 926 

19th DM,. W. L. Criin. Rep 15,615 

R. W. Townsend, Dem 18,086 

C. Rohrbaugh, Pr 425 

20t7iDtst.-G. W. Smith. Rep 19,005 

F. F. Robinson, Dem and U. L 17,186 

J. C. McReynolds, Pro 667 



Republicans... 

Democrats 

Labor 

Prohibition'ts.. 
Independents.. 
Greenback 



LEGISLATIVE. 

,-1889-90 , 1887-8 . 

Sen. Ho.J.Bal. Sen. Ho. J.Bal. 



72 



115. 



78 110 
64 81 



ELECTION RETURNS. 99 


ILLIK 

ADAMS COUNTY. 
Rep. Dem.Pro.Lab 

Harrison. Clevel'd. Fisk. Str'ter 

Beverly 134 83 4 
Burton 109 182 9 - 
Camp Point.. 224 177 13 6 
Clayton 276 176 9 9 
Columbus.... 85 142. 2 3 
Concord 84 151 3 3 
Ellington.... 141 147 5 
Fall Creek... 73 151 
Gilmer 109 153 5 
Honey Creek 138 184 5 4 
Houston 84 105 17 14 
Keene 138 153 3 22 
Liberty 136 192 5 
Lima 112 182 12 


OIS BY COUNTIES AND T 
Rep. Dem. Pro. Lab 

Harrison.Cleve'd.Fisk.Str'ter 

Zion 74 59 19 2 


3WNS. 

Rep. Dem. Pro.Lab 

Harrison.Cleve'd.Fisk.Str'ter 

Shannon 120 112 9 
Washington .92 54 6 
Woodland... 136 53 11 
Wysox.. 254 54 25 1 


Total 1685 1276 212 8 
Plurality 409 
BOONE COUNTY. 
BELVIDKRE.... 776 245 72 4 
Bonus 167 53 24 
Boone 298 31 23 
Caledonia.... 217 53 3 3 
Flora 157 32 17 2 
Leroy 160 17 17 
Manchester.. 194 12 6 4 
Spring 131 52 13 - 


York 242 105 8 - 


Total 2644 1329 169 1 
Plurality 1315 

CASS COUNTY. 
Arenzville... 97 175 1 
Ashland 154 177 20 1 
E.Beftrdsto'n 178 153 4 3 
W " 374 437 9 7 
Bluff Springs 68 83 1 2 
Chandl'rville 117 188 5 5 
Hickory 38 62 11 2 
Indian Creek 27 63 - 
Monroe 23 61 3 1 
Oregon 68 110 1 
Philadelphia 54 86 3 
Princeton 39 42 8 
Richmond 56 144 1 5 
Virginia 234 292 41 2 
Total . 1528 2072 106 29 


Total 2100 495 175 13 
Plurality 1605 
BROWN COUNTY. 
Buckhorn.... 61 169 1 23 
Coopersto'n . 116 168 8 41 
Elkhorn 62 186 4 51 
Lee 10o 170 9 6 


McKee 126 130 1 
Melrose 138 302 9 - 
Mendon 190 185 16 1 
Northeast.... 181 123 14 
Payson 183 241 16 

,cYW; d i :li 4 m ,o , 

" 3. 183 215 10 
" 4. 135 174 13 1 
" 5. 154 145 9 
" 6. 152 229 5 
" 7. 114 227 3 1 
" " 8. 120 146 3 
" 9. 244 258 3 
" 10. 253 143 1 1 
" 11. 215 125 4 - 
" 12. 129 369 10 4 
" 13. 161 201 12 1 
" 14. 156 237 8 
" 15. 166 283 5 
" 16. 114 365 4 


Missouri 71 126 11 1 
Mt. Sterling.. 198 435 22 17 
Pea Ridge.... 80 160 13 
Ripley ..77 22 8 15 
Versailles!... 177 180 9 45 


Plurality 544 
CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. 

Ayers 83 40 


Total 945 1616 73 202 


Plurality 761 
BUREAU COUNTY. 
Arispie 103 149 3 1 
Berlin 145 110 17 
Bureau 87 105 6 


Brown 145 115 30 - 
Champaign.. 749 582 59 15 
Co If ax 73 159 2 


Compromise. 146 142 14 5 


Clarion 109 37 2 


Concord 369 254 31 10 
Dover 195 81 13 - 
Fairneld 83 89 7 - 
Gold 53 64 1 3 
Greenville... 121 97 
Hall 412 614 8 73 


Crittenden... 73 142 6 
East Bend 141 92 8 


Totai city.. 2608 3471 114 11 


Harwood 101 78 9 


Richfield.. .. 106 157 11 
Riverside ... 545 181 12 
Ursa 146 228 2 - 


Hensley...... 100 38 5 1 
Homer 321 82 1 


Kerr 56 24 


Indiantown.. 193 129 5 
Lamoille 186 101 41 
Leepertown. 38 50 3 
Macon 105 62 1 
Maniius 89 86 5 2 
Milo - 117 87 3 


Total ..6088 7196 287 73 


Mahomet.... 164 114 30 1 
Newcomb 115 92 7 
Ogden 186 134 6 2 


Plurality.. .. 1108 
ALEXANDER COUNTY. 

Beech Ridge. 66 17 
CAIRO Ward 1. 166 243 3 
" 2. 166 257 3 6 
" 3. 357 123 9 
" 4. 273 229 14 
" 5. 301 172 2 23 


Pesotum 98 135 6 
Philo 176 145 12 
Rantoul 312 242 30 11 
Raymond 134 121 6 1 
Sadorus 170 232 6 1 
St. Joseph.... 236 126 18 2 
Sidney 219 163 5 4 
Scott 116 134 7 
Somer 144 92 2 9 
Stanton 90 105 13 2 
Tolono 200 202 10 2 
Urbana 526 388 34 " 4 


Mineral 113 81 3 - 
Neponset.... 183 95 23 
Ohio 152 116 12 
Princeton.... 589 394 76 8 
Selby 119 170 5 36 


Walnut 180 126 20 1 
Westfield.... 73 206 


Total city.. 1263 1024 5 54 


Clear Creek.. 54 49 
E.CapeGrdu 52 45 - - 
Elco 114 114 3 


Wheatland.. 60 36 1 
Wyanet 196 148 16 1 
Total 4070 3487 301 135 


Goose Isle... 86 71 1 
L. Milligan... 31 32 1 
Sandusky.... 101 51 16 
Santa Fe 31 40 
Thebes 115 44 
Unity 101 57 3 1 


Plurality 583 
CALHOUN COUNTY. 
Bellevue 115 109 2 7 
Carlin 25 48 - 27 
Crader 42 90 


Total 5104 4103 353 61 
Plurality ....1001 

CHRISTIAN COUNTY. 

Assumption .172 264 23 12 
Bear Creek.. 122 154 8 20 
Buckhart .... 222 304 25 7 ; 
Greenwood .. 130 99 6 3 
Johnson 76 128 6 7 
King 93 112 7 1 
Locust 112 137 18 36 
Mosquito 116 207 5 
Mt. Auburn.. 142 221 2 


Total 2014 1544 8 77 
Plurality 

BOND COUNTY. 

Beaver Cr'k.. 152 46 26 
Fairview 66 59 6 
Gilham 24 125 - 


Gilead 63 69 
Hamburg.... 80 126 8 
Hardin 77 103 1 - 
Point 112 2321 
Richwoods... 75 161 1 


Total 589 938 12 35 


Plurality 352 
CARROLL COUNTY. 
Cherry Grove 97 84 5 
Elkh'rn Grve 107 35 - 
Kairhaven.... 188 74 3 
Freedom 82 44 9 
Lima 55 24 1 
Mt.Carroll. .. 416 199 42 
Rock Creek.. 350 171 24 
Salem 125 53 10 - 
javanna 380 267 16 - 


Greenville... 440 220 36 1 
LaGrange ... 116 44 17 
Millersburg.. 104 76 
Mulb'y Gr've 94 102 26 - 
Okaw 89 92 8 - 
Pocahontas.. 122 89 16 - 
Reno 78 69 21 


Pana 517 521 61 18 
Prairieton... 105 130 85 
Ricks 165 198 31 
Rosemond... 125 91 26 12 
South Fork.. 161 197 2 
Stonington .. 122 142 5 8 
Taylorsville . 377 387 44 39 


Ripley 94 122 - 
Smittiboro.... 104 63 14 5 
Sorento 128 110 23 - 


Total 2863 3360 286 179 
Plurality 497 



100 CHICAGO 


DAILY NEWS ALMANAC 


FOR 1890. 


CLARK COUNTY. 
Rep. Dem.ProLali 

Hairuon.Utvc'd.FUkStr'Ur 

Anderson.... 107 192 


Rep.DemPro. U.L.* 

Stree-Cow- 
Harrion.ClT'rt Fisk. ter. drry. 

Cal'met.l. 180 159 11 


Rep.DemPro. U.L.* 

IfcwQM 

Harriw.ClT'd.Plik. Mr. drj 

Total... 6318 4828 172 80 4 


Auburn 61 90 
Casey 274 229 7 2 


" P 3. 96 166 


Jeffer'n 1. 245 95 6 1 - 


Darwin 147 125 


" P 4. 110 36 12 1 




Dolson 109 199 8 


" P5. 226 118 32- 




Douglas 17 97 1 


" P6. 93 47 5 


44 P 5. 69 30 12 


Johnson 108 144 2 23 


Total.... stfi 569 (-4 3 - 


44 P 6. 117 158 8 - 8 




CHICAGO 1. 3A*> awW 37 5 5 


Jeffer'a7. 175 132 18 9 


Melrose 145 130 4 6 


" W 2. 3183 2290 46 7 3 


Total... 952 69 76 7 I 


Orange... .. 115 145 3 


44 W 3. 3156 2143 48 4 8 




Parker 57 108 4 


" W 4. 3044 1982 81 16 1 




Wabash 335 379 2 12 
Westfleld.... 151 104 33 
York 172 133 3 4 


" W 5. 2070 3425 48 CO 13 
" W 6. 2006 3117 3 24 4 
W 7. 1766 2624 7 21 4 


P 3. 39 157 1 
P 4. 114 191 1 
P 5 152 192 14 


Total . 2418 2686 73 48 




P 6. 94 234 


Plurality 268 
CLAY COUNTY. 
Bible Grove. 96 126 2 
Blair 108 90 
Clay City 180 163 5 
Harter 364 286 11 2 


" W 10. 2038 2176 44 24 13 
44 W 11. 3761 2698 148 13 2 
44 W 12 5264 2992 266 6 2 
44 W 13. 3194 2680 74 18 4 
* W 14. 2157 1683 67 67 1 
44 W 15. 1854 1982 76 18 1 


P 7. 141 164 4 

P 8. 158 268 4 
P 9. 122 250 
P10. 163 226 15 1 
P 11. 158 305 51 
P12. 161 104 29 1 


Hoosier 138 95 1 
Larkinsburg. 151 89 7 6 
Louisville.... 180 149 2 - 
Oskaloosa.... 59 158 6 
Pizley... ... 137 186 14 3 


44 W 16. 2302 3507 30 59 21 
44 W 17. 1515 1991 21 6 
" W 18. 2759 2979 54 34 4 
" W 19. 230 4712 21 40 3 
44 W 20. 1605 1340 38 4 6 


P 13. 194 311 88 
P14. 273 157 20 
P15. 2C8 244 9 
P 16. 332 277 21 
P17. 291 147 11 


Songer 56 102 19 


" W 21. 2034 2557 32 27 1 


P 18. 416 214 26 


Stanford ... 157 109 6 1 
Xenia 89 103 2 42 


44 W 22. 2051 2576 16 27 10 
44 W 23. 2503 28(3 59 30 6 


P 19. 343 216 23 1 
P 20. 283 107 12 
P 21 172 208 2 


Total 1714 1656 48 8] 


* W 24. 3068 3934 66 12 9 




Plurality 58 


Totalc..6UlU2 63706 1308 255 126 


P23. 119 231 2 


CLINTON COUNTY. 
Aviston 22 125 1 
Breese 96 278 1 
Brookside.... 103 64 1 
Carlyle 147 302 12 


Cicero.. 1. 141 254 42 
44 P 2. 186 134 22 5 - 
* 4 P 3. 382 182 29 1 
P 4. 67 26 6 
" P 5. 203 44 28 


P24. 51 115 
P25. 96 113 
P26. 87 64 1 
P 27. 90 287 73 
P28. 71 177 3 


Clement 86 54 14 
Damiansville 16 119 
East Fork.... 84 57 2 
Germantown 6 JfiB 


" P 6. 294 81 40 
44 P 7. 27 19 
P 8. 94 28 
44 P 9. 131 245 1 


P29. 47 225 
P30. 45 186 1 
P31. 126 278 1 
P32. 143 244 72 


Irishtown.... 87 92 11 
Lake 6^ 60 3 


Total.... 1525 1013 130 7 1 


44 P34. 279 158 29 


Meridian 93 82 3 


ElkGr've 136 22 
Ev'st'n 1. 355 168 , 41 


Total... 5539 6749 268 8 5 


Santa Fe 16 84 1 
St. Rose 104 134 1 
Trenton 196 176 6 
Wade ..57 93 


4 - P 2. 299 131 97 
4 * P 3. 224 73 26 
44 P 4. 279 158 10 
44 P 5. 171 154 20 - - 


L.View 1. 521 639 8 1 
44 W 2. 448 324 12 
" W 3. 538 399 15 1 
" W 4. 561 581 15 3 


Wheatfleld.. 116 81 1 


Total.... 1328 684 194 - 


W 5. 406 289 5 - - 


Total 1413 2187 57 - 
Plurality 774 


Hanover. 146 50 17 


44 W 7. 447 315 37 


COLES COUNTY 


44 P 2 389 321 53 


Total . . . 3;0 3035 94 18 2 


Ash more 289 166 28 
Charleston... 556 590 20 13 
E.Oakland.. 272 224 15 


44 P 3. 194 165 82 
P 4. 422 216 20 
" P 5. 363 110 5 


Lemontl. 273 443 16 
" P 2. 46 92 2 
44 P 3. 19 4; 3 


Hutton 222 238 24 


44 P 7. 282 177 8 


Total... 338 582 21 


Lafayette.... 149 167 1 
Mattoon 939 751 43 11 
Morgan 88 179 


44 P S\ 123 118 8 
44 P 9. 239 143 14 1 
44 P10. 2B3 239 131 


Leyden,!. 61 16 
" P2. 89 57 


N. Okaw 160 279 
Paradise 163 76 4 
Pleasant Grv 268 162 8 
Sev'nHick'ry 162 200 6 


H P 11 . 122 81 41 
44 P12. 185 189 7 31 1 
P 13. 102 233 24- 
44 P14. 127 137 7 


Lyons . 1. 230 110 25 
P 2. 72 64 
44 P 3. 55 31 


Total 3424 3286 155 % 




44 P 4. 49 51 


Plurality 138 




44 P 5. 58 10 20 




" P 18 125 116 1 


Total... 464 266 45 - 


Rep. Dem Pro. U.L.* 

Stree-Cow- 


4 - P 19. 160 204 54 
44 P20. 188 213 3 1 


Maine . 1. 152 110 12 
P 2. 173 61 7 - - 


Bar'nirt'n 233 38 16 


44 P21. 143 32 
44 P 22 331 339 11 1 


Total... 325 171 19 - 


B100K...1. 87 71 6 
44 P 2. 78 31 71- 


" P 23. 200 156 1 
44 P 24. 55 78 


N. Trier 1. 150 92 10 
' P 2. 135 187 12 - 


Total... 165 102 13 1 - 


44 P 25. 257 237 4 


Total ... 285 279 22 - 


Bremen,!. 88 34 
" P 2. 93 41 2 


44 P27. 261 117 12 
44 P 28. 184 223 -8 1 1 


Niles.Pl. 172 116 
P 2. 83 36 5 


Total... 181 75 2 - 


14 P 29. 171 GO 8 


Total... 255 152 3 



ELECTION RETURNS. 101 


Rep.DcmPro. U.L.* 

Stree-Cow- 
Hrri9on.CleT'd. Fik ter. dre j 

N'rthf'dl. 115 40 
P 2. 81 61 8 


DE WITT COUNTY. 
Rep. Dem.PrnLab 

HarrisoQ.Cleve'd.FukStr'ter 

Barnett 100 169 12 1 
Cltntonia 518 296 18 8 


Summit 75 118 8 - 
Teutopolis... 8 201 
Union 80 91 2 
Watson 122 129 3 4 
West 65 135 - - 


N'rdPkl. 107 31 3 
" P 2. 73 29 - 


DeWitt 127 103 1 1 
Harp 103 108 5 17 


Total 1484 2539 88 9 
Plurality 1055 

FAYETTE COUNTY. 
Avena 194 132 4 
Bear Grove.. 76 161 13 
Bowl'gGreen 125 187 2 - 
Hurricane.... 46 316 7 
Kaskaskia ... 122 63 7 
Laclede 178 90 28 3 
Lone Grove.. 66 122 1 


Nixon 129 116 1 7 


Total ... 180 60 3 
Orland.... 156 42 13 
Palatine. 275 89 14 2 - 
Palos 107 88 
Proviso.l. 276 86 18 
" P 2. 154 204 15 
' ' P 3. 57 14 


Rutledge 56 84 7 - 
Santa Anna.. 356 171 25 
Texas 98 106 2 7 
Tunbridge.... 119 248 9 
Wapella 98 190 17 - 
Waynesville. 130 158 5 - 
Wilson 102 64 2 




Total 2042 1976 108 60 
Plurality 66 

DOUGLAS COUNTY. 
Arcola 369 415 17 1 
Bourbon 149 201 10 3 
Bowdre 165 252 14 2 
Camargo 157 157 30 20 
Garrett 253 202 7 - 
Murdock 112 96 23 1 
Newman 305 124 12 1 


Total ... 547 315 37 2 - 


Otego 125 111 2 


Rich 139 87 4 
Riverside 105 58 1 
Sch'mb'g. 100 53 
Th nt'n 1. 154 31 1 
' P 2. 156 72 
4 P 3. 19 41 
' P 4. 67 40 1 - 
' P 5. 60 45 4 - - 


Pope 36 90 


Ramsey 154 307 7 
Sefton 209 82 5 
Seminary.... 66 176 4 
Sharon 179 172 6 - 
Vand'a, Istd 151 128 5 - 
2d d 217 188 7 1 
Wheatland... 95 107 7 


Total ... 456 229 6 - 


Wilberton ... 105 119 


W'eel'gl. 174 148 21 
P 2. 77 59 2 


Tuscola.'.i '.'.'.'. 455 321 32 - 


Total 2264 2760 102 8 
Plurality... 496 
FORD COUNTY. 
Brenton 136 135 22 2 


Total... 251 207 23 - 


Plurality 258 

DU PAGE COUNTY. 
Addison 180 119 3 - 
Bloorningd'le 111 135 3 
Downer's Gv 547 238 28 
Lisle 188 177 36 


Worth.... 325 198 61- 


T'l towns.25205 20785 1269 48 14 
Grand T' 1.85307 84491 2577 303 140 
Plurality. 816 
*Streeter, Union Labor; Cow- 
drey, Unttet La'jor. 
CRAWFORD COUNTY. 
Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Harrison.CleveM.FUkStr'ter 

Honey Creek 183 284 4 - 


Dix 166 119 7 4 
Drummer.... 385 i75 29 3 
Lyman 16* 105 11 
Mona 68 71 13 - 
Patton. 502 195 68 


Milton 322 247 59 3 
Naperville... 277 213 35 - 
Wayne 124. 80 11 - 
Winfleld 320 241 12 - 
York 288 165 4 - 


Peach Orch'd 137 52 5 
Pella 82 71 5 2 


Rogers 101 67 7 
Sullivarit 121 104 15 - 


Lamotte 276 207 3 1 
Licking 176 252 
Martin 85 202 1 - 
Montgomery 151 269 3 
Oblong 206 227 7 4 


Total 2357 1615 191 3 
Plurality.... 742 
EDGAR COUNTY. 
Bruilletts Ck 154 163 1 - 
Buck 64 170 6 


Wall 95 70 


Total 2113 1208 187 11 
Plurality... 905 . 
FRANKLIN COUNTY. 
Barren 43 102 6 
Benton 191 304 9 
Browning.... 118 135 1 
Cave 305 110 7 3 
Denning 87 149 2 
Eastern 184 143 5 
Ewing 98 181 12 13 
Frankfort.... 220 98 2 - 
Goode .. 63 77 3 
Northern 153 136 5 2 
Six Mile 60 109 2 - 
Tyrone 91 160 7 


Robinson.... 374 284 14 9 
Southwest.... 43 24 


Edgar 205 187 13 2 


Elbridge 199 175 3 1 


Total 1784 2000 38 14 


Embarrass .. 148 260 6 
Grand View.. Ill 294 7 
Hunter 89 168 8 - 
Kansas 262 161 26 - 
Paris 829 615 46 3 
Prairie 147 97 8 - 
Ross 211 143 24 


Plurality 216 
CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 
Crook'd Cr'k. 202 73 6 - 
Cottonwood . 132 208 3 
Greenup 283 283 47 - 


Spring Point. 84 259 2 
Sumpter 212 283 16 
Union 136 337 18 8 
Woodbury.... 97 151 32 


Shiloh 145 147 5 
Stratton 238 78 10 


Simms 113 283 - 
Yng America 192 228 3 3 


Total 1613 1704 56 23 
Plurality... 91 
FULTON COUNTY. 
Astoria 228 310 21 1 
Banner 117 111 4 


Total 1539 1776 108 15 
Plurality 237 
DE KALB COUNTY. 
Afton 82 84 7 


Total 3107 3169 167 9 
Plurality 62 
EDWARDS COUNTY. 
Albion 402 88 12 
Bone Gap ... 115 55 23 - 
Brown's 148 39 3 - 
Dixon 116 35 1 - 


Bernadotte.. 95 185 12 
Buckheart... 331 121 6 18 
Canton. .866 697 65 16 


Clinton 189 77 28 
Cortland 192 78 16 


Cass 115 196 15 3 
Deerfleld 87 128 6 - 
Ellisville 106 41 2 1 
Fairview 171 171 6 3 
Farmers 117 161 17 


Franklin 217 66 18 - 
Genoa . . 222 77 29 


French Cr'k. 211 104 1 - 
Salem 215 142 8 
Shelby 94 185 9 - 


Kingston .... 221 53 8 - 


Malta 160 72 13 - 
Mayfield 121 39 20 - 
Milan 97 60 17 - 


Total 1301 648 57 - 
Plurality 653 
EFFINGHAM COUNTY. 
Banner 44 87 3 
Bishop .... 61 147 2 


Farmington.. 330 321 5 2 
Harris 116 172 2 - 
Isabel 106 89 1 


Paw Paw 130 48 5 - 
Pierce 73 97 2 
Shabbona.... 232 72 18 6 
fomonauk... 532 279 75 8 
outh Grove. 104 48 10 
Squaw Grove 176 105 23 - 
Sycamore.... 598 248 50 
Victor 107 44 11 


Joshua 121 160 - 
Kerton. . 60 79 1 


Douglas 303 568 15 
Jackson 97 158 7 - 
Liberty 72 92 6 3 


Lee 124 90 5 


Lewistown... 476 283 28 
Liverpool.... 113 178 8 
Orion 126 161 1 - 
Pleasant 153 243 22 22 
Putnam 228 241 9 39 


Lucas 119 54 4 1 
Mason 164 203 10 
Moccasin .... 75 126 8 1 


Total 3971 1793 384 14iMound 152 296 17 
Plurality 1178 J St. Francis.. 47 134 3 - 


Union 211 163 4 
Vermont 286 205 31 1 



102 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR isgo. 


Rep. Dem. ProLal 

Harriioi.Cleve'd.FiakStr'te 

Waterford.... 57 61 1 
Woodland.... 140 207 10 - 
Y'ng Hickory 126 131 3 - 


Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Harrison.Cleve'd.FUkStr'tei 

La Harpe.... 234 213 5 10 
Montebello. 281 183 6 6 
Pilot Grove. 116 158 16 - 
Pontoosuc... 71 8 3 2 
Nauvoo 102 207 4 
Prairie 118 119 13 3 
Rock Creek. 114 147 21 4 
Rocky Run... 79 72 2 - 
Sonora 105 144 5 12 


Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Harrison. Cleve'd-FiskStr'ter 

Douglas 223 213 26 
(Fountain C'k 82 82 3 
Iroquois 71 112 5 


Total 4948 49(53 281 120 
Plurality... 15 

GALLATIN COUNTY. 
Asbury 58 17L 3 
Bear Creek .. 100 262 2 - 
Bowlesville.. 52 79 - 
Eagle Creek.. 130 88 4 3 
Equality 160 199 11 33 
Junct'n City., 104 98 1 
New Haven.. 91 86 - 
Kidseway 160 **% 5 


Lovejoy 132 67 13 
Martin ton.... 127 114 1 2 
Middleport... 313 291 17 2 
Milford 263 178 17 
Milk's Grove. 66 66 2 
Onarga 1 Dis. 124 55 34 
" 2d Dis. 182 74 39 - 
Papineau 162 79 1 
Pigeon Grove 123 103 
Prairie Gr'n.. 143 58 16 
Ridgeland.... 75 78 26 


St. Albans.... 141 159 17 
St. Marys 150 189 28 1 
Walker 129 186 - 
Warsaw 341 293 2 
Wilcox 53 74 - 


Wythe.... ; .. 12t5 97 3 1 


Saline....'.'.'.'. 84 63 - - 
Shawneet'n.. 301 319 18 7 
Wabash 


Total 35b9 3911 229 68 
Plurality... 342 
HARDIN COUNTY. 
Battery Rock 93 56 


Sheldon 225 165 30 
Stockland.... 114 95 6 - 


Total 4101 3350 322 7 
Plurality... 751 

JACKSON COUNTY. 
Bradley 156 314 26 3 
< arbondale .. 508 286 26 1 
Degognia 96 109 
De Soto 151 135 10 28 


Waltonboro.. 46 82 
White Oak... 94 99 3 - 


Total.. ..1380 1771 35 46 
Plurality... 391 
GREENE COUNTY. 


McFarland... 116 139 4 
Monroe 161 188 1 
Rock Creek.. 65 179 1 
Rose Clare... 135 60 1 - 


Bluffdale 90 170 1 
Carrol Iton.... 300 429 27 
Kane 142 oUO 8 


Total 631 769 7 1 
Plurality... 138 
HENDERSON COUNTY. 
BaldBluff.... 68 68 4 5 
Bedford 104 118 4 


Elk 84 57 3 
Fount'n Bluff 43 95 
Grand Tower 192 126 8 
Kinkaid 35 106 3 
Levan 81 126 10 2 
Makanda 220 189 2 1 
Murphysboro 524 568 23 53 
Ora 134 169 7 36 


iLinder 100 106 3 - 
Patterson.... 69 2HO - 4 
Rockbridge... 338 248 17 - 
Roodhouse.. 256 475 7 69 


Biggsville.... 181 89 12 1 
Carman 61 441 
Dallas 23 17 - 
Greenville.... 177 69 5 
Honey Creek 80 53 2 1 
Olena 98 65 6 2 


Walkerville.. 74 197 4 - 
White Hall.. 331 377 13 54 
Woodville... 80 162 
Wrightsville. 93 157 4 8 


Pomona 151 185 3 3 
Ridge 64 65 2 1 


Somerset 168 163 3 11 
Vergennes... 118 97 13 7 


Oquawka 191 120 5 3 
S.Henderson 96 106 11 
Terre Haute. 130 70 9 3 
Waln't Grove 86 33 6 
Warren 47 45 1 


Total 2072 3237 88 140 
Plurality... 1165 
GRUNDY COUNTY. 


Total 2725 2790 139 146 
Plurality... 65 
JASPER COUNTY. 
Crooked Cr'k. 216 309 7 4 
Fox 81 123 4 
Granville .... 230 121 1 19 
Grove 98 159 1 3 
Muddy 245 308 18 10 
Smallwood... 124 136 11 1 
St. Marie 65 194 2 1 
Wade 328 478 33 21 


Au Sable 91 105 17 - 
Braceville... 453 259 43 90 
Errenna 29 28 - - 
Felix 158 102 5 2 


rotal 1342 897 65 16 
Plurality... 445 
HENRY COUNTY. 
Alba 39 43 


Goodfarm.... 103 65 5 
Greenfield.... 222 100 54 1 
Highland 45 148 - 
Mazon 1T8 86 45 


Andover 217 39 14 - 
Annawan 137 74 7 
Atkinson 123 110 9 6 
Burns 80 99 10 - 
Cambridge... 310 99 18 2 
Clover 168 97 28 - 
Colona ... 96 81 


Morris 399 370 66 17 


Willow Hill.. 167 277 4 4 


Nettle Creek. 132 21 1 
Gorman 45 47 2 
Saratoga 149 24 12 12 
Vienna... 96 105 28 1 
Wauponsee.. 104 48 7 


Total 1554 2105 81 73 
Plurality... 551 

JEFFERSON COUNTY. 
BaldHill 95 86 3 
Blissville 74 127 - - 
Cassner 84 137 4 1 
Dodds 106 97 10 18 


Cornwall 75 44 7 1 
Edford 82 64 2 


Total 2164 1508 276 123 
Plurality... 656 
HAMILTON COUNTY. 
Beaver Creek 57 166 1 7 
Crook 66 232 1 
Crouch 126 206 1 14 


Geneseo 587 317 37 8 
Hanna 86 40 1 2 
Kewanee 789 446 80 
Loraine 78 25 
Lynn .. 150 19 2 


Elk Prairie.. 80 139 6 
Farrington... 97 94 4 1 
Field 95 132 - 
GrandPrairie 101 55 2 3 
McCIellan.... 54 175 
Moore's Pr'ie 130 106 - 9 
Mt. Vernon.. 418 533 32 35 
Pendleton... 147 147 11 
Rome 143 126 1 9 
Shiloh 133 148 3 1 
Spring G'rd'n 115 128 9 61 
Webber 109 138 6 3 


Munson 124 57 3 - 
Osco 126 62 6 
Oxford 112 69 23 2 
Phoenix 70 67 1 
Weller 160 103 12 12 


Dahlgren .... 165 262 6 7 
Flannigan.... 222 207 1 10 
KnighfsP'rie 175 138 5 2 
Mayberry .... 159 231 3 3 
M'Leansboro 253 325 14 2 
Twigg 238 240 - 4 


Western 211 80 18 3 
Wethersfl eld 130 82 37 - 
Yorktown.... 102 32 3 
Total .4431 2364 364 49 
Plurality... 2067 
IROQUOIS COUNTY. 
Artesia 186 176 5 2 
Ash Grove... 182 115 - 
Ashkum 117 213 13 - 
Beaver 207 98 - 


Total 1461 2007 32 49 
Plurality... 546 
HANCOCK COUNTY. 
Appanoose... 35 112 1 10 
Augusta 296 174 13 5 
Bear Creek... 77 142 7 - 
Carthage 295 325 , 31 - 
Chili . 177 129 13 2 


Total 1981 2378 75 150 
Plurality... 397 
JERSEY COUNTY. 
Elsah 85 146 9 - 
English 58 206 4 
Fidelity 91 174 8 1 
lersey 369 648 32 
Mississippi... 107 137 13 
Otter Creek.. 162 104 5 
Piaa 108 161 4 


Dallas City... 125 153 3 - 
Durham 86 104 14 5 
F't'n Green.. 142 143 8 
Hancock 96 113 6 4 
Harmony.... 80 177 12 


Belmont 188 109 6 
Chebanse .... 235 230 19 
Concord 146 133 21 
Jrescent 98 132 4 1 
Danforth 120 191 12 - 


Quarry 160 134 6 



ELECTION RETURNS. 1C3 


Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Hamson. CleTe'cLFiskStr'ler 

Richwoods... 102 124 9 - 
Rosedale 98 43 1 - 
Ruyle 62 95 5 - 


Rep. Dem, ProLab 

Harrwon.Cleve'd.FiskStr'ter 

St.Anne 160 92 2 
Sumner 62 91 12 
Yellowhead.. 229 74 32 


Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Hurigou.Cleve'd.FiskStr'ter 

Farm Ridge.. 125 125 16 - 
Freedom 169 98 5 
Gr'nd Rapids 77 86 7 
Groveland... 177 151 17 2 
Hope "... 157 96 23 5 
LaSalle 717 1113 26 31 
Manlius 253 255 47 19 
Mendota 470 446 21 7 
Meriden 103 73 12 2 
Miller 125 66 5 
Mission 225 46 21 2 


Total 1400 1072 96 1 
Plurality... 572 

JO DAVIESS COUNTY. 
Apple River.. 96 105 21 
Berreman.... 63 48 1 
Council Hill.. 83 24 2 - 
Derinda 71 84 
Dunleith 122 161 - 15 
E. Galena.... 157 252 5 - 
Elizabeth.... 193 96 21 1 
Guilford 87 116 - 
Hanover 184 101 19 47 
Menominee . 9 143 
Nora 103 70 25 - 
PleasantVTy 58 104 4 
Rawlins 41 28 
Rice 68 46 2 


Total 3219 21C1 244 32 
Plurality... 1118 
KENDALL COUNTY. 
Big Grove.... 274 49 23 - 
Bristol 196 82 27 - 
Fox 139 78 19 1 
Kendall 155 116 45 


Lisbon 157 28 44 
Little Rock... 414 168 34 21 
Na-au-say.... 86 63 36 - 
Oswego 267 96 11 1 


Northville.... 107 102 9 - 
Ophir 107 118 2 


Osage 85 139 9 


OTTAWA 872 1149 47 - 
Otter Creek. .152 56 7 


Seward 121 44 17 2 


Total 1809 724 256 25 
Plurality... 1085 
KNOX COUNTY. 
Cedar 214 123 36 - 
Chestnut 147 78 2 
Copley 145 35 6 23 
Elba 88 94 3 3 


Richland 37 118 
Rutland... 197 178 30 12 


Serena 113 100 3 
South Ottawa 211 128 20 
Troy Grove. . 136 149 5 
Utica 174 136 21 
Vermilion ... 93 52 5 
Wallace 33 132 4 


Rush 171 58 13 


Scales Mound 98 71 6 - 
Stockton 176 114 9 
Thompson... 103 69 
Vinegar Hill 37 79 4 


w 1.. 182 94 7 5 
41 w2.. 215 60 15 3 
" w 3. . 380 73 17 5 
" w 4. . 550 152 24 21 
" w 5. . 259 210 6 10 
" w6. 250 80 13 2 
" w 7.. 240 220 2 25 


Waltham 89 89 7 1 


Ward'sGrove 33 47 
Warren 249 122 34 1 


Total 8006 8313 573 118 
Plurality.... 307 

M'LEAN COUNTY. 


W.Galena.... 386 716 13 - 
Woodbine.... 140 65 6 - 


Total 2728 2719 185 64 
Plurality... 9 

JOHNSON COUNTY. 
Belknap 90 1'9 5 - 
Bloomtield... 226 77 17 1 
Burnside 246 105 11 60 
Cache 108 39 8 - 


Anchor 76 103 14 

Arrow smith.. Itil 97 10 


Total city... 2076 889 84 71 


Haw Creek... 156 85 1 1 
Henderson... 192 148 
Indian Point. 175 208 9 2 
Knox 350 202 20 19 
Lynn 109 48 2 15 
Maquon 165 170 12 - 


BLOOJI1NGTON.2392 1750 163 21 
Blue Mound.. 141 102 22 
Chenoa 243 214 23 
Cheney's G'v. 269 136 38 1 


Elvira 130 62 8 - 
Goreville... . 110 187 1 21 
Grantsburg... 146 70 26 
Simpson 181 66 2 18 
Tunnel Hill.. 209 89 7 18 
Vienna 312 134 20 - 


Dale 150 114 4 


Orange 136 80 5 4 
Persifer 106 41 - 19 
Rio... .. 112 100 8 - 


Danvers 204 163 11 
Downs 177 123 15 
Dry Grove.... 114 111 8 - 
Empire 289 303 33 1 
Funk's Grove. 118 66 3 
Srldley 154 177 7 - 
udson 129 166 14 1 
Lawndale 133 86 9 
Lexington.... 351 193 40 1 
Martin 164 143 26 
Money Creek. 113 104 11 
Mt. Hope 251 84 6 
Normal 853 466 122 7 
Oldtown 113 112 3 
Padua 182 141 12 1 


Salem 241 181 27 2 


Total 1758 948 105 118 
Plurality... 810 
KANE COUNTY. 
AIROKA 2451 1686 163 64 
Batavia 578 324 41 3 


Sparta 237 76 9 
Truro . 82 99 3 9 


Victoria 126 70 59 
Waln't Grove 256 42 18 4 
Total 5450 2885 277 232 
Plurality... 2565 
LAKE COUNTY. 
Antioch 300 86 3 - 
Avon 199 45 7 
Benton 80 30 24 
Cuba 129 71 2 


Big Rock 147 44 4 3 
Blackberry .. 217 93 6 
Burlington... 106 87 6 
Campton 173 41 7 


ELGIN 1909 1128 194 75 


Randolph 234 257 15 
Towanda 149 146 8 
West 139 144 8 
White Oak... 77 37 6 
Yates 142 87 13 - 


Geneva 288 90 26 


Deerfleld 306 232 25 - 
Ela 128 99 - 
Fremont 139 75 8 


Hampshire .. 222 109 24 
Kaneville.... 126 83 2 
Plato 121 45 6 
Rutland 109 85 6 - 
St.Charles.... 352 186 36 - 
Sugar Grove. 147 41 12 2 
Virgil 184 109 7 - 


Liberty ville.. 184 134 25 - 
Newport 159 82 4 - 
Shields.. .. 121 129 26 


Total 7708 5935 694 36 
Plurality.... 1773 

LAWRENCE COUNTY. 


Vernon 125 108 3 - 
Warren 149 68 28 
Wauconda... 156 76 14 - 
Waukegan.... 566 415 40 - 


Totali 7572 4386 582 147 
Plurality... 3186 

KANKAKEE COUNTY. 
Aroma 207 57 9 


Bond ..167 166 12 
Bridgeport... 123 75 3 - 
Christy 293 155 14 
Denison 266 245 12 


Total 2790 1718 209 - 
Plurality... 1072 
LA SALLE COUNTY. 
Adams 250 56 20 - 
Allen 141 71 13 


i Bourbonn'is.. 167 86 3 
Essex 133 128 23 30 
Ganeer 212 72 22 - 
Kankakee. ..807 731 54 
Limestone... 109 56 2 
Manteno 169 111 7 1 
Momence.... 228 66 11 - 
Norton 192 125 26 - 
Otto . 115 157 5 


Lukin 98 256 27 
Petty 210 147 8 


Russell 128 191 15 - 


Brookfleld.... 70 141 3 
Bruce 1249 1189 78 25 
Dayton 98 87 3 


Total 1635 1609 111 
Plurality... 26 

LEE COUNTY. 
Alto 125 63 6 
Amboy 411 364 24 
Ashton 153 57 20 
Bradford. ... 86 52 3 
Brooklyn .... 134 123 6 


Deer Park.... 114 68 7 -- 
Dimmock.... 63 110 1 
Eagle 123 229 24 - 
Earl 287 185 28 


Pembroke 39 15 - 
Pilot 138 89 17 1 
Rockville.... 134 62 20 - 
Salina 118 89 - - 


Eden 147 137 14 - 
Fall River.... 51 50 8 



104 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


Sep. Dem. Pro Lab 

Harruon.Cleve'd.FiskStr't*r 

China 194 98 30 


Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Huri9on.CleTe'd.Fl3kStr'tcr 

Illini 132 126 34 


Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Hamson.CleTe'd.FiskStr-ter 

Raccoon 101 88 12 17 
Romine 82 94 1 31 


Dixon 690 450 32 


Long Creek.. 151 137 15 
Maroa 241 238 30 3 


Salem 166 278 37 22 
Sandoval 
Stevenson... 43 90 15 14 
Tonti 64 121 3 2 
Vernon 


Hamilton.... 31 39 
Harmon 78 115 6 - 
Lee Center. 138 69 4 
Marion 43 161 1 


Milan 79 47 15 


Mt Zion 168 150 20 3 


Niantic ..... 97 197 13 24 


Oakley 89 130 2 - 


May 45 107 1 
Nachusa 146 79 3 
Nelson 75 38 - 
Palmyra 160 72 17 
Reynolds.... 87 47 1 
S. Dixon Ill 82 3 - 
Sublette 134 117 6 - 
Viola 82 51 


Pleas'tView. 156 186 9 
S. Macon 179 159 &3 8 
S Wheatland 107 130 15 
Whitmore.... 145 103 36 1 


Total 2156 2492 172 235 
Plurality... 336 
MARSHALL COUNTY. 
Belle Plain.. 106 121 5 
Bennlngton.. 86 123 6 
Evans 250 191 21 - 
Henry 249 231 11 2 
Hopewell.... 43 87 1 
La Prairie... 143 94 10 4 
Lacon 231 284 11 1 


Total 4084 3789 601 54 
Plurality.. 295 
MACOUPIN COUNTY. 
Barr 121 145 4 


WillowCreek 170 62 11 
Wyoming .... 233 126 18 
Total 3364 2488 192 
P.urality... 876 
LIVINGSTON COUNTY. 
Amity 123 lih 44 


Bird 105 116 2 - 
Brighton 247 166 19 - 
Brushy M nd 103 110 6 3 
Bunker Hill. 359 236 48 3 
Cahokia 90 129 5 1 
Carlinville... 448 548 17 4 
Chesterfield. 98 51 21 1 
Dorchester.. 102 116 13 
Gillespie 144 249 13 19 
Girarcf. 175 237 37 32 
Hilyard 94 138 20 - 
Honey Point 64 123 13 - 
Medora 89 67 21 
Mt. Olive 209 222 5 1 
Nilwood 114 146 14 
Otter 191 287 8 2 


Richland 84 90 4 
Roberts ... 109 137 2 


Saratoga 95 108 2 
Steuben 112 125 3 
Whitefleld... 105 1<B 3 - 


Avoca 95 97 9 - 


Belle Prairie 59 63 7 
Broughton... 96 101 9 -- 
Charlotte .... 60 97 6 
Cnatswortb... 156 1S3 15 12 
Dwight 232 200 10 - 
EppardsP'int 142 74 18 1 
Esmen 97 62 8 
Fayette 52 75 - 
Forrest 239 Hi 7 - 
Germanville. 37 51 1 
Indian Grove 3,Sf5 297 23 
Long Point .. 127 120 7 - 
Nebraska.... 110 150 10 
Nevada 42 115 2 
Newtown.... 143 9ti 16 - 
Odell . ly7 154 34 


Total 1613 1697 99 7 
Plurality... 84 
MASON COUNTY. 
Allen'sGrove 119 124 6 
Bath 101 210 - 
Crane Creek. 53 108 
Forest City . . 88 101 12 
Havana 363 515 14 11 
Kilbourne.... 86 102 1 3 
Lynchburg... 57 103 5 
Manito 108 135 7 1 
Mason City. . 298 291 36 
Pe'nsylvania 68 109 10 
Quiver 83 84 5 1 
Salt Creek... 74 97 10 
Sherman 58 135 5 - 


Polk 93 113 5 - 
Fiasa 109 61 14 - 
Palmyra. ... 282 385 13 
Scottville ... 89 235 10 - 
Shaw's Point 136 109 12 - 
Shipman 85 82 17 - 
Staunton 193 273 22 8 
Virden 244 229 12 16 


Owego 88 103 lo - 


Pike 78 93 1 - 


West'rnM'nd 86 130 5 - 


Total 1555 2114 111 16 1 
Plurality... 559 

MASSAC COUNTY. 
Benton 94 45 


PleasantR'ge 72 57 3 
Pontiac 389 333 93 - 
Reading 157 156 10 1 
Rooks Creek. 140 74 22 7 
Round Grove 85 96 10 
Saunemin.... Id 121 17 1 
Sullivan 113 130 4 5 
Sunbury 70 139 4 


Total 4070 4703 373 93 
Plurality... 633 
MADISON COUNTY. 
Alhambra.... 120 139 2 
ALTON 1103 1187 14 9 
Chouteau . . . . 140 83 5 
Collinsville.. 434 553 19 49 
Edwardsville 451 539 12 5 
Fosterburg.. 179 137 2 1 
Ft. Russell... 179 111 17 1 
Godfrey 195 223 17 4 
Hamel 155 98 3 


Brooklyn 45 73 
George's Cr'k 137 33 5 
Grant 155 97 5 - 
Hillerman.... 188 104 3 
Jackson 208 66 


Waldo 53 89 1 


Metropolis... 487 300 13 
Washington. 116 81 


Total 3914 3691 425 27 
Plurality... 223 
LOGAN COUNTY. 
^Etna 164 66 3 
Atlanta 269 135 37 1 
Broadwell.. . 81 125 4 2 
Chester 71 97 12 1 
Cornland... . 48 62 - 
Corwin 102 130 3 
E. Lincoln. .463 465 63 12 
Elkhart 132 98 4 - 
Eminence.. . Itil 94 23 1 
Hurlbut 54 74 1 
Laenna 106 142 3 
Lake Fork ... 19 82 3 - 
Mt. Pulaski.. 252 373 20 - 


Total 1430 799 26 
Plurality... 631 
M'DONOUGH COUNTY. 
Bethel 135 113 9 8 


Helvetia 365 212 7 - 
Jarvis .. 213 250 15 8 


Leef . ..98 73 2 - 


Marine 240 171 1 - 
Moro 143 82 13 


Bushnell 343 269 13 5 
Chalmers.... 83 115 2 1 
Colchester... 326 239 23 21! 
Eldorado 9i 105 4 2j 
Emmet 118 110 6 3 j 
Hire 87 176 18 


Nameoki 179 118 - 1 
New Douglas 91 114 12 
Omph Ghent. 162 144 7 2 
Olive 82 74 2 - 


Pin Oak 122 120 5 - 
Saline 137 110 


Industry 157 164 40 8 
Lamoine 105 152 9 
McComb City 518 354 39 9 
McCombT'p. 131 182 9 
Mound 154 118 2 
New Salem.. 143 129 9 1 
Prairie City. 186 102 12 1 
Sciota 116 198 7 2 
Scotland 142 83 4 - 
Tennessee.... 90 13ti 36 6 
WalnutGr've 117 116 4 2 


St. Jacob 201 162 13 1 
Venice 135 110 3 2 
Wood River, 31 365 44 2 


Orvil . 173 130 10 


Total 5485 5175 215 85 
Plurality... 310 
MARION COUNTY. 
Alma 61 111 17 2 


Prairie Creek KW 122 1 
Sheridan 58 138 19 - 
W. Lincoln.. 234 468 34 6 


Total 2604 2919 246 23 
Plurality... 315 
MACON COUNTY. 
Austin 99 87 2 - 
Blue Mound. 152 119 6 
DEC ATI R 194? 1566 282 15 


Carrigan 76 85 8 1 
Centralia.... 784 491 12 38 
Foster 54 118 4 
Haines 60 117 5 9 


Total 3176 3125 264 69 j 
Plurality... 61 
M'HENRY COUNTY. 
Alden 153 62 17 - 
Algonquin... 276 151 42 
Burton 39 19 2 
Chemung.... 443 207 28 
Coral 166 70 16 - 


luka 102 125 16 
Kinmundy.... 116 175 23 34 
Meachum.... 32 77 6 45 
Odin 234 263 20 40 


Friend's Cr'k 171 195 18 
Harristown.. 66 112 22 
Hickory P'int 105 107 29 


Omega 62 91 11 45 
Patoka 128 169 10 1 



ELECTION RETURNS. 1"5 


Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Harmon.Clve'd FiskStr'ter 

Dorr. 396 2t>0 51 


MORGAN COUNTY. 
Rep. Dem. ProLab 

HMTiwn.Cleve'd.FukStr'ter 

Alexander.... 112 139 
Arcadia 127 120 7 17 
Bethel 131 154 12 


Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Hwrion.Ueve'd.FiBkStr'UT 

PEORIA 3802 4382 92 18 


Dunham 130 63 2 
Grafton 137 108 23 1 
Greenwood... 143 75 18 
Hartland 41 195 3 - 
Hebron 226 20 13 


Princeville... 182 198 16 1 
Radnor 147 122 23 1 
Richwoods... 191 162 5 - 
Rosefleld 131 130 3 11 
Timber 198 198 11 


Concord 110 125 9 7 
Franklin 157 382 25 - 
JACKSONVILLE. ' 
W 1 . . 198 205 5 7 
W2.. 281 144 10 4 
W3..277 201 25 13 
W 4. . 311 138 14 4 
W 5.. 237 234 26 5 
Wt>.. 122 59 -- 17 
VV7.. 161 92 8 2 
W8.. 119 87 9 - 
W9.. 116 99 21 2 


Marengo 372 144 40 


Trivoli 122 168 9 1 


McHenry 227 278 9 
iXunda 2-6 165 20 - 
Richmond.... 257 65 9 
Rlley. ..109 63 5 


Total 6677 7476 229 115 
Plurality.... 799 
PERRY COUNTY. 
Beaucoup.... 54 130 1 


Seneca 162 57 24 - 


Total 35t,3 2002 322 1 
Plurality.... 1561 
MENARD COUNTY. 
Athens 237 145 28 


Cutler 154 73 21 - 
Duquoin 669 551 74 104 
Paradise 61 100 - 4 
Pin'kn'yville. 294 449 15 32 


Fancy Prairie 46 56 3 
Greenview. .. 228 205 3 9 
Indian Creek. 77 91 2 1 
Little Grove. 29 102 2 5 
Oakford 39 177 1 1 
Petersburg. . 289 464 22 54 
Rock Creek.. 72 133 2 9 
Sand Ridge... 42 76 9 3 
Sugar Grove. 97 77 7 
Tallula li 122 17 8 


Total city.. 1822 1259 115 55 


Swanwick.... 115 8!) 16 
Tamaroa 228 183 11 7 


Lynnville 117 85 2 
Meredosia.... 121 225 9 2 
Murrayville. 182 250 3 3 
Sulphur Sp'gs 67 68 3 
Waverly 258 406 26 1 
Woodson 95 185 6 1 
Yatesville.... 127 245 3 - 


Total 1046 1661 138 157 
Plurality.... 15 
PIATT COUNTY. 
Bement 283 314 12 1 


Blue Ridge... 280 J96 24 3 
CerroGordo.. 407 276 21 3 


Total 3426 3643 221 87 
Plurality.... 217 

MOULTRIE COUNTY. 
Dora 126 157 10 


Total 1292 lt>48 96 90 
Plurality.... 356 
MERCER COUNTY. 
Abingdon.... 78 109 2 14 


Monticello.... 379 349 4 1 
Sangamon.... 213 159 5 
Unity 216 256 25 3 
Willow Br'ch. 185 207 9 


E. Nelson 100 183 


Eliza 88 85 2 


Jonathan Cr'k 95 167 
Lovington.... 232 269 10 - 
Lowe . 156 181 


Total 2174 1939 102 11 
Plurality.... 235 
PIKE COUNTY. 
Atlas 253 159 4 12 


Greene 205 130 26 1 
Keithsburg... 185 218 1 24 
Mercer 375 222 4 15 
Millersburg.. 152 107 4 
New Boston.. 202 174 9 8 
N. Henderson. 106 104 10 
Ohio Grove... 121 5)2 8 5 
Perryton 89 117 2 1 
Pre-Emption .100 94 4 
Richland Grv. 2b8 161 15 1 
Rivoli 166 96 9 2 


Marrowbone . 249 157 25 16 
Sullivan 328 474 17 


Whitley 144 164 


Barry 287 329 11 20 


Total. 1430 1752 52 16 
Plurality.... 320 
OGLE COUNTY. 
Brookvllle.... 82 38 3 - 
Buffalo... . 454 238 26 4 


Chambersb'rg 37 101 17 2 
Cincinnati.... 10 43 - - 
Derry 81 185 4 3 


Detroit 64 118 13 2 
Fairmount... 99 120 2 1 
Flint 40 50 6 - 
Griggsville. .. 258 230 43 4 
Hadley 125 99 2 19 


Byron 225 108 16 
Dement 140 58 13 
Eagle Point.. 112 39 6 1 
Flagg 350 215 22 - 
Forreston 271 196 8 
Grand Detour 74 40 
Lafayette 65 27 2 
Leaf River... 206 111 28 - 
Lincoln 149 74 3 
Lynnville 117 30 10 
Marlon 252 30 13 


Suez 1W 84 8 - 


Total ,...234i 104 126 60 
Plurality . . 545 
MONROE COUNTY. 
Bluff 52 123 - - 
Columbia 232 227 - - 
Harrisonvtlle. 81 88 - 
Maredock.... 47 88 
Milchie 99 109 - - 
New Design.. 134 1KO - 
NewHanov'r. 66 67 
Pr'iri' D 1 L'ng. 131 162 - 
Renault 138 220 7 1 


Hardin 66 99 5 67 
Kinderhook.. 134 203 11 16 
Levee 24 42 1 
Martinsburg. . 115 117 1 48 
Montezuma.. 95 106 11 119 
Newburg 146 85 11 18 
New Salem... 123 231 23 12 
Pearl 53 118 1 107 
Perry 195 196 12 3 
Pittsfleld 290 406 20 68 
Pleasant Hill. 71 180 10 51 
Pleasant Vale 135 185 1 1 
Ross . 37 22 1 4 


Maryland 130 134 15 
Monroe 158 64 10 - 
Mt. Morris. ... 212 195 22 - 


Waterloo 257 454 1 


Oregon 300 171 29 


Spring Creek. 82 158 17 51 


Total. ...1237 1698 8 1 
Plurality.... 461 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 
Audubon 121 171 12 3 
Bois d'Arc. . .. 87 214 2 2 
Butler Grove. 131 103 13 - 
E. Fork 148 242 22 1 


Pine Creek .. 143 116 4 
Pine Rock.... 152 88 7 
Rockvale ... 123 60 5 
Scott 148 46 14 
Taylor 57 12 10 
White Rock. . 116 48 19 
Woosung 68 61 


Total 2820 3592 227 628 
Plurality.... ' 772 
POPE COUNTY. 
Alexander.... 141 59 2 
Columbus 85 58 - - 
Eddjvllle 146 80 4 - 


Fillmore 109 361 2 2 
Grlsham 98 78 7 5 
Harvel 43 101 5 
Hillsboro 304 303 36 - 


Total 4135 2255 309 5 
Plurality.... 1880 

PEORIA COUNTY. 
Akron..* .. 91 129 6 
Brimfleld. . . 224 185 16 - 
Chillicothe .. 244 293 6 1 
Elmwood 346 190 14 12 
Hallock.... 143 111 6 


Grand Pier... 81 40 1 
Jackson 115 66 
Jefferson 69 44 2 
Logan 138 26 


N. Litchfleld. 469 546 56 10 
Nokomis 240 218 39 2 
Pitman 85 113 8 
Raymond 166 217 10 
Rountree 122 67 3 1 
S. Lltchfield.. 237 387 17 6 
Walshville.... 151 80 8 - 
Witt 131 102 3 


Monroe 95 71 1 
Polk . 72 57 


Union 108 66 3 - 
Washington.. 73 55 
Webste* 114 56 


Jubilee... ..87 116 


Total 1646 911 15 - 
Plurality... 735 
PULASKI COUNTY. 
America 81 50 2 
Grand Chain. 221 107 7 
Junction 169 45 


Kickapoo ... 156 221 1 15 
Limestone . . 145 394 4 5 
Logan 174 105 20 30 


Zanesville.... 65 154 5 1 
Total 2875 3607 278 13 
Plurality.... 732 


Medina 71 115 1 9 
Millbrook.... 114 124 7 - 



106 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1S90. 


Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Hamson.Cleve'd.FUkStr'te 

Mound City. . 210 174 9 
Ohio 185 104 2 


Rep. Dem ProLab 

Harrison.Cleve'cLFiskStr'te 

Ind'pendence 195 62 5 
Long Branch. 100 143 2 2 
Plainview... 5^4 145 2 1 
Raleigh 142 223 6 - 
Stonefort 101 42 - 
Summerset... 106 102 6 5 


Rep. Drm. ProLab 

Haori3on.CleTe'd.FiskStr'tcr 

Oconee 119 222 6 3 
Okaw 86 117 14 26 


Pulaski. 224 79 


Penn 84 64 5 1 


Ullin 115 135 
Villa Ridge... 213 74 23 - 
Wetaug 97 44 - 


Pickaway .... 102 75 10 11 i 
Prairie 178 270 8 1 
Richlaud ... 87 169 29 9 


Total 1515 812 43 
Plurality... 703 
PUTNAM COUNTY. 
Granville 161 121 7 - 
Hennepin 184 174 22 


Total 2104 1864 65 34 
Plurality... 240 
SANGAMON COUNTY. 
Auburn 205 279 48 
Ball 71 143 42 2 


Rose 104 186 6 10 


Rural 74 125 12 15 


Sigel 40 163 1 
Shelbyville .. 327 580 33 3 
Todd's Point. 52 50 13 10 
Tower Hill... 138 171 23 1 
Windsor 143 314 13 1 


Magnolia 147 156 21 
Snachwine... 88 65 15 - 


Barclay.... 65 80 4 3 


Buffalo 120 130 24 - 


Total 580 516 65 
Plurality... 64 
RANDOLPH COUNTY. 
Baldwin 134 151 15 1 
Blair 60 66 3 1 
Bremen.... 42 115 1 1 


Buffalo H'art 64 79 2 
Cantrall 129 95 2 
Cartwright. . . 198 221 33 
Chatham 139 162 39 
Clear Lake... 285 213 30 - 
Cooper. 89 136 14 - 
Cotton Hill.. 114 121 11 - 
Curran . 104 125 36 


Total 2521 3988 302 125 
Plurality... 1467 
STARK COUNTY. 
Elmira 151 22 10 1 
N. Essex 93 75 1 4 
S. Essex.... 67 43 3 7 
Goshen 89 38 17 
EastGoshen. 78 39 11 
Osceola.. 222 111 7 1 


Brewerville.. 55 168 b 
Central PO 76 17 - 
Chester 390 416 6 1 
Coulterville.. 161 37 3 2 
Evansvllle... 131 145 3 2 
Florence 57 96 1 
Kaskaskia... 25 199 - - 
Palestine 72 73 - 


Gardner 98 185 20 
IHiopolis 171 187 18 - 
Island Grove. 87 162 3 - 
Loami 215 153 16 
Mechanicsb'g 128 84 23 
New Berlin... 76 192 
Pawnee 123 183 44 
Rochester.... 143 174 32 
Salisbury 35 121 8 - 
Sherman 44 36 3 
SPRINGFIELD. .2713 2856 155 49 
t'p.. 454 449 51 
Talkington... 75 145 10 - 
Wheatfleld... 90 111 5 - 
Williamsville 192 78 7 - 
Woodside.... 209 238 7 2 


Penn 139 95 7 4 
Toulon 180 98 28, 7 
Bast Toulon. 161 115 8 7 
Valley 79 113 


West Jersey. 100 77 27 16 


Pr.du Rocher 60 234 
RedBud 228 241 2 11 
Rockwood.... 149 47 1 1 
Ruma 52 140 
Sparta 527 105 53 42 


Total... .1359 826 119 47 
Plurality... 384 
ST. CLAIR COUNTY. 
BELLEVILLE... 1309 1390 9 210 
Caseyville .. 239 169 2 53 
Centerv'le St 309 337 3 
Engelmann.. 91 67 1 
E. St. Louis... 940 1206 4 229 
Fayetteville . 122 213 
Freeburg 168 221 1 
Lebanon 360 314 26 20 
Lenzburg.... 99 100 2 5 
Marissa 152 149 65 2 
Mascoutah... 387 3034 
Millstadt 356 271 37 
New Athens. 120 191 5 
O'Fallon 209 221 22 
Pr.du Long.. 112 98 - 
Shiloh Valley 125 147 4 34 
Smithton 132 201 - 21 
Stookev 189 115 2 13 
Sugar Loaf... 179 120 
StClair 198 324 2 39 
Stiles 136 31-1 


Steeleville... 136 190 3 27 
Tilden 84 12 36 


Wine Hill.... 41 129 - 7 


Total 2494 2646 156 102 
Plurality... 152 

RICHLAND COUNTY. 
Bon Pas 128 142 12 - 
Claremont.... 138 169 2 
Decker 128 115 4 


Total 6436 7148 681 5b 
Plurality... 712 
SCHUYLER COUNTY. 
Bainbridge... 120 163 5 7 
Birmingham. 148 82 3 
Brooklyn 166 103 6 - 
Browning.... 108 188 7 - 
Buena Vista. 158 236 15 1 
Camden 84 187 6 - 
Frederick.... 51 38 6 
Hickory 37 85 1 
Huntsville 95 144 1 


Denver 87 97 12 - 
German 60 157 4 
Madison 164 128 13 
Noble 154 172 2 
Olney 604 472 31 5 
Preston 78 173 6 


Total 1541 1625 86 5 
Plurality. . . 84 
ROCK ISLAND COUNTY. 
Andalusia.... 80 44 2 11 
Blackhawk... 142 128 3 6 
Bowling 144 54 1 
Buffalo Pr'ie. 106 130 5 1 
Canoe Creek. 46 44 6 1 
Coal Valley. . 54 93 1 5 
Coe 116 83 19 - 
Cordova 106 88 6 - 
Drury 148 91 3 3 


Littleton 153 105 9 - 
Oakland 115 148 7 - 
Rushville.... 287 341 24 3 
Woodstock 88 174 9 7 


Total 1610 1994 92 18 
Plurality. . 384 
SCOTT COUNTY. 
Alsey 77 69 2 9 
Bloomfleld... 27 90 1 - 
Bluffs 67 126 2 3 
Exeter 83 113 - 
Glasgow 132 90 3 
Manchester.. 136 134 1 4 
Merritt 56 88 4 1 
Naples 69 91 4 


Total 5932 61S8 116 700 
Plurality... 256 
STEPHENSON COUNTY. 
Buckeye 197 87 20 - 
Dakota 104 146 21 
Erin 87 70 3 


Florence 116 103 10 
Freeport 965 1217 74 1 


Edgington... 138 114 7 
Hampton 237 211 16 20 
Moline 1368 763 107 17 
Port Byron . . 109 68 20 
ROCK ISLAND.. 1348 1320 27 6 
S.Rock Island 117 92 5 4 
Rural 68 79 4 2 
S. Moline 176 lf',8 16 15 
Zuma 81 74 7 


Harlem 143 149 9 


Jefferson 47 64 6 
Kent 122 119 9 


Lancaster.... 137 96 19 
Loran 173 83 4 


Oxville 45 9fi 3 


Pt.Pleasant.. 61 64 3 
Sandy 44 68 1 7 
\. Winch' st r 144 200 6 6 
S.Winch'sfr 184 179 4 6 


Oneco 190 146 14 17 


Ridott 182 175 11 


Rock Grove.. 158 91 4 
Rock Run.... 260 183 23 


Total 4584 3644 256 87 
Plurality... 940 
SALINE COUNTY 
Brushy 113 2041 


Total 1125 1408 25 45 
Plurality... 283 
SHELBY COUNTY. 
Ash Grove.... 76 230 4 4 
Big Spring.... 94 125 3 - 
Cold Spring. .135 221 27 11 
)ry Point.... 2C.9 262 33 1 
Hat Branch . 77 165 15 3 
Holland 92 197 15 M 
Moweaqua... 166 146 10 -1 


Silver Creek. 97 132 5 
Waddam's... 112 101 5 - 
West Point . . 271 346 35 
Winslow .... 123 121 18 - 


Total 3484 3429 300 la 
Plurality... 55 

TAZEWELL COUNTY. 
Boynton 63 96 5 
Cincinnati... 55 98 1 


Cot'ge Grove 123 102 4 
Douglas 192 204 8 
Eldorado 215 250 19 - 
Galatia 218 182 6 8 
Harrisburg... 510 205 12 13| 



ELECTION RETURNS. 107 


Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Harrison.Cleve'd.Fi!,kStr'ter 

Delevan 328 204 30 - 


Rep. Dem. ProLab\ Rep. Dem.ProLab 

Harrison.Cleve'd.Fiak.Str'ter Harrison-CleveUFiskStr'ter 

Tompkins.... 127 138 22 RlCrete 235 103 1 


Dillon 78 152 4 - 
Elm Grove... 96 116 1 
Fond du Lac. 53 119 1 14 
Groveland... 188 103 2 9 
Kittle 138 79 7 2 
Hopedale.... 142 166 8 
Lit'leM'cknw 1S 170 11 - 
Mackinaw.... 130 224 23 1 
Malone 55 104 2 4 


Total 2709 2016 294 5 
Plurality... 661 
WASHINGTON COUNTY. 
Ashley 171 192 12 4 


uusier w> OH 4 
Du Page 91 125 7 1 
Florence 93 99 2 
Frankfort.... 209 145 3 
Green Gard'n 154 55 
Homer 124 87 10 1 
Jackson 114 149 17 
JOLIET 2264 2116 80 20 


Beaucoup.... 56 53 20 - 
Bolo . . 37 85 3 3 


Covington.... 95 164 9 
Dubois . 119 165 4 
Elkton 96 97 17 - 
Hoyleton 118 127 6 2 
Irvington .... 96 52 1 
Lively Grove 125 116 11 
Nashville.... 353 288 66 21 
Okawville 287 146 3 - 
Pilot Knob... 65 38 11 
Plumb Hill... 136 63 - 
Richview 139 65 17 4 
Venedy 98 w 


Lockport 374 453 28 
Manhattan 127 126 6 


I Morton 93 135 1 
Pekin 653 773 5 14 
Sand Prairie. 95 135 7 - 
Spring Lake.. 95 156 
Tremont 104 144 4 
Washington . 312 368 10 


Monee 171 90 
New Lenox.. 148 90 12 
Peotone 172 156 15 
Plainfleld.... 307 96 50 1 
Reed 608 446 10 3 
Troy 76 119 1 


Total 2926 342(5 126 54 
Plurality... 500 
UNION COUNTY. 
Anna 106 171 3 12 


Washington .221 74 3 
Wesley 116 80 1 - 
Wheatland . . 103 64 25 


Total 1991 1747 101 . 
Plurality .. 244 
WAYNE COUNTY. 
Arrington.... 154 214 1 3 
Bedford 189 135 2 9 
Big Mound... 68 171 27 
Brush Creek. 174 1683 
Elm River. . 69 125 21 
Fairfleld 440 387 6 18 
Four Mile.... 138 143 11 1 
Hickory Hill. 135 118 - 
IndianPr'rie. 172 182 5 5 
Jasper 124 91 - 10 


Will 108 49 7 
Wilmington.. 259 259 1 
Wilton 94 113 17 


Alto Pass.... 155 283 2 - 


Dongola 147 326 19 4 
Hess 162 273 4 16 
Jonesboro.... 94 345 3 2 
Lick Creek... 102 98 2 -- 
Mill Creek.... 28 83 1 
Misenh'imer. 9 104 - 
Preston 27 39 
Rich 84 38 


Total 6357 5257 312 26 
Plurality... 1100 
WILLIAMSON COUNTY. 
Bainbridge... 41 125 6 
Carterville... 126 127 3 
Crab Orchard 234 56 1 
Eight Mile... 114 44 
Grassy 233 136 1 18 
Herrin'sPrai. 64 111 2 
Lake Creek.. 264 227 4 
Marion 266 358 17 1 
Northern 274 105 2 


Stokes 71 88 5 - 
Union 29 120 


W.Saratoga.. 74 149 - 


Leech .. . 164 151 6 


Total 1346 2376 49 38 
Plurality... 1030 
VERMILION COUNTY. 
Blount 204 205 21 7 


Massilon 58 86 2 
Mt. Erie 152 147 5 4 
Orel 156 150 1 1 


Rock Creek. .174 29 2 
Saline 196 117 11 
Southern 87 209 5 38 
Union 183 209 11 3 


Zif 70 22 - 


Butler 248 214 22 - 
[Carroll 201 225 3 - 
Catlin . 286 204 6 15 


Total 2334 2394 37 117 
Plurality... 
WHITE COUNTY. 
Burnt Prairie 191 223 
Carmi 508 433 17 


Total 2337 1949 54 72 
Plurality... 388 
WINNEBAGO COUNTY. 
Burritt Ill 48 5 - 
CherryValley 198 54 21 - 
Durand 186 75 34 7 
Guilford 181 25 15 - 
Harlem 94 58 15 - 
Harrison 121 18 8 2 
Laona 85 57 5 3 
NewMilford. 146 34 22 1 
Owen 133 24 17 1 
Pecatonica. . . 269 119 35 2 
ROCKFORD....2793 1304 311 51 
Rockton 213 95 49 5 
Roscoe 153 52 18 -- 


! DANVILLE 2024 1591 6(5 27 
lElwood 419 217 27 - 
Georgetown.. 378 232 17 1 
Grant 460 283 67 8 
Middlefork... 334 186 11 1 
Newell 217 270 7 1 
Oakwood 382 226 16 3 
Pilot 244 102 9 


Emma 166 201 6 - 
Enfleld 178 255 12 
Gray 137 251 5 
Hawthorne.. 208 178 2 2 
Herald'sPrai. 140 290 3 30 
Indian Creek. 167 402 
Mill Shoals... 252 292 2 11 
Phillips 183 3*4 15 - 


Ross 416 322 19 6 


Sidel .... 182 179 12 1 
Vance 252 165 11 5R 


Total 2230 2889 62 43 
Plurality... . 659 
WHITESIDE COUNTY. 
Albany 96 68 5 


Total 6246 4621 314 109 
Plurality... 1635 
WABASH COUNTY. 
Belmont 190 131 14 - 
Coffee 125 191 22 


Clyde 108 79 4 


Shirland 97 16 5 1 
Winnebago .. 184 117 44 2 


Coloma 293 118 26 - 


Friendsville.. 124 110 10 
Lancaster 41 153 
Lick Prairie. \ 70 50 
Mt.Carmel... 466 445 - 
Wabash P8 256 64 - 


fenton 8t> 69 6 2 
Fulton 222 236 24 
Garden Plain 173 61 8 
Genesee 142 72 27 - 
Hahnaman 38 8't 8 


Total 5086 2176 621 76 
Plurality. . .2910 
WOODFORD COUNTY. 
Cazenovia... 129 166 11 
Clayton 123 116 1 


Total lix>4 1336 110 - 
Plurality... 252 
WARREN COUNTY. 
Berwick 96 99 7 


Hopkins 121 89 12 3 
Hume 61 47 6 
Jordan 119 91 11 5 
Lyndon 130 95 19 8 
Montm'rencv 61 54 13 
Mt. Pleasant. 407 225 38 
Newton .... 91 77 12 


Cruger 50 70 3 
El Paso 269 241 21 3 
Greene 58 87 8 3 
Kansas 53 57 3 3 


Coldbrook... 82 119 8 1 
i Ellison........ 124 80 - 4 


Linn 65 110 6 
Metamora ... 126 199 23 
Minonk 297 279 14 24 
Montgomery. 95 84 - 
Olio 213 214 39 3 


Greenbush... 94 110 5 - 


Portland 119 91 5 
Prophetsto'n. 23(5 125 32 1 
^terlinK 815 496 63 3 
Tampico 124 90 16 
Union Grove. 138 51 18 
Ustick 130 50 17 12 


j Kelly 115 114 6 
Lenox 93 99 3 - 


Palestine 68 211 4- 1 
Panola 81 153 12 1 
Partridge .... 24 91 
Roanoke 7 158 5 22 


Monmouth... 931 499 140 14 
iPt.Pleasant.. 102 82 8 - 
Roseville 174 170 21 
Spring Grove 133 18(5 9 - 
Sumner 150 71 16 
Swan 121 124 13 1 


Total 3843 2453 384 34 
Plurality... 1390 
WILL COUNTY. 
Channahon .. 123 105 12 - 


Spring Bay.. 29 55 
Worth tv5 119 1 - 


Total 1812 2410 165 60 
Plurality... 598 



108 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



COUNTIES. 

(92) 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew. , 

Benton 

Blackford 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark 

Clinton."!!.'.'.'.'.'! 

Crawford 

Daviess 

Dearborn 

Decatur 

DeKalb 

Delaware 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gibson 

trant 
reene 
amilton 

Hancock 

Harrison 

Hendricks 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson 

Jennings 

Johnson 

Knox 

Kosciusko 

Lagrange 

Lake 

La Porte 

Lawrence 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery.... 

Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 

Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

St. Joseph 

Steuben 

Sullivan 

Switzerland.... 
Tippecanoe .... 

Tipton 

Union 



. PRES., 

Rep. Dem. 

HuTison-Clerel'd. 

1277 2936 

5455 9692 

2742 3109 

1626 1425 

Mi! 

661 
2607 

4221 



Fik. 

141 

162 



INDIANA. 

, GOVERNOR, _ 
Lab. Rep. Dem. Pro. 

Stricter. Hover. Matson. Hugh<4. 

1234 2929 137 



5443 9685 

2730 3113 

1629 1424 

1138 1233 

3441 3320 

662 1534 

2608 2560 




2412 



77. 



18.. 2930 2<5 

21.. 3595 2404 

8. . 1985 2380 

2134 2526 

3286 2079 

51.. 3844 2284 

89.. 3599 2197 

3.. 3567 3474 

18. . 224 3235 
21.. 1602 
72.. 2810 
.. 3313 
23.. 2051 
162.. 2159 
3.. 2913 

6. 4139 3080 

35.. 2256 1506 

6.. 2544 2072 

16. . 3746 4587 

5.. 2255 1813 
29.. 3436 

57.. 17021 17619 

38.. 2587 3190 
1555 
3495 
1819 



1002 
2741 
2708 
1603 
2602 
3627 



3928 197 



100 



2713 2292 
743 1030 
2877 3409 



57 



4006 3773 

2488 2080 

BR & 

725 588 

1778 1656 

1625 1923 

2772 2151 

1976 2007 

2209 2091 

2427 2011 



2411 



2641 
1446 



2555 3024 
4628 2249 
2404 
2700 



2381 
2299 



742 1030 

2879 3412 

2736 2684 

833 904 

4921 5256 

2351 1347 

1905 3377 

1562 1629 

27.. 5058 4287 

24.. 2038 2373 

6.. 1103 864 



42 



1798 2190 
1019 777 



217 104 



128 



33 116 



142 36 

42 8 

66 14 

15 3 

194 17 

310 182 

96 82 



225 3 

163 58 

26 1 

23 43 

24 25 



ELECTION 


RETURNS. 109 


Huritoa. Clerelana. Flak. 8treter. 


H.TCJ. Mataon. Hughe*. Milror. Kob'tson. Nelson. Okie. Pope. 


Vanderbarf 3027 5889 65 14.. 


6109 6846 45 12.. 44"9 4026 22 1443 


Vermillion 1730 1438 49 87.. 


1733 1435 47 89.. 1629 1325 25 46 


Vigo 6273 6102 160 52.. 


6265 6106 52 155.. 5411 5209 64 122 


Wabash 3986 2555 261 22.. 


3985 2558 263 21.. 3761 2254 194 7 


1 Warren 1847 1017 38 15.. 


1845 1019 35 14.. 1789 904 16 4 


Warrtck 2361 2567 62 38.. 


2375 2551 57 36.. 2261 2384 67 4 


Washington... 1847 2389 14 8.. 


1847 2397 13 8.. 1591 2106 15 1 


Wayne 6138 3*553 266 20.. 


6132 3651 272 19.. 6402 3037 341 9 


Wells 1926 2942 286 28.. 


1915 2939 291 27.. 1529 2541 250 173 


White 1942 2017 69 17.. 


1943 2021 65 17.. 1747 1813 64 3 


Whitley 2133 2325 162 95.. 


2129 2320 161 13.. 1909 2197 155 


Total 263361 261013 9881 2694 .2 


53194 260994 9920 2702 .231922 228598 9185 464 


Plurality 2348 


2200 .. 3329 


Percent 49.04 48.61 1.85 .50.. 


49 48.62 1.84 .50.. 48.92 48.21 1.93 .97 


Total vote 536949 


536810 .. 474,351 


FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS, 1888. 


Johnson, Pro 583 


tstDist. Frank B. Posey, Rep 20,627 
W. F. Parrott. Dem ; 20,647 
Dewhurst. Pro 422 
2d Dist. Thomas N. Braxton, Rep 16,653 
John H. O'Neall, Dem 18.537 
Blewett, Pro 234 
2dDist. Stephen D. Sayles, Rep 15,198 
Jason Brown. Dem 18,272 
Poindexter, Pro 272 
Carr, Lab 110 
4th Dist. Manly D. Wilson, Rep 16,176 
W. S. Holman, Dem 16,905 
Caster, Lab 272 
SthDist. Henry C. Duncan, Rep 17,506 
G. W. Cooper, Dem 18,210 
Beckett, Pro... 796 
Harrymon, Lab 221 
6th Dist. Thomas M. Brown, Rep 23,424 
Morris, Dem 14,302 
Pallock, Pro 1,054 


Myers, Lab.... 457 
9th Dist. -Joseph B . Cheadle, Rep 24,717 
McCabe, Dem 20,267 
Walker, Pro 1,227 
Snyder, Lab ^ 334 
10th Dist. W. D. Owen, Rep 19,546 
Zimmerman, Dem 18,390 
Overhalze, Pro 711 
Johnson, Lab 102 
llthDis-.-G. W. Steele, Rep 21,900 
A. U. Martin, Dem 22,375 
Ryker, Pro 1,435 
Schull, Lab 88 
12thDist.J. B. White, Rep 19,62^ 
C. A. O. McClellan, Dem 20,i39 
Butler,Pro 855 
Miner, Lab . 176 
13th Dist. William Hoynes, Rep 21,206 
B. F. Shively, Dem. and Lab 21,561 
Huntsinger. Pro 878 


Taylor, Lab 67 
7th Dist. -T. B. Chandler, Rep 25,500 


LEGISLATURE. 


W. D. Bynum, Dem 27,227 


, 1888-90 . , 1887-8 . 


Eaton, Pro 814 


Sen. Ho.J.Bal. Sen. Ho.J.Bal. 


Kh Dist. J. T.Johnson. Rep 23,084 
B. V. Brookshire. Dem 23,153 


Republicans... 23 43 66 . 19 55 74 
Democrats 27 57 84.. 31 45 76 


IOWA. 


COUNTIES. GOVERNOR, 1889. 


PRES. 1888. , . Gov. 1887. 


(99) Rep. Dem.U.L.Pro.Gbk. Rep. Dem. Pro. Lab. Rep. Dem.LabPro. 

Hutchison Boies. DowningSmithDoty. Harrison. Clevel'd. Jr'isk. Str'ter.Larraboe. Anderson. CainFarn'm 


/Vdams 1277 109!) 79 11 


.. 1387 1146 53 112.. 1178 950 268 


(Ulamakee 1704 1937 39 - 


1.. 1903 2023 1 43.. 1627 1941 64 ^ 


(Vppanoose 2021 1858 95 34 


.. 2103 1837 59 44.. 1762 1599 67 


kudubon 1214 1247 32 


-.. 1366 1210 17 67.. 10% 935 178 1 


Benton 2388 2902 3 


2.. 2768 2646 32 39.. 2312 2345 33 


BlackHawk 2458 234(5 2 


.. 3106 2127 18 56.. 2450 1657 204 


Boone 1982 1776 44 4 


.. 27ti8 1847 16 105.. 1917 1401 226 


Bremer 13T8 1921 19 7 


-.. 1K13 1728 21 39.. 1435 1543 53 


Buchanan 2070 1964 65 20 


3.. 2343 1880 34 52.. 2343 1596 152 1 


Buena Vista 1254 890 3 - 


3.. Iti93 857 27 2f5.. 1235 558 21 


Butler 1498 1210 1 


.. 2031 1284 15 10.. lt>70 1020 22 


Calhoun 1345 904 14 3 


-.. 1729 828 22 10.. 1298 595 6 - 


Carroll 1108 2191 9 2 


.. 1593 2052 14 64.. 1172 1912 191 


Cass 2035 1751 133 - 


-.. 2372 1721 15 221.. 1778 1327 554 - 


Cedar 1930 2235 13 38 


-.. 2137 2134 62 11.. 19(55 1825 8 1 


CerroGordo 1404 907 1 76 


-.. 1866 1004 71 7.. 1684 805 6241 


Cherokee 1177 1157 10 32 


-.. 1960 1162 68 75.. 1413 803 9 1 


Chickasaw 1420 1689 27 


-.. 1561 1604 10 55.. 1382 1351 66 1 


Clarke 1244 957 107 11 


-.. 1395 910 23 157.. 1133 808 195 1 


Clay... 1127 498 2 


.. 1438 494 34 2.. 10.8 329 1 


Clayton 1735 3395 23 11 


.. 2576 3311 35 42.. I960 3175 48 


iClinton 24*) 4944 8 1 


.. 3597 5105 31 58.. 210 4206 227 1 


Crawford 1317 2250 8 3 


-.. 1658 2123 13 6.. 13:>3 1787 11 - 


Dallas 2003 1289 - 


-.. 2533 1579 17 2?9.. 2113 1316 334 - 


Davis.... 1210 140 500 32 


. 1428 1626 48 334.. 1143 1427 4:32 - 


Decatur 1724 1577 35 32 


. . 1753 1497 6ti It55.. 1683 1222 345 


Delaware 1940 1593 


.. 2247 1570 36 14.. 1879 1347 74 - 


DesMoines 2061 4137 14 1 


-.. 33 ' 4291 34 23.. 2237 3451 


Dickinson 5>:8 249 1 - 


.. 672 225 8 1.. 52(5 160 2 


Dubuque 1820 6144 62 4 


.. 3060 5948 58 383.. 1894 4521 1456 


Emmet.. 575 194 13 


.. 573 206 6 14.. 258 212 265 


Fayette 2481 2472 111 51 


-.. 2781 2182 59 287.. 2,771 2123 274 - 


Floyd 1725 1240 110 3 


-.. 1982 1288 24 68.. lr 15 1217 58 - 


Franklin 1335 709 - 2 


.. 1609 842 11 .. 1275 C.83 1 


Fremont . 1475 1639 114 - 


.. 1851 1866 39 84.. 1349 1490 280 ] 



110 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


Hutchison. Boie.Downing.Smitb.Dotj.Harrison. Clev'd. FisV. Str'ter. LarrabecAnaereonCainFaro'm 


Greene 1784 1165 13 - 


.. 2113 1300 45 52.. 1776 1103 56 1 


Grundy 1174 1222 1 20 


.. 1372 1132 27 4.. 1171 10H3 21 


Guthrie 2018 1413 70 17 


.. 2218 1405 . 32 147.. 1849 1084 296 


Hamilton 1533 899 - 


-.. 1778 1007 5 17.. 1357 781 12 ! 


Hancock 831 615 1 2 


.. 892 561 14 -.. 714 408 - 2 


Hardin 2168 1302 22 13 


.. 2522 1287 46 18.. 1989 974 20 


Harrison 1954 2333 58 8 


.. 2381 2247 70 220.. 1949 1670 590 


Henry 2134 1729 1 


1.. 2485 1728 63 46.. 2070 1326 144 3! 


Howard 1136 972 5 


-.. 1233 1012 13 10.. 1158 901 23 3 


Humboldt 1027 594 6 15 


-.. 1237 641 34 3.. 1048 504 


Ida 1025 1167 1 10 


.. 12tj9 1087 12 12.. 1070 964 1 


Iowa 1376 1963 41 6 


.. 1664 1978 17 50.. 2669 2094 25 


Jackson 1604 2869 19 - 


..2029 3029 32 42.. 1539 2565 27 


Jasper 2791 2276 382 33 


-.. 3137 2341 69 354.. 2592 2075 456 - 


Jefferson 1794 1467 10 10 


.. 2046 1588 59 29.. 1871 1470 9 


Johnson 1730 2884 


.. 2051 3038 9 10.. 1655 2990 8 


Jones 2188 2267 2 9 


.. 2448 2187 37 13.. 2140 2031 42 - 


Keokuk 2321 2757 16 12 


.. 2o90 2635 45 80.. 2238 2375 245 


Kossuth 1224 1038 17 


.. 1451 1026 6 36.. 1117 770 


Lee 2530 4284 12 18 


.. 3820 4650 26 99.. 2305 3692 2 


Linn 3690 4348 47 143 


6.. 5247 4373 165 79.. 3909 3329 505 18 


Louisa 1614 1054 19 17 


-.. 1836 1012 33 68.. 1594 919 


Lucas 1521 1287 10 4 


.. 1891 1225 16 94.. 1638 1039 249 - 


Lyon 732 625 


.. 952 676 6 -..545 387 


Madison 1875 ia31 286 10 


.. 1870 1346 23 373.. 1799 1374 287 


Mahaska 3062 2582 163 68 


.. 3700 2703 96 208.. 2972 2183 285 - 


Marion , 2224 2249 285 7 


-.. 2374 2322 28 295.. 2129 2220 194 2 






Mills 1572 1518 30 17 


.. 1623 1461 24 101.. 1426 1350 74 


Mitchell 1452 899 3 3 


.. 1(183 1028 31 15.. 1534 904 42 


! Monona... . 1605 1321 238 11 


-.. 1590 1088 24 286.. 1106 719 351 - 


: Monroe.... 1385 1268 78 9 


.. 1442 1233 16 175.. 1258 974 868 - 


Montgomery 1808 1169 28 18 


.. 2260 1228 28 24.. 1807 1028 33 


Muscat! ne... 2263 2784 11 


.. 2.54 2767 21 54.. 2156 2456 104 -i 


i O'Brien 1420 1221 - - 


.. 1671 1085 4 2.. 1296 856 13 


Osceola 614 385 


.. 695 354 2 4.. 566 289 


Page.... 1992 1227 101 128 


.. 2571 1468 200 183.. 2210 1071 236 


I PaloAlto 802 882 27 


1.. 840 850 8 64.. 683 727 28 - 


Plymouth 1275 2319 13 34 


.. 1755 2140 58 61.. 1357 1864 1 - 


Pocahontas 867 748 3 


8.. 999 746 40 1.. 858 609 2> 


Polk 5484 4880 56 40 


.. 7049 4966 108 142.. 5216 5866 282 - 


Pottawattomie 3138 4948 128 1 


.. 4591 4881 41 90.. 3271 4522 167 - 


Poweshiek... 2218 1843 138 


2.. 2347 1770 34 167.. 1357 1864 13; 


Ringgold 1512 953 17 49 


.. 1766 1749 82 62.. 1550 905 115 - 


Sac- . 1441 1126 1 


.. 1832 1102 55 7.. 1421 866 11 


Scott . 1645 5282 2 


.. 2832 5692 51 53.. 1557 4698 292 - 


Shelby. . 1520 1831 61 


., 1714 1762 8 150.. 1654 1640 230 - 


Sioux. ..: 1516 1344 1 11 


-.. 1905 1408 15 11.. 1485 1102 5 


Story... 2196 939 37 15 


.. 2420 1050 37 98.. 1807 991 51 


Tania.... 2180 2467 49 13 


.. 2305 2294 29 98 2195 2024 117 


Taylor 1582 1354 137 9 


.. 2015 1322 29 230.. 1694 1111 221 


Union . 1544 1355 396 14 


.. 1833 1414 24 460.. 1541 1118 424 


i VanBuren.... 1861 1683 24 43 


-.. 2028 1775 72 20.. 1819 1571 9 - 


Wapello.... 2841 3485 323 


-.. 3282 3101 3 344.. 2682 2739 410 1 


Warren... 2031 1433 132 47 


.. 2289 1523 63 215.. 1933 131)2 200 


Washington 2110 1870 13 27 
' Wavne . 1713 1489 84 4 


.. 2345 1990 33 76.. 2141 1867 81 
.. 1781 1570 29 61.. 1659 1523 84 


Waster" I".. 2012 2080 138 6 


.. 2353 1809 9 239.. 1558 1552 448 - 


Winnebako.... . 914 226 10 
i Winneshiek 2174 2053 4 16 
i Woodbury .. 2969 4054 29 


-.. 894 218 20 3.. 763 252 12 2\ 
15. . 2559 2043 30 19. 2124 1963 4 , 
.. 4169 3588 42 87.. 2979 2913 25 


'worth 878 437 16 6 


-..1063 542 22 7.. 965 453 


wSSfe.:....:...:. 1527 790 - 4 


-.. 1677 831 19 1.. 1340 662 2 ! 


Total 173588 180111 5579 1353 


42. .211598 179877 3550 9105.. 172141 155975 Lu& 292 


Plurality 6523 


.. 31721 .. 16166 


Percent 48.01 49.941.54 .35 


..52.35 44.58 .87 2.05.. 48.77 44.30 4.11.82 


Totalvote 360673 


404130 342,930 


VOTE ON OTHER STATE OFFICERS, 1889. 


Mrs. M. H. Dunham, .Pro . 1,381 


Lieut.-Gov.A.. X. Poyneer, Rep 177,812 
Samuel L. Beston, Dem 176,031 
E. Brownell, U. L 5,605 
J.N. Murphy, Pro 1,071 
J. M. McDonald, Gbk 59 
Judge of Supreme Court Josiah Given, 
Rep 178,250 


T. F. Tobin, Gbk 53 
Railroad Commissioner Spencer Smith, 
Rep 181,396 
David L. Morgan, Dem 172,916 
L. H.Griffith, U.L 5.370 
J. W. Noble, Pro 1,342 
Robert Garrett, Gbk 51 


W. F. Brennan. Dem 174,959 


FOR REPRESEXTATIVES IX COXGRESS. 


M.H.Jones, U.L 5,614 


1st Di-tt.John H. Gear, Rep 18,130 


J.W.Rogers, Pro 1,216 


John J . Servley, Dem 17.256 


E. M. Farnsworth, Gbk 92 
Sup't Public Instruction Henry Sabln, 


C. H. Bandy, Pro 18Q! 
Scattering IQ 


Rep... 179,018 
Thos. M. Irish, Dem 174,692 


2d Disi.P&rKer U. McManus, Rep 15.842 
Walter I . Hayes, Dem 20,877 


Mrs. H. J. Bellangee, U.L 5,823 


Scattering g 



ELECTION RETURNS. 


111 


3d Dist. David B. He 
B. B. Richards, De 


aderson. Rep 


...21.4J 
168* 


7 

1 

2 9th 

18 
6 
lOtt 
1 
7 
7 
3 lit 
2 
19 
1 
9 
4 
A 
7 
7 Re 
3 De 
17 Un 
2 1m 

LNSAS 

Gov. 
Dem. 

.Martin. 

1076 
998 
2644 
774 
1243 

1832 
1682 
615 
718 
2183 
424 
356 
1036 
1089 
1245 
402 
2081 

"S8 

751 
1751 
1130 
1719 
345 
814 
755 
859 
356 
648 
1077 
134 
280 

& 

268 
1175 
179 
294 
947 
1097 
199 
226 
1253 
1633 
1094 
1496 

748 
381 
1320 
287 
3701 
658 

290 
1471 


George G. 
S. A. Gille 

fSSKSffi 

D. M. Har 
J. R. Sove 
C. B. Chris 
i Dist. -J.I 
J. A.O. Y( 
O. Tyson, 
Scattering 
1 Dtst.-Isa 
M. A. Keif 
George W 
Wilmot W 

publicans, 
mocrats... 
ion Labor, 
lependents 

5. 

1888 
Pro. Lab. 

Botkin. Elder. 

72 312. . 
182 339.. 
21 328.. 
12 257.. 
63 97.. 

18 A: 

226 692.. 
31 315. . 
12 448.. 
181 1162.. 
14 22.. 
2 93.. 
134 698.. 
97 571. . 
103 453 
1 89.. 
114 1445.. 
119 1253.. 
11 101.. 
36 137.. 
143 465.. 
3 14.. 
221 196.. 
17 119. . 
41 505.. 
1 108.. 
17 39.. 
11 48.. 
51 125.. 
185 1141.. 
5 4.. 
19 11. . 
4 246.. 
6 51.. 
36 48.. 
44 495. . 
7 107.. 
8 27.. 
41 599. . 
67 696.. 
- 21.. 
14 83.. 
80 11.. 
92 13. 
125 706. . 
156 264.. 
2 3.. 
35 657.. 
51 108. . 
59 1826.. 
15 36.. 
63 302 . 
57 345.. 
38 1122.. 
- 33.. 
147 440. . 


Calkii 
y, Pr 


is. La 
> 


b .. . 




92 






247 i 








. .18,8 
16 6 








*&\ 


4thDist.-3. H. g 
L. S. Reque, , 
L. H. Weller 
H. V. Parker 
Scattering 


wene 
Dem. 
Lab 


7, Re\ 






phR 
ris, D 
reign, 
tie, P 
'. Dol 
;oman 
Lab.. 


Reed, Rep 














If 


Lab. 






1619 


, Pro 










ro... 






' 82 








..19,44 
16 9C 


iver, 
, Den 


Rep 




20 864' 


5th Dist.Danie\ 
J. H. Preston 
W. H. Calhoi 
E. J. Helmes 


Kerr 
, Dem 
m, La 
Pro 


,Rep. 






i 




....15,49(5! 






800 


b 






3t 








8 








1 


ac S. 
o, De 
Lee, 
aitfiel 

LEG! 

Sen7 
. 28 
. 20 
. 1 
. 1 

Rep. 

Martin. 

1561 
1542 
2052 
1185 
1331 
3585 
1801 
3640 
1014 
1426 
1978 
408 
746 
2045 
2459 
1694 
570 
3169 
2425 
709 
863 
2010 
1736 
2789 
565 
1575 
590 
1198 
1803 
986 
2025 

402 

808 

1889 

1479 
1532 
1648 

818 
1624 
1925 
2113 
1776 

1788 
672 
2427 
529 
2146 
1099 
2027 

2449 


Struble, Re 




21 472 1 














15,213 


6th Dist. JohnF 
J. B. Weaver 
C. L. Haskell 


. Lacey, Rep... 
Dem& Lab 
Pro 




. .18,0 


Lab 






. 677 




17 V 


d, Pr 

SLAT 

-1890-1 
Ho. 
50 
45 
1 
4 

OV., 1 
Dem. 

Moonl't. 

1261 
1015 
3110 
1146 
1317 
1691 
1370 
1631 
795 
955 
2067 
322 
580 
1286 
1760 
1347 
486 
2286- 
2082 
948 
583 
2300 
1170 
1799 
399 
1003 
722 
922 
1040 
905 
1937 

239 
370 

1177 

934 
1173 
1162 

498 
1105 
1(551 
1309 
1476 

1337 
501 
2195 
334 
3810 
877 
1278 

1569 


j 




. 275 




15 


UKE. 

f 1888-9 
J.Bal. Sen. Ho.J.Bal. 
78.. 32 64 96 
65.. 17 34 51 

O __ 

5i! 1 2 3 

886 ^ GOV., 1884^ 
Pro. Ren.Dem.Pro. 

Bransc'be.Martin. Glick.Phil'ps 

76.. 1733 1414 25 
268.. 1685 1059 191 
1.. 3043 2966 18 
.. 827 753 68 
19.. 990 1165 35 
10.. 2902 1952 80 
90.. 2213 1596 25 
373.. 3136 2108 157 
38.. 956 891 12 
93.. 1709 1234 224 
693.. 2548 2460 624 

1 " " 

105!'. 2147 1200 190 
134.. 2364 1557 203 
201.. 1862 1447 76 

-158!! 3578 2793 143 
228.. 2987 2366 168 
5.. 723 856 90 
. , 473 241 8 
203.. 2471 1998 101 
3.. 1984 1327 - 
150.. 3375 1948 183 
- . 418 364 25 
101.. 1723 1149 146 
451 610 19 
30. 923 948 20 
34.. 227 160 2 
197.. 568 670 28 
317.. 2532 1573 635 

l" 388 175 16 
139!! 1792 1290 152 

15!! 

65.. 1540 1197 215 
116.. 2172 1394 53 

6!! 263 131 32 
37 1768 1185 g 
131.. 2129 1831 10 
203.. 2343 1348 366' 
243.. 2101 1722 154 

21.'.' 1256 1052 84 
125!! 3454 2347 128 

125!! 3196 3993 35 
150.. 829 790 71 
42.. 2167 1297 425 

212!! 2931 1887 178 












7th Dist. -Edwin H. C 
A. E. Morrison, Di 
J. A. Nash, Pro.* 


onger, Rep 
m 


..18,45 
..13,01 
.. l,5f 


Lab.. 










8th Dist. James P. Fl 
A. R. Anderson, D 

COUNTIES. / ] 
(106) Rev. 

Harrison. 

Allen isafi 


eck, I 
zm.. 


lep 




19,21 






1S.21 


PRES. 
Dem. 

ClevePd 

1036 
960 
2600 
710 
1228 
1830 
1803 
1616 
593 
692 
?038 
420 
920 
350 
1053 
1227 
383 
1938 
1874 
754 
731 
1692 
1106 
1(569 
333 
696 
756 
830 
631 
1112 
348 
130 
278 
344 
245 

1110 
180 
295 
940 
1065 
197 
220 
1220 
1603 
999 
1433 
249 
622 
381 
976 
26J 

801 
283 
1376 


1888 
Prc 

171 
25 
11 

70 

221 
36 
12 
192 
14 
2 
140 
118 
109 

120 
120 
10 
46 
157 
7 

2 

22 

208 
5 
19 
4 

33 

47 
8 

3? 

68 

14 
92 

99 
128 
171 
2 
24 
30 
85 
20 
71 
59 
38 

155 


K^ 

. Lab. Rep. 

Str'ter.Humphre 

332. . 1789 " 
369.. 1830 
332.. 3185 
304.. 958 
101.. 1357 
805.. 3556 
235.. 2686 
721.. 3131 
326.. 1112 
466., 1586 
1269. . 2910 
22.. 780 
98.. 466 
794.. 1900 
557. 2508 
440. . 1952 
93. . 477 
1534.. 4062 
1362.. 3149 
97.. 994 
131.. 1212 
473.. 2709 
14.. 2237 
217.. 3179 
114. . 531 
600.. 1550 
105.. 692 
39.. 1129 
49.. 690 
119. . 871 
1056.. 2406 

7!! 587 
245.. 793 
-.. 289 
48. . 417 
542.. 2233 
105. . 424 
28.. 480 
587.. 1468 
676.. 2103 
21.. 291 
83.. 558 
13. . 1952 
11.. 2251 
757.. 2257 
303. 2147 
1.. 356 
75(5.. 1380 
107.. 504 
2126.. 2860 
49. . 457 
335 . 3174 
349.. 1046 
1119.. 2159 
33.. 606 
469.. 2954 


Anderson 
Atchison 
Barbour 
Barton 


1843 
3219 
977 
1353 

3172 
1126 
1590 
2935 
779 
473 
1914 
2542 
1970 
490 
4112 
3156 
1027 
1224 
2746 
2245 
3189 
541 
1566 
690 
1159 
694 
882 
2422 
225 
586 
797 
390 
417 
2242 
422 
480 
1490 
2145 
291 
5K3 
1979 
2268 
2285 
2164 
367 
1413 
525 
2870 
459 
3272 
10t 
2166 
(W 
3014 




Butler 


Chase 


Cha'ta'qua 
Cherokee 
tCheyenne 
tClark 


Clay . 


Cloud 
Coffey 
tComanche 
Cowley 


Crawford 


Davis 
Decatur 
Dickinson 
Doniphan 


Douglas 
Edwards 
Elk... 


Ellis 


Ellsworth 


Finney 
Ford 


Franklin 
Garfleld 
fGove 


Graham 
Grant. 


Gray 


Greenwood 
*Greeley 


tHamilton 
Harper 
Harvey . 


Haskell 


Hodgeman 
Jackson 


Jefferson 
Jewell 
Johnson 
Kearney 
Kingman 


tKiowa 
Labette,. 


tLane 
Leavenworth... 
Lincoln 


Logan 


Lyon 



112 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


Harrison. ClT*d. Fisk. Btr'ter. Humphrey. Mrtin.Botkin. Elder Martin. Moor.l't Bransc 

Marion 2375 1283 71 219 2357 1331 72 209 1975 1346 51 


be.Mrtm. GlkkPhil'ps 

. 1613 1312 3 
. 2646 2157 9 7 
. 2427 1440 245 

.' 2036 1920 217 
1742 1019 167 
.2950 2444 283 
. 1345 914 41 

.' 2186 1767 6 
. 2084 1762 200 
. 368 250 49 
. 779 373 70 
. 3114 1892 488 
. 1558 757 91 
. 1510 1124 64 
. 755 347 9 
. 1042 519 345 
. 2247 1965 42 
774 516 71 
. 192 177 8 
. 1984 1381 113 
. 2261 1180 113 
. 1586 1037 114 
. 1497 968 146 
. 990 484 134 
.471 333 35 
. 709 656 7 
. 1912 1634 2 

! 3190 2964 289 

! 5607 3040 90 
. 93 70 3 

.' 16i 867 339 
.' 726 400 32 
! 3428 2791 342 

! 371 195 4 
. 1362 1041 6 

.' 2584 1637 86 

'. 2011 1244 - 
. 1137 749 70 
. 3031 2614 94 


Marshall 2547 1815 73 835.. 2528 1849 65 828.. 2661 2324 54. 
McPherson 2279 828 119 1181 . 2199 1011 112 1070.. 2138 1151 248 
tMeade 578 1596 7 91.. 574 342 7 96.. 706 573 25 
Miami . 2170 878 100 359 2164 1620 97 355 1759 1573 252 


Mitchell 1676 1863 105 337 . 1637 936 98 331 1650 1290 42 


Montgomery... 2871 840 33 709.. 2975 2121 27 592.. 2662 2222 24. 
Morris 1612 205 35 258.. 1601 894 11 241.. 1508 864 30. 
'Morton... . 333 340 7 29.. 332 205 7 30 . . 


Nemaha 2515 1682 93 81.. 2517 1702 77 75.. 2046 1678 25. 


Neosho 2134 1147 37 982.. 2122 1236 29 928.. 1921 1700 70. 
Ness 891 471 71 124.. 883 479 70 125.. 737 532 24. 


Norton . 1471 630 31 466.. 1460 641 28 479.. 1177 635 . 


Osaee .. 3442 1380 164 1001.. 3361 1534 159 917.. 3030 1831 210. 


Oborne 1680 684 45 182.. 1668 695 42 186.. 1720 832 9. 


Ottawa 1569 769 94 366.. 1565 819 78 334.. 1718 1083 75. 


Pawnee 895 303 38 209.. 882 340 36 189.. 937 512 83. 
Phillips 1681 763 35 592.. 1674 797 28 577.. 1501 1082 . 


Pottawa'ttomi'e. 2419 1472 52 162.. 2373 1535 46 148.. 3117 1677 10. 
Pratt . 1115 653 85 370.. 1093 663 101 366.. 1033 855 31. 


Rawlins 1023 637 2 127.. 1017 643 2 127.. 611 497 . 


Reno .. .. 3398 1840 158 366.. 3378 1873 159 358.. 1875 1327 163. 


Republic 2595 1205 159 110.. 2581 1206 161 106.. 2190 1371 55. 
Rice 1851 934 134 284.. 1838 958 126 283.. 1508 1030 140. 


Riley . 1856 773 56 286.. 1815 825 57 276.. 1552 1001 27. 


Rooks"" . 1112 412 33 350.. 1088 437 29 351. 1279 842 15. 
Rush ........ 681 424 29 26.. 678 430 26 26. 951 721 2. 


Russell 953 571 15 24.. 940 595 14 21.. 881 5119 1. 


Saline 2263 1187 126 329.. 2209 1267 124 320.. 1837 1635 199. 


tScott 294 180 13 49.. 293 184 9 53.. 436 340 . 


Sedewick 6071 4025 223 618.. 5814 4068 268 615.. 3221 2834 208. 


tleward 400 208 4 43.. 397 217 5 39. . 338 225 -. 
Shawnee. 7672 3143 271 117.. 7587 3415 235 91.. 4307 2500 87. 
Sheridan.. 623 337 8 37.. 624 340 7 36.. 391 218 -. 


*Sherman... .803 481 12 146.. 780 487 11 146.. - . 
Smith 1726 777 71 699.. 1710 795 70 697.. 1660 1049 111. 


Stafford"" 975 483 89 505.. 966 302 90 499.. . 
Sttnton" 298 197 3 50.. 296 201 2 51.. 1076 922 113. 


tStevens.. .307 268 21 61.. 326 239 21 69.. 114 107 -. 
Sumner 3499 2136 99 1301.. 3481 2370 99 1086.. 3287 2881 226. 


tThomas 751 483 6 121.. 753 489 4 120.. 754 543 . 


Treeo 477 220 24 25.. 473 226 25 26 '581 282 1. 


Wab'nsee 1708 198 5 31.. 1663 1007 33 39.. 1362 916 10. 


*Wal/ace 412 960 33 9.. 410 198 7 21.. - - -. 


Washington.... 2999 1511 45 260.. 2976 1567 39 251.. 2744 1649 23. 
*Wicbltf." .".. 438 207 15 78.. 432 216 11 78 


Wilson 2191 1035 47 671.. 2186 1123 36 601.. 1900 1206 23. 
Woodson 1149 595 104 363.. 1145 616 101 354.. 1028 785 263. 


Wyando ? te"::" 5431 4155 25 190.. 5357 4277 23 171.. 2082 3103 4. 


Total 1&29U4 102730 6779 37788.. 180841 107480 6439 35837. . 149513 115594 8094. 


.141 -.777 
. 38493 
. 55.33 

1 


106284 9880 

40.82 
!65,239 

.... 6.415 

. . . 38.960 


Plurality 80159 733*1 .. 33919 


Percent .'. 58.41 31.11 2.65 11.44 54.70 32.48 1.98 10.84.. 54.73 42.312.96. 


Total vote .... 330213 330597 .. 273,201 


*Attached to other counties, being unorganized. tOrganized since 1884. 
VOTE FOR OTHER STATE OFFICERS, 1888. I. O. Pickering, Pro 








S* CONGRESS. 
wm 


K J Finfey Pro ..6440 FOR REPRESENTATIVES i: 


SB Todd U L 38,082 1st Dist E N Morrill Hep 


Sec of State William Higgins. -Rep 182,511 E K, Townsend. Dem 




14 5o i 


Allen G Thurman, Dem 102,951 H. Shumaker, Pro 




444 


I K Mclntyre Pro 6,391 Alonzo J Grover U L 




1.253 
24 (ZP 


M' J " Albright U L 38 182 zd Dist E H Funston Rep 


Auditor's ute i imothy McCarthy Rep 182.791 John T Burris Dem 




14 %9 


W H Willhoite Dem 102871 Delos Walker, 17 L 




5517 


Gabriel Burdette Pro... 6.355 3d Dis . B VV Perkins, Hep 




23315 


J H Lathrop L 38371 W H Utley Dem 




11 7^5 






581 


William H White Dem 102,844 John A Faton ' L 




10,556 
29 338 


R M Slonecker Pro 6215* 4th Dist Thomas Ryan Rep 


Sam Nutt U L .... 38423 David Overmyer Dem 





14.3.3 
1,072 
4 3X) 


Att'v-Oen'l L B Kellogg Rep 182633 J C Hebbard / ro 


C F Diffinbacher Dem 182841 John Heaton L'. L 




Stanton A Hyer, Pro 6,455 5th Dist. John A Anderson 


Rep 


2984S 


W F Rightmire U. L 38,454 N. D. Tovy, Dem 




14347 


Supt Pub InsVn Geo. W.Winans, jRep.l8.'.799 E. l-eonardson U. L, 




1 115 


Albert Hurst, Dem 98,890 6th Dist.E. .1 . Turner, Rep... 




23.428 
12 2S 9 


Miss Sarah A Brown } ro 6.283 8 W McElroy Dem 


H F Hixon U L 38,264 S P Stevens Pro 




633 


A N Cole Jnd . 3,440 H A Hart r. L 




4550 


Associate Justice Wm A. Johnson, Rep 182 794 7th Dist S R Peters Rep 




37984 


W. P. Campbell. Dem 102,842 Charles S. Ebey, Dem . ... 




22616 









ELECTION 


RETURNS. 113 


E W Beeson Pro ', 1 293 


Colmo. Sharp. Cobb. Harrison den-land FtskStr'trr 


S H Snycler U L 9467 


Logan... 1470 2282 6.. 2248 3010 18 26 


LEGISLATURE. 

. 1889-90 1887-8 
Sen. Ho. J.Bnl. Sen. Ho.J.Bnl. 
Republicans... 39 121 100.. 37 97 134 
Democrats 1 2 3.. 3 24 27 
Independents.. .. 3 3 
Labor 2 211 


Lyon 436 613 26.. 573 640 38 1 
Madison. 2110 2245 39. 2343 2406 59 - 
Magoffin. 835 566 1.. 865 660 2 1 
Marion... 1112 1494 9 . 1008 1599 27 
Marshall 331 1156 18. . 364 998 24 5 
Martin... 367 164 . 5i5 218 1 
Mason... 1179 1734 6. 2265 2778 34 -r 


KENTUCKY. 

COUNTIES. TREAS.,'89-^ ^PRESIDENT,1S88- 
(118) Kep. Dem. Fr<.. Rep. Dem.ProLab 

Colson Sliarp Cobb Ilarrison.CieTelanaFiskstr'ter 

Adair.... 1266 1053 17. 1283 1128 35 
Allen 9i8 1330 17. 1326 1527 45 
! Anders'n 727 1150 40 742 1235 58 
Ballard.. 179 1000 17 321 9t>l 12 - 
Barren.. 1332 2038 70 . 1791 2749 81 - 
Bath 792 1054 10. 1362 1545 37 3 
Bell 803 148 928 279 1 
Boone... 377 1578 7 635 2116 18 - 
Bourbon 1451 1941 18 2052 1990 40 - 
Boyd 808 ' 1054 9 1531 1302 17 - 
Bovle.... 937 1084 . 1367 139 57 
Bracken. 6S5 1211 30 10H6 1702 83 
Bre th't ..505 636 17 
Br'k'r'ge 1721 1962 5. 17f,9 1826 13 - 
Bullitt.. 386 768 19 429 996 23 - 
Butler... 1457 838 12. 1K37 973 78 
Caldwell 843 1085 22.. 1080 10;)8 26 - 
Callowav 279 1156 9. 340 995 22 21 
Campb'll 3144 &310 41.. 4141 4160 41 27 
Carlisle.. 185 1064 16 271 88 27 - 
Carroll... 453 1166 70.: 623 1632 69 4 
Carter.... 1207 1033 25. 1773 1373 37 
Casey.... 1149 885 13.. 120t 1125 61 
Christian 1903 I48f, 80 3481 2247 104 122 
Clark 1098 1860 26. 14*7 1835 54 - 
Clay 1033 366 1. . 1390 652 1 - 
Clinton.. 553 210 9 903 409 14 - 
Critt den 1125 990 7.. 1357 1175 18 14 
Cum'rl'd 675 363 3.. 1016 677 3 
Daviess. 1404 2703 14.. 2233 3818 59 9 
Edm'son 638 596 6.. 7ri4 762 12 
Elliott... 305 975 8.. 426 10W 4 - 
Estill. ... 928 949 .. 917 835 10 
I Favette.. 2199 4092 57.. 3301 3435 122 
Fleming 1509 1724 73 1711 1813 101 


McCr'k'n 807 12-7 191.. 1535 1812 78 1 
McLean. 390 634 18.. 742 972 45 4 
Meade.... 451 1064 8.. 593 1348 5 
Menifee. 166 4:25 5. 229 5til 15 1 
Mercer.. 1012 13.9 . . 13K1 1711 125 3 
Metcalfe. 846 695 10 1033 89(5 23 - 
Monroe.. 1115 (8) 1. 1311 837 10 
M'tgom'y 920 1211 21 Ii02 15il 35 - 
Morgan . 555 1)87 -. 683 1342 10 - 
Mu'enb'g lr,29 1644 7. 1817 17 4 22 27 
Nelson.. 1105 1630 31.. 1102 187(5 44 - 
Nicholas. 745 1225 123 . 933 1475 143 
Ohio 2175 2171 5 . 2100 20iV> 21 24 
Oldham.. 310 555 52.. 4' 83! 46 - 
Owen 686 2237 182 834 2922 152 1 
Owsley.. 481 147 .. 699 2)8 3 
Pendle'n 1114 1518 12.. 1417 1915 55 
Perry.... 516 248 3.. 699 5-W5 2 
Pike 721 917 43 12o5 1249 li - 
Powell. . 275 315 - . 403 411 7 
Pulaski.. 1693 856 77 2!<24 1752 144 2 
Rob'ts'n. 316 484 19 346 (57 18 
R'kc'stle 772 679 38.. 10fO 777 42 
Rowan... 403 416 2. 412 334 3 
Russell.. 656 530 3.. 804 697 21 
Scott 1027 1590 176.. 1531 2037 126 - 
Shelby.. 1171 1675 6.. 1436 2219 21 11 
Simpson. 848 1205 33.. 859 1525 58 1 
Spencer.. 312 667 16.. 3ii9 993 27 
Taylor... 701 835 50. 792 1059 63 - 
Todd 9rt7 1090 18.. 1555 1622 38 - 
Trigg 834 974 41.. 978 928 94 - 
Trimble. 173 867 35.. 247 1195 23 
Union... 555 1667 3.. 955 2244 18 
Warren.. 752 2220 24 .. 2590 3587 98 1 
Washt'n 1401 1417 5.. 1365 1328 17 
Wayne... 975 1012 11.. 1107 1108 28 
Webster. 810 1345 . . 1034 1626 16 8 
Whitley. 1471 421 39.. 2202 081 33 1 
Wolfe... 313 629 -..444 805 14 
Woodfd 1066 1357 17.. 1217 1387 34 - 


Floyd.... 615 1047 8 690 1122 7 - 
Franklin 1302 I'M 16.. 1459 2334 26 3 
Fulton... 228 1066 14.. 333 933 38 2 
Gallatin. 245 608 15.. 31.3 821 25 1 
Garrard.. 955 883 9.. 12iO 1124 38 2 
Grant.... 938 14t>0 58.. 1126 1604 62 
Graves... 1035 2633 39. 1182 2432 60 25 
Gravson. 1393 1687 23. 1513 1461 56 2 
Green 1037 1004 13 1181 1047 17 23 


Total . .114649 147982 3351. .155134 183800 5225 622 
Plurality. 33288 . 28666 
Percent. 4310 55.64 .12.. 44.99 5331 1.52 .18 
Tt'lvoie 265982 .. 344781 
*No returns received from this county. 

FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 

1st Dist. Edward Farley, Rep 8,850 
W J Stone, Dem. 14 ]% 


Greenup 941 1061 .. 13 1230 2 


Josiah Harris, Pro. .. 487 


Hancock 930 949 4 . 881 900 12 


2d Di-t G W. Jolly, Rep... 12906 


Hardin.. 1209 1815 35.. 1421 2175 73 3 


W T. Ellis, D m 16459 


Harlan 711 132 5 837 211 17 -- 


W L Gordon Pro 5r>7 


Harrison 935 1634 173 1337 2133 164 


3d Dist W G Hunter, Rep 15 630 


Hart 1415 1603 49 . 1505 1635 56 


J H Goodnight Dem 17365 


H'derson 1441 2160 162 2413 3043 170 18 
Henry . 1018 1670 73.. 1184 1964 140 2 


E. Underwood. Pro 165 
4th Dist C. M. Pendleton, Rep.. . 11 019 


i Hickrnan 190 1290 22. 333 1053 60 17 


A B Montgomery, Dem 15477 


Hopkins. 1201 1538 36.. 1569 1882 163 89 


G. W. Booth, Pro 211 


Jackson. 755 16S .. 1019 231 20 


5th Di t.A. E. Wilson, Rep 13,561 


! Jefferson W95 W~'2Q 64 12863 17535 170 23 


A G <'aruth Dem 16588 


Jessam'e 1051 1234 74.. 1110 1310 60 


E J Polk, Pro ... 85 


Johnson. 1315 781 7.. 1357 854 21 


6th Dist. R Hamilton, Rep 12887 


1 Kenton.. 1761 3369 .. 3994 5879 38 80 


J. G. Carlisle, Dem 18907 


Knott.... 164 418 1.. 164 468 1 


W. R. Fox Pro P5 


Knox.... 1079 421 4.. 1424 646 9 


S. Shoemaker, Lab r32 .93 


: LaUue 728 1029 19 724 1002 22 


7th Dist A M Swope Rep 1 16"> 


Laurel.: 979 684 21.. 1384 975 38 8 
La'rence 1485 1484 7.. 1717 1655 6 


W. C. P. Breckinridge, Dem 18,920 
Alfred Cobb. Pro . . 734 


Lee... . 638 471 4.. 514 432 2 


J. M. McMartry Lah 8 


i Leslie... 537 53 6.. 6tiO 66 


8th Dist.-R. L. Earll. Rep.... . ]4,fi60 


' Letcher 391 255 .. 616 281 5 


J B McCreary Dem 16209 


Lewis 1284 845 18. . 1880 1379 38 


John A Nooe Pro 612 


i Lincoln.. 1022 1392 167.. 1322 1612 209 - 
Living n. 372 801 19 . 514 997 12 1 


SthDist. D. J. Burchett, Rep 18,285 
T. H. Paynter Dem 18,664 



114 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


G W Young Pro 430 


Francis T Nichols, Dem 137 257 ' 


10th Dist John H Wilson, Rep 15725 


Lieut. -Gov. Andrew Hero, Jr., Rep 51,244 ! 


B F Day Dem 1547 


J M Rash, Pro . 87 


Si'C. of State- John F. Patty, Rep 51,31)2 
L F Mason Dem 137 278 


llth Dist H F Finley Rep 15 822 


F L Woliford Dem 14 006 


Att'y-Gen Robert Ray Rep 51484 


J 6 Stephenson Pro 344 


W H Rogers, Dem 137 205 


LEGISLATURE. 
. 1889- 90 . 1887-8 
Sen. Ho. J.Bal. Sen. Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans... 7 14 &\.. 6 25 31 
Democrats 31 86 117.. 32 70 102 
Prohibitionists. . 3 3 
Labor - .. 2 2 
LOUISIANA. 
COUNTIES. PRES.,1888 ^GOV.,'84 

(58.) Rep. Dem.Pro.L b. Rep. Dem. 

Harnaon.Clevel'd.Fisk.Str'terStev'gon.McEnerj 

Acadia 4 607 - -. - - 
Ascension 890 1965 ..1565 1015 
Assumption.... 1045 2239 . 1741 1000 
Avoyelles 607 1507 ..991 1853 
Bienville 1 988 1 . 2319 1478 
Bossier 172 2155 .. 408 794 
Caddo 125 '^541 - . . 2 1538 
Calcasieu 273 1420 7 -.. 686 2342 
Caldwell 22 882 .. 549 2090 
Cameron 12 203 . . 222 1944 
Catahoula 328 733 .. 182 673 
Claiborne IB 1653 6 .. 46 255 
Concordia 466 2477 . 1316 702 
DeSoto 2 1020 - - . 4 483 
E. Baton Rougel835 1270 . 65 1402 
East Carroll.. 374 1996 .596 2175 
East F liciana. 7 826 . 676 2208 
Franklin 26 566 - -.. 5 1732 
Grant 93 .584 . 366 1903 


Tre 'surer B. F. Flanders, Rep 51831 j 


W. H. Pipes, Dent 13H 761 ! 


Audi or James Forsythe, Rep 51065 


O B Steele Dem 137026' 


Supt. Education J. A. Breaux, Dem....l87,'723! 
No opposition. 
FOR REPRESENTATIVES IX CONGRESS. 
1st Dtrt.-Charlea B. Wilson, R-p 4,927 


Theodore S. Wilkinson, Dem.. 8979 


2dDist.-H. Dudley Coleman, Rep... 9121 


Ben C Elliott Dem 8947 


3d Dis . James R Jolley Rep 6351 


Edward J . Gay, Dem 18 854 


4thDist. W E Maples, Rep 963 


Newton C. Blanchard, Dem 16302 


5tfi Dist. Frank Morey. Rep 1151 


Charles J. Boatner, Dem .. 212751 


6th Dist.W. H. Harrison, Rep 4,314 


S. M. Robertson, Dem 12 078 


LEGISLATURE. 
. 1889-90 . . 1888-9 . 
Sen. Ho.J.Bnl. Sen. Ho. J.Bal. 
Republicans... 4 12 16.. 5 15 20 
Democrats 33 86 119.. 31 83 114 

MAINE. 
COUNTIES PRES.. 1888 - Gov., 1886 , 
(16) Rep. Dem.Pro.La'b.Rep. Dem.Pro. 

Hirroon.Ce d.Fisk. Str'ter. Bodwell.Edw'ds.CUrk 

Androscgin.. 4893 3585 219 201.. 4227 3579 265' 
Aroostook.. 3365 1808 tfO 8.. 3643 3389 482 
Cumberland 9880 7975 458 50.. 8942 7960 563 
Franklin .... 2485 1518 53 21.. 2290 1591 90 
Hancock.... 4160 2772 57 69. . 3642 2334 131! 
Kennebec... 7453 4139 221 119.. 7250 4142 368 i 
Knox 2965 2290 99 317.. 2675 2905 335 
Lincoln 2436 1801 84 10.. 2606 2022 152 
Oxford 4349 2951 141 80. 3980 3401 119 


Iberia 9 1594 - . 252 1808 
Iberville 1895 1116 . 1 927 
Jackson - 519 1 . 374 598 
Jefferson 1059 594 - . 1262 2233 
Lafayette 32 1373 - -.. 1817 992 
L'Fourche 732 2335 .. - 668 
tincoln 842 41 1:380 423 


ivingston 77 377 39.. 1015 12V6 
Madison 166 2523 - .. 1422 1773 
Morehouse 4 1286 2 .. 20 1222 
Natchitoches.. 338 1599 - -.. 306 525 
Orleans 771315473 4 .. 731 781 


Penobscot... 7873 5292 338 77.. 7423 5928 380 
Piscataquis. 2091 1297 77 -..1950 1297 127' 
Sagadahoc... 2536 1246 116 112.. 2329 1236 168 
Somerset.... 45?2 2851 97 60.. 3993 3413 170 
Waldo 3123 2504 81 75.. 3140 3194 122 
Washington 4298 2876 40 84.. 4178 3222 68 
York 7255 576 250 61.. 6623 6628 333' 


Ouachita 4 2702 15 699 


Plaquemines..l372 703 - .. 535 2203 
Pointe Coupee 791 878 - -..4038 20834 


Rapides 402 3397 3 .. 1355 
Red River 73 1479 8 -..1505 573 
Richland... .. 1090 8 .. 992 1450 


Total 73734 50481 2691 1344. .68891 56242 3873 
Plurality.... 23253 ..12549 
Percent 57.48 39.36 2.09 1.04. .53.40 43.59 3.00 
Total vote... 128250 .. 129006 
VOTE FOR GOVERNOR 1888. 
Edwin C. Burleigh, Rep .. 79405' 


Sabine 612 .. 1157 1708 
St Bernard.... 350 561 - -.. 221 574 
St. Charles 1248 105 - -.. 2 1201 
St. Helena 77 393 - .. - 933 
St. James 831 543 - -.. 333 706 


William L. Putnam, Dem 6li394 


t. Landry 574 1631 . 407 528 
t. Martin's.... 4 1009 . 1290 492 
ISt. Mary's 1445 1781 9 -. 1015 282 
St.Tammanv.. 294 374 - -. 2581 3746 
Tangipahoa... 391 902 -. 985 1171 
Tensa* 363 1787 2435 326 


W H Simmons Lab l 52a j 


FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN COXGRESS. 
M Dis'. Thomas B. Reed, Rep 18288 


William Emery. Dem . 158551 


Timothy B. Hussey, Pro '806 ! 


Ter re Bonne.. 1074 1484 -. 549 452 
Union - 2033 4 . 676 814 
Vermilion 160 977 41 .. 2 3820 
Vernon - 588 - 1810 1059 


Robert A. Williams. Lab 6 


2d Di-t. Nelson Dingley, Jr., R p 21.075 
Charles E. Allen. Dem 15613 


William T. Eustis, Pro 724 


Washington... 79 417 25 . 45 1087 
Webster 42 1310 -. 422 1255 
W.BatonRouge 429 573 . 746 
West Carroll.. - 563 -. 179 596 
West Feliciana 46 1795 - -. 840 588 
Winn 16 553 - -. 12 812 


Ebenezer A. Howard. Lab 771 
3d Dist. Seth L. Milliken, Rep 20.558 


Simon- S Brown, Dem . 14 027 


Birnsley S. Kelley, Pro 528 


Frank A . Howard, Lab 350 i 


4th Dist. Charles A. Boutelle, Rep 19,827 


Total 3048485032 160 39.. 43502 88794 
Plurality 54548 .. 45292 
Percent 26.42 73.48 .32.88 67.11 
Total vote 115715 .. 132296 
OTHER STATE OFFICERS, APRIL, 1888. 
Governor Henry C. Warmouth, Rep 51,471 


John Barker, Pro 976 i 


LEGISLATURE. 

1888 9 1887 8 


Sen. HoJ.Bal. Sen. HoJ.Bal. 
Republicans... 31 125 156.. 27 122 149 
Democrats 26 26.. 4 29 33 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



115 



MARYLAND. 
COTTXTIES. ^COMPT'R.'89.-s , PRES. 1888. , 

(24) Rep. Dem. Pro.Rep. Dem. Pro. 

WellmstonBauirhmanStoneHarmonClevelaud.Fisk. 

Allegany 4200 2K38 126. 4072 3299 167 

AuneArundel.. 3072 3237 92. 

Baltimore C'y.. 37790 41'493 638. 

Baltimore Co... 4860 6526 451. 

1011 28. 

1710 89. 



Calvert 1167 

Caroline 1487 

Carroll 3349 

Cecil 2463 



1940 
2525 
... 5432 
... 1377 
... 2477 



Charles 

Dorchester 
Frederick . 
Garrett. . . . 
Harford.... 

Moward 1607 
ent 2076 

Montgomery . . . 2617 
Prince G'rge's.. 3289 
Queen Anne's.. 1643 

Somerset 2124 

St. Mary's 1828 

Talbot 2226 

Washington.... 4436 
Wicomico ... 
Worcester.... 

Total 

Plurality 



1250 
1264 



2950 70. 

1508 10. 

2841 102. 

5361 249. 

1242 16. 

3403 98. 

1855 24. 

2239 55. 

2867 142. 

2855 5. 

2249 166. 

1672 344. 

1523 22. 

2453 92. 

4027 160. 

2229 185. 

2422 310. 



. .96527 1031HX) 3741. 



7393 



Percent 47.24 50.89 1.85. 



Total vote. 



204168 



5224 
1163 
1490 
3674 
2879 
1431 
260-3 
5822 
1533 

1521 
2037 
2712 
3019 



2979 114 
44604 1252 
6464 443 
933 53 
1420 113 
3772 170 



90 

1430 12 

2114 135 

5385 233 

1239 20 

3408 175 

1774 65 

2062 89 

3270 142 

3081 21 



1738 2286 173 

2072 1625 374 

1772 1551 34 

2282 2120 108 

4648 4254 205 

1441 2210 236 

1473 1916 343 



99986 106168 4767 

6182 

47.60 50.55 2.30 
210921 



FOB REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 

1st Dist. Thomas H. Hodson, Rep 15,145 

C. H. Gibson, Dem 15,627 

W. L. Harman, Pro : 1,566 

2d Dist. -Theodore F. Lang, Rep 16,588 

Herman Stump, Dem 18,470 

Joseph L. Benson, Pro 993 

3d Dist. D. Z. Brinton, Rep 14.289 

Henry W . Rusk, Dem 19.578 

J. B. Dunning, Pro 385 

4thDist.-U. Stockbridge, Jr.,Rep 19,078 

Isador RH yner, Dem.'-. 18,998 

W. H. Reed,Pro 475 

5th Dist. Sidney E . Mudd, Rep 15.819 

Barnes Compton, Deni 16.000 

W. H. Heller,Pro 343 

6th Dist. -I. . E . McComas, Rep 19,056 

H . K. Douglass, Dem 17,422 

W. W. Moore, Pro 452 

LEGISLATURE. 

. 1889-90 , 1888-9 . 

Sen.Ho.J.Bal. Sen. Ho.J.Bal 

Democrats 18 60 78. .22 68 90 

Republicans 8 31 39.. 4 23 27 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

COUNTIES. . Gov. 1889 - PRES. 1888 , 
(14.) Rep. Dem. Pro. Rep. Dem. Pro. 

Brackett.Rus*ell.Blackmer.HarrHon. Clev'd. Fisk. 

Barnstable. 1854 725 239.. 3371 1045 180 

Berkshire.. 4728 5394 723.. 6826 6073 403 

Bristol 8216 6540 1025.. 14570 8985 584 

Dukes 299 109 84.. 570 199 119 

Essex 18806 15563 2043.. 27560 19890 1178 

Franklin.. 2537 2345 547.. 4100 2854 381 

Hampden.. 6318 7654 1053.. 9577 9181 510 

Hampshire 2723 2901 692.. 4731 3405 325 

Middlesex. 25664 23486 2756. . 35768 28624 1516 



BrMkett.Rus9ell.Rlackmer.Harrison.Cleverd.FiBk. 

Nantucket.. 299 173 27.. 487 215 13 
Norfolk ..... 7405 6981 882.. 10770 8729 449 

Plymouth... 5674 4465 824.. 9366 6093 618 
Suffolk ..... 25044 29724 1748.. 31191 38623 921 

Worcester.. 17790_14522_2460. . 25005 17939 1501 
Total ..... 127357 120582 15108.. 183892 151855 8701 

Plurality... 6775 .. 32037 

Percent.... 48.40 45.83 5.74.. 53.37 43.96 2.23 

Scattering.. 64 .. 60 

Total vote. 263111 .. 344517 

VOTE FOB OTHER STATE OFFICERS, 1889. 
Lieut -Gov Wm. H. Hart, R>p .......... 132,821 

John W. Corcoran, Dem ................ 112,030 

B. F. Sturtevant, Pro .................. 12,715 

Sec. of State Henry B. Peirce, Rep ........ 132,659 

Wm. N. Osgood, Dem ................... 107.183 

Geo. D. Crittenden, Pro ................ 12,048 

Treasurer Geo. A. Marden, Rep .......... 131,419 

Edwin L. Mumm,Dem ................. 107,163 

Fred L. Wing, Pro ..................... 11,984 

R. 



Ladd , Rep ..... 1 ........ 132,329 

Wm. D. T. Tref ey, Dem ................ 103,937 

W. H. Gleason, Pro .................... i3,177 

Atfy-Gen. Andrew J. Waterman,.Rep. ..129,433 
Elisha B. Maynard, Dem ............... 107,260 

Allen Coffin, Pro ........................ 12,604 

FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 

1st Dist. Charles S. Randall, Rep ......... 14,588 

John W. Cummings, Dem .............. 5,103 

George Delano, Dem .................... 3,468 

William Miller, Pro ...................... 809 

2d Dtsi.-Elijah A. Morse, Rep. . . .......... 17,072 

Josiah Quincy. Dem ..................... 13,388 

William H.Phillips, Pro ................ 719 

Josiah A. Quincy, Pro .................. 294 

3d Di8t.-Ala.nsoo. W. Beard. Rep .......... 14,780 

JohnF. Andrew, Dem .................. 16,338 

Henry W. Shugg, Pro .................. 283 

4th Dis : .Peter Morrison, Rep ............. 6,718 

Joseph H.O'Neil, /tern .................. 14,749 

Frederic G. Whitcomb, Pro ............ 187 

5th Dist. Nathaniel P. Banks, Rep ........ 14,929 

T. Wentworth Higginson, Dem ........ 13,465 

Edward Kendall, fro .................... 424 

6th Dist. Henry Cabot Lodge, Rep ........ 19,598 

Roland G. Usher, Dem .................. 14,304 

George A. Crossman, Pro .............. 885 

7th .Dirt William Cogswell. Rep .......... 16.796 

Samuel Roads. Jr., Dem ................ 12,224 

James J. H. Gregory, Pro... ........... 548 

8th Dist. Frederic T. Greenhalze, Rep... 14,493 
John J . Donovan, Dem .................. 11.273 

Nathaniel A . Glidden, Pro .............. 455 

9th Dist.-John W. Candler, Rep ............ 15,714 

Edward Burnett, Dem ................... 13,678 

JohnC. Park,Pro ....................... 719 

10th Dist.-Jo&eph H. Walker, Rep ......... 13,965 

IrvingB. Sayles, Dem ................... 12,050 

Charles G. Allen, Pro .............. ..... 834 

llth Dist. -Rodney Wallace, Rep .......... 15,335 

William Skinner, Dem .................. 11,519 

Hervey S. Cowell. Pro .................. 1,128 

12th Dist. Francis W. Rockwell, Re<> ..... 14.853 

Henry W. Ely, Dem ..................... 12,826 

Henry Cutler, Pro ....................... 811 

LEGISLATURE. 

Sen. Ho. J.Bal. Sen. Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans... 29 160 189.. 33 181 214 
Democrats ..... 11 80 91.. 7 58 65 
Independents.. .. 1 1 



COUNTIES. 

(83.) 



Alcona 

Alger 

Allegan 

Alpcna 

Antrim 



MICHIGAN. 

,-JUSTICE SUPREME CT.^ 
Rep. Dem. Pro. Lab. 

- irood. Ling. McHugh. 



424 

179 



1220 

907 



209 

27 

2231 

1161 

449 



12.. 
20 

618 
67 
171 



, PRESIDENT, 1888 > 
Rep. Dem. Pro. Lao. 

Harrison. Cleveland. Fiak.Streeter 



645 
284 
5078 
1486 
1305 



542 



3824 
1501 



7 

10 
721 
118 
114 



116 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 




Grant. 


Sherwood 


Laing. 


Me flush. 'Harriso 


n. Cleveland. 


Fiak.Streefcr 


Arenac 


127 


22 


2 


493. 


357 


266 


41 


462 


Baraga 


231 


302 


3 




389 


40d 


4 




Barry 


2288 


1833 


281 


132. 


3112 




391 


167 


Bay 


2750 


2598 


4 


99. 


4378 


63S*j 


12] 


127 


Benzie 


514 


276 


65 


13. 


710 


41y 


94 


17 i 


Berrien 


3276 


3413 


353 


8. 


5126 


468y 


468 


29 


Branch 


2628 


1316 


545 


39. 


4097 




503 


63 


Calhoun 


3669 


2677 


452 


148. 


5733 


435 


613 


159 i 


Cass 


2006 


1711 


237 


2. 


2929 


256 


293 


11 


Charlevolx 


863 


569 


109 


59. 


1270 


eft 


95 


1 


Bheboygan 
hippewa 


680 
1107 


795 
552 


96 
61 


5. 


1110 
1055 


123' 
909 


76 

8? 


8 


Clare 


515 


276 


104 





905 


912 


57 


12 


Clinton 


2349 


1732 


329 


47. 


3493 


3248 


347 


91 


Crawford 




236 


15 


2. 


436 


479 


9 


1 


Delta 




307 


8 





1586 


1332 


11 




Eaton 




1917 


424 


186.. 


4624 


3266 


607 


376 


Emmet 


768 


767 


62 




946 


1056 


106 






3825 


2325 


608 


18.. 


5403 


3904 




20 


Gladwin 


317 


200 








357 


9 


2 


Gogebic 


608 


27 


8 





1367 


1112 






Grand Traverse 


1397 


587 


147 





1858 


925 


154 


8 


Gratiot 


2619 


1768 


268 


25.. 


3667 


2854 


416 


68 


Hillsdale 


3265 


1522 


432 


92 . 


4959 


3035 


566 


140 ' 


Houghton 


2179 


1095 






3009 


2699 


184 




Huron 


1476 




302 


126.. 


ItiOS 


1987 


206 


856 


Ingham 


3653 


3543 


*533 


142.. 


4545 


4782 


507 


112 


Ionia 


2903 


2628 


372 




4435 


3778 




9 


losco 


994 


935 


51 


24.. 


1505 


1639 


114 


53! 


Iron 


1500 


3 


1 




598 


tea 


3 




Isabella 


1367 


971 


107 


8.. 


2154 


1841 


175 


16 


Jackson 
Kalamazoo 


3927 
3402 


3831 
3088 


441 
335 


': 


5647 
5437 


5170 
3949 


585 
522 


164 
38 


Kalkaska 


610 


117 


83 


19.. 


798 


400 


77 


5 


Kent 


8452 


7829 


862 


4.. 


12810 


11865 


12H 


1 


Keweenaw 


360 








411 


185 


4 




Lake 
Lapeer 
Leelanaw 


534 
2620 
516 


1856 
344 


75 
242 

78 


A: 


1062 
3663 
899 


803 
2914 
673 


86 
262 

48 


2 

25 


Lena wee 


4442 


3495 


681 


94.. 


6474 


5671 


916 


21 


Livingston 


2153 


2144 


379 


120. 


2706 


2842 


348 


119 


Luce 


161 


87 


20 






172 


12 




Mackinac 


320 


573 


41 





625 


913 


15 





Macomb '. 


1789 


2460 


128 


1.. 


3244 




a? 


3 


Manlstee 


990 


1208 


117 


19.. 


1668 


2328 




44 i 


Manitou 




123 






3 


141 







Marquette 


3728 


639 


335 





4511 


2105 


244 


s 


Mason 


943 


1023 


37 


71. 


1697 


1573 


67 


4 


Mecosta 


1773 


997 


287 


8. 


2604 


1793 


888 


10 


Menominee 


2612 


498 


82 


I. 


3156 


2182 


96 




Midland : 




661 


107 


20. 


1336 


1148 


127 




Missaukee 




252 


53 


9. 


632 


572 


47 




Monroe 




2042 


177 


17. 


3430 


3940 


181 


15 


Montcalm 


2782 


1789 


382 


38. 


4480 


3495 


372 


46 


Montmorency 


143 


119 


14 





235 


237 


9 




Muskegon 


2414 


1935 


233 


41. 


4520 


3514 


896 


181 


Newaygo 


1456 


1141 


214 


14.. 


2448 


1932 


241 


100 ! 


Oakland 


3921 


3974 


4S8 




5389 


5410 


589 


2 


Oceana 


1041 


841 


357 


30.. 


1726 


1426 


4H4 


22 


Ogemaw 


479 


366 


44 


25.. 


620 


579 


n 


49 


Ontonagon 


521 


79 






308 


542 


t 




Osceola 


1178 


520 


175 


21.. 


1882 


1090 


320 


9 


Oscoda 


149 


91 


16 





277 


299 


11 




Otsego 


388 


181 


67 


84.. 


573 


434 


64 


14 


Ottawa 




1905 


223 


13.. 


4302 


3184 


268 


57 i 


Presque Isle 


306 


316 


32 




408 


484 


11 




Koscommon 


135 


165 







360 


358 


1 


1 


Saginaw 


4515 


6123 


330 


29.. 


6723 


8924 


826 


54 


Sanilac 
Schoolcraf t 


2158 
371 


1805 
142 


294 
22 




2940 
590 


2431 
589 


1 


72 


Shiawassee 


2567 


1765 


500 


12. 


4007 


3186 


513 


' 12 


St. Clair 


3655 


3292 


24ti 


22. 


5418 


5286 


826 


20| 


St. Joseph 
Tuscola 


2426 
2878 


2200 
1690 


146 
95 


8. 
74. 


3372 

3888 


3217 
3112 


180 
891 


203 
72 


Van Buren 


3087 


1769 


301 




4783 


2986 


458 


13 


Washtenaw 


3114 


H913 


336 


5. 


4550 


5481 


543 


14 




9743 


9971 


368 


12.. 


21322 


25976 


H77 


23 


Wexford 


889 


573 


111 




1437 


1066 


160 


1 


Total 


156426 


122955 


16380 


2681.. 


236370 


213459 20942 


4542 


Plurality 










22911 








Percent 


52.41 


40.45 


5.48 


.96.. 


49.65 


44.63 


4.31 


.95 


Scatter'g 






39 






917 






Total vote 


* 298481 


476230 







ELECTION 


RETURNS. 117 


FOR REPRESENTATIVES IX CONGRESS, 1888. 
1st Dist.-Hibbard Baker, Rep 22,076 
J. Logan Chipman Dem 25179 


Daniel W. 
9th Dist. By r 
Hiram B. I 
Lathrop S 
10th DM. F 
Spencer O. 
William H 
William H< 
llth Di t. Sar 
John Powe 
OrrienE. I 

FOR OTE 

Regent State I 
William J. 
John S. Lai 
W. L. Chur 
R. M. Kellc 
John Russ< 
G. C. McAl 
E. P. Green 

Republicans.. 


Breckenridge, Pro 1.709 
~>n M . Cutcheon, Rep 23.025 \ 
ludson, Dem 18,651 1 


Charles E. Coneley, Pro 884 
! 2d Dwt.-Edward P. Allen, Rep 19,660 
Willai d Stearn s. Dem 18.096 


Ellis, . ro 2,476 
nk W. Wheeler, Rep 18.959 i 
Fisher, Dem 18,844 
Fulton Pro 824 


John H. Hobart, Lab 143 
3d Dist.J ames O'Donnell, Rep 24,097 
Eugene Pringle, Dem 17.495 


mry,LaZ> 667 
auel M. Stephenson, Rep. . .20,336 
T.Dem 16,978 


AlmonG. Bruce, Pro 2.609 
Calvin J Thorpe, Lab 824 


)owniug, Pro 1,198 
[ER STATE OFFICERS, 189. 
'niv.C. S. Draper, Rep. . . . 154,977 
Cocker Rep 153773 


4th Dist. Julius C. Burrows. R 
Charles S. Maynai d, Dem. . 
George P. Coming*, Pro.... 
Hampden Kelsey, Lab 


en .21,649 


17,464 


;. 1,587 
221 


vrence, Dem 123^56 
chill. Dem ...12:3,793 


5thDist.-< hnrles E. Belknap, tfe.< 26.bU9 
Melbourn e H . Ford, Dem 23,642 
Byron B. Godfrey, Pro 2,057 


gg, Pro 16,524 
;ll,Pro., 16465 


ister, Labor 2.675 


6th DzsJ.-Mark S. Brewer. Rep 21.271 


LEGISLATURE. 

, 1889-90 . . 1887-8 . 
Sen. Ho.J. Bal. Sen.Ho.J.Bal. 
...24 70 94.. 22 62 84 
8 30 38 






7th Dis .William Hartsuff, Re 
Justin R. Whiting, Dem 


p 16,488 


16,894 
.. 1.037 


Dem.andGr.F 
Labor Fusion' 
Labor-Rep 
Gr.-Repub 

JTIES AND T( 
COUNTY. 
o. Dem. ProLab 

i3on.Clev'd.FiskStr'ter 

5 89 11 - 
S3 1191 64 44 
J7 32 5 - 

53 71 8 - 

1 t i = 

Jo 19 ' 1 - 
$2 43 17 


la. -.. 8 27 35 
ts. -.. 1 6 7 

::: = = =:: i J ! 

)WNS. 
BARAGA COUNTY. 
Rep. L'cm. ProLab 

Hamscn.Clev'd.FiskStr'ter 

Arvon' 49 7 
Baraga . . 101 215 1 




8thDiit.-A*ron T. Bliss, Rep .23.028 
Timnthv "P Tarsnev Dem 20.943 


MICH 

ALCONA COUNTY. 
Rep. Dem. Pro Lab 

Ha>rfson.Cleve'd.FiskStr'ter 

Alcona 71 53 1 
Caledonia.... 17 5 2 - 
Curtis 68 100 - 
Greenbush... 36 24 - - 


[GAN BY COUI 
ALPENA 
Re 

Har 

Alpena Tp . . . 
City.HK 
Green 
Long Rapids. I 
.Maple Ridge. 
Ossineke 1 
Sanborn 
Wilson 


L'Anse 195 165 3 
Spurr 44 19 - 


Gustin 94 70 
Harrisville... 195 175 2 6 
Haynes 115 52 
Mikado 49 23 - 


Total 389 406 4 - 
Plurality... 17 

BARRY COUNTY. 

Assyria 146 67 8 63 
Baltimore.... 159 143 26 
Barry 193 129 12 3 
Carlton 149 201 25 8 


Total 645 502 7 6 
Plurality... 143 
ALGER COUNTY. 
Autrain 61 35 


Total 14$ 
Plurality... 

ANTRIM 

Banks 15 
Central Lake 
Chestonia ' 


!6 1504 118 44 
18 

COUNTY. 

51 56 9 - 
>1 53 7 - 
37 12 - 
13 40 1 - 
>9 27 4 - 
95 5 - 
>5 40 9 - 
4 57 11 - 
17 41 13 
!3 31 2 - 
1 221 7 - 
9 77 19 - 


Burt ,.16 27 


Castleton .... 347 260 55 2 
Hastings Tp.. 123 154 28 1 
City. 316 3tiO 34 24 
Hope 170 161 4 


.Munising 43 86 10 - 


Rock River.. 91 13 - - 


Total 284 162 10 - 
Plurality ... 122 
ALLEGAN COUNTY. 
AJJgan g* 5| 31 13 


3ustar 
Echo 


Irving 169 177 10 6 
Johnstown... 170 83 20 6 
Maple Grove. 159 146 23 28 
Orangeville.. 172 117 9 2 
Prairieville.. 183 79 22 12 
Rutland 120 140 12 11 


Elk Rapids... 2( 
forest Home. ' 


Jord.n i 
Kearney 5 
Mancelona... 31 
Milton i 


Cheshire 232 84 32 3 
Clyde 120 119 4 1 
Dorr 150 228 23 11 


Thornapple . . 294 183 35 
Woodland.... 199 185 51 - 
Yankee Sp'gs 143 91 17 1 


Fillmore 282 96 11 - 
Ganges 264 127 31 3 
Gun Plain.... 314 286 77 6 
Heath - 113 98 4 


Torch Lake. .25 47 5 - 
Warner 38 18 5 


Total 3212 2676 391 167 
Plurality... 536 

BAY COUNTY. 
Bangor . 70 57 2 2 


Total 13( 
Plurality. . . 4J 

ARENAC 
Adams ] 


>5 811 114 - 

4 

COUNTY. 

1 2 16 11 
W 22 90 
18 19-41 
15 12 20 44 
'7 53 73 
W 23 2 65 
to 19 2 40 
i 38 1 9 
>3 29 64 
1 75 
!9 23 - 20 


Hopkins 279 139 37 
Laketown.... 137 45 6 - 
Lee 135 78 7 - 
Leighton W7 111 26 1 
Manlius 204 93 6 6 
Martin 162 97 61 - 
Monterey.... 214 169 15 - 
Otsego... 283 238 154 45 
Overisal 110 152 7 2 
Pine Plains . . 72 66 2 - 
Salem .. ... 165 198 5 2 
*augatuck...2ti3 272 36 
Trowbridge.. 147 176 33 22 
Watson 163 117 40 13 
Wayland 289 184 36 3 


Bay City 2162 1917 55 87 
Beaver 46 63 1 
Frenkenlust.. 53 163 1 
Fraser 78 86 3 5 




Au Gres f 
Clayton ' 
Deep River . . / 
Lincoln ' 
Mason 4 


Garfleld 11 8 
Hampton 233 307 5 - 
Kawkawlin.. 77 112 - 1 
Merritt 62 109 
Monitor 123 183 1 
Pinconning... 227 205 3 
Portsmouth.. 89 93 
West Bay CitylOOo 1001 1 10 
Williams 142 82 9 5 


Moffltt i 
Standish i 
Turner 1 


Whitney .... 5 


Total 5078 3829 721 135 
Plurality... 1249 3 


Total 357 261 41 462 
Plurality... . 105 


Total 4378 5386 121 127 
Plurality.... 1003 



118 THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


BENZIE COUNTY. 
Hep. Dem. ProLab 

Harrison.Clev'd.FiskStr'ter 

Almira ... 64 23 7 


Rep. Dem. Pr^Lab 

Harrison. Clev'd,FiskStr'ter 

Vewton 100 114 1 
Pennfleld 151 73 18 25 
Sheridan 13S 145 16 
Tekonsha 257 127 37 


Rep.Dem.ProLab 

Harn3on.Clev'd.FiskStr'ter 

Greenwood... 37 25 6 - 
Hamilton 64 90 1 
Hatton 50 88 
Hayes 112 144 1 6 
Sheridan 55 51 14 
Summerfield. 20 14 2 
Surrey 170 66 6 


Benzonia 73 21 25 
'Blaine 34 19 19 4 
Colfax 20 30 - 
Crystal Lake. 23*> 90 13 - 
Gilmore 71 90 11 1 
Homestead.. 31 27 2 
Inland 54 33 9 


Total 5733 4357 613 159 
Plural. ty... 1376 
CASS COUNTY. 
Calvin 329 56 17 2 
Dowagiac 373 296 47 
Howard 110 122 4 - 
Jefferson 78 172 12 2 
LaGrange .... 242 331 21 - 
Marcellus.... 228 249 21 2 


Winterfleld . . 66 23 2 - 


Total 905 912 57 2 
Plurality.. . 7 

CLINTON COUNTY. 
Bath 166 137 29 4 


. oyfleld 47 19 7 
'Lake 21 18 13 


Platt 42 29 1 


Weldon 17 13 


Total 710 412 94 17 
Plurality... 298 
BERRIEN COUNTY. 
Bainb ridge... 190 161 18 
Benton 833 434 53 - 
Berrien 216 167 35 
Bertrand 147 175 6 
Buchanan.... 405 343 63 
Chickaming. . 116 91 12 11 
Gallen 181 156 1 - 
Hagar 143 79 7 - 
Lake . 172 199 7 


Mason 86 141 2 
Milton 64 74 3 


Bengal 152 160 6 2 
Bingham .... 652 458 42 11 
Dallas 90 291 2 7 
DeWitt 151 216 21 
DuPlain 346 109 59 
Eagle 182 135 18 11 


Newberg 230 148 10 5 
Ontwa 106 140 30 - 
Penn 218 174 39 - 
Pokagon 166 128 29 - 
Porter 274 157 15 
Silver Creek. 112 111 21 - 
Vollnia 198 144 8 - 
Wayne 115 121 3 - 


Essex 228 169 21 
Greenbush... 249 126 9 1 
Lebanon 141 156 10 1 
Olive 185 157 15 2 


Total 2929 2564 282 11 
Plurality.... 365 
CHARI.EVOIX COUNTY. 
Bay 73 36 6 - 
Bear Lake... 21 33 2 - 
Boyne Valley 58 73 - 
Chandler 27 9 
Charlevoix. .. 201 130 13 1 
Evangeline... 97 57 9 
Eveline 142 80 16 - 
Hayes 61 80 1 - 


Riley 155 154 6 8 


Victor 148 100 31 
Watertown... 202 153 30 29 j 
Westphalia... 21 364 2 - 


Lincoln 198 198 10 - 
New Buffalo.. 109 178 13 15 


NilesTp 189 186 8 
" City.... 475 588 17 - 
Oronoko 142 306 32 
Pipestone.... 216 140 37 - 
Royalton 107 157 7 - 
Sodns . 175 82 18 


Total 3493 3248 347 911 
Plurality.... 245 
CRAWFORD COUNTY. 
Ball 9 19 
Beaver Creek 36 24 4 
Blaine 8 5 


St. Joseph.... 460 401 74 
ihree Oaks... 228 182 8 3 
Watervliet... 286 264 28 - 
Weesaw 138 201 14 - 


Hudson 26 6 
Marion 39 46 4 
Melrose 64 35 5 
Norwood 91 44 1 
Resort 19 32 9 
South Arm... 272 160 21 - 
Springvale... 19 20 
Wilson 60 33 8 


Center Plains 38 38 4 
Frederic 56 25 1 
Grayling 223 2051 


Total 5126 4689 468 29 
Plurality.... 437 
BRANCH COUNTY. 
Algansee 249 70 41 1 
Batavla 181 151 19 2 
Bethel 203 164 25 - 


Maple Forest. 40 118 
South Branch 22 13 


Total 436 479 9 1 
Plurality.... 43- 
DELTA COUNTY. 


Total 1270 874 95 1 
Plurality.... 396 
CHEBOYGAN COUNTY. 
Beaugrand... 49 94 4 
Benton 522 548 25 3 


Bronson 203 328 21 
Butler . . 234 132 23 


Bark River... 70 29 
BayDeNoc.. 66 31 
EscanabaTp. 67 57 
City 596 718 5 


California.... 113 69 17 
Coldwater Tp 204 118 22 11 
City 743 530 94 16 
Gllead 128 68 21 12 
Girard 200 108 38 - 


Hurt 35 49 2 - 

Ellis 18 18 


Forest 10 10 5 - 


Ford River... 174 40 
Gard en 89 123 


Kindernook.. 105 43 10 
Mattlson 202 123 15 5 
Noble 64 82 7 7 


Hebron 19 28 
Inverness.... 98 141 1 1 
Mackinaw.... '0 53 2 


.Maple Ridge. 38 16 1 
Masonville.... 76 62 
Minnewakee.. 131 134 5 
Nahma 91 43 
Sack Bay 38 14 


Ovid 170 94 7 f. 


Qulncy 402 267 80 3 




Sherwood.... 231 166 17 - 
Union 41*) 226 47 


Nunda. ..:.... 78 49 4 


Total 4051 2739 503 63 
Plurality.. ..1312 

CALHOUN COUNTY. 
Albion Tp.... 112 104 20 - 
City... 441 428 126 3 
Athens 177 190 16 - 
! Battle C'k Tp. 161 93 16 19 
" City 1582 920 13*1 72 
Bedford 194 87 19 8 
Burlington... 223 158 30 
Clarence 107 138 13 11 
Clarendon.... 235 62 16 - 
Convis 136 125 4 
I Eckl'ord 203 83 6 


Waverly 4 5 


Plurality.. . 254 
BATON COUNTY. 
Bellevue 308 234 9 4 
Benton 241 155 26 42 
Brookfield.... 185 164 14 4 


Total 1110 1237 76 8 
Plurality.... 127 
CHIPPEWA COUNTY. 
Bruce 93 126 16 


Detour 101 46 2 
Drummond... 33 42 - 


Carmel 162 145 17 1 
Charlotte 566 408 109 1 
Chester 191 164 16 


SaultSte.M'ie 56 7 4 - 
City 526 524 35 
Sugar Island. 59 32 3 
Superior 73 54 3 
Trout Lake.. 11 10 - - 
White Fish... 21 9 


Delta 208 162 40 26 1 


Eaton 171 127 16 


EatonRap.Tp 166 172 22 5 
" City 304 221 60 4 
Hamlln 192 88 43 1 
Kalamo 241 180 18 


Emmet 159 100 11 14 
Fredonla 117 106 6 - 
Homer 287 218 33 2 


Total 1055 909 82 - 
Plurality.... 146 
CLARE COUNTY. 


Oneida 323 254 52 217 
Roxana 285 121 25 26 


Sunfleld 240 106 29 24 
Vermontville 281 208 50 
Walton 320 164 44 
Windsor 240 193 17 21 ' 
Total 4624 32G6 007 376 
Plurality... 1358 


Lee 125 176 7 


LeRoy 178 86 27 2 Arthur 20 58 1 - 
Marenjro 119 151 11 1 Franklin 72 142 1 - 
Marshall Tp.. 103 101 12 Frost 31 24 
City. 428 572 32 2;Grant 208 187 23 6 



ELECTION RETURNS. 119 


EMMET COUNTY. 
Rep.Dem.ProLab 

Harrison.Cles-'d.Fiskbtr'ter 

Bear Creek... 391 462 65 - 
Bliss 35 19 - 


Rep.Dern.ProLab 

Hmon.Clev'd.Fi8kStr'ter 

Hamilton .... 104 70 7 
Ithaca 260 180 22 


INGHAM COUNTY. 
Rep. J em.ProLab 

Harrison. Clev'd.FiskSWter 

Alaiedon.... 143 193 17 8 
Aurelius .... 219 180 40 1 
Bunker Hill. 108 159 10 - 
Delhi 170 200 29 13 
Ingham 184 179 27 2 
Lansing Tp.. 163 119 27 1 
City 1264 1582 141 12 
LeRoy 186 184 19 4 


Lafayette.... 151 135 17 ; 


Carp Lake.... 28 19 
Center 36 28 
Cross Village. 17 99 1 
Kgleston 14 27 - 
1 Friendship.... 52 31 1 - 
Littlefleld.... 35 86 6 
Little Trav'se 183 163 16 
Maple River. 98 62 6 - 
PleasantView 22 41 2 - 
Readmond. .. 35 69 9 - 


New Haven.. 187 153 2 
North Shade. 187 156 4 
North >tar... 223 191 12 3 
Pine River... 334 325 92 1 
Seville 141 153 17 15 
Sumner 225 131 13 
Washington . 185 149 9 2 
Wheeler 170 132 35 - 


Leslie 425 230 20 7 
Locke 199. 137 22 6 
Mason City.. 243 301 37 13 
Meridian ... 152 243 22 


Total 3667 2854 416 68 
Plurality... 813 
HILLSDALE COUNTY. 


Total 946 1056 106 - 
Plurality... 110 
GENE8EE COUNTY. 
Argentine.... 92 156 18 1 
Adas 230 132 10 


Onondaga ... 243 159 13 8 
Stockbridge.. 195 156 21 4 
Vevay 153 118 29 22 


Allen 261 165 13 - 
Amboy 192 109 15 9 


Wheatfleld... 126 175 8 
White Oak... 146 173 11 1 
Wllliamst'wn 226 286 14 10 j 


Burton 171 110 32 1 
Clayton 146 195 29 - 
Davison 279 126 46 
Fenton 470 474 63 
Flint Town'p. 184 124 36 
" City.... 1275 878 120 18 
Flushing 450 163 78 - 
Forest . 206 129 31 6 


Camden 256 203 14 54 
Fayette 282 242 21 - 


Total 4545 4782 507 112 j 
Plurality ... 237 

IONIA COUNTY. 
Berlin 201 204 27 
Boston 287 209 59 


Hillsdale Tp. 72 51 5 2 
City 592 269 75 26 
Jefferson 307 160 19 1 
Litchfield .... 328 114 73 172 
Moscow 176 159 21 - 
Pittsford 310 171 9 - 
Ransom 241 85 44 
Reading 316 191 31 7 
Scipio 139 97 23 6 


Cimpbell 212 140 42 
Danby 177 155 18 - 
Easton 190 188 26 1 
Ionia Towns'p 221 197 38 1 
" City.... 542 596 49 5 
Keene 164 123 14 


Gaines 266 185 21 


Genesee 230 187 43 
Grand Blanc. 228 142 49 - 
Montrose 197 112 21 
Mt. Morris... 136 202 20 - 
Mundy . 194 118 58 


Somerset .... 200 170 14 
Wheatland... 293 50 43 5 
Woodbridge . 208 129 25 2 
Wright 268 234 46 1 


Lyons 357 320 32 
North Plains. 218 209 13 
Odessa 252 292 27 


Richfleid 226 151 22 - 
Thetford 163 141 41 
Vienna 260 179 98 4 


Total 4959 3035 566 140 
Plurality . . .1924 
HOUGHTON COUNTY. 
Adams 112 69 15 - 
Calumet 1167 478 66 - 


Orange 169 151 17 
Orleans 201 177 15 


Total 5403 3904 836 30 
Plurality... 1499 
GLADWIN COUNTY. 
Billings 44 22 


Otisco 396 260 28 


Portland 426 302 25 2 
Ronald 251 77 24 
Sebewa 171 178 28 - 


Buckeye'..'.'.'!! 64 50 1 2 
Butman 44 44 


Chassell 77 25 
Franklin 266 206 6 
Hancock 268 434 5 
Laird 10 7 


Total 4435 3778 482 9 I 
Plurality... 657 

IOSCO COUNTY. 
Alabaster.... 26 29 3 - 
Au Sable. ... 261 425 13 25 
Baldwin 277 199 32 7 
Burleigh .... 42 53 10 4 
Grant 21 19 - 
Oscoda 521 555 30 6 
Plainfield ... 21 21 - 
Reno 34 23 3 


Clement 6 29 


1 Gladwin 88 34 3 - 
Grout 179 101 4 


Osceola 236 136 17 - 
Portage 3H 423 20 
Quincy 133 111 1 - 
Sch olcraft.. 162 588 38 
Torch Lake. . 264 222 16 - 


Sage 76 50 1 - 


Tobacco 24 27 


Total 525 357 9 2 
Plurality.... 168 
GOGEBIC COUNTY. 
Bessemer 414 362 5 
Ironwood 709 440 31 - 
Marenisco... 30 62 
Wakefleld.... 138 146 - 
Watersmeet . 76 102 


Total 3009 2699 184 
Plurality . . 310 
HURON COUNTY. 
Bingham 96 74 12 64 
Bloomfleld... 29 47 4 16 
Brookfleld ... 44 42 1 6fi 
Caseville 141 78 12 15 
' handler .... 49 66 11 45 
Colfax 61 73 17 25 
Dwight 25 78 1 79 
Fair Haven.. 53 71 1 8 
Gore 21 18 12 


Sherman 24 24 1 
Tawas 205 271 21 9 
Thompson... 10 6 
Wilber 63 14 2 1 


Total 1367 1112 36 - 
Plurality... 255 
GRAND TRAVERSE CO. 
Blair 76 57 3 - 
East Bay 169 60 19 
Fife Lake.... 119 64 15 - 
Garfleld 108 71 21 - 


Total 1505 1639 114 53 1 
Plurality.... 134 

IRON COUNTY. 
Bates ^g 26 


Grant 39 45 22 65 


Crystal Falls. 163 158 1 - 
Felch 42 26 


Hume 35 55 5 29 
Huron 48 50 4 2t5 


Iron River . . 133 202 1 
Mastodon .... 122 20 
Stambaugh ..92 88 - 


Green Lake.. 51 25 3 - 
Long Lake... 63 35 13 


Lake... .. 26 19 12 3 


Lincoln 8 16 9 28 


Mayfleld 86 49 8 
Paradise 243 134 7 4 
Peninsula.... 160 65 9 
Traverse 525 269 43 4 
Union 22 19 1 - 
Whitewater.. 137 55 12 - 


Meade 40 30 10 46 
Oliver ..46 43 3 18 


Total 598 520 2 - 
Plurality.. . 78 
ISABELLA COUNTY. 
Broomfleld... 78 26 3 
Chippewa.... 136 40 11 
Coe 295 165 51 - 
Coldwater.... 141 58 - 
Deerfleld 94 117 8 - 
Denver 77 78 4 
Fremont 113 162 7 9 
Gilmore 49 50 6 - 
Isabella 148 147 17 - 
Lincoln 169 136 7 6 
Nottawa 31 112 4 


Paris 35 174 - 7 
Port Austin.. 108 99 5 79 
Rubicon 82 90 18 32 
sand Beach.. 228 124 12 44 


Total .... 1859 925 154 8 
Plurality... 934 
GRATIOT COUNTY. 
Arcada 433 234 31 2 
Bethany 266 202 81 3 
Elba 287 160 8 2 


Sheridan ..".'. 5 90 7 &3 
Sherman 39 141 13 
Sigel 33 44 17 25 


Verona 95 95 17 49 
White Rock. .39 21 10 
Windsor 85 56 6 19 


Emerson .... 167 132 34 7 
Fulton 186 220 22 - 


Total 1608 1987 206 857 
Plurality... 379 



120 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


Rep. Dem.ProLab] Rep. Dem.ProLab 

Harrison ClevM.FukStr'ter! Harrison.CWd.FisicStr'ter 

Rolland 148 77 1 Grattan 140 160 10 - 
Sherman 64 55 lLowell 483 320 85 
'Union 414 406 46 [Nelson 278 232 34 


LENA WEE COUNTY. 
Rep. Dem.ProLab 

Harrison. UfT'd.Fiskstrter 

Adrian Tp.... 182 198 24 
" City.. 1071 1101 88 13 j 
Blissfleld .... 333 205 30 
Cambridge.... 129 187 20 2 
Clinton 195 187 7 
Deerfleld .... IfS 218 16 
Dover 177 195 41 1 
Fairfleld 321 253 55 - 
Franklin 207 135 17 - 
Hudson 548 443 52 4 


Vernon 102 150 6 - Oakfield 128 114 5 - 
Wise 91 61 5 |Paris 334 250 50 - 


Total 2154 1840 175 16 
Plurality... 314 

JACKSON COUNTY. 

Blackman.... 205 196 7 7 
Columbia 176 246 34 2 
Concord 223 137 35 7 
Grass Lake 258 213 25 


Plainfleld .... 216 174 30 
Solon 254 128 26 


Sparta... ... 308 206 174 


Spencer 89 151 8 


Tyrone 192 149 31 
Vergennes... 118 155 8 
Walker 256 306 36 - 
Wyoming .... 309 294 29 - 


Macon 189 157 25 - 
Madison . 186 153 29 1 


Hanover 193 230 39 24 
Henrietta.... 136 173 16 3 
Jackson City. 2315 2338 101 36 
Leoni 189 181 15 7 
Liberty 92 122 36 15 
Napoleon.... 172 103 20 - 
Norvell 84 131 11 4 
Parma 150 125 65 - 
Pulaski 131 154 16 12 


Total . . . .12810 11865 1252 2 
Plurality ... 945 

KEWEENAW COUNTY. 
Allouez 126 30 
Clifton 6 3 
CopperHar'or 13 48 
Kagle Harbor 88 49 1 - 
Grant 10 12 


Medina 281 189 11 


Ogden 322 135 69 - 
Palmyra 207 181 22 
Raisin 261 158 73 - 
Ridgeway.... 162 162 37 - 
Riga . 210 248 17 


Kollin 251 117 81 
Rome 194 153 26 
Seneca 371 353 68 
Tecumseh.... 340 324 85 
Woodstock.. 168 219 23 


Rives 209 129 13 3 
Sandstone.... 215 132 23 8 


Houghton ... 31 16 
Sherman 137 27 3 


>pring Arbor. 142 113 53 
Springport ... 259 99 39 19 
Summit 176 87 9 2 
Tompkins.... 201 80 18 14 
Waterloo.... 121 181 12 1 


Total 411 185 4 - 
Plurality... 226 

LAKE COUNTY. 
Center 21 21 


Total 6474 5671 916 21 
Plurality... 803 
LIVINGSTON COUNTY. 
Brighton 257 182 3(5 
Cohoctah 200 153 19 
Conway 138 87 33 98 
Deerfleld 104 193 4 - 
Genoa 108 157 8 - 


Total 5647 5170 585 164 
Plurality... 477 

KALAMAZOO COUNTY. 
Alamo . 165 113 42 


Chase 248 118 36 1 


Cherry Valley 59 46 9 
Dover 47 90 1 - 
Kden 16 7 


Elk 86 37 


Green Oak... 147 92 26 
Hamburg 110 161 12 
Handy 215 357 39 9 
Hartland 170 140 19 - 
Howell 435 405 69 10 
losco 133 137 4 1 
Marion 144 165 12 
Oceola 133 132 5 1 
Putnam 121 213 21 
Tyrone 140 147 20 
Unadilla 151 121 21 - 


Brady 183 221 20 6 
Charleston... 162 87 19 - 
Climax 277 131 22 1 


llsworth.... 247 289 22 
Glencoe 19 18 
Lake 15 4 


Comstock.... 271 181 20 6 
Cooper 136 146 34 - 
KalamazooTp 243 1<>9 19 - 
" City2211 1650 177 11 


Pinora 135 62 10 - 
Pleasant Pi's. 80 70 4 - 
Webber 35 24 2 


Yates 54 20 2 1 


O*htemo 214 107 15 
Pavilion 170 121 6 


Total 1062 806 86 2 
Plurality ... 256 

LAPEER COUNTY. 
Almont 284 162 18 - 
Arcada ... 81 149 9 


Port ge 127 120 13 - 
PrairleRonde 132 120 16 2 
Richland 207 95 18 
Ross 221 182 19 1 
Schoolcralt.. 353 224 44 11 
Texas 142 124 8 


Total 2706 2842 348 119 
Plurality... 136 
LUCE COUNTY. 
Lakefleld 31 16 
McMillan 154 144 6 


Attica 205 176 2 
Burlington ..193 107 14 
Burnsioe 172 174 22 


Wakeshma.. 223 155 30 - 


Total 5437 3949 522 38 
Plurality ...1488 
KALKASKA COUNTY. 
Boardman ... 93 57 12 
Clearwater... 17 35 9 - 
Cold Springs. 24 14 
Excel*Tor .... 51 34 2 - 
Garfleld 13 17 5 
Glade 12 29 


Deerfleld 134 94 7 -- 
Dryden 196 177 6 - 
Klba 120 155 5 




Total 212 172 12 - 
Plurality .. 40 
MACKINAC COUNTY. 
Brevort 30 32 2 
Cedar. 44 75 
Garfleld 61 140 - - 
Hendricks ... 49 29 
Holmes 53 96 
Marquette ... 14 22 7 
Moran 40 57 
Newton 54 114 
Portage 9 19 
St. Ignace Tp 9 18 
City 262 311 6 - 


Goodland .... Ill 115 11 
Hadley 234 98 22 - 
Imlay 321 242 35 - 
LapeerTp.... 158 90 1 - 
" City... 387 298 20 19 
Marathon .... 256 172 24 - 
Mayfleld 157 122 22 - 
Metamora.... 176 187 5 - 
NorthBranch 207 182 31 5 
Oregon 147 126 1 - 
Rich 124 88 7 1 


Kalkaska 295 118 26 - 
Oliver 11 34 


Orange 49 36 14 
Rapid River.. 100 28 2 5 
>pringfleld... 52 17 2 
Wilson 31 12 1 


Total 3563 2914 262 25 
Plurality. 749 
LEELANAW COUNTY. 
Bin chain 87 49 2 
Ce tervllle.. 67 59 2 - 
Cleveland... 49 45 7 - 
Klmwood 100 55 8 - 
Kmpire 66 64 4 
Glen Arbor .48 26 - 
Kasson Ill 35 12 - 
Leelanaw.... 179 102 7 - 
Leland 58 78 1 - 
tolon 42 30 4 
utton's Bay. 92 130 1 


Total 793 400 77 5 
Plurality... 398 
K.NT COUNTY. 
Ada 150 153 40 


Total 625 913 15 
Plurality... 288 

MACOMB COUNTY. 

Armada 249 161 40 
Bruce 342 178 7 
Chesterfield . 163 187 9 
Clinton 133 244 3 
Erin 183 282 6 - 
Harrison .... 50 99 1 
Lenox 256 251 37 
Macomb lOt? 303 16 
Mt. Clemens. 3'4 592 22 1 
Rav... . 188 124 17 - 


Algoma 411 155 44 


Alpine .. ..187 191 27 


Bowne 211 133 7 - 
Byron 174 250 34 


Caledonia.... 2tO 102 37 - 
Cannon 167 116 34 
Cascade. .... 167 127 22 
Courtland ... 184 169 24 
Guinea 187 137 23 - 
G'd Rapids Tp 1004 628 59 - 
" CityGU03 7005 1252 2 


Total 899 673 48 - Richmond.... 374 175 21 - 
Plurality.. 226 Shelby 189 197 19 



ELECTION RETURNS. 121 


Rep. Dem.Pro Lab 

Harrison.Cli v'd.KijkStr'ter 

Sterling 142 294 2 


Rep. Dem. f'rnLab 

Harri8on.Clev'd.Fi9kStrVr 

Millbrook .... 92 88 24 3 
Morton 155 77 3 
Sheridan 69 26 
Wheatland 145 135 19 


Rep. Dem. P roLab 

Hrrison.Cl>v'd.Fi9kStr'ter 

Cato 256 179 41 
< rystal 155 153 23 - 
Day 232 171 21 


Warren 186 291 3 
Washington.. 319 229 14 2 


Total 3244 3708 217 3 
Plurality... 464 
MANISTEE COUNTY. 
Arcadia 66 50 12 8 
Bear Lake.... 141 101 31 
Brown . . 67 46 1 2 


Total 2c04 1793 333 10 
Plurality.... 811 
MENOMINEE COUNTY. 
Breen 57 57 


Eureka 169 73 10 
Evergreen ... 187 163 7 
Fair Plain.... 189 117 17 
Ferris 203 99 10 - 
Greenville ... 477 407 29 2 
Home 336 145 9 
Maple Valley 214 167 19 
Montcalm.... 172 175 8 
Pierson 173 176 2 - 
Pine . . 84 152 4 


Breitung 72 33 
< edarville.... 39 45 
Ingallston.... 78 28 
Iron Mt. City. 719 233 37* 41 
Menuminee.. 262 145 - 
" City 837 987 18 - 
Nadeau 231 51 6 
Norway 404 251 14 7 
Spalding 218 216 1 
Stephenson.. 239 136 20 


Cleon 64 41 20 
Filer 72 242 6 12 


Manistee Tp. 145 238 15 6 
City 802 1320 82 . 1 
Maple Grove. 29 16 
Morilla 50 37 1 - 
Onekama 118 132 15 - 
Pleasanton... 75 36 25 
Springdale... 21 94- 
Stronack 18 60 5 


Reynolds 271 170 7 
Richland 113 147 8 
Sidney 190 168 3 
Staunton 207 156 12 
Winfield 157 60 15 - 


Total 3156 2182 96 48 
Plurality . . 974 
MIDLAND COUNTY. 
Edenville 62 53 3 - 
Genev 42 40 10 14 
Greendale 26 45 9 1 
Homer 74 70 3 39 


Total 4480 3495 372 2 
Plurality... 985 

MONTMORENCY COUNTY. 
Albert. . 33 50 


Total 1668 2328 212 34 
Plurality... 660 

MANITOU COUNTY. 
Chandler 2 34 - 
Galilee 21 - - 
Peaine 1 86 - - 


Briley 80 110 


Hillman 65 38 8 
Montmo'ency 17 9 
Rust 33 15 1 


Total 3 141 - 
Plurality... 138 
MARQUETTE COUNTY. 
Champion.... 433 28 1 
Chocolay 114 108 7 
Ely 58 41 2 


Ingersoll 132 104 12 
Jasper 127 42 2 
Jerome 44 48 10 


Wheatfleld... 7 15 _ 


Total 235 237 9 
Plurality .. 2 

MUSKEGON COUNTY. 
Blue Lake 34 14 _ _ 
Casinova 176 120 39 28 
Cedar Creek. 37 30 1 
Dalton 83 46 18 


Larkin 30 38 6 2 


Lee 28 39 5 


Lincoln 39 22 5 1 
Midland Tp.. 126 105 10 - 
City. 375 288 37 12 
MountHayley 40 41 
Porter 39 57 5 1 
Warren 100 117 5 7 


Forsyth 36 24 - - 
Humboldt.... 142 28 - 
IshpemingTp 134 62 3 
" Cityl215 447 130 - 


Eggleston ... 34 7 1 
Fruitland .... 74 16 5 
Fruitport 150 159 6 
Holton 133 64 11 20 
Lakeside .... 228 167 75 4 
i.aketon 321 234 37 33 
Montague 180 217 21 28 
Moorland 109 32 10 
Muskegon Tp 134 96 9 1 
" City2046 2007 85 46 
Norton 116 39 9 1 


" City 760 714 70 - 
Michigamme. 184 43 6 
Negaunee Tp 37 8 
" City 724 340 10 - 
Republic 458 164 9 
Richmond 86 16 - 
Tilden 99 33 2 


Total 1336 1148 127 83 
Plurality... 188 

MISSAUKEE COUNTY. 
^Etna 16 45 


Bloomfleld... 21 12 - 
aldwell 78 44 3 
Clam Union.. 99 32 2 - 


Turin 13 8 2 - 


Ravenna 200 114 25 13 
Whitehall ... 299 111 47 - 
White River. 66 41 10 10 


Total 4511 2105 244 - 
Plurali y ...2406 
MASON COUNTY. 
Amber 109 102 5 1 


Lake 42 55 8 


Norwich 34 47 8 


Reeder 137 119 9 2 
Richland 78 30 2 - 
Riverside .... 38 38 13 - 
West Branch. 35 99 - 


Total 4520 3514 396 196 
Plurality . .1006 
NEWAYGO COUNTY. 
Ashland 182 156 26 10 


Branch 37 29 
Custer 169 91 20 2 
Eden 90 54 1 


Free Soil 80 73 5 - 
Grant 22 20 


Total 637 572 47 2 
Plurality... 60 

MONROE COUNTY. 
Ash 234 371 4 


Beaver 57 26 6 
Big Prairie ... 67 38 4 
Bridgeton.... 84 62 3 4 
Brooks 125 126 16 


Hamlin 9 17 
Lincoln 16 15 
Ludington ... 711 752 13 - 
PereMarq'tte 72 92 5 - 
Riverton 127 104 9 
Sherman Ill 118 1 
Summit 57 44 8 
Victory 87 62 1 


Bedford 225 177 35 - 
Berlin 93 276 5 
Dundee 505 312 38 1 
Erie 99 208 
Exeter 138 283 4 - 


Dayton 246 177 32 11 
Denver 113 84 13 23 
Ensley 170 108 15 - 
Everett 85 88 13 
Garfleld 162 136 26 
Goodwell 40 44 
Grant 31 66 2 - 
Home 92 81 1 36 
Lincoln 107 65 4 
Monroe 125 86 
Norwich 99 72 
Sheridan .... 152 146 37 5 
Sherman 88 47 8 1 
Troy 32 67 3 3 


Total 1697 1573 67 4 
Plurality ... 124 
MECOSTA COUNTY. 
JEtn& 151 102 32 - 
Austin 70 65 19 


Frenchtown.. 131 312 
Ida 167 168 5 3 


LaSalle 95 231 1 
London 157 135 17 
Milan 372 158 19 - 
Monroe Tp... 52 144 2 
City. 434 719 3 - 
Raisinville ... 209 230 6 
Summerfield . 249 169 13 9 
Whiteford.... 270 147 29 2 


Big RapidsTp 92 61 7 
" City 868 482 95 2 
Chippewa.... 165 78 16 - 
Colfax 138 109 6 - 
Deerneld 175 95 24 - 
Fork 67 45 10 


Wilcox 165 118 8 2 


Total 3430 3940 181 15 
Plurality ... 510 
MONTCALM COUNTY. 
Belvidere.... 120 140 9 - 
Bloomer 398 235 42 - 
Bushnell 187 136 29 


Total 2448 1932 241 100 
Plurality . . 516 

OAKLAND COUNTY. 

Addison 142 185 16 
Avon 278 262 23 1 
Bloomfleld . . 309 221 23 - 


Grant 107 46 8 


Green S02 102 14 - 
Hinton 132 101 35 5 
Martiny 92 83 -3 
Mecosta 81 98 18 



122 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


Hep. Dem.P roLab 

Harrison.Clev'd.FiskStr'ter 

Brandon 200 174 21 1 
Commerce... 184 133 16 
Farmington.. 268 177 18 - 
Groveland.... 145 134 10 
Highland .... 220 137 31 - 
Holly 275 31(5 36 


Rep. Dem.P roLab 

Harrison.Clev'd.FikStr'ter 

Lincoln 185 45 33 - 
Marion 91 120 5 


S AGIN AW COUNTY. 
Rep. Dem.P roLab 

Harri8on.Clev'd.FikStr-ter 


MiddleBr'nch 50 15 
Orient 97 46 7 
Osceola 170 111 57 4 
Richmond.... 488 218 58 1 
Rose Lake.... 50 36 27 
fherman 72 68 8 
ylvan 67 33 20 
Total 1882 1090 320 9 
Plurality . . 792 
OSCODA COUNTY. 
Atherton 12 16 2 - 
Big Creek.... 55 22 - - 
< 'omins 68 75 2 


Birch Run.... 158 159 11 
Blumfleld .... 159 128 - 
Brady 182 147 14 
Brant 138 75 1 12 
Bridgeport... 216 179 14 1 
Buena Vista.. 147 290 
<:arrollton.... 143 251 6 
Chapin 78 81 6 
Chesaning ... 377 195 31 
E.SaginawCy.2284 2995 105 10 
Frank 'nmuth 59 364 - 
Fremont 62 71 
James 26 139 11 -- 
Jonesfleld.... 68 127 
Kochville .... 49 97 
Lakefleld 20 57 1 - 
Maple Grove. 148 192 6 
Marion 36 17 
Richland Ill 134 3 1 
Saginaw Tp.. 104 181 6 3 
City. 1187 1890 57 25 
Spaulding.... 38 64 - - 
St. Charles... 181 184 17 
Swan Creek.. 47 44 2 
Taymouth.... 110 181 2 
Thomastown. 142 115 7 
Titt'bawassee 213 144 12 
Zilwaukie .... 166 166 1 


Independ'nce 140 229 19 - 
Lyon . ..241 162 57 


Milford 220 293 56 


Novi 212 130 35 - 


Oakland 83 170 8 - 
Orion 130 239 33 - 
Oxford 310 306 18 


PontiacTp... 99 176 8 
City. 585 754 41 - 
Rose 128 150 3 - 
Royal Oak. ... 243 183 11 
Southfleld ... 218 145 10 
Springfield... 187 125 9 - 
Trov 224 132 20 


Elmer 13 15 1 
Greenwood... 22 51 
Harmon 28 16 1 - 
Long Lake... 26 26 5 - 
Mentor 39 64 - 
MountPindus 14 4 


Waterford... 121 177 10 - 
W.Bloomfleld 144 160 12 - 
White Lake.. 93 140 31 - 


Total 277 299 11 - 
Plurality . . 22 
OTSEGO COUNTY. 
Bagley 72 81 7 7 
Charlton 44 42 2 - 
Corwith 81 62 18 


Total 53895 410 589 2 
Plurality . . 21 
OCEANA COUNTY. 
Benona 79 139 30 1 
Claybanks.... 78 69 17 - 
Colfax 29 27 1 - 
Crystal 75 86 24 
Blbridge 121 130 27 
Ferry 116 53 34 - 
Golden 134 . 63 13 - 


Dover 17 26 3 


Hayes 38 16 8 1 


Total 6723 8924 325 54 
Plurality... 2201 
SANILAC COUNTY. 


Livingston . . 152 67 13 6 
Otsego Lake. 101 77 2 - 


Greenwood... 59 31 5 - 


Total 573 434 64 14 
Plurality . . 139 
OTTAWA COUNTY. 
Allandale .... 2t)8 82 24 
Blendon 113 110 4 
Chester , 115 243 12 - 
Crockery 187 109 3 - 


Argyle 64 73 
Austin 81 71 16 


Leavitt 89 87 18 - 
Newfield 95 38 32 - 
Otto 31 97 


Bridgeh'pton. 85 140 10 
Buel 91 82 4 
Custer 61 43 


Pentwater.... 193 185 18 - 
Shelby 245 193 106 21 


Delaware 159 179 5 
Elk 139 124 
Elmer 43 54 11 


Weare 95 103 10 
Total 1726 1426 434 22 
Plurality... 300 
OGEMAW COUNTY. 
Beaver Lake. 53 43 6 
Churchill 43 71- 
Cumming 12 28 
Damon 44 25 10 


Georgetown .229 170 30 
G'd Haven Tp 51 111 10 
Tity529 498 22 4 
Holland Tp.. 383 220 11 18 
City 405 262 16 32 
Jamestown... 232 184 12 
Olive 245 106 13 


Evergreen.... 57 19 33 
Flynn 50 71 2 - 
Forrester.. . 66 94 6 
Fremont 113 79 20 


Greenleaf .... 55 69 1 22 
Lamotte 61 27 12 
Lexington.... 328 188 55 
Maple Valley. 128 92 21 
Marion 121 192 12 


Polkton 382 259 34 
Robinson 56 66 10 2 
Spring Lake.. 325 169 17 - 
Tal Image 210 157 17 - 


Edwards 17 48 - - 
Foster 23 17 - - 


Marlette 249 197 26 - 
Minden 76 128 1 
Moore 124 31 3 
Sanilac 220 120 8 


Goodar 29 62 
Hill 7 4 


Wright 203 254 30 
Zeeland 429 184 3 


Horton 14 25 
Klacking 34 28 - 
Loean 8 3 


Total 4302 3184 268 56 
Plurality ...1118 
PRESQUE ISLE COUNTY. 
Allis 16 23 10 - 


Speaker 169 90 8 
Washington.. 114 84 11 
Watertown... 134 69 5 
Wheatland... 19 28 12 
Worth 133 90 13 - 


1 Mills .11 13 - - 


Ogemaw 61 56 
Richland 35 27 - 38 
Rose 25 8 10 - 


Bismarck.... 24 1 - 
Case 15 22 - - 


Total 2940 2434 245 72 
Plurality . . 506 
SCHOOLCRAFT COUNTY. 
Germfask 24 12 
Hiawatha.... 162 101 30 
Manistique... 271 183 20 
Seney 58 141 
Thompson 75 152 5 


West Branch. 204 185 5 11 


Total 620 579 32 49 
Plurality . . 41 
ONTONAGON COUNTY. 
Bohemia 6 
arpLake.... 6 2 - 


Krakow 18 55 
Metz 44 39 1 - 
Moltke 7 40 - 
Posen 62 158 


Presquelsle. 63 22 - - 
Rogers 84 60 - 


Greenland.... 36 24 
Ontonagon ... 202 424 1 
Rockland 58 92 1 - 


Total 408 484 11 - 
Plurality . . 76 
ROSCOMMON COUNTY. 
Denton 22 62 - 
Gerrish . 28 25 


Total 590 589 55 
Plurality . . 1 

SHIAWASSEE COUNTY. 
Antrim 134 89 20 4 
Bennington ..209 123 17 
Burns 168 206 29 1 
Caledonia ... 143 139 30 
CorunnaCity. 180 177 29 
Fairfleld 139 91 - 
Hazleton 252 141 34 - 


Total 308 542 2 - 
Plurality . . 234 
OSCEOLA COUNTY. 
Burdell ... 132 75 6 


Higgins 88 71 1 
Markey 13 16 
Nester 15 20 - 
Richfield 16 10 - - 
Roscommon . 35 48 1 
St. Helens.... 143 106 


Cedar 32 53 3 
Evart 106 110 24 4 


Hartwick 39 25 12 
Hersey 115 58 8 - 
Highland.... 26 30 18 - 
Le Roy 162 60 21 - 


Total 360 358 1 I'Middlebury .. 175 74 14 2 
Plurality . . 2 |New Haven .159 160 64 



ELECTION 


RETURNS. 123 


Rep. Dem.P roLab 

Harmon.Cle'vd.FiskStr'ter 

Owosso Tp... 170 99 15 1 
" City.. 741 638 53 2 
Perry 295 157 53 - 


TUSCOLA 



Akron 
Aimer 1 


COUNTY. 
p. Dem.Pro Lab 

Tison.Clev'd.FiskStr'ter 

89 87 9 
43 132 8 - 
98 141 8 - 
44 211 4 3 
34 96 24 - 
31 206 20 
14 146 22 3 
87 79 12 12 
18 168 3 1 
59 184 23 
43 152 18 - 
23 76 5 


Rep . Dem . ProLab 

Harnson.Clev'd.FiskStr'tCT 

Manchester.. 220 351 
Northneld.... 91 240 17 - 
Pittsfleld 170 115 8 1 
Salem 161 128 38 - 
Saline 205 235 21 
Scio 187 296 23 9 
Sharon 94 156 13 
Superior 139 157 10 - 
Sylvan 313 247 37 
Webster 160 73 13 1 
York 232 263 36 
Ypsilantl Tp. 184 129 
City 660 634 142 


Sciota 175 184 30 - 
Shiawassee.. 323 246 23 
Venice 160 148 23 


Arbela 1 
Columbia .... 1 
Dayton ] 


Vernon 80S 266 42 2 
Woodhull . . . . 108 107 6 - 


Denmark; / 
Elkland / 
Ellington 
Elmwood ' 
Fair Grove... S 
Fremont S 
Gilford 1 
Indian Fields J 
Juniata 1 
Kingston 1 
Koylton : 
Miflington ... 2 
Novesta 
Tuscola 1 


Total 4007 3186 513 12 
Plurality . . 821 

ST. CLAIR COUNTY. 

Berlin 157 158 21 1 
Brockway .... 230 167 63 
Burtchviile . . 73 39 3 - 
Casco 169 239 1 - 
China 145 171 3 


17 267 25 
82 114 6 - 
26 101 9 2 
08 122 6 - 
40 154 8 
38 54 5 44 
77 163 10 
95 250 43 1 
84 96 19 - 
73 64 7 - 
45 48 1 1 


Total 4550 5481 543 14 
Plurality . . 931 

WAYNE COUNTY. 

Brownstown. 289 255 26 
Canton 114 171 11 a - 
Dearborn 256 223 11 
Detroit 1632720839 564 7 
Ecorse 338 316 1 1 


Clay . .. 192 118 9 


Clyde 107 124 6 - 
Columbus.... 120 193 - 2 
Cottrellville . 91 133 - 
East China.... 36 23 1 - 
Emmet 67 254 3 
Fort Gratiot. 329 277 14 7 
Grant 125 130 13 - 
Greenwood... 159 90 10 - 
Ira 127 156 


Vassar 2 


Watertown . . 1 
Wells 


Wisner 


Greenfield ... 217 249 


Total 38 
Plurality . . 7 

VAN BURE] 


88 3112 295 'Cl 
76 

* COUNTY. 

70 106 3 - 

45 197 24 2 
27 140 11 - 
81 244 23 1 
26 198 35 - 
71 156 4 - 
90 92 20 - 
76 247 65 - 
22 129 36 - 
40 115 15 
17 219 57 1 
65 110 25 - 
20 135 35 - 
45 305 33 4 
85 180 28 - 
72 117 5 2 
09 196 41 3 
22 100 8 


Grosse Point. 144 433 
Elamtramck. . 240 311 1 
Huron '. . 237 220 9 
Livonia 170 194 22 
Monguagon . . 209 245 15 
Nankin 314 331 34 - 


Kenokee 157 151 2 - 
Kimball 166 159 7 


Lynn ..64 85 17 


Antwerp J 
Arlington .... 2 
Bangor < 
Bloomingdale 3 
Columbia 2 
('overt 1 
Decatur 2 
Geneva 2 


Plymouth .... 518 387 109 
Redford 214 239 8 
Romulus 166 182 47 
Springwells .. 566 460 1 
Sumpter 192 195 12 
Taylor 140 86 6 
VanBuren... 219 276 6 - 
Wyandotte Cy 455 364 9 - 


Marine City. . 331 230 11 2 
, Mussev 225 138 29 - 
PortH'uronTp 102 129 7 - 
Cityl280 1336 37 6 
Riley 232 158 42 - 
St. Clair Tp.. 200 234 1 - 
" City. 256 293 9 - 
Wales 277 101 17 2 


Total 5418 5286 326 a) 
Plurality . . 132 

ST. JOSEPH COUNTY. 

Burr Oak 252 234 12 2 
Colon 228 203 5 1 
Constantino.. 364 241 13 5 
Fabius 121 134 1 11 
Fawn River.. 54 91 9 - 
Florence 99 111 48 
Flowerfleld . . 183 120 7 15 
l.eenidas 211 131 8 9 
Lockport 523 458 15 109 
Mendon 260 271 19 10 
Mottville 50 103 2 5 
Nottawa 284 191 39 4 
Park 166 139 1 16 
Sherman 71 172 2 2 
Smrgis 328 362 38 1 
White Pigeon 178 256 5 6 


Hartford 3 
Keeler 1 
Lawrence S 
Paw Paw 3 
Pine Grove... 2 
Porter 1 


Plurality . . 4654 

WEXFORD COUNTY. 

Antioch 87 37 6 
Boon 49 37 


South Haven. 4 
Waverly 2 


Cadillac City. 586 444 33 1 
Cedar Creek.. 241 145 64 
herry Grove 20 22 2 
Clam Lake... 70 82 27 
I!olfax 67 58 4 
Greenwood . . 29 17 1 
Hanover 43 26 5 
Harring 36 29 - 
Henderson... 7 12 
Liberty 39 13 5 
Seima 35 27 5 
Springville... 39 21 1 
South Branch 20 9 
Wexford 69 86 7 - 


Total 47 
Plurality . .17 

WASHTENA 

Ann Arbor Tp 1 
City 9 
Augusta 2 
Bridgewater.. 
Dexter 
Freedom 
Lima 1 
Lodi 


S3 2986 458 12 
97 

W COUNTY. 

55 195 13 - 
19 1012 158 - 
10 179 - 3 
37 178 10 - 
51 140 2 
32 257 - - 
D5 146 - 
73 240 fc - 
72 110 2 - 

SOTA 
Ha 
Cottonwood 
Crow Wing. ] 
Dakota .... 1 
Dodge : 
Douglas... . ] 
Faribault. . 2 
Fillmore.. . J 
Freeborn.. . 5 
Goodhue.. . 3 
Grant 
Hennepin . 2' 
Houston. . 1 
Hubbard. . 
Isanti 
Itasca 
Jackson.. .. ] 
Kanabec. .. 


Total 3372 3217 180 204 
Plurality . . 155 

COUNTIES. PRES., 1888 
(80) Rep. Dem. Pro. L 

HarrUou-Cleveland. Fisk. St 

Aitkin 408 185 185 
Anoka 1320 807 175 
Becker 1360 511 301 
Beltrami.... 
Benton 527 762 35 
Big Stone... 641 446 109 
Blue Earth. 3307 2761 403 
Brown... . 1285 1489 112 
Carlton 924 439 40 
Carver . .. 1486 1886 61 


Total 1437 1065 160 1 
Plurality . . 372 

rrison, Clev'd, Fisk. Str'ter. McGilL Ames. 

760 273 90 .. 698 192 
144 699 65 -.. 708 908 
664 2372 210 7.. 1355 2208 
530 805 222 -.. 1307 712 
744 661 345 75.. 1280 789 
176 1054 297 -.. 1760 825 
428 1759 349 86.. 2768 1884 
413 973 388 .. 1694 1162 
813 1721 364 .. 3904 1811 
899 316 170 . 689 298 
209 15040 1689 84. . 14177 14573 
624 1376 103 -.. 1592 1203 
169 181 1 26.. 105 129 
924 159 320 -.. 937 228 
58 105 10 -.. 26 178 
018 476 86 -.. 936 352 
162 82 114 -.. 237 81 




MINN! 
-^-Gov., 1886-v 
ab Rep. Dem. 

r'ter McGill. Ames. 

-. 213 354 
-. 1019 914 
-. 1070 481 

-! 254 809 
-. 516 512 
8. 2.539 2K77 
17. 91fi 1418 
L3. 502 600 
-. 792 1940 
214 103 
5. 679 543 
-. 1339 503 
-. 1100 902 
31 23 


Cass 474 236 6 
Chippewa... 820 506 182 
Chisago 1481 419 172 * 
Clay. . 1547 972 198 
Cook 24 29 



124 CHICAGO DAILY NE^\ 


r S ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


Harrisoa. Clev d. Flsk. Str'ter. McGill. Ames. 

Kandiyohi . 1938 472 388 13.. 1722 556 


FOR REPRESENTATIVES IX CONGRESS. 
1st Dint M H Uunnell,.Rep 18829 


Kittson 603 360 73 . 494 374 


Thomas Wilson, Dem 16,985 




Robert Taylor Pro 1568 1 


Lake 222 89 2 . 225 47 


2d Dist John Lind Rep 2569 1 ) 


| Le Sueur 1817 2121 199 1 . 1257 2409 


M S Wilkinson Dem *. .... 16,480 


Lincoln 594 399 63 14 . 588 251 


D. W. Edwards, Pro 2.D24 


McLeod 1323 1827 105 . 892 1618 


3d Dist.D . S . Hall, Rep , . .19,259 
J. L Macdonald, Dem 16.391 




C. A. Fosnes, Pr 1,843 




4'hDist S P Snider Rep 44 IF*) 


Meeker 1799 1231 243 . . 1377 1316 


Edmund Rice Dem 34 3^1 


MilleLacs.. 414 229 23 .. 244 198 


J P Pinkham Pro. 3720 1 




5th Dist S G. < omstock. Rep. ... 31351 




Charles Canning, Dem 23,833! 




Z D Scott Pro 4 %> ;>4 ; 


Nicollet 1383 1201 120 . . 1164 1108 
Nobles 896 682 142 34.. 758 503 
Jsorman 1162 356 461 .. 716 634 
Olmsted.... 2432 2094 135 12.. 2109 1952 
Otter Tail... 3874 1770 7X3 -.. 2922 1927 
Pine... .487 431 63 .. 244 443 


LEGISLATURE. 

, 1889- 90 , 1887-8 
Sen. Ho.J.Bal. Sen. HoJ.Bal. 
Republicans... 31 89 120.. 30 66 96 
Democrats 16 9 25 . 16 34 50 


Pipe Stone. 668 305 34 126.. 604 349 
Pope 3096 1711 640 . 1086 388 
Polk. 1267 390 242 . 2625 2019 


Farm Alliance. 2 2.. 1 3 4 
Independents.. 3 3.. 


Ramsey 12163 13094 805 127 . 6830 11699 
Redwood... 1018 540 205 - . 838 409 
Renville.... 1903 1070 192 . 1393 1095 
Rice 2512 2195 295 99 . 2204 2546 
Rock 995 325 94 2 . 839 2t>7 


MISSISSIPPI. 

COUNTIES . Go v.'89.< PRES . , 1888. % 
(74) Dem. Rep. Dem.ProLab 

Stone.Harri-son.Clevel'd.FiakStr'ter 

Adams 710. 1981 793 


t. Louis 4920 1914 242 297 . 2858 1849 


Alcorn 1903.. 447 1094 3 


cott 805 2092 51 . 513 2036 


Amite 719 375 13 ( (9 3 


Sherburne.. 790 437 59 . 679 549 
Sibley 1389 1437 54 . 867 1596 


Attala 1956.. 927 1924 - 
Benton 846 479 814 1 


Stearns 2173 4747 195 . 1361 3869 
Steele 1488 1207 137 1339 1290 


Bolivar 410.. 1726 907 


Stevens 679 . 475 78 - . 576 4K1 


Calhoun 2001.. 108 1163 5 
Carroll 1704.. 60 1052 4 


Swift 1098 743 132 .. 890 842 
Todd 1508 870 102 849 894 


Chickasaw 1063.. 432 1264 2 - 


Traverse .. 542 451 44 .. 440 649 


Choctaw 1066, 3 743 
Claiborne .... 477 . 14 599 


Wabasha... 1669 2033 179 .. 1435 2226 


Clarke 911 . 496 1510 12 


Wadena 604 337 71 ..981 944 


Clay 698 . 234 1508 


1 Waseca 1498 1169 171 .. 938 1442 


Coahoma 441.. 1591 612 


Washington 2764 2015 123 .. 2015 2230 


Copiah 2135 461 2267 


Watonwan . 928 326 88 .. 761 313 


Covington 998 4 638 


Wilkin 546 359 50 . . 407 414 
Winona 3176 3738 142 2.. 2378 3845 


DeSoto 1279.. 960 2083 - 
Franklin 1691 . 203 776 9 


Wright 2877 2133 345 .. 2393 2231 
Y. Medicine 1175' 346 139 1027 314 


Greene 553.. 63 381 
Grenada 453.. 253 708 


Total 142492 104385 15311 1094 106966 104483 
Plurality 38106 . 2483 


Hancock 1408.. 313 725 33 
Harrison . . 1144 478 850 22 


Per cent.... 54.11 39.64 5.80 .42 . 48.66 47.46 
Scattering . 24 ... 


Hinds 1259. 956 2201 12 - 
Holmes 2714 . 717 1664 2 


Total vote . 263306 220531 


Issaquena 1098 . 568 487 


Child, Pro., in 1886 received 9,030 votes for 
Governor. 


Itawamba 1886: 50 13X) - 
Jackson 11*96.. 616 833 8 - 
Jasper 811 , 611 1045 4 




Jefferson 599 . 363 683 


Governor W R Mcrriam Hep 134,355 


Jones. 1282.. 671 
Kemper 577 325 1213 


E M Wilson Dem 110251 


Lafayette 1160 487 1687' 


Hugh Harrison, Pro 17.026 


Lauderdale 904 ! 332 2150 13 


J H Paul Lab 385 




Lieut -Gov A E Rice Rep. 139984 


Leake 684 209 1200 


Daniel Buck Dem 104808 


Lee 3054 27 1508 


T S Reimestad Pro 15565 


Leflore 334 1 825 2 


M M Pond Lab 497 


Lincoln . 1979 631 1097 1 


Sec of State Hans Mattson, Rep 141.373 


Lowudes 620 . 17 1122 2 


W C Bredenhagen. Dem, 104,80i> 


Madison 964 . 344 2032 1 




Marion 1082 5 826 5 




Marshall 1691 1420 2264 


Treasurer J Bableter, Rep 141916 


Monroe 1779 413 21)62 


H Nelson Dfm 104100 


Montgomery . 474 118 989 


J A Allen, Pro 15,510 


Neshoba 1256.. 3 884 


J Whitehead. Lab 539 


Newton .. 1004.. 135 1875 1 - 


AWy- Gen. M E. Clapp, Rep 142.074 


Noxubee a34.. 846 


Charles D'Antremon. Dem 104,202 


Oktibbeha 693.. 399 1342 11 


C E Shannon Pro . 156 4> 9 


Panola . 1510 . 1121 1650 


William Welch Lab . 644 


Perry 801 . 17 547 34 


Chief Justice-3. Gilflllan, Rep 144.962 
Segrove Smith, Dem 105,795 


Pike 690.. 585 1518 6 - 
Pontotoc 2233.. 509 9t>7 4 


V. L. Claffey. - ro ~tt 
Associate Justice L W Collins Reo 148785 


Prentiss 2084.. 281 1231 - - 
Quitman 507 . 167 105 


G F Batchelder. Dem 101937 


Kankin .. 1212.. 504 1545 


G. S. Livermore, Pro 569 


Scott 533.. 112 1016 5 - 



ELECTION RETURNS, 












126 


Stone.Harriion.ClevrrdJ'iskStr'tcr. 

Sharkey 886 599 228 4 


] 
Clay 
Clinton 
Cole 


larrison 

1103 
1632 
1709 
2416 
1255 
1741 
1169 
2049 
1598 
957 
1306 
719 
3261 
1735 
1623 
4934 
2344 
2418 
2634 
1076 
1831 
1278 
1370 
662 
14350 
4522 
2228 
2895 
1372 
1274 
2819 
2460 
1412 
1628 
2505 

s 

2850 
685 
539 
2294 
1921 
1596 
787 
1448 
983 
1906 
1260 
352 
1787 
3016 
360 
1446 
884 
168 
1198 
3393 
685 
2729 
1010 
2100 
662 
1935 
816 
1890 
1796 
259 
507 
2'W8 
1635 
1445 
776 
38072 
2184 
1042 
1226 
629 
423 
1102 
1064 
854 
2021 
827 
1161 


Clev'd- 

3628 
2167 
1824 
2685 
1172 
1479 
706 
2320 
1573 
1174 
477 
1838 
2579 
556 
2042 
3985 
1363 
1722 
3289 
628 
I4a3 
2578 
1506 
1004 
15663 
3635 
2438 
3183 
1661 
1030 
3865 
2181 
2268 
2380 
2588 

1118 
1055 
3365 
1097 
1195 
1312 
1436 
3873 

1114 
1969 
2989 
1157 
1190 
434 
599 
1284 
a369 
1183 
3493 
2727 
1794 
1048 
1045 
1942 
3481 
3182 
862 
805 
2381 
1(598 
2214 
1167 
30108 
4387 
1329 
1680 
1382 
828 
2105 
1919 
303 
1948 
471 
1813 


Fisk. 

145 
61 
9 
7 
9 
44 

27 
58 
16 

31 
14 

76 
96 
34 
14 

67 

72 



8 
457 
67 
30 
89 
31 
21 
51 
37 
23 
5 
76 
31 
4 
71 
34 
5 
92 
18 
17 
28 
20 
25 
51 
8 

40 
97 

i 

i 

77 
13 
75 
37 
69 

41 
12 
36 
55 

4 
6 
38 
44 
1 
225 
51 
7 
24 

95 
20 

21 

10 
12 


Str'trr 
1.. 

100.. 
8.. 
30.. 
2.. 
266.. 
485.. 
239.. 

ft: 

634.. 

10" 

4.. 

129.. 
722.. 
37.. 
147.. 
217.. 
164.. 
55.. 

fc: 

94.. 
295.. 
975.. 

i.: 

46.. 
518.. 
95.. 
505.. 

60S)!! 
236. 
164.. 
35.. 
38.. 
128.. 
17.. 
39.. 
2.. 
397.. 
12.. 
7.. 
2.. 

533!.' 
446.. 

* 

172.'.' 

49!! 
99.. 
305.. 
11.. 
1.. 
325.. 
59.. 
33.. 

128:: 
75. . 
2.. 

77.. 
12.. 
318.. 
56.. 
51.. 
1797.. 
202.. 
20.. 
9.. 

30" 
13.. 
2.. 
105.. 
6.. 
93.. 
335.. 


Brace, Cravens, 

3660 721 
2310 1530 
1669 1525 
2425 210o 
1125 1007 
1274 1580 
714 951 
2247 1972 
1536 1534 
1019 695 
533 1478 
1862 212 
2277 2696 
420 1674 
2063 1599 
3443 3987 
1093 1909 
1670 2291 
2733 2028 
711 1045 
1294 1742 
2016 1143 
1383 1081 
949 421 
10916 9469 
2954 3402 
2353 1766 
2969 2659 
1523 1096 
1136 956 
3344 2412 
1938 2089 
2013 1152 
2147 858 
2197 2142 
2010 1320 
998 646 
3004 2288 
990 407 
1080 461 
2809 1403 
920 1624 
1119 1287 
1060 570 
1535 1363 
4051 653 
1990 1534 
1175 1061 
900 294 
2025 1804 
2985 2<-,38 
1114 304 
1211 1322 
383 637 
719 90 
1221 1018 
2982 2488 
1331 929 
3220 19.56 
2573 811 
1722 1997 
950 582 
1046 1577 
1518 497 
3373 1243 
3004 1429 
957 136 
903 401 
2013 2433 
1703 1414 
1554 736 
1068 680 
20562 18527 
3517 1918 
1288 973 
1617 1064 
1293 437 
549 172 
1887 540 
1858 742 
280 736 
1908 1824 
385 599 i 
1542 924 


Simpson 923.. 193 750 1 
Smith 1515.. X 1082 2 - 
Sunflower 638.. 14 365 - - 
Tallahatchee 643.. 28 1021 - 
Tate 1362 . 437 1931 


Cooper 
Crawford... 
Dade 
Dallas 
Daviess 
DeKalb 


Tippah . 1364 . 483 1301 1 


Tishomingo 1384.. 144 810 5 
Tunica... 664. 956 509 


Union... 1718.. 397 1049 4 


Warren 2493.. 958 2364 
Washington 666.. 1322 18"0 9 


Douglas 
Dunklin 
Franklin.... 
Gasc'nade... 
Gentry 
Greene 
Grundy 
Harrison 
Henry 
Hickory 
Holt 
Howard 
Howell 
Iron 


Wayne. ., 752.. 494 690 4 - 


Webster 1512.. 161 725 2 22 
Wilkinson 378.. 37 495 - 
Winston 807 . 708 2 


Yalobusha 1992.. 211 1046 


Yazoo 489.. 7 1196 - 


Total 84929. .30096 85471 218 22 


Plurality . 84929.. 55375 


Per cent. 100. . 25.21 73.80 1.88 
Total vote 84929.. 115807 
A Republican State Convention was held at 
Jackson Sept. 25, 1889, and a full State ticket 
was nominated. In October, however, the 
ticket was withdrawn, which left the Demo- 
cratic ticket without any opposition. 

O^HFR STATE OFFICERS ELECTED, 1889. 

Lieut.-Gon.M. M. Evans. Dem. 
Sec't/ of State G. M. Govan, Dem. 
Auditor Vf. W. Stone, Dem. 
Treasurer 3 . 3 . Evans, Dem. 
Alt" y- Gen. T. M. Miller, Dem. 
Supt. Jnst.J. R. Preston, Dem. 

FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 

1st Dint. Dr. Joseph M. Bynum, Rep 1,732 
John M Allen, Dem 11,353 


Jackson 
Jasper 
Jefferson 
Johnson 
Knox 


Laclede 
Lafayette... 
Lawrence... 
Lewis 
Lincoln 
Linn 


Livinest'n... 
McDonald... 
Macon 
Madison 
Maries 
Marion 
Mercer 
Miller 
Mississippi . 
Moniteau... 
Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 
N.Madrid... 
Newton. ... 
Nodaway.... 
Oregon 
Osage 
Ozark 
Pemiscot ... 
Perry 
Pettis 


2d Dist James R Chalmers Rep 5817 


John B Morgan Dem 13,978 


3d Dist James Hill Rep 4,614 


Thomas C . Catchings. Dem 11,624 
4th Dist. Matthew K. Mister, Rep 2,396 
Clarke Lewis, Dem 12.855 


5th Dist F. M. B. Cook, Rep 3.9: 




6th IK,s.-LeonC. Duchesne, Rep 4,464 
Thomas R ^tockdale. Dem ..10,580 


7th Dist. Henry Kernaghan, Rep 3,587 
Charles E . Hooker, Dem 11,977 
LEGISLATURE. 
, 1890-91 > , 1888-9 . 
Sen. Ho. J.Sal. Sen. Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans.... 6 6.. - 8 8 
Democrats 40 114 154.. 40 120 160 

MISSOURI. 
COUNTIES. ^PRESIDENT, 188S-. Sup.CT.'Sfi. 
(124) Rep. Dem. Pro. Lab. Rep. Dem. 

Harrison. Clev'd Fisk. Streeter. Brace. Cravens. 

Adair 2228 1531 55 36.. 1433 1893 
Andrew 1976 1691 62 8.. 1637 1840 
Atchison... 1554 14fi5 39 308.. 1463 1328 
Audrain 1506 3152 53 23.. 2435 901 
Barrv 1904 1963 7 351.. 1739 1676 
Barton 1543 1883 116 412.. 1766 1312 
Bates 2674 3556 161 633.. 3311 2403 
Benton 1704 1374 9 53.. 1352 1554 
Bollinger.... 1090 1303 4 5.. 1292 766 
Boone 1512 4069 38 26.. 3544 1274 
Buchanan... 5011 6369 80 139.. 4763 2955 
Butler 857 1189 1 42.. 986 494 
Caldwell.... 1853 1528 35 175.. 1401 1618 
Callaway... 1624 3912 20 9.. 2904 860 
Camden 1056 675 -- 225.. 693 887 

CapeGirardeau... 2198 1894 21 195.. 1839 2044 

Carroll 2>30 290B 121 133.. 2630 2531 
Carter 292 455 1 .. 280 115 
Cass 2095 3015 104 20.. 2696 1698 
Cedar 1124 1434 44 404.. 1564 1564 
Chariton.... 2345 3452 23 86.. 3087 1971 
Christian.... 1541 795 7 459.. 823 1359 
Clark 1724 1791 37 -.. 1676 1508 


Phelps 
Pike 
Platte 
Polk 
Pulaski 
Putnam 
Rails 
Randolph... 
Ray 
Reynolds.. .. 
Sipley 
St.Charles... 
St. Clair 
St.Fr'ncois.. 

Ste. GeneTievc 

St. Louis.... 
Saline 
Schuyler 
Scotland 
Scott 
Shannon .... 
Shelby 
Stoddard.... 
Stone 
Sullivan .... 
Taney 
Texas 



126 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



Harrison. Clevel'd. Pik. S r'ter Brace. Cravena. 



Vernon 2252 4057 61 257. 



Warren 1498 589 13 

Wash'gton.. 1222 1336 1 

Wayne 1001 1428 5 

Webster 1441 1286 10 

Worth 771 

Wright 1372 



4(5.. 



1709 

639 1464 

1492 995 

1381 753 

1330 1364 

883 754 

1040 1398 



789 39 137. 

771 11 538. 

Total ..236257 261974 4539 18632. .229125 178490 

Plurality.... 25717 . . 50635 

Percent 45.16 50.07 .86 3.57.. 54.16 42.19 

Scattering.. 17S6 ... 276 

Total vote... 523198 .. 423549 

Orr, Pro., In 188ri received 3.504 and Jones, 
Gbk., 12,430 votes for Judge Sup. Court. 

VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS 1888. 

Governor E. E. Kimball, Rep ...242,533 

I) . R. Francis, Dem 255,764 

Lowe. Pro 4,387 

A. Mauring, .Lab 15,388 

Scattering 269 

Lieut. -Gov.-G. H.Wallace, Rep 238,534 

S. H. Claycomb, Dem 261,734 

Wilson, Pro 4,672 

Seabourn, Lab 3,440 

Sec. of State Y'.'w.'Moii', Rep'.". .'.'.'.' .'.'.'.'.236,855 

Alex. LeSueur, Dem 261,401 

Faris, Pro 4,389 

B. Fox, Lab 18,769 

Auaitor-G. W. Martin, Rep 236,686 

J. H. Seiberl* Dem 261.759 

Cobban.Pro 4,380 

W. H. Noerr.Laft 19,074 

Treasurer A. P. Frowein, Rep 236,695 

E. T Noland, Dem 261,745 

(jraig. Pro 4,524 

W. Vertrees, Lab 18,881 

Att'y-Gen.L. L. Bridges, Rep.dc U. L.. 252.165 

J. ". Wood, Dem 261,810 

Bowling, La& 4,464 

Register of Lands-3 . H. c base. Rep 236,519 

McCulloch. Dem 261,738 

McMurry,Pro 4,327 

G. DeBernard1,Lab 18,772 

Railroad Com.-B. W. Vedder, Rep 236,469 

Hennessy, Dem 261,580 

Laney, Pro 4,320 

W. H. Bell, .Lab 18,931 

Judge Sun. Court J. S. Botsford, Rep... 235,129 

Barclay, Dem 262,723 

Boswell. Pro 4,302 

O. D. Jones, Lab 15,542 

FOR REPRESENTATIVES IX COXGRESS. 

IstDist. Sidney G. Brock, Rep 17,349 

William H. Ra.tch.Dem 20,859 

Thomas H. Tat low. Lab 470 

2d Dist. A. C. Eubanks. Rep 16,949 

Charles H . Mansur, Dem 21,608 

O M. Shanklin, Pro 265 

Larkin Wise, La 1,328 

3d Dist .James Love, Reu 16,743 

Alexander M . Dockery, Dem 20,414 

JamesH. Hillis, Lao 1,065 

4th Dist. -Henry R. W. Hartwig, Rep 13,729 

James N. Burnes, Dem 16,866 

Lorenzo D. Cook, Pro 517 

Samuel Black, Lab 1,040 

5th Dist. Thomas B. Bullene, Rep 20,499 

John C. Tarnsey, Dem 22,635 

6th Dist Joseph B.Upton, Rep 21,249 

JohnT. Heard, Dem 25,129 

Joseph Whittaker, Lab 1,943 

7fh.Dtet.-W. W. Edwards, Rep 16,312 

Richard H . Norton, Dem 18.275 

8th Dist. Frederick G.Niedringhaus,Bep. 14,210 

John J. O'Neill, Dem 12,394 

Andrew Grassley, Pro 54 

R. C. Langsdon, Lab 572 

9th Dist .-Nathan Frank. Rep 13,762 

George A. Castleman, Dem 11,312 



Frederick H Ingalls, Lab 

10th Hist. William M. Kiusey, Rep 

Martin L. Clardy, Dem 16,886 

J. V. E. Swart, Pro 112 

Michael J Ratchford, Lah 1,411 

llth Dist. Thomas H. Mustek, Rep 1583.. 

Richard P. Bland, hem 18,096 

Jasper Needham, Lab 1,954 

12th Dist. John H. Hannah, Rep 19,431 

William J. Stone, Dem 24,054 

VanB. Wisker, Pro 587 

AvaE. Page, Lib 4.613 

13th Dist. William H. Wade. Rep 16.480 

Christopher C . Matlock, Dem 13.601 

Frederick P. Alter, Lab 3.792 

14t h Dist. -Moses Whybark, tfep 14.139 

James P. Walker, Dem 19,878 



LEGISLATURE. 



Republicans 

Democrats 

Union Labor.... 

Independents 

Gr. -Labor 



. 1889-90 . , 1887-8 

Sen. Ho:J.Bal. Sen.Ho.J.Bal. 
58.. 8 50 58 



99.. 24 ' 88 112 

13.. - 2 2 

4.. - 

-.. 2 2 



MONTANA. 



COUNTIES. Gov. '89. 
(16) Rep. Dem. 



Beaverhead . 

Choteau 

Cascade 

Custer 

Dawson . 



Powers. Toole. 

852 706. . 

645 613. . 

896 813. . 

618 546.. 

289 256.. 



Deer Lodge... 2587 3133.. 

Fergus 673 619.. 

Gallatin 769 952.. 

Jefferson 1144 1250 . 

Lewis & Clark 2541 2852. . 

Madison 724 696.. 

Meagher 691 727.. 

Missoula 1651 1624.. 

Park 1064 886.. 

Silver Bow ... 3444 3610.. 
Yellowstone. ._400_281 J _._ 

Total 1898819564.. 

Majority 556.. 

Percent 49.2850.72.. 

Total vote 38552 .. 

In 1888 Wilson, Pro., for 
148 votes. 



COXST'N. DEL.'88. 
Dem.Rep. 

For.Agamst, Clarke.Carter 

1187 102 . 725 909 
807 
973 
801 
364 



45., 



732 
913 
616 
213 



5111 



25. 

593. . 2173 3284 
854 92.. 548 780 
1296 86. . ' 855 761 
1514 121.. 1170 1339 
3141 191.. 2675 3290 
1145 105. 
989 90. 
2331 137. 



655 763 

691 848 

1504 2182 

677 1067 



1053 

3062 467. . 2844 4331 
457 21.. 369 556 



24096 2274. 17360 22486 
22406 . . 4978 

92.67 7.33. .43.38 56.19 

26950 .. 40014 
delegate, received 



VOTE FOR OTHER STATE OFFICERS. 

Lieut.-Gov.E,. J. Rickards, Rep 19,764 

H.Conrad, Dem 18,198 

Sec. of State L. Rowitt, Rep 19,803 

J. A. Browne, Dem 18,048 

AtVy-Gen. H. J. Haskell. 7?<>p 19,261 

W. Y. Pemberton, Dem 18,517 

Treasurer R. O. Hickman, Rep 19,726 

J.Collins, Dem 18,126 

Supt. Pub. Jnst.Johv Gannon, Rep 18.326 

J.R. Russell, Dem 18,022 

Auditor E. A. Kinney, ' ep 19,487 

T. A. Fitzgerald, Dem 18,252 

Chief Justice H. J. Blake. Rep 19,690 

S. DeWolfe,D<?m 18,082 

Associate Justice (5 years) E. N. Har- 

wood, Rtp 18.859 

F. K. Armstrong, Dem 18,374 

Associate Justice (7 years) W. H. De- 
Witt, Hep 19,274 

W. M. Bickford, Dem 18,208 

Clerk Sup. Court W.J. Kennedy, Hep.. 19,571 

G. F. Cope, Dem 17,684 

FOR REPRESEXTATIVE IX COXGRESS. 

Thomas H. Carter. Rep 19,912 

Martin Maginnis, Dem 18,264 



ELECTION 


RETURNS. 127 


LEGISLATURE. 
. 18PO 1 1888 , 
Senate. Ho. J. B. Council. Ho. 


Norval. Amrs.Wighton.HaTison. Clev'd.FiskStr'ter 

Pierce 439 532 8. 428 447 22 20 
Platte 1265 1*505 42. 1240 1627 91 
Polk .. 1011 870 112 951 480 175 389 


Democrats.. '.'.'.'.'.'.& 24 32 5 4 
This la the Legislature according to the cer- 
tificates of the State Board of Canvassers. The 
Board threw out Tunnel precinct in Silver 


Red Willow 980 431 68. 1155 565 64 288 
Richardson. 1717 1751 97 2084 1888 128 45 
Rock 412 175 . - 
Saline 1661 1599 183. 2109 1746 293 - 
Sarpy 601 734 45 658 875 71 1 


Bow county because of frauds. The County 
Clerk later issued certificates of election to 
several Democratic legislators affected by the 
rejection of that precinct, which made the 
Lower House Democratic. Two legislatures 
therefore convened. The courts of the state 
will have to decide which set of certificates is 
legal. 
NEBRASKA. 

COUNTIES. --SupJDG.'89-^ .-PRESIDENT, '88,-v 
(88) Rep. Dem. Pro. Rep. DemPro.Lab 

Norval. AmfsWizhtonHarriionClevelandFiskStr'ter 

Adams 1668 1170 221.. 1929 1282 375 230 
Antelope.. 832 813 90.. 1412 584 153 135 
Banner 309 13.. 
Blaine 170 84 .. 146 96 11 17 


Saunders. .. 1574 1?91 324. 2141 1806 369 57 
Scott'sBluff 251 164 . - 
Seward 1740 1490 104. 1804 1658 104 12 
Sheridan. .. 1027 872 9. 1008 699 81 64 
Sherman. . 602 546 . 706 561 42 1 
Sioux 322 235 1. - 286 292 6 34 
Stanton 476 521 1. 442 467 9 21 
Thayer 1251 1093 67. 1391 1060 83 73 
Thomas 87 35 . 80 78 3 5 
Thurston... 311 159 10. 
Valley 762 604 87. 829 525 132 48 
Washington 1254 921 170. 1302 971 147 55 
Wayne 645 595 3. 616 433 31 138 
Webster.... 1451 775 87. 1316 749 123 116 
Wheeler.... 254 33 1. 293 J26 2 9 
York 1942 1058 139. 2253 1111 179 65 


Boone 1126 516 40. . 1188 598 58 - 
BoxButte. 715 636 32.. 718 556 46 3 
Brown 505 394 3.. 1075 542 45 138 
Buffalo 2402 1239 27.. 2324 1375 172 55 
Butler 983 1519 136.. 1478 1495 226 47 
Burt 1013 45*i 98.. 1627 613 112 36 
Cass 2225 2013 81.. 3041 2913 141 119 


Total 91470 72442 5821. .108425 80552 9429 4226 
Plurality... 19028 .. 27873 
Per cent.... 53.35 42. 78 3.42.. 53.50 39.70 4.162.08 
Total vote.. 169733 .. 202632 
Edgerton, Lab., in 1887 received 2,653 votes 
for Judge Sup. Court. 


Cedar 634 733 24.. 586 6JO 16 63 
Chase 628 383 2.. 731 417 49 12 
8heyenne.. 638 467 5.. 1689 1114 94 49 


VOTE FOR OTHER STATE OFFICERS, 1889. 

Regents of the University C. H. Mor- 
rill, 'Rep 93 317 


herry 719 543 .. 749 540 44 55 


J. L. Knights, Rep. . . 93 356 


Clay 1648 869 243. . 2090 995 303 12 


W. S. McKinny, Dem. . 68 194 


Coif ax 732 1107 46. . 829 1040 83 5 


E. W. Hess, Dem 68364 


Cuming 796 1250 71 . 1038 1316 96 22 


J. F. Holires, Pro 5587 




L. B. Palmer, P ro .. 5416 




W. Blakely, Lab 2 308 


Dawes 1138 783 5.. 1128 656 -- 


O. M. Kent, Lab 2'%9 


Dawson 1307 657 11.. 1087 614 72 
Deuel 404 197 .. 
Dixon 808 650 126.. 888 627 112 1 
Dodge 1418 1973 104.. 1853 2245 178 6 


FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 
1st Dist.Vf. J. Connell,^ p.... ....32,926 


Douglas 5745 6975 156. . 10237 10810 430 63 


J. Sterling Morton, Dem .29,519 
Edwin B. Graham, Pro .. . 2,9d2 




J. W. Edgerton, Lab 6501 




Scattering 22 




2d Dist. James Laird, Rep 30959 


Furnas 1100 620 1 1317 647 85 51 


W. G. Hastings, Dem 21 201 ' 


Gage 2907 1796 171 3563 2341 327 48 


George Scott, Pro . 4,128 


Garfleid 191 160 10 * 235 122 6 34 


R. H. Rohr, Lab L715 




Scattering 45 


Grunt 51 57 . 42 49 5 


3d Dist. -George W. E . Dorsey, R p. 42,188 


Greeley 534 589 519 569 1 4 


E. P. Weatherby, Dem 31118 


Hall " 1706 1325 8* " 1907 1509 99 33 


A. M. Walling, Pro 2.995 


Hamilton 1477 1036 61 1730 988 140 2 


I. O. Jones, Lab 1487 




Scattering 104 


Hayes 544 363 .. 516 320 7 35 
Hitchcock.. 851 412 1.. 826 436 28 54 
Hooker 29 7 .. 
Holt 1682 1271 131.. 1990 1532 70 50 
Howard 834 962 8.. 916 963 30 - 


LEGISLATURE. 
. 1889-90 1887-8 , 
Sen. Ho.J.Bal. Sen.Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans 27 76 10:1.. 25 70 95 
Democrats 6 22 28 8 30 38 


Jefferson. .. 1442 922 85.. 1742 1001 120 20 
Johnson. ... 1192 1001 109.. 1252 947 116 78 
Kearney.... 968 696 35.. 105(5 667 113 117 
Keith 324 303 15.. 319 263 21 34 
KeyaPaha.. 475 323 -.. 636 a38 56 39 
Kimball 172 23 7.. 
Knox 930 67T 107.. 1038 706 69 84 
Lancaster.. 3830 2181 455.. 5677 3508 780 - 
Lincoln 1088 714 .. 1154 726 18 11 
Logan 203 120 206 149 1 1 


United Labor. ... 1 1.. 
Ind. Republicans 1 1. . 

NEVADA. 

COUNTIES. ,-PRES. 1888-^ ^Gov. 1886-s 
(14) Rep.Dem.Pro, Rep, Dem 

Harnson.Clev'd.FUk. Stevenson. Adams 

Churchill 86 89 -.. 100 96 
Douglas 269 144 6 251 165 


Loup 256 15 204 58 1 7 


Elko 790 695 6 690 609 


Madison 1183 1217 151.. 1392 1154 100 69 


Esmeralda 413 265 2 446 304 


Merrick. 1081 337 209.. 1136 639 273 7 


Eureka 614 356 1 615 516 


Nance 692 323 77.. 645 369 98 15 
Nemaha 1258 1013 105 1427 1094 132 113 


Humboldt 427 467 11.. 445 499 
Lander 374 270 381 328 ' 


Xuckolls 1106 765 149 1251 742 167 42 


Lincoln . . 150 177 157 1% ' 


Otoe 1654 1705 284 2039 2137 351 17 


Lyon 448 263 389 303 


Pawnee 1307 653 131 1297 645 148 139 


Nye 198 137 180 210 


Perkins 574 398 24.. 645 402 17 68 


Ormsby 570 354 .. 442 456' 


Phelps 1106 501 16.. 1238 355 185 73 


Storey 1605 1241 -.. 1233 1318 



1 8 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


Harri3on-Clevel'd.Fisk.Stevenon. Admaj. 

Washoe... . 899 655 14. 761 601 


Gru'ib. AbbetfLaMonte. Harrison. Clevel'd.Fisk. 

Gloucester... 33">9 2934 246.. 3970 3094 317 
Hudson 14306 27822 189.. 19142 27til5 290 
Hunterdon... 302 4926 473.. 3556 5530 540 
Mercer 8328 8077 399.. 9455 8214 374 
Middlesex.... 5234 6727 212.. 6061 7209 268 
Monmouth... 6046 7520 524.. 735S 8510 648 
Morris 4894 4994 465.. 5828 5580 536 
Ocean 1967 1446 97.. 2316 1465 113 
Passaic 8913 7081 283.. 9184 8950 283 
Salem . 3132 2950 211 3354 3135 273 


White Pine 385 213 1. 372 261 


Total 7229 5362 41. 64fi2 5862 
Plurality... . 1903 . 600 


Percent 57.14 42.44 . 52.53 47.47 


Total vote 12632 . 12,324 
FOB REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS. 
H. F. Bartine, Rep 6,912 


G. W. Cassidy, Dem 5,682 

VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS 1888. 

Justice Sup. Conrt-A. M. Murphy, Rep.. . .6.467 


Somerset 2-0 2950 222.. 3142 3294 195 
Sussex 1902 2779 165.. 2343 3310 160 
Union 5620 6321 231.. 6658 7571 254 


Warren 2?C7 4455 470.. 3358 5078 503 


Regents S ate University 
Lone Term T H Wells Hep ..7,077 


Total 123992 13*245 6853. .144371 151521 7939 


Plurality 142^3 .. 6150 
Percent 45.89 51.372.54.. 47.16 49.87 2.64 
Scattering ... 13 
Total vote... 269103 .. 303831 

FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 
1st Dist C A Bergen Rep 24 906 


^ fl. L. Fish.^ep '- 7,150 
M 8 Bonnliield Dem 5.284 


g ')' King D^m 5317 


Short Term K T George, Rep 7.150 




LEGISLATURE. 

, 1889-90 , 1887 8 . 
Sen. Ho.J.Bal. Sen. Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans 15 26 41.. 14 31 45 
Democrats 5 14 19.. 6 9 15 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

COUNTIES. ,-PRESiDENT,'88-^ Gov., '86 , 
(10) Rep. Dem. Pro. Rep. Dem. Pro. 

ffirriTOn.Clev-d.Fisk. Sawyer. CoiswellWent'th 

Belknap 2687 2542 113. 2027 2418 92 
Carroll . 2338 2434 162. 2019 2197 183 
Cheshire 4118 3164 110. 3191 2373 243 
Coos 2298 2719 44 1773 2310 87 


Brindle, Dem 19440 


Nicholson, Pro 2107 
2d Dist. James Buchanan, Rep 22407 
Beasly Dem 19 104 


Morgan Pro 1 292 


3d Dist John Kean, Jr Rep 203 8 


J A Gelssenhainer, Dem 22961 


Park Pro 1110 


4th Dist Voorhees, Rep 12 117 


Fowler. Dem 12 190 


Roe, Dem 5 079 


Lamonte, Pro . .1593 


5th Dist Beckwith. Rep 20277 


Hoagland Dem 19 205 


Uirafton 5209 5170 190. 4499 43fiO 229 
Hillsborough 9148 8439 267. 7479 7271 400 
Merrimack . . 6004 6119 346. 5189 5310 518 
Rockingham. 6450 0552 200. 5395 5555 242 
Strafford .. 4580 4271 80. 4156 a581 101 
Sultan..... 2688 2041 82. 2067 1910 115 


Wlnterhurn Pro 901 


6th Dixt. -Herman Lehlbach, Rep 25,536 
Haynes, Dem .24 7f>2 


Anderson. Pro . 835 


7th DM . -Colli ns. Rep 20,424 
William McAdoo, Dem 26,498 


Total 45820 43451 1594. 37795 37295 2210 
Plurality .. 2369 . 500 
Percent 50.3947.791.82. 49.07 48.49 3.43 
Scattering.... 1651 
Total vote.... 90922 .. 7<300 

VOTE FOR GOVERNOR 1888. 
Daniel H Goodiell Rep ... 44 809 


LEGISLATURE. 
. 1889-90. , . 1887-8. 
Sen. Ho. J.Sal. Sen.Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans 11 23 34.. 11 28 39 
Democrats 10 37 47.. 10 32 42 

NEW MEXICO. 

DELEGATE , 
COUNTIES. 1888. 1886. 
(14) Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. 

Otero. Joseph. Dwver. Joseph. 

Bernalil o 1692 12P9.. 1578 1310 
Colfax 660 849.. 621 888 
Dona Ana 893 1122.. 553 868 
Grant 962 1195.. 823 913 
Lincoln 371 955.. 398 924 


Charles H Amsden Dem 44,093 


Edgar L. Carr, Pro. 1,5 .7 


FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 

1st Dist. Alon/o Nute, Rep 21,754 
Luther F McKinney Dem 21345 


Daniel C. Knowles, Pro C67 
2dDiit Owen C Moore, .Rep 23,519 


Edward F Mason Dm 22 450 


Mora 739 1455 531 1589 


Josiali M Fletcher Pro 744 


RioArrioa 1211 1240. 1208 1574 
San Juan 169 234.. 
San Miguel 2 '.90 2iJ66.. 2525 2717 
Santa Fe 1108 1468.. 977 13ST 


LEGISLATURE. 

, 1888-9 , 1887-8 
Sen. Ho. J.Sal. Sen.Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans 18 169 187.. 15 169 184 
Democrats 6 144 150.. 9 138 147 

NEW JERSEY. 

COUNTIES. - Gov. 1889. \, PRES., 1888. , 
(21) Rep. Dem. Pro. Rep. Dem. Pro. 

GruBb. Abbett.LaMonte. Harrison. Ck-veUFisk 

Atlantic 2818 2247 236.. 3031 2560 263 
Bergen 3374 4196 140.. 4239 4898 104 
Burlington.. 7449 5838 43.. 7480 6969 5il 
Camden 9773 6979 392.. 10490 7901 481 
Cape May... 1351 1048 127.. 1464 1101 165 
Cumberland 4880 4000 626.. 5542 4353 840 
Essex 22097 22955 682. . 25300 25184 768 


Sierra 706 658 601 700 


Socorro 1400 1107 919 1613 


Taos 952 1055 . 817 1060 


Valencia 928 828.. 795 706 


Total 14481 16131. . 12346 16249 
Plurality 1650 . 3903 


Percent 47.30 52.70.. 43.17 56.82 
Total vote 30612 .. 27395 


LEGISLATURE. 

. 1890. , 1888. , 
Council. Ho. 
Republicans .... 7 15 19 


Democrats 4 9.. 17 
Independents 1 .. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



129 



NEW YORK. 

COUNTIES. ,-SEC. STATE, 1889-x , PRESIDENT. 1888. . . GOVERNOR, 1888. > 

(60) Rep. Dem. Pro. Gbk. Sep. Dem. Pro.U.L.Un.L.Rep. Dem. Pro.Soc.UnL.U.L 

Gilbert. Rice. Griffen.Beecher.Harnson.Cleveland.Fisk.Str'ter.Cowdrej.Milfer. Hill. Jones. Hall. PigeWard'r 



Albany 15807 19157 

Allegany 4780 2227 

Broome 5890 4434 

Cattaraugus 6108 4206 

Cayuga 7172 4843 

Chautauqua 7766 3845 

Chemung 4002 4734 

Chenango 5279 3974 

Clinton 5034 2859 

Columbia 5599 4870 

Cortland 3859 2562 

Delaware 6023 4826 

Dutchess 8006 6747 

Erie 2763425627 

Essex 3192 1694 

Franklin 4035 20(58 

Fulton 4738 3378 

Hamilton 482 642 

Genesee 3524 2531 

Greene 3094 3640 

Herkimer 5707 4804 

Jefferson 7660 6387 

Kings 59597 67838 

Lewis 3465 3046 

Livingston 3866 3128 

Madison 4873 3355 

Monroe 1502612102 

Montgomery 4850 4747 

New York..! 67120130696 

Siagara 5287 5449 

nefda 1288711877 

Onondaga 13076 9541 

Ontario 4338 5107 

Orange 9328 8800 

Orleans 3610 2817 

Oswego 7815 5048 

Otsego 6358 5932 

Putnam 1893 830 

Queens 6724 9156 

Rensselaer 11372 14926 

Richmond 3045 4163 

Rockland 2465 2707 

St. Lawrence.. . 10033 3802 

Saratoga 6587 4989 

Schenectady 2705 3207 

Schoharie 2655 4277 

Schuyler 1858 1282 

Seneca 2790 3164 

Steuben 8317 6881 

Suffolk 5154 4550 

Sullivan 3222 3075 

Tioga 3680 2658 

Tompkins 3762 2930 

Ulster 9074 8513 

Warren 3351 2257 

Washington... 5872 3S60 

Wayne 5463 3535 

Westchester 11604 11399 

Wyoming 4083 2480 

Yates 2771 1715 



974 
625 
754 
537 
797 
331 



5U2 
615 
486 
612 
156 
135 
472 
16 
320 
373 
307 



19362 21037 407 
70B7 3625 1174 241 



24 . 18741 



6.. 8495 
74.. 8586 
45.. 9646 
32.. 12108 
23.. 5467 
41.. 5798 
6.. 6271 
6447 
4732 



6447 
6173 
6380 
6178 
6037 
4640 
4724 



6602 5332 

10265 9249 

31612 29543 

5043 2930 

5757 3028 

[5892 4634 

3633 
4494 
5611 



. 

5 - 

6 . 
- 1. 
14 3. 



8275 
8456 
9301 
12045 
5258 
5775 
6213 
6401 
4669 
6682 
10235 
28011 
4993 
5709 

5851 



21634 
3662 
6544 
6274 
6693 
6205 
6249 
4630 
4756 
6047 
3188 



2977 
3067 

4660 



1187 
809 
842 
646 
898 
359 
615 



35 



20 - 

S -i 

1 



563 3 1 



4952 
4460 
6H83 



987 15. 



1048 
174 
778 
588 
974 
710 
354 
548 
613 
464 
491 
116 
163 
530 
52 
189 
546 
656 
130 
195 
217 
127 
860 
426 



470 
265 
400 
5f4 
574 



14., 



70052 82508 

4369 3807 

5584 4067 

7199 4641 

18.. 21650 16677 

1. 6355 5677 

37.. 106922 162738 

6886 6429 

16241 14276 

20144 14001 

6957 5753 

11261 10852 

4277 3214 

11296 7429 

7829 6974 

2098 1515 

11017 12683 

15718 15410 

4100 5764 

3013 3939 

14611 6509 

8594 6570 
3329 
5006 
1975 

3576 3705 

11637 9154 

7167 6600 

3860 3757 

4852 3609 

5073 3909 

10825 10487 

4135 2883 

8023 4284 

7850 5120 

13799 14948 

4899 3166 

3410 2139 



n I: 



j f:: 

2184'.'. 
2 6.. 



j 

17.! 

8.. 

11.. 

4.. 
2 -.. 



754 
124 
93 



418 
274 



5 - 



540 
512 3 



134 - 

12272549 




15.. 



4.. 

33.. 

8.. 
21.. 
24.. 

3.. 
13.. 






4511 4439 

6678 5640 

9749 7616 

68747 82932 1258 507 

4314 3850 167 1 

5442 4188 

7006 4826 

20574 17602 

6291 5749 

99352 168454 

6657 6633 

15650 14786 

19332 14679 

6890 5818 

11230 10854 

4226 3243 

11204 7510 

7752 7068 

2125 1475 

10943 12653 

15281 15827 

4250 5532 

3101 3841 

14470 6631 

8608 6573 

3640 3305 

3684 5000 

2632 2045 
3731 
11359 

7316 

3772 3825 

4835 3620 

5162 3814 

10763 10550 

4057 2944 

8007 4304 

7675 5258 

13967 14485 

4718 3318 

3?3S 2222 



10 - 



6 - 



214 
146 

9418 1107 
6386 507 



J 1 
67 - 
2 - 



95 

11 - 

5 - 

~2 - 



11 - 

1 - 

1 5 

15 - 

5 - 



161 - - 



315 
487 
311 
373 
638 
743 
519 
278 



21 1 
46 - 



1 - 

4 



Total 486867505894 26763 753. .650338 635C61 30231 626 2663. .631293 r,50464 30215 3348 313 

Plurality 20~>27 .. 1437 19171 

Percent 47.5949.61 2.62.. 49.19 48.10 2.29 .16.. 47.99 49.43 2.29 .25 

Scattering 953 1 

Total vote 101973* . . 1321892 1315C63 



VOTE FOR OTHER STATE OFFICERS, 1889. 
Comptroller- M. W. Cook, Rep 489,154 

Edw. Wemple, Dem 500,344 

B.L. Rand. Pro 

Treasurer I. W. Hedges, Rep... 

Elliott Danforth, Dem 

J. W. Bruce, Pro 26,527 



488,427 



Atfy-Gen. J. M Varnum, Rep. 

C. F. Tabor, Dem 499,480 

C.A. Hart, Pro 26,836 

Engineer W . P. Van Rensselaer, Rep.. 487.079 

John Bogart. Dfim 504.060 

A. B. Kenyon, Pro 26,724 

Judge Court Appeals A. Haight, Rep. . .487,567 



Dennis O'Brien, Dem. . 
W. J. Ferrington, Pro. 



FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS, 1888. 

1st Dist. James W. Covert, Dem 24.347 

George W. Cromwell, Rep 22,711 

John P. Ellis, Pro i... 890 

2d Dist. Felix Campbell, Dem 23,497 

Thomas Se ward, Rep. dk Lab 17,625 

Charles F. Burke, Pro 389 

3d Dist. -William J. Combs, Dem 21,231 

William C. Wallace, Rep 18,410 

Henry R. King, P o 428 

4th Dist. John M . Clancy, Dem 20,987 



130 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 18M. 



W E. Robinson, Rep. & Lab 14.060 

IsaacK Funk, Pro 292 

5th Dist Thomas J. Magner, Dem 18,613 

Henry J. Hesse, Rep 16,469 

Charles H. Colby. Pro 202 

6th Dist.F. T. Fitzgerald, Tarn. Dem 13,079 

John Cavenagh, Co. Dem. A Rev 9,833 

George M . Myer, Pro 397 

George Knight, Soc. Lab 6 

7th Dist. Edward J. Dunphy, Tarn Dem..l0.257 

Charles N. Taintor, Rep 8,843 

L. L. Bryce, Co. Dem 6,482 

Dean LaBanta, Pro 85 

L. Blynn, Soc. Lab 28 

8th Dist. John H. McCarthy, Tarn. Dem.. 14.827 

Tim J. Campbell, Co. Dem 9.778 

Julius Schwartz. Rep 3,456 

John C. McCaulay,Pro 

John Shaefer, Soc. Lab 162 

9th Dist. Samuel S. Cox, Dem 184J67 

John Mackin, Rep. A Lab 7,320 

A. W. W agnail. Pro 399 

Christian J. Yeager, Soc. Lab 636 

Aaron Hanover, Ud. Lab 23 

10th Dist.F.B. Spinola,Dem 13,749 

William Beyhan, Rep. & Lab 12,016 

W A. Wilson, Pro 389 

John Hansen, Soc. Lai, 189 

llth Dist. Charles A. Winch, Rep.& Lab. 15,619 

John Qulnn, Dem 20,730 

M.J.Ryan.Pro 175 

E. Wolf, Soc. L'ib 321 

12th Dis'.-Roswell P. Flower,Dem 25.546 

Davis M . Hildreth, Jr., Rep 12,273 

John L . Thomas, Pro 159 

John J. Flick, Soc. Lah 670 

13th Dist. -A. P. Fitch, Dem 28,580 

James O. Hoyt,7?ep 19,412 

Herman Kahn, Soc. Lab 270 

8. W. Clapp, Pro 192 

14th Dist.Vf.G. Stahlnecker.Dem. 22,485 

James Wood, Rep 18,356 

V. W. Benedict, Pro. 841 

Ed. Goldsmith, Soc. Lab 162 

15th Dist. Moses D Stivers, Rep 18,358 

Henry Bacon.Dem 18,284 

Thomas Caldwell.Pro 954 

16th Dist. John Ketcham, Rep 18,912 

Michael Denning, Pro 6,370 

nth Dist. -Charles M. Knapp, Rep 21,826 

Frank N. Gillert, Dem 20,217 

A. K. Smiley, Pro 1.420 

18th Dist.--J. A, Quackenbush, Rep 23,639 

S. B. Sanford, Dem. 19,717 

Truman Temple, Pro 879 

lirth Dist. Charles Tracy, Dem 21 



Moses W. Dodge._Rep., 
ussell, . 



George Russell, Pro 

A. Kessler Lab 37 

20th Dist. John Sanford, Rep 23,966 

Z. 8. Westbrook, Dem 20.665 

W. H. Place, Pro 1,301 

21st Dist. John H . Moffitt, Rep 21.361 

FrancisG. Crosby, Dem 1,063 

22d Dist. Frederick Lansing, Rep 24,309 

George C. Sawyer, Dem 13,582 

W R Gray.Pro 1,283 

23d Dist. James S. Sherman, Rep 20,119 



John D. McMahon.Dem 

Solomon Hoxie, Pro 1.104 

24th Dist. -David W11ber,^p 18,532 

John S. Pindar.Dtm. 17.273 

C. S. Johnson, Pro 1,049 

25th Dist. James J. Belden, Rep 24.672 

A. N. Vamlerbilt, Pro 6,691 

Charles Dohne. Lab 90 

26th Disl. Milton Delano. Rep 26,267 

Patrtck Maloney, Dem 18,955 

T. E Case, Pro 2,171 

27th Dist .-N. W . Nutting, Rep 2^.803 

D S.Titus. Dem 18.327 

H. E. Rheubottom.Pro 2027 

28th Dist Thomas S. Flood, Rep 1(5.822 

Adrian Tuttle.Dem 15.564 

Thomas Carman, Pro 1.063 



29th Dist. John Raines, Dem ............... 21,794 

John W. Dininny, Rep ................... 16.969 

W. R. Hunt, Pro ......................... 1.843 

30th Dist. Charles S. Baker, Rep .......... 21,810 

Chan cey Nash, Dem .................... 16,106 

John J. Cornell, Pro ..................... 1,400 

3ist Dist. John G. Sawyer, Rep ............ 19.50*5 

Fred C. Stevens, Dem ................... 14.082 

E. E. Barnum, Pro ....................... 2,284 

32d Dist. John M. Farquhar, Rep ......... 22,4ti8 

W. E. Mackey.Dem .................... 20,859 

J. W. Grosvenor, Pro .................... 193 

33d Dist. John M. Wildey, Dem ........... 15,705 

Richard Crowley. Rep ................... 15.141 

George T. Chester, Pro ................. 1.318 

34th Dist.-W. G. Laidlaw, Rep ............ 27.453 

Charles F. Howe, Dew .................. 12,027 

M. 9. Covey, Pro .: ...................... 2,256 

8. C. Davis.Zab .......................... 484 

LEGISLATURE. 

, - 1890. - , . - 1889. - > 

Sen. Ho.J.Bal.Sen.Ho.J.Bal. 

Republicans ..... 19 71 90.. 20 77 97 

Democrats ....... 13 57 70.. 11 51 G2 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

COUNTIES. ^PRES. 1883. N 

(96) Rep. Dem. Pro 

Harrison. CleVd. Fisk. 

Alamance ........................ 1544 1716 148 

Alexander ....................... 548 943 27 

Alleghany ...................... 407 687 4 

Anson ............................ 1055 2157 - 

Ashe .............................. 1518 1416 - 

Beaufort ......................... 1833 2033 126 

Bertie ............................ 1109 1218 5 

Bladen ........................... 1375 1520 - 

Brunswick ....................... 965 1023 4 

Buncombe ....................... 2873 2956 121 

Burke ............................ 1162 1249 7 

Cabarrus .......................... 933 1659 81 

Caldwell .......................... 723 1257 1 

Camden .......................... 614 588 - 

Carteret .......................... 714 1082 33 

Caswell ........................... 1627 1351 11 

Catawba ......................... 765 2349 94 

Chatham ......................... 2027 2581 130 

Cherokee ........................ 888 673 

Chowan ........................... 808 738 4 

Clay .............................. 290 401 9 

Cleveland ........................ 762 2264 32 

Columbus ........................ 893 2078 15 

Craven ........................... 2618 1359 6 

Cumberland ..................... 2028 2523 - 

Currituck ........................ 461 1001 6 

Dare .............................. 337 321 

Davidson ......................... 2346 2023-97 

Davie ............................. 1199 1008 17 



Duplin 

Durham 

Ed 



rham ........ ; ................. 1618 

gecombe ...................... 2542 



2209 

1835 82 
1331 5 



Forsyth 2613 2238 - 

Franklin 2019 2218 1 

Gaston 1260 1589 77 

Gates 808 1146 3 

Graham 195 284 

Granville 2625 2399 10 

Greene 1078 994 

Guilford 2721 2402 361 

Halifax 2867 2488 - 

Harnett 1100 1498 

Haywood 991 1328 22 

Henderson 1297 915 8 

Hertford 1055 1107 



Hyde 771 

Iredell 1894 

Jackson 612 



843 - 
2720 73 
902 18 



Johnston 2129 2992 

Jones 613 706 3 

Lenoir. 1428 1598 40 

Lincoln 922 1205 9 

Macon 754 805 41 



Madison. 



1901 1158 



ELECTION RETURNS. 131 


Harriwn, ClevM.Fisk. 

Martin.... . 1308 Ifi63 


Miller. Roach. For. AgainstMathewsHarden 

Benson 467 111.. 523 45.. 117 439 
Buttineau 335 304.. 450 116.. 314 414 
Billings 45 14. 57 1.. 33 15 


McDowell 874 1002 11 


Mecklenburg . 3253 4206 93 


Mitchell 15i*6 675) - 


Montgomery 1207 992 3 




Moore 1826 1955 42 


Dickey 10S7 506. 1471 26.. 1000 650 
Eddy 241 161. 381 13.. 273 233 
Emmons 391 78. 462 2.. 374 93 
Foster 235 131. 333 4.. 227 130 


\a*h 1719 2181 


New Hanover 2856 1870 


Northampton 1996 1684 .6 


Orange 1299 1613 35 


Grand Forks.. 1^29 1263. 687 1930.. 2272 510 
Griggs 346 205. 351 150.. 296 506 
Kidder 259 88. 340 3.. 321 124 
LaMoure 594 235.. 818 11.. 56S 261 
Logan 77 13.. 90 ..56 5 


Pamlico 605 730 9 


Pasquotank 1221 826 25 


Pender 758 725 - 


Perquimans 986 783 16 
Person 1292 1369 


Morton 680 335.. 924 21.. 684 315 
McHenry 219 68.. 257 7.. 277 62 
McLean 223 41.. 264 .. 259 53 
Mclntosh 375 20.. 394 ..273 17 


Pitt 2358 2569 68 


Polk 418 436 6 


Randolph 2339 2121 260 
Richmond . 1743 1729 9 


Mercer 70 15.. 84 1.. 93 18 


Robeson 1970 2879 41 


Oliver 28 48.. 47 30.. 31 44 
Pembina 1553 1241.. 1762 830.. 1348 1355 
Pierce 181 46.. 221 1.. 


Rockingham 2176 2351 44 


Rowan 1274 2732 58 


Rutherford 1669 1678 24 
Sampson . 1608 2390 7 


Richland 1199 771.. 1409 251.. 1093 978 


Stanly 776 1021 16 


Ramsey 779 343.. 810 231.. 1069 551 
Roulette 250 238.. 435 10.. 229 337 


Stokes 1363 1442 7 


Surry 1611 1672 15 
Swain 453 527 23 


Stark... 432 182.. 610 .. 434 198 
Stutsman 818 603.. 1334 47.. 715 853 
Steele 546 92.. 241 361.. 546 173 
Sargent 1027 216.. 973 177.. 1029 366 
Traill...: 1524 469.. 1411 462.. 1356 794 


Transylvania . . 565 523 


Tyrrell... . 374 472 1 


Union 879 2067 16 


Wake 5029 4511 88 


Towner 184 244.. 284 93.. 172 185 
Walsh 1842 1100. . 606 2248. . 1848 1718 
Wells 186 152 336 149 182 


Warren 879 549 1 


Washington .. 1051 775 12 


Ward 296 114.. 350 43.. 355 252 


Watauga 976 908 3 


Wayne 2629 2748 42 


Total 25365 12733. .27441 8107.. 25290 13801 


Wilkes 2292 1691 16 


Majoritv 12632 ..19334 .11329 
Per cent 66.57 33.42. .77.19 22.80. .61.00 33.45 
Total vote 38098 .. 35548 .. 41291 

In 1888 Bierly, 7. D., for delegate, received 
1722 votes, and Cranmer, Pro., 418 votes. 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS. 


Wilson . 1580 2130 


Yadkin . 1431 1065 45 


Yancey 805 929 - 


Total .. 134784 147902 2784 


Plurality 13118 


Per cent 47.22 5182 .08 


Total vote 285470 


VOTE FOR GOVERNOR 1888. 

O H Dockery Rep 135980 


D W Maratta, Dem 12',006 


VOTE FOR OTHER STATE OFFICERS, 1889. 
Lieut.-Gov Alfred Dickey, Rep 25,779 
S. K. McGinnis, Dem 12316 


D G Fowle Dem .149,592 


FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 
1st Dist.E . A. White, Rep 15,457 
T.G. Skinner,Dem 16,615 


Sec. of State John Flittie, Rep 25,620 
A. S. Frostid, Lem 12.424 


2dDist. H. P. Cheatham, Rep 16,504 
F.M. Simmons, Dem 16,051 
3d Dist. W. S. O'B. Robinson,.R0p 12,835 
C. W. McClammy, Dem 16,809 
4th Dist.- John Nichols, Rep 17,SJ8 


C. E. Lord, Dem, 12,386 
Auditor John O. Bray, i ep 25,719 
P. Odegard, Dem 12,356 
Att'y-Gen. Goodwin, Rep 25,855 
T. R. Bangs, Dem 12,148 


5th Dist.J . M. Brower, Rep 15,940 
J. T. Morehead,Dcm 15,265 
6th Dist.-C. P. Lockey, Rep 14,797 
A. Rowland, Drm 20,502 


Supt . Pub. Inst. . Mitchell, Rep 25,784 
C.A.Kent, Dem 11,746 
Com.ofAff.andLab.U. T . Hi\geson,Pep 2t>,339 

Com of ns A L Carey Pep 26 332 


7th Di.-it. W. J. Ellis, Rep 12,125 
J. S. Henderson, Dem 15,122 
C. P.Frazier, Pro 619 


W. A. Friedley, Dem 11,388 
Judges of Supreme Court Alfred Wall- 


8thDist.~E. W. Ward, Rep 10.031 
W H H Cowles Dem .. .13139 


G. C. H. Corless, Pen 27,315 
. Bartholomew, Pep 26,289 
W. P. Millar, Dem 11,840 


9thDist. H. G. Eward, Rep Io.4o3 


LEG ISLATURE. , 1889-90 . 1887-8 
Sen. Ho.J.Bal. Sen. Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans 13 35 48.. 17 56 73 
Democrats 37 85 122.. 29 56 85 
Independents .. 3 9 12 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

COUNTIES. Gov.'89. CoNST'N.^-DEL.'88-^ 
(38) Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. 

Mil'.rr. Roach, For. AgainstMathew.Har.U n 

Barnes 1191 498 . 1673 8 953 727 


. Gammons. Dem 11.680 
Railroad Comrs.T.S. Montgomery Pep 25,G36 
T S Underhill Pep 24.850 


David Bartlett Pep . 25,057 


F P Wrisht Dem 13184 


Peter Cameron Dem 12227 


J.A.Ely, Dem 11,750 

LEGISLATURE. 
1 Q 80 'JO 


S.- nate. Ho. J.B. 
Republicans 23 54 77 




Burleigh 771 322.. 1083 2.. 714 383 


Independents 112 



132 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



COUNTIES. 

(88) 

Adams 

Allen 

Ashland 

Ashtabula.... 

Athens 

Auglaize 

Belinont. 

rown 

Butler 

Carroll 

Champaign... 

Clarke 

Clermont 

Clinton 

Columbiana. , 

Coshocton 

Crawford...., 

Cuyahoga 

Darke , 

Defiance 

Delaware 

Erie 

Fail-field. 

Fayette , 

Franklin 

Fulton.... 

Gallia 

Geauga.. 

Greene 

Guernsey 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Hardin 

Harrison 

Henry 

Highland 

Hocking 

Holmes 

Huron 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Knox 

Lake 

Lawrence .... 

Licking 

Logan 

Lorain... 

Lucas 

Madison 

Mahoning 

Marion 

Medina 

Meigs 

Mercer 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 

Morgan 

Morrow 



OHIO. 

, GovERNOR,1889. ., PRESIDENT. 18 
Rep. Dem. Pro. Lab. Rev. Dem. Pro. 

Forake..CampbellHelwi 3 Rhodes. Harrison.Cleveland. Fisk, 



35! 



Muskingum. 
Noble 



Ottawa. 

Paulding., 

Perry..., 



ike..., 

Portage 

Preble 

Putnam 

Richland 

Ross 

Sanclusky 

Scioto 

Seneca 

Shelby 

Stark 

Summit 

Trumbull 

Tuscarawas. , 
Union 



2950 2948 151 

., 3319 4783 327 31. 

.. 2302 3118 215 - 

.. 6164 2160 710 6 

.. 4095 2648 431 4 

.. 1846 3824 114 - 

... 5820 5601 598 4 

.. 2777 4132 183 -, 

... 4044 7619 239 10 

.. 2251 1658 115 11 

... 3697 2858 358 7 

... 6193 5251 964 

... 3899 4420 181 3 

... 3607 2270 353 

,.. 6035 4435 504 

... 2594 3402 238 -. 

... 2353 4767 222 11. 

... 20334 17788 625 175. 

... 3760 5090 503 4. 

... 1974 3120 170 . 

... 3335 . 3017 508 15. 

... 3576 3921 124 4. 

... 2924 4866 205 . 

... 3029 2137 289 . 

... 12a38 14596 580 . 

... 2427 1726 262 . 

...3359 2234 133 . 

..2236 647 201 3. 

... 4460 2571 410 -. 

.. 3301 2422 598 . 

... 33550 40803 392 162. 

... 4468 4542 427 4. 

... 3435 3418 296 . 

.. 2584 1884 328 . 

.. 1704 2982 203 . 

.. 3515 3381 343 . 

... 1738 2453 211 

.. 1162 3072 176 

.. 3845 2964 368 

.. 3044 2590 251 

.. 4362 3115 350 

.. 3407 3497 269 

.. 2540 953 181 

... 4011 2948 

.. 4435 5935 284 

,.. 3692 2465 349 

.. 4686 2608 520 

.. 7904 7250 

.. 2620 2309 312 

... 5345 4906 321 

... 2336 3302 261 

... 2972 2037 230 

.. 3644 2219 229 

.. 1617 3770 97 

... 4882 4299 441 

.. 1412 3656 70 

... 11647 13052 473 

... 2424 1958 218 

.. 2368 2070 333 

.. 5781 5994 460 

.. 2446 2135 149 

.. 1315 2713 76 

.. 2707 2899 133 

.. 3108 3575 168 

.. 2811 3830 184 

... 1702 2216 87 

.. 3307 2886 310 

.. 3019 2920 341 

... 2181 3889 

.. 3701 5080 301 

... 4638 4359 252 

... 2831 3592 127 

... 3670 2981 199 

... 3858 4978 241 

... 2202 3409 111 

.. 8324 9417 544 

... 5373 4802 541 

5247 2529 645 

5254 344 



4257 



i 



124 . 
32. 



280 -, 



17. 



16. 



180 . 



3240 2145 271 . 



2870 3022 123 

3761 5123 240 

2445 3152 180 

7164 2675 758 

4570 1612 339 

2212 3938 82 

6615 5778 434 



Lab. 

Streeter. 
34.' 

5. 
34. 
47. 

1. 

5. 



3055 4237 169 -.. 
4143 7454 262 57.. 
2405 1746 -130 28.. 



3933 3049 361 

7128 5860 761 

4097 4180 207 

3816 2305 289 



, GOVERNOR.1887. , 

Rep. Dem. Pro. Gbk 

Foraker, Powell. Seitz. Sharp. 

2807 2930 - 152 

32,56 4242 206 206 

2323 3044 14 260 

5984 2038 24 808 

3775 2012 210 367 

1900 3318 41 110 

5991 5507 

2610 3712 

3566 5764 

2255 1615 

3H67 2747 



15 441 

4 236 

490 331 

61 180 
15 



63T.9 4063 1244 906 
4060 3943 63 276 



-.. 3527 1995 345 



7700 5154 474 163.. 6070 4151 342 537 



27(58 3567 223 
2681 50S5 185 



.. 2622 3406 294 



25994 23949 721 384. 



4267 5495 424 



2245 3567 
3432 3004 
3721 4322 119 



176 
450 



3058 4846 

3316 2192 164 

13453 14126 603 

2901 1997 289 

3651 2216 86 

2712 843 216 

4893 2682 353 

3560 2520 450 

41507 37661 468 

4634 4539 351 

3611 3339 330 

2763 1927 335 

2047 3583 168 

576 3489 283 

2113 2541 153 

1241 3388 180 

4392 3438 356 

3570 2628 249 

5106 3293 385 

3588 3528 248 

2987 1157 184 

4713 3068 135 

4867 6199 204 

4115 2533 283 

5235 3311 583 

9443 8ti38 290 

2708 2376 255 

6162 5337 440 

2521 3297 274 

33: 2181 224 

3989 2413 195 

1841 4146 134 

5312 4258 426 

1621 3-S6 74 

12491 13142 432 

2531 1974 !&'} 

2514 2068 306 
6234 58S4 336 

2515 2037 90 
1730 30;i5 43 
2975 2781 133 
3528 3474 145 
3046 3831 

1769 2162 

3880 3260 249 

3157 2966 312 

2355 4261 169 

4188 5198 246 

4942 4584 217 

3218 3917 1 12 

4070 3075 155 

4165 5232 213 

2447 aW 119 

8763 9094 543 

6455 5495 500 

6299 3177 572 

4730 5484 228 

3468 2224 219 



142 
91 



2595 4258 310 227 
18467 15386 2830 736 



220 . 



4030 4808 

1872 2865 

3159 3048 

3165 3650 

2864 4417 

2999 2026 

11150 12053 

2605 1862 

3447 2122 

2324 700 

4431 2326 

3204 2456 

30040 23338 11121 525 

3596 3716 130 323 

3445 3274 

2438 1835 

1714 2919 

3511 3357 

1798 2202 117 259 

1133 3166 - 258 

3 ( .X)8 2815 129 403 

29C4 1971 602 310 

4233 2701 

3298 3289 

2532 816 

4188 2855 

4418 5605 126 282 

3709 2292 37 325 

4575 2722 34 786 

7719 6753 331 180 

2463 2164 13 326 

5004 4403 142 535 

2276 3173 307 

3061 2097 - 358 

3572 2055 28 303 

1522 3436 12 122 

4624 3371 291 597 

1487 3619 - 83 

11030 11304 990 543 

2T75 1859 2 241 

2367 2067 

5552 5577 

2433 2133 

1252 2492 

2509 2607 

3133 3133 

2801 3715 

1728 2043 



466 
204 

503 
41 147 
6 279 
3 285 
558 526 
2 349 
121 
15 299 
65 439 
77 615 



16 332 

5 442 

35 171 

27 287 



42 487 

98 316 

91 170 

238 



75 379 

50 480 

53 124 

7 87 

18(5 

155 209 

5 226 



28 123 
21.. 3415 2826 158 374 



12.. 
4.. 

50 . 
96.. 
58.. 
5.. 

a 



2946 2702 

2050 3T.78 

3762 4763 

4747 44(!4 



7 439 



_... .... . 274 

23i)3 3484 153 174 

2431 573 192 

4534 266 276 
146 

7595 7962 442 644 

5625 4122 736 563 

5411 2756 65 687 

4012 4959 165 a30 



2192 3316 



34. 
15 
14.. 3241 2148 14 250 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



133 



VanWert 3254 3526 

Vinton 1661 1969 

Warren 3790 2867 

Washington 4553 4471 

Wayne 3732 4662 

Williams 2786 3003 

Wood 4638 4138 

Wyandot 2071 2912 



Foraker.Carapbell.Helwig. Rhodes Harrison Cleveland. Fisk Streeter. Foraker Powell. Sei 

3126 3186 
1729 1796 
3813 2345 

4313 ; 

4603 
28.'$ 
4421 



253 1 .. 



202 
217 
513 
191 



207 . 



Total 30855137942326504 1048. .4160>4 

Plurality . 10872 .. 19599 

Percent...' 47.5148.91 3.41 .13.. 49.41 47.09 

775545 841941 




.41. 



4706 



2122 



2KW 

3074 
2891 



356534 333201 24711 2J700 
47.61 44 62 3.30 3.97 



VOTE FOR OTHER STATE OFFICERS, 1889. 

Lieut.- Gov.E. L. Lampson, Rep 375,090 

W. V. Marquis, Dem 375.068 

L. B. Logan, Pro 26,587 

F.L.Rice, U.L M20 

Treasurer- J. C. Brown, Rep 377,102 

W.E. Boden.Z>et 373,466 

B. N. Trowbriage, Pro 26,547 
.D.Marvin, U.L 1,079 

Atry-Gen.-D.K. Watson, Rep 377,140 

J. M. Lewis, Dem 373,335 

E. J. Pinney, Pro 26.439 

W. Baker. U. L 1,140 

Judge Supreme Court F.J.Dickman,J?ep.376 649 

M. D. Follett, Dem 373,895 

G.T.Stewart, Pro 26,638 

J. M. Johnson, U. L 1,062 

Board Public Works-W. H. Hahn,^p.. 377.059 

F.Reynolds, Dem 372,659 

H.Clark, Pro 26,641 

0. Dcitz, U. L 1.727 

Com'r of Schools J . Hancock, Rep 377,107 

C. C'. Miller, Dem 373,391 

F.C.Fuson. Iro 26,555 

D.E.Tate, U.L 1,059 

Clerk Supreme Court V. H. Hester,72cp.377,021 

1. J. C. Shumaker. Dem 373,453 

H. D. McKnigh t, Pro 26,605 

G.A.Perrine, U.L 1,045 

VOTE FOR CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 
Taxati on For 245,438 

Against 273,268 

Single Districts -For 245,444 

Against ,.259,420 

Biennial Elections For 257,662 

Against 254,215 

FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 
1st Dist. Benjamin Butterworth, Rep. 



O. J. Cosgrove, Dem 17,437 

Henry T. Ogden, Pro 241 

T.L. Markland,ia6 280 

2d Dist. John A. Caldwell, Rep 21,627 

C. W. Gerard, Dem 20,031 

L. E. Brown, Pro 178 

W.H. Stephenson, Lab 611 

SdDist. E. S. Williams, Re 20,912 

G.W.Houk, Dem 20,479 

ThomasG. WillIam8.Pro 1,099 

4th Dist.-R. L. Mattingly, Re? 14,500 

SamS. Yoder, Dem 22,296 

W. R. Sueman,Pro 998 

Moses Townsend, Lab 58 

5th I>tt.-W11son Vance. Rev - 16,081 

George E. Seney, Dem 22,075 

C.C. Nestlerode, Pro 1,061 

W. H. Patterson, Lab Ill 

6th Dist.-M . M . Boothman, Rep 22,434 

G.M.Saltzgaber, Dem 22,339 

A. B. Leonard, Pro 1,3.7 

J. M. Barbour. Lab 120 

7t?i Dist. Henry L. Morey, Rep 17,600 

John M. Pattison, Dem 16,742 

Mighill Dustin,Pr^ 8<'l 

J.H. Gardiner, Lab 53 

8th Dist. Rot) P. Kennedy, Rev 20,8 ( .8 

Andrew R. Bolin, Dem 17,C.28 

FrankS. Tulsom, Pro 1,810 

9thDist. William C. Cooper, Rep 19,491 

John S. Braddock, Dem 17,267 



Joseph McFarland, Pro ................. 1,646 

Abram Conklin. L >b ..................... 26 

10th Dist. Jacob Romeis. Rep .............. 18.496 

William E. Haynes, Dem ................ 19,637 

William Nicholson. Pro ................. 495 

M. H. Darrow.a& ...................... 91 

llth Dist.- A. C. Thompson, Rep ........... 20.802 

J. W. Shinn.Dem ........................ 15.817 

John Morris, Pro ........................ 799 

12th Dist. J. J. Pugsley, Rep .............. 20,133 

Laurence T. Neal, Dem ................. 19,453 

A. E. Clevinger, Pro .................... 1,015 

13th IXst.-John B. Neil, Rep ............... 22^93 

J. H. Outhwaite, Dem .................. 24,896 

John Aikin, Pro ......................... 890 

C. C. Pomeroy, Lab ....... . ............. 156 

14th Ih'sJ.-Charles P. Wickham, Rep ...... 16,211 

D.L. Wadsworth, Dem .................. 15,249 

George W. Walker, Pro ................. 1,278 

15th Dist. Charles H .Grosvenor, Ret... .17.591 

John P. Sprigg, Dem .................... 15.284 

Malcolm Roberts, Pro .................. 1008 

16th Disf.-Edwin L. Lyburger, Rep ........ 19,819 

James W. Owens, Dem .................. 24,444 

James M. Scott, Pro ..................... 1,161 

S. R. Crumbaker,.L& .................. 53 

i:tfi Dist. -Joseph D. Taylor, Rep .......... 20,584 

William Laurence, Jr., Dem ............ 15.5SO 

T. A. Rodifer, Pro ...................... 1.655 

18th Dist .-William McKinley, Jr., Rep. . . .25,2ft 

George P. Ikert, Dem ................... 21,150 

L. B. Logan, Pro ................ ... 1,498 

G. W. Thornburg, Lab ........... 331 

19th Dist. -Ezra. B. Taylor, Rep ............. 22,991 

Henry Apthorp, Dem .................... 11,091 

William H.Dana, Pro .................... 2,004 

D. D. Marvin, Lab ............. . 129 

20th Di St. Martin L. Smyser, Rep ......... 19,381 

C. P. Humphrey. Dem .................. 17,283 

John D.Jones, Pro ...................... 1,438 

Louis F. Renner, Lab ................... 183 

2l8tDist.-Theo.E. Burton, Rep .......... 20,086 

Tom L.Johnson, Dem ................... 19,470 

Ellsha S.Loomis, Pro ................... 368 

Edmund G. Vail, Lab .................... 407 

LEGISLATURE. 
- - 1890-1 -- . . - 1888-9- - - 
Sen. Ho. J.Bal. Sen. Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans... 17 54 71.. 25 64 89 
Democrats ..... 19 60 



11 44 



OREGON. 



COUNTIES. 

(29) Rep.Dem. Pro. Un.L 

Harrison. Clere Fisk. Streeter. 

Baker 843 747 9 8.. 

Benton 1206 969 66 18.. 

Clackamas. 1527 1005 56 120 . 

Clatsop .... IftiO 647 50 

Columbia.. 611 335 8 1.. 

906 779 83 29.. 

17 -.. 

143 .. 

1117 97 



Coos . . 

Crook 438 522 

Curry 

Douglas.. . 1305 1117 97 2.. 

Gilliam 601 440 8 6.. 

Grant 971 933 31 -.. 

Jackson.... 1181 1320 64 13.-. 

Josephine.. 6>5 528 4 .. 

Klamath.... 315 405 10 .. 

Lake 358 371 8 .. 



v SEC. ST. '86.^ 
. Rep.Dem.Pro 

.M'Bride.Gib'nsKin'7 

854 1062 45 
936 990 137 
1258 1141 143 
861 815 129 

251 

683 

519 



462 
810 
336 



20 
7(5 
32 

201) 188 12 
1123 1059 273 
504 16 
844 17 



514 
744 



867 1239 110 

442 469 10 

325 2 

278 - 



134 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



HarrUon.Cleverd.Fisk.Str'ter.3IcBri,le.GiVn;.Km'.v. 

1342 1312 94 
1371 1*578 162 
19^5 1570 420 



21). 



Lane 1593 1368 

Linn 1(503 1633 128 

Malheur.... 330 303 14 

Marion 2235 1567 329 

Morrow.... 598 479 35 

Multnomah 6250 3996 125 

Polk 785 729 

Tillamook . 393 220 

Umati-lla.... 15:23 1531 

Union 1303 1223 

Wallowa... 4.55 306 

Wasco 1595 1054 

Washingt'n 1248 838 

Yamhill .... 1289 994 

Total 33291 26522 1677 362. 

Plurality... 67r59 

Per cent ... 53.93 42.84 2.70 .53. 

Total vote.. 61905 



71 
IS 
102 
24 



79 



597 710 7(5 

4097 3452 409 

810 79(5 124 

245 175 28 

12(51 140(5 127 

1415 1521 5 

1032 1078 114 

1031 788 112 

1166 10.19 82 



2(5212 25922 2775 

290 

47.73 47.20 5.05 
54,909 



FOR REPRESENTATIVE IX CONGRESS. 

Binder Hermann, Rep 32,820 

John M. Gearin, Z>em 25.413 

G. M. Miller, Pro 1,974 

VOTE FOR SUPREME JUDGE 1888. 

W. P. Lord, Rep 33,008 

John Barnett, Dem 26,33;5 

LEGISLATURE. 

. 1889-90 . , 1887-8 . 

Sen. Ho. J.Bal. Sen.Ho.J.Bal. 

Republicans 21 51 72.. 19 34 53 

Democrats 9 9 18.. 11 26 37 



COUNTIES. 

(67) 

Adams 

Allegheny 

Armstrong 

Beaver 

Bedford 

Berks 

Blair 

Bradford 

Bucks 

Butler 

Cambria 

Cameron 

Carbon 

Center 

Chester 

Clarion 

Clearfleld 

Clinton 

Columbia 

Crawford 

Cumberland.... 

Dauphin 

Delaware 

Elk 

Erie 

Fayette 

Forest 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Greene 

Huntingdon 

Indiana 

Jefferson 

Juniata 

Lackawanna . . . 

Lancaster 

Lawrence 

Lebanon 

Lehigh 

Luzerne 

Lycoming 

McKean 

Mercer 

Mifflin 

Monroe 

Montgomery... 

Montour 

Northampton... 
Northumberl'd. 

Perry 

Philadelphia... 

Pike 

Potter 

Schuylkill 

Snyder 

Somerset 

Sullivan 

Susquehanna . . 

Tioga 

Union 

Venango 



Rep. 

Boyer. 
2502 

23507 
4208 
2951 
2791 
6279 
4132 
4595 
6744 
3466 
3976 

1757 
3263 
8699 
1576 
2727 
1346 
1187 
4712 
3298 
6150 
6585 
826 
4801 
5263 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

-> .-PRESIDENT, 1888-s ,-Aui>. GEN'L, 1888.-, 
Dem. Pro. Rep. Dem. Pro. Lab. Rep. Dem. Pro. Lab. 

Bigler.Johnston.Harrin. Clev'd. Fisk StreeterMcCamant.Meyer.Marquis.Green. 



3010 107. 

18767 991. 

3502 2(57. 

1478 322. 

23(55 162. 

11321 225. 

2882 553. 

1906 431. 



3371 3794 
45118 24710 1117 




10626 18105 
7311 5175 316 



3373 3790 74 ., 
5.. 44472 25015 1100 .. 
5024 3764 181 6.. 
5545 3704 19(5 34.. 
21.. 
8.. 



24.. 4291 

9.. 10548 17950 24ti 
7379 5107 



8762 4552 536 58.. 

7262 307.. 8584 8642 253 .. 8578 8635 246 
2845 361.. 5358 3986 434 169.. 53 !6 3985 425 



'56 4547 535 57., 



4594 186.. 5517 5948 237 

472 62.. 782 551 12 

2180 107.. 3279 3665 180 

4241 327.. 4574 4712 173 

5688 596.. 11578 7541 666 

1646 132.. 29.50 3880 117 



9.. 52S5 5776 
-.. 783 551 
53.. 3279 3664 172 
12.. 4567 4710 164 

3.. 11531 7556 
3845 



42(55 591.. 5297 6266 337 -.. 5279 6267 317 



1716 156.. 2756 3204 

2426 355.. 2484 4676 258 

3081 631.. 8040 59.54 

3850 324.. 4693 5386 256 

4246 422.. 10852 7(584 

3(527 367.. 8791 5028 

54.. 1321 1824 
9372 




9 .. 
47.. 
13.. 

12., 
114 12(5.. 



703 465 



12L 

3508 499. , 

5(590 416., 



43(55 
724 
1446 
3145 
2816 
2058 
973 
4190 

10462 
2597 
2720 
41(50 

11219 
4112 
2,561 
3633 
1793 
(536 

10017 
707 
4023 
3903 
2579 

s-it;s'. 
208 
23fi6 
9110 
1228 
2787 
729 
3225 
4029 
1370 
2332 



nil 

7034 6951 
917 612 



346 5. 
52 18- 
710 88. 
278 43. 

1 



3837 2(54.. 5772 5082 174 14. 



866 37. , 
2596 184. . 



951 1230 
2373 4116 



34 
141 



2275 269.. 4217 2789 117 78. 

1116 2.18.. 5084 2231 294 483. 

1650 393.. 4090 3257 178 123. 

776 117.. 1760 1842 96 1. 

3990 7(50.. 10279 9858 1058 . 

4738 459.. 21976 10495 525 16. 

1035 355.. 4342 2113 437 49. 

1427 115.. 61)96 3670 119 10. 

6092 118.. 6977 8927 



11641 
5803 



.. 15543 15218 790 
6591 7467 303 



1(585 349.. 4066 2922 



2762 3J94 81 34. 

4651 229 76. 

5845 755 233. 

5391 251 12. 

7555 278 . 

4945 331 6. 

49 15. 

9365 7101 683 85. 

7035 6829 259 42., 
916 611 



8791 

1274 1788 



75 

5776 5175 121 



952 1230 
2371 4096 



31 
125 



164 120. 
96 1. 



4270 2757 104 

5081 2224 

4079 3251 

1757 1843 

10210 9t586 1068 -. 

21965 10440 514 11. 

4333 2114 428 36. 

6079 3658 94 7. 

6964 8928 153 22. 

15165 14699 757 6. 

6505 7415 296 158. 

4062 2920 422 297. 



2o97 451.. 6428 4^06 556 133.. 6252 4606 535 136. 



1773 120.. 2321 2084 105 .. 2315 2084 
59.. 1107 3274 56 .. 1084 3244 



1657 
9970 

1275 

6221 . 

4039 708.. 6288 6257 231 

2492 95.. 3168 2738 66 



.. 13445 12582 379 11.. 13445 12573 376 11. 

76.. 1289 1865 41 35.. 1287 1859 41 35. 

123.. 6785 10027 192 99.. 6405 9293 190 47. 

66. 6285 6251 219 61. 



43707 1188.. 111358 92786 1225 75. 

630 35.. 559 1265 16 -. 

1791 188.. 2570 1692 172 182. 

10033 273.. 12522 13054 211 193. 



708 53.. 2360 1493 
13u9 195.. 4825 2319 



57 . 



1198 123.. 946 1260 48 



3169 2740 68 

111613 92635 1247 75.. 

559 1264 10 -.. 

2560 1686 172 179.. 

12538 13044 210 188.. 

2267 1455 55 -.. 

4823 2312 237 -.. 

936 1259 48 56.. 



2150 504.. 5019 528 717 12.. 4810 3186 676 6.. 



1342 2315.. 7808 2972 254 245.. 7809 29(58 
692 150.. 2448 1582 50 ]0.. 2448 1581 



240 
51 



14.; 



1980 735.. 4424 3475 688 175.. 4327 3256 665 165.. 



ST.TREAS..1&87. 

Rep. Dem. Pro. 

Hart. MeGrann. Irish 

2797 3204 

28(569 20516 1145 

4062 2814 214 
4172 2752 180 
3860 3:591 42 
6371 11798 253 
4471 3140 312 
6106 2954 437 
7465 7472 237 
3998 3370 324 
3342 4193 232 

612 444 

1830 2194 175 

3719 3889 124 

7593 5150 744 

2077 3046 88 

3410 4110 242 

2398 2743 54 

1561 2876 114 

7218 5751 652 

3780 4654 302 

7957 5277 348 

5320 2782 336 

976 1426 4 

6064 4196 620 

5796 5903 266 

719 498 30 

4880 4226 139 

807 1035 32 

2016 3(567 108 

3386 2382 50 

4063 1370 254 
3394 26t53 40 
1593 1623 3 
7821 8(594 930 

14947 8350 429 

3136 1425 370 

3825 1946 104 

5077 6970 107 

8531 9388 921 

4286 5318 215 

2797 1339 233 

5507 4284 490 

1939 1791 52 
918 2657 7 

11107 10i"04 358 

868 12ri8 56 

5086 8399 281 

4946 4777 108 

2738 2516 83 

86872 72620 1188 

3(56 993 6 

1940 110*5 
9223 10060 188 
2031 1326 41 
3647 1516 171 

577 950 39 

3813 2459 515 

4882 1872 241 

1740 1015 112 

31(56 2287 630 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



135 



er Johnston, Harrison. Clevel'J. FUtc.Str'ter.McCamant! 

493.. 4329 2640 676 119.. 4321 
7801 



i 

184T 
12359 



571 

375 -. 

430 147. 

125 4. 

301 '-. 



7797 
2 : .32 
9724 

2023 



Marquis-Green. 
678 117.. 

568 
3009 365 



9400 
1831 



Boyer. 

Warren 2795 

Washington.... 4829 3448 520.. 

Wayne 1921 2418 3S1.. 

Westmoreland. 8828 9598 379.. 

Wyoming 1704 1*508 160.. 

York 5556 8113 296.. 

Total 341244 280318 21308. .526091 446633 20947 3873. 5235S1 443438 20262 3575: 

Plurality 60926 .. 79453 . 80143 

Percent 52.98 43.52 3.31.. 52.79 44.77 2.09 .39.. 52.84 

Scattering 
Total vote. 



406 
123 
266 



Hart. MeOrann-Irish. 

2962 2070 691 
-.. 6356 4954 tllrf 
2148 S226 294 



60926 .. 7945S 
....52.98 43.52 3.31.. 52.79 44.77 

1152 
644012 907568 



44.75 2.04 31. 



764f> 7392 
1830 1834 
6293 8074 



11(1 



Houston, Lab. , in 1886 received 4.834 votes for 
Governor. Kennedy, Lab., in 1887 received 
8,896 votes for State Treasurer. 

VOTE FOR OTHER STATE OFFICERS 1888. 

Judge Sup. Court-J. T. Mitchell, Rep. ...523,585 

J. B. McOollom. Dem 444.327 

James Black, Pro 20,708 

John B. Young, Lab 3,877 

FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 

1st Dist . Bingham, Rep 22,523 

Flanigan, Dem 13,838 

Eastlack, Pro 86 

2d Dist. O'Neill. Rep 16,776 

Dougherty, Dem 12,368 

Jones, Lab 192 

3d Dist.-Randall, Dem 17,642 

Scattering 112 

4th Dist. Kelley, Rep 32J-41 

Ayres, Dem 23,202 

Jones, Pro 467 

5th Ditt. -Harmer, Rep 29.466 

Herwig, Dem... 22.781 

Whittcar, Pro 198 

6th Dist. -Darlington, Rep 19.299 

Greenwood, Dem 2,799 

Drayton,Pro 1,130 

7th Dist. Yardley, Rep 22,226 

Ross, Dero 21,215 

Mutchler, Pro 405 

nth Dist.- Reeder, Rep 11,731 

Mutchler, Dem 18,071 

Chose, Pro 415 

9th Dist. -Kiery, Rep 17,373 

Brunner, Dem 27,032 

Stauffer, Pro 414 

10th Dist. Brosius, Rep 21,796 

Haldeman, Dem 10,622 

Reist, Pro 402 

llth Dist Scran ton, Rep 10,844 

Collins, Dem 9,158 

Lathrope, Pro 1,212 

12th Dis . Osborne, Rep 16,117 

Lynch, Dem 14,618 

Evans, Pro 700 

13th D/.s.-Brumm, Rep 12.570 

Reilly. Dem 13,258 

Hallopeter, P/-o r. 152 

14th Dist. Rif e. Rep 20,206 

Bower, Dem 13,944 

Spicer, Pro 485 

15th D St. Wright, Rep 18 833 

Ham, Dem 12.494 

Brown, Pro 1.S10 

16th Dist . McCirmick, Rep 20 204 

Steck, Dem 15,550 

Schaeffle, Pro 6(59 

17th Dist Robinson, Rep H,aT6 

Buckalew, Dem 14,012 

Kaseman, Pro 336 

18th Dz-st.-Atkinson, Rep 20.583 

McWilliams. Dem 15.867 

Reed, Pro 165 

19th Dist. Young, Rep 16.901 

Maisch, Dem 21,480 

Knauss, Pro 608 

20th Dist. -Scull, Rep 21.7:i9 

Gree vy, Dem 17,458 

Beachley, Pro 816 

21st Dist. -Craig, Rep 24.151 

Donnelly, Dem 18,930 

Vankirk, Pro 820 

St.Clair.Lab.... . 860 



85514 340296 18471 

45245 

51.18 45.18 2.45 



753177 

22d Dzst.-Dalzell, Rep 21.970 

Parkinson, Dem 13,OtS 

Brickell. Pro 419 

23d Di,st. Bayne, Rep 13,999 

Lanfltt, Dem 6,711 

Holman, Pro 241 

24th Dis .-Ray, Rep 26,246 

Wampler,Dem 21.908 

Morgan, Pro 1,161 

25th Dist. Townsend, Rep 21,636 

Griffith, Dem 14,481 

May, Pro 1,597 

Scattering 662 

6th Dist Culbertson, Rep 16,924 

Burns, Dem 13^52 

M. Miller, Pro 859 

R. Miller, Lab . 604 

7th Dtet. -Watson, Rep 13.5822 

Rankin, Dem 9,370 

Miller, Pro 1,670 

Whitiley, Lab 919 

~8th Dist. Rynder, Rep 14899 

Kerr, Dem 17,588 

McCreery, Pro 418 

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 

Suffrage- -For 183,371 

Against 420,323 

Pr. hibitionFor 296,617 

Against 484,644 

LEGISLATURE. 

( 1889-90 . 1887-8 

Sen. HoJ.Bal. Sen. HoJ.Bal. 
Republicans... 34 144 178.. 34 133 167 

Democrats 16 60 76.. 16 67 83 

Gbk.-Labor.... .. 1 1 

RHODE ISLAND. 

COUNTIES.- Gov. 1889. , ,-PRES.1888.-^ 

(5) RepDemL.E. Pro. Rep.Dem.Pro. 

Ladd. DavU.Chi.Rich'sonHarri3onClev'd, Flak. 

Bristol 766 7fi5 100 73.. 9S1 703 81 

Kent 1612 1221 477 119.. 1988 1261 65 

Newport ... 2322 1864 181 147.. 2447 163t 79 
Providence 10S06 16241 2403 742. 142015 12440 787 
Washington 1657 1198 436 265. . 2346 1492 238 

Total 16870 21289 3597 1346. .21968 1753UH1250 

Plurality... 4419 .. 343S 

Perce t.... 39. 14 49.39 8.34 3. 12. .53.93 43.00 3.00 

Scattering.. 9 

Total vote . 43111 . . 40748 

No candidate having a majority ,the election 
went to the Legislature, which, being Repub- 
lican, chose Herbert W. Ladl, the Repub- 
lican candidate. 

FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 

1st Dist. -Henry J. Spooner, Rep 11,092 

Lapham, Dem 9,002 

Macomber, Pro 704 

2d Dist. Warren O. Arnold, Rep 10.940 

Baker, Dem 8,049 

Greene, Pro 582 

VOTE FOR OTHER STATE OFFICERS, 1889. 

Lieut. -Gov. (no choice) D. G. Little- 
field, Rep 17.080 

Howard Smith, Dem 21,101 

Franklin Metcal f. L. E 3,559 

JohnC. Brown, Pro 1.405 

Sec'y of State ( no choice) S.H.Cross,Re/> 17,233 

E. S. McGuinness, Dem 20.973 

J. B. Foster, L. E 3,567 

Daniel Howard, Pro 1.378 

AWy-Gen,. Horatio Rogers, Rep 20,981 

Z. O. Slocum. Dem. (Slocum elected) 21,848 



136 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


Gen. Treasurer (no choice) Samuel 
Clark, jT.,Rep 17,158 


SOUTH DAKOTA. 
Gov. '89. CONST'N. DEL. '88. 
COUNTIES. Rep. Dem. Rep.Dem. 

(50) MtlletteMcClure. For. Ag'nst.MatL'sHardin. 


John G Perry Dem 21087 


Edw A Green L E 3519 


Jason P. Hazard, Pro 1,358 


LEGISLATURE. 
1890. , 1889. 
Sen. Ho. J.Sal. Sen.Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans 26 33 59.. 31 64 95 
Democrats 11 39 50.. 6 8 14 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
^PRES.-S , GOVERNOR 

COUNTIES, 1888. 1888. 1886. 1884. 1882. 1882. 
(34) Eep . Dem . Dem . Dem . Hep . Dem . 

Ham^on.Clev-dKichd'snThom'sn.McVeThom'sn 

Abbeville 74 . 21)85. . 1564 531 196 2456 
Aiken 404 2532 972 2365 477 2545 


Beadle 1949 943 2595 88 1665 ('90 


Brown 3208 1399. 4109 153.. 2379 1633 
Brookings 1791 438. 1972 70.. 1411 552 
Buffalo 203 56 246 6 127 74 


Brule 918 757. 1339 164.. 7ti3 852 


BonHomme.. 929 808. 1596 61.1001 580 
Butte 224 102 302 2 205 108 


Custer 587 337 852 39 517 396 


Campbell 572 129. 658 8.. 471 182 
Clark 1471 405. 1559 200.. 1110 524 


Coddington... 1507 540. 1S50 57.. 1033 677 
Charles Mix.. 762 305. 1023 18.. 673 221 
Clay 1311 249. 1353 96. .1149 269 
Day 1412 471. 1733 95.. 914 806 
Douglas 675 397. 944 60.. 738 275 
Deuel 917 92. 939 22.. 614 486 
Davison 1032 470 1384 66.. 858 572 
Edmunds 830 474. 1188 51.. 778 475 
Fall River 425 2->l. 570 34.. 341 165 
Faulk 814 315. 1055 23.. 718 33(5 
Grant 896 571. 1307 72.. 712 691 
Hamlin 837 298 1047 43 475 541 


Anderson 124 2015.. 997 2706 2713 
Barn well 613 2905.. 1478 3000 134 2990 
Beaufort 17t>9 509.. 276 309 1233 310 
Berkeley 1318 1H11.. 1043 12J9 785 1239 


Charleston 435 2,52.. 1318 3268 574 3927 
Chester 42 1735 . 872 1696 399 1599 


Chesterfield... 177 1871.. 13 54 1570 851 1121 
Clarendon 331 1452.. 918 13*>4 472 1148 
Colleton 704 2805.. 851 2009 668 2479 
Darlington 294 1852.. 1373 2613 873 26o4 
Edgefield 34 3142.. 1875 3569 594 3429 
1 Fairfleld . 5 1389.. 615 1664 355 1579 


Hand 1283 634 1774 57 1046 871 


Hanson 681 405. 1070 7 . 627 451 


Hughes 679 704 1219 46 528 245 


Georgetown... 628 703.. 916 197 658 866 
Greenville 456 3305.. 1233 32i7 637 3011 
Hampton 324 1393.. 1093 1596 91 1526 
Horry 363 1241.. t>45 1356 19 1378 
Kershaw 170 1258.. 556 1396 518 1601 
Lancaster 221 1740.. 737 1963 301 1250 
Laurens 36 1451.. 778 1731 47 1911 
Lexington 9l 1903.. 719 1669 587 1671 
Marion 705 2417.. 947 2992 1229 2935 


Hutchinson... 670 977. 1X56 49.. 1087 328 
Hyde . .. 380 166 497 14 379 201 


Jerauld. .... 705 237. 895 17. 438 316 
Kingsbury . . . . 1539 470. 1785 138.. 1207 256 
Lake..., .. 1365 334. 1521 68.. 939 (126 


Lawrence 2355 1227. 2857 21..2967 1523 
Lincoln 1548 419 17V>9 112 1532 352 


McCook 831 680. 1420 33.. 655 788 
McPherson... 741 228. 858 34.. 471 226 
Marshall 906 387 1114 53 655 498 


Marlboro 12 1231.. 671 1690 399 1588 
Newberry 58 1729.. 835 1860 544 1787 
Oconee ..231 1212.. 701 1171 580 1028 


Meade 642 479 903 109 


Miner 835 399. 1150 31.. 796 537 
Minnehaha... 3640 1133. 4613 49.. 2441 1444 
Moody 1166 230. 1285 35.. 869 256 
Pennington... 1080 545. 1408 93.. 930 549 
Potter 622 286 788 47 463 324 


Orangeburg.... 1165 3044.. 1622 2761 760 3443 
Pickens 95 858 505 1284 177 1203 


Richland 443 1912.. 579 1898 652 2027 
Spartanburg... 502 3344.. 991 2 !92 510 2527 
Sumter 944 17X5.. 1198 1734 187 1720 


Roberts 3ftt 45. 381 11.. 247 117 
Sanborn 972 240 1143 45 818 355 


Union . 30 1920.. 992 2192 375 2000 


Willamsburg.. 813 1634.. 980 1134 493 1129 
York 105 2305.. 934 2419 881 2353 


Spink 2293 064. 2624 127 . 1822 872 


Sully 543 207. 714 10.. 477 142 


Total 13736 65825. .33154 67895 17719 67158 
Majority 52089.. [No op's'n] 49439 
Percent 17.2082.78.. 20.8779.12 


Turner 1494 513. 1871 71. 1425 170 
Union 1124 748. 1544 217. .1045 706 
Walworth 404 172. 548 17.. 201 265 
Yankton 1148 941. 1948 57.. 1479 588 


Scattering 380 . . 40 
Total vote 79561 ..3319467895 84877 
FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 
1st Dist S W McKinley Rep 1 296 


Total 53964 23840. 70131 3267. .39326 24759 
Majority 30124 . 66864 
Per cent 69.48 30.52. 95.42 4.58. . 
Total vote .... 77804 . 73391 .. 

In 1888 Bierly, 7. D., for delegate, received 30 
votes, and Cranmer, Pro., 918 votes. 

OTHER STATE OFFICERS, 1889. 

Lieut.-Gov. James H. Fletcher, Rep 54,711 
Anson W. Pratt, Dem 22,946 


Samuel Dibble Dem 8,540 


2d Dist Seymour E Smith Hep 1 403 


George D Tillman, Dem 10,704 


3d Dist James S. Cothran, Dem 8,758 


No opposition. 
4th Dist William H Perry Dem 11410 


No opposition. 
5th Dist John J Hemphill, Dem 9559 


Sec'y of State Amund O. Ringsrud, Rep. 54.587 
Otto Peemiller Dem 23 272 


No opposition . 
6th Dist George W Dargan Dem 8,586 


State Auditor Louis C. Taylor, Rep 54,521 
Joseph E. Horton, Dem 23309 


Mitchell K Holloway Ind 327 


7 1 ft Dist Thomas E Miller, Rep 7003 


State Treasurer Wilbur F. Smith, Rep.. 54,680 
Austin D. Hill, Dem 23,052 


William Elliott Dem 8,358 


Robert Simmons, Ind. Rep 74 


Supt. Pub. Inst. -^Gilbert L.Pinkham,7??j0 54,781 
George A McFarland, Dem 23055 


VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS 1888. 
Governor John P. Richardson, Dem 58,730 
Lieut -Gov. "VVm. L. Mauldin, Dem 58,955 
Sec. of State 3. & Marshal \,Dem 58,741 


Atfu-Oen. Robert Dollard, Rep 55364 


H. F. Fellows, Dem 22,632 
Comr. Schools and Pub.LandsO&mer H. 
Parker. Rep 53.846 




Henry Volkmar, Dem 23,790 


Comptroller J S Verner Dem ..58812 


JUDGES SUPREME COURT. 
1st Dist. Dighton Corson, Rep . . . 54 960 


Supt. Education James H. Rice, Dem... 58,806 
LEGISLATURE. 
. 1889-90 , . ! 5 87-8 
Sen. Ho. J.Sal. Sen.Ho.J.Bal 
Republicans - 3 3.. 2 4 6 
Democrats 35 121 156.. 33 120 153 


Daniel McLaughlin,.Z)em 22,196 


2d Dist.Alonzo G. Keelam, Rep 54,979 
C. H. Winsor, Dem 22,798 


3d Dist John E Bennett Rep 51.482 


S. B. Van Buskirk, Dem 23,057 





ELECTION RETURNS. 137 


FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS 
OscarS. Gifford. Rep 54,983 


HarriRon. Cleve'd..Fu>k.A TajlorR..Tajlor 

Loudon 1226 530 5. 852 427 


John A. Pickler, Rep 54,105 
LlnneusO Jeffries Dem .. 23229 


Madison 1479 3206 62. 1736 2746 
Marion 1483 1198 . 1011 741 


8 M Booth Dem 22 532 


PROHIBITION. 
For 40234 


Marshall 786 2291 131 750 1992 


Maury 2836 3T>58 216 2370 3252 


McMinn 1901 1364 79 1659 ll')2 


Against 34 510 


McNairy ... 1511 1525 11 1336 1311 


MINORITY REPRESENTATION. 
For 24 161 


Meigs 589 740 9. 545 687 
Monroe 1399 1457 30. 1120 1167 


Against 46,200 


Montgomery 2164 2628 110 1190 2336 


TEMPORARY SEAT OF GOVERNMENT. 
Pierre 27 256 


Moore 102 980 81. 67 978 
Morgan 860 3t'>9 24 570 272 


Obion 1167 2987 62. 832 3063 


Huron 15617 


Watertown.. .12,012 




Sioux Falls.. . ... 11,883 


Pickett 409 369 


Mitchell 7,793 


Polk 635 679 7 526 667 


Chamberlain 2421 




LEGISLATURE. 
. .1889-90. , 
Senate. Ho. J. B. 
Republican 37 104 141 


Rhea 1414 1177 16. 1119 993 
Roane 2042 844 13 1472 682 


Robertson 952 2203 350. 721 1900 
Rutherford 2479 3303 183. 1437 2400 
Scott 1418 104 4 669 98 


Democrats 4 13 17 


Independents 4 7-11 


Sequatchie 180 350 . 122 247 
Sevier 2830 489 50 1835 402 


TENNESSEE. 

COVNTIES. . PRES. 1888 -^ >-Gov.'86-, 
(96) Rep. Dem. Pro. Rep. Dem. 

Harrison. ClevU Fisk.A.TaTlor^B.Tajlor 

Anderson .. .. 1740 733 5 1304 601 


Shelby 8 <) 79 11930 43 3503 7009 


fmith lf02 2108 37 1025 1738 


tewart .. 536 1277 42 355 971 


Sullivan 1513 2255 90 1278 1898 


Sumner 1228 2778 31 1129 2277 


Tipton 1486 2351 2 1420 1717 


Bedford 1988 2475 160 1610 2118 


Trousdale... . 316 792 2. 211 576 


Benton 640 1075 1 C91 1185 


Unicoi... .645 85 8. 498 83 


Bledsoe 653 482 586 438 


Union 1501 5 9 3 29 1172 468 


Blount 2237 1009 74 1877 82t> 


Van Buren 103 423 24. 517 383 
Warren . . 636 1976 75 701 1765 


Bradley . . 1518 991 42 1244 878 


Campbell . . 1845 559 6 1108 378 


Washington, .. 2008 1524 142 1852 1414 


Cannon 658 1194 27 661 1090 


Wayne... . 1204 772 11. 1040 671 


Carroll 2356 1875 50 2267 1740 


Weakley.. . . 1764 2764 65 1786 2650 


Carter 1797 453 140 156 387 


White 499 1034 48 478 1329 


Cheatham 305 1063 47.. 291 799 
Chester .. 


Williamson 1491 2358 129 1303 2130 


Wilson 1676 2518 157. 1236 2314 


Claiborne 1392 959 30.. 1173 901 
Clay 479 749 5.. 309 539 
Cocke 1947 842 -. 1490 751 


Total 138988 158779 5969. .107889 126486 
Plurality 19791 .. 18589 
Percent 45.71 5226 193 4667 5333 


Coffee 539 1818 68.. 505 1385 
Crockett 1080 1253 99. 1001 1193 
Cumberland 632 422 13.. 508 329 
Davidson 9321 9715 613.. 6754 6943 
Decatur 757 862 5 702 785 


Scattering 48 
Total vote .... 303784 
VOTE FOR GOVERNOR 1888. 
S W Hawkins Rep 139014 


DeKalb 1310 1462 47 1188 1317 


Robert L Taylor Dem 156,799 


Dickson.. . . 765 1511 72 . 430 1318 


J C Johnson Pro / ... ... . 6393 


Dyer . 925 2013 63.. 806 1743 


FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 


Fayette 980 3SJ3 -.. 2027 1580 


Fentress 602 249 7.. 447 199 


D. P. Wilcox, Dem.'. 12^324 


Gibson 1893 3763 331.. 1864 3017 


J. M. Pierce, Pro 474 


Giles 2100 3181 138.. 1287 2530 
Granger 1416 931 10.. 1744 809 


2dDist. L. C. Houk, Rep 23,3t!8 
S.G Heiskell,D<?m 9,844 


Greene 2722 2195 235.. 2476 2097 
Grundy 216 901 38. 204 512 
Hamblen 1219 891 38.. 1086 735 


3d Dist.ll. Clay Evans, Rep 18,641 
C. F. Bates, Dem 18^53 


Hamilton 6264 3906 196.. 3581 2381 
Hancock 1216 480 1.. 1016 425 
Hardiman . 1099 1913 21.. 1021 1718 


M. C. Cone, Pro 295 
4th Dist. John S. Wooten, Rep lOttS 
B.McMillln, Dem 16.162 


Hardin 1745 1208 25.. 1324 985 
Hawkins 2260 1624 61.. 1914 1391 
Haywood 1724 1962 2248 1129 


5th Dint . C. H. Shaffuer, Rep 8396 
J. D. Richardson, Dem 17754 


6th Dist.W. H. Young, Rep 12677 


Henderson... . 1772 1512 9.. 1640 1480 
Henry 1197 2103 48.. 1245 2151 


J. E. Washington. Dem 18.965 


L. G. Mumford,Pro 1.505 


Hickman 1137 1510 39.. 929 1230 
Houston 259 745 4.. 179 543 
Humphreys 393 1448 54.. 333 1397 
Jackson 545 1585 6.. 379 1214 
James... .587 308 1.. 525 254 
Jefferson 2348 806 18 1953 764 


7th Dtst.K. A- Haggard, R p 10,507 
W. C. Whftthorne. Dem 14362 


8th Dist Warren Smith, Rep. .. 11905 


B A. Enloe, Dem 14,385 
9th Dist. -J. W. Brown, Rep 10.127 
Rice A . Pierce, Dem 17.21 7 


Johnson 1347 180 14.. 1185 159 
Knox... .. 6124 3929 331.. 4079 2<">61 
Lake... 59 450 34.. 22 328 
Lauderdale 1433 1838 24.. 1295 1309 
Lawrence 633 1089 20.. 696 924 
Lewis 132 254 4. 74 Ltt 


Wth Dist.S. B. Eaton, R<-p 11.780 
James Phelan, Dem 20,149 
LEGISLATIVE. 
. 18S9-90 . 1887-8 
Sen. Ho.J.Bal. Sen. Ho.J Ral. 
Republicans.... 10 30 40. 12 36 48 
Democrats 23 69 92.. 21 63 84 


Lincoln 1082 3285 156 . 890 2415 





138 



CHICAGO DAILF NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



TEXAS. 

- PKES. 1888 < 
Rep. Dem. Pro. Lab. 

HarrUon.Clevcland.Kisk:.S:r<eter. 

. 1321 1635 18 179.. 
95.. 



P2 1050 
172 
109 
645 



.. 34 

. 52 

'.'. 1126 

.. 212 461 

.. 1408 2079 

1 238 

84 422 



4 2.. 

19 .. 

13 -.. 

143!! 
2 

7 



Dem. Rep. 

Ross. Cochran. 

1667 1010 

1021 32 

125 1 

93 43 

749 39 

1589 1143 

1331 



.. 466 459o 64 491.. 

.2798 4335 17 10.. 

. 156 613 8 35.. 

. 193 1864 26 337.. 

..1297 2110 58 39.. 

452 3 . . 

1469 15 145. . 

283 .. 

38 1198 5 440.. 

.. 1039 1212 28 118.. 

.. 141 1222 117 .. 

.. 743 1491 169 272.. 



613 
1871 
320 
304 
3541 



.. 1298 
.. 1482 
. 51 



119 

619 



423 1432 



7 100., 



597 17 
58 



59.. 



559 
16 

,. 1065 2034 14 246! 
. . 136 2b7 
.. 1077 2394 



31 40i: 



1731 
1181 
1301 
1575 
139 
638 
1503 
542 



261 
2009 



114 
35 

556 
1629 

435 
4'i 
46 



1(13 

509 

836 

49 

52 

36o 

44 

80 

732 

1028 

36 

1298 

1175 

1695 

1 

1967 



77 
2178 
419 
430 
695 
2297 
16 
471 



160 

2813 



342 
50 

233 



718 10 158. , 
6., 



875 
866 
4580 



- .51 



895 1 

5647 125 467. 
1855 3 154. 

692 - 
1329 7 846.. 1909 



2354 85 

1700 21 

223 15 

7059 223 

1475 70 

270 J 81 

1114 16 

146 

273 4 

369 

1163 7 

223 

4763 174 

1418 7 

1806 29 

1819 42 

5114 63 
3279 

213 

552 

979 
17* >9 

342 



742. 
679.' 



476.. 
84.. 



19.. 
1006.. 
510.. 

488.. 
179., 



999 
2922 
936 
212 
135 
1168 



195 

4077 
1620 
1890 



146.. 



voy . 



459., 
364., 
75., 



467 15 

2037 34 

5822 107 

2(55 1 

633 6 



1346 
81 

1176 14 234. 
6 

185. 

3571 18 216. 
1937 
179 
1304 



830 
621 
2135 
5184 
35 
1061 



352 - 



141 

1188 



155.. 



158 



4550 2350 

830 76 

2297 50 

1(507 1001 

382 1073 

1581 1331 



71 
1 

249 

1526 1578 
615 315 



5567 1151 



11 



419 
486 
1 

2146 1317 
2159 141 
2931 



1 -.. - 



252 1532 

1005 69 

1361 745 

379 1 

4699 1229 



175 
2 
762 
12U9 
- 
489 



1643 1905 
1346 951 



1381 16 
15. . - 



373 103 

4249 1975 

3018 816 

152 - 



3 705.. 13:36 



Hidalgo 

Hill.. 

Hood 

Hopkins 

Houston 

Howard 

Hunt 

Jack 

Jackson 

Jaspe- 

Jeff Davis.... 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Jones 

Karnes 

Kaufman 

Kendall 

Kerr 

Kimble 

Kinney 

Knox 

Lamar 

Lampasas 

LaSalle 

Lavaca 

Lee 

Leon 

Liberty 

Limestone ... 

Lipscomb 

Live Oak 

Llano 

Madison 

Marion 

Martin 

Mason 

Matagorda... 

Maverick 

McCulloch.... 
McLennan ... 
McMullen.... 

Medina 

Menard 

Midland 

Milam 

Mills 

Mitchell 

Montague 

Montgomery. 

Morris 

Nacogdoches 

Navarro 

Newton 

Nolan 

Nueces 

Oldham 

Orange 

Palo Pinto... 

Panola 

Parker 

Pecos 

Polk 

Potter 

Presidio 

Rains 

Red River.... 

Reeves 

Refugio 

Robertson.... 

Rockwall 

Runnels 

Rusk 

abine 
. Augustine. 
San Jacinto.. 
San Patricio.. 

SanSaba 

Scurry 

Shackelford.. 

Shelby 

Smith 

Somervell 

Starr 

Stephens 



Harrison.Clevel'd.FUk. 

45 513 

370 3389 147 

12 958 85 

453 30SO 253 



Streeter. Ross.Cochran. 

-.. 1243 318 



81 



1728 

187 - 

552 4369 134 

136 860 5 

304 312 - 

257 511 2 

206 152 
361 

114 2916 116 



16 365 

40 444 1 

676 3701 85 

443 251 

,331 
329 
193 

157 

1537 36J7 68 

167 837 153 

283 147 - 

564 2457 10 

494 1401 5 

761 1454 7 

306 313 

571 2115 98 

132 1 

32? 9 

905 5 

772 - 



97 

617 3 

250 1 
334 - 
453 - 

4023 253 

177 

702 1 

251 
120 8 

2733 33 



211 

10 

315 



76 



50 
193 



185 
505 



78 
1791 



27 
32 
790 
67 



483 

590 

1319 

87 

347 



17 

623 

3 

80 

1286 
14 
68 

2184 
41 
28 

1477 



594 
87 

86 
195 
I'JTti 



279 10 

2102 24 

1047 33 

760 

2063 4 

3365 137 

527 6 

216 4 

1091 

247 - 



1646 
2405 97 
156 - 



923.. 

73., 

41., 
113., 

I:: a** 

.. 921 



3791 
1061 
3007 
1512 
316 



- 100., 



10 . 



42. . 381 

22.. 2dO 

296.. 3447 

. . 216 

84.. 492 



.. M 

30.. 505 

728.. 2565 

168.. 

15. . 715 

5.. 2069 

574.. 2944 

36.. 502 



.. 
170. 



1240 
285 
. . 437 
. . 475 
60.. 1563 
237.. 2640 
258 
<J46 



490 7 

2576 

308 

161 

1918 109 

1020 32 

- 5 

2216 18 

680 

802 - 

3(59 

149 

783 12 

117 7 



400., 



.. 1515 



245 
1927 
2714 
292 
479 
676 



298.. 
29., 
4.. 



14.. 



2464 
616 
377 
22', 7 
532 
723 
401 
163 
976 
164 



22.. 1661 

207.. 2490 

144. . 517 

.. 546 

78. . 529 



. . 379 79 

-. . 116 

129.. 2235 410 

145. 1031 33 

. . 327 

1.. 2139 6 

130.. 1405 551 

113.. 1545 746 

198.. 345 264 

707.. 1740 471 

'.'. 342 

-.. 1169 

339. . 775 230 

. . 694 1159 

. . 113 

. . 839 48 

.. 272 479 

-. . 376 183 

1.. 468 2 

95,.. 3064 940 

.. 676 251 



69 .. 



33 
2 

456 
4 

2094 

26 
707 
134 

388 



110 
1856 



. ELECTION 


RETURNS. 139 


Harrison.Clevrd.Fi3k.Stre<>ter Zoti. Cochran. 

Tarrant 1069 4129 69 1676.. 4086 1008 
Taylor 86 CM 33 51.. 557 
Throckmort'n 34 135 2 -.. 170 
Titus 237 1162 - 139.. 1092 225 
Tom Green.. 418 878 - ..942 276 
Travis . . . . 2738 3178 63 108. . 3539 2267 


UTAH. 

. DELEGATE , 
COUNTIES. 1888. 1886. 
(24) Nor. Gen.MorD. Nor.A.M. 

Came. Baakin.Thurman. Caine. Ferry. 

Beaver 174 76 13 419 l 9 ?^ 


Trinity 89 992 1 35.. 912 258 
Tyltr 455 953 823.. 1061 201 


Box Elder 366 74 11.. 682 110 
Cache 904 87 9 17% 23 


Upshur 510 1237 31 294.. 1419 582 


Davis 341 55 28.. 792 44 


Uvalde. 153 510 2 .. 633 43 


Emery 221 49 18 403 41 


Va' Verde.... 198 318 - -..274 80 
V^nZandt... 147 2001 36 952.. 2533 85 


Garfleld 104 8 .. 113 2 
Iron 174 14 4. 376 fi 


Victoria 843 723 2 -.. 731 734 


Juab . 258 146 26.. 501 92 


Walker 332 722 865. . 869 854 


Kane 92 134 


Waller 1351 787 1 4.. 632 1175 


Millard 2 9 4 48 6 647 30 


Washington . 2242 2598 12 4 . 2214 1986 


Morgan... 127 21 3 244 16 


Webb 138 765 - -.. 1724 43 
Wharton.... 1416 332 .. 183 820 


Piute 116 28 5.. 198 17 
Rich 105 8 5.. 164 5 


Wheeler 108 357 .. 410 56 
Wichita ... 99 339 1 -. . 339 55 


Salt Lake 2099 1189 94.. 3925 657 
San Juan. . 14 


Wilbarger.. .. 110 286 5 42.. 507 41 


San Pete . , 914 128 49 . 1665 122 


Williamson... 803 2t6 105 229.. 2252 142 


Sevler.... . 325 65 7.. 657 67 


Wilson... . 63 1479 12 225.. 1590 166 


Summit 300 717 10 647 674 


Wise 263 2318 37 568.. 2466 167 


Tooele 275 100 3 472 86 


Wood 447 1543 -- 88*5 . 1331 "269 


Uintah 32 18 1 90 2 


Joung 53 648 15 49.. 620 39 


Utah 1458 254 200 2550 204 


apata 196 - -.. 217 
Zavala 12 163 - -. . 190 


Wasatch 190 5 12.. 304 5 
Washington 3K3 16 3.. 678 50 


Total 88422 234883 4749 29459. .228776 65236 


Weber 945 388 4 . 2142 464 


Per cent 21 90 65 6*) 1 05 8 55 20 1 73 


Total 10127 3484 511 19605 2810 


Total vote.. 357513 .. 313,198 


Majority 6132 .. 16795 
Percent... 71.71 24.67 3.61.. 88.70 11.30 




Total vote 14122 .. 22483 


STATE OFFICERS FOR 1889-90- 
Governor L. S. Koss. Dem. 
Lieut.-Gov.T. B. Wheeler. Dem. 
Treasurer F. R. Lubbock, Dem. 
Comptroller J . D. McCall, Dem. 
Sec. of State J. M Moore, Dem. 
Supt. Pub. Inst.O. H. Cooper, Dem. 
Com. Gen. Land OMcell. M. Hall, Dem. 
Att'y-Gen.J. S. Hogg, Dem. 


LEGISLATURE. 

Nearly unanimously Mormon. 

VERMONT. 

COUNTIES. ^PRES., 1888.-^ Go v., 1886. , 
(14) Rep.Dem.Pro. Rep. Dem. Pro. 

Harrison. Cleve.Fisk. Onnsbee.Shurtleff.Seeley, 

Addison 4036 618 164.. 3513 626 254 


Adjt.-Gen.W. II. King, Dem. 
Com. Ins. and S:at.it. L. Foster, Dem. 
Supreme Judge J. W. Slayton, Dem. 
Associate Judq s Sup. Court J. L. Henry, 
Dem.. R. K. Gaines, Dem. 

FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 
1st Dist Lock McDaniel Rep 9,817 


Bennington... 2497 1128 91.. 2338 1347 45 
Caledonia... . 3083 1249 162.. 2384 1252 274 
Chittenden.. . 4149 1940 106.. 3474 2188 73 
Essex 907 502 25.. 800 4(59 27 
Franklin 3121 1343 171.. 3041 1359 235 
Grand Isle... . 465 180 3.. 449 263 4 
Lamoille 1797 543 66.. 1319 517 157 


Charles Stewart Dem 14813 


Orange 2792 1277 114.. 2652 1667 51 


Jack Davis Jnd 4166 


Orleans 303H 724 103.. 2597 840 41 


2d Dist W H Martin Dem 16,210 


Rutland 6088 2417 153.. 4770 2147 143 


R. M. Humphrey, ind 6,656 
3d Dist. C. B. Kilgore, Dem 20.579 
W. E Farmer. Un. Lab. ... ...9.697 


Washington . 3715 1892 103 . 3087 1986 96 
Windham 4344 1518 122.. 3232 1248 99 
Windsor 5163 1457 77.. 4053 1278 42 


4th Dist.-D. B. Culberson, Dt-m .24,380 
E L Dahoney Pro . 1 


Total 45193 16788 1460. . 37709 17187 1541 
Plurality 28405 205 9 2 


5th W E Farmer Ind 31 


Per cent 71 19 26 44 2 30' 66 16 30 15 2 70 


Dist. -Silas Hare, Dem 27,006 
I II Thomas, Did 4.482 


Scattering 35 
Total vote 63476 57099 


6th Dist J. O. Abbott, Dem 26.815 




Sam Evans Ind 12 126 


FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 


7thDist. C. G. Brewster. Hep 12.063 




W. H. Grain, Dem 15,610 




8th Dist. L. W. Moore, Dem 21,220 


Peter Dakin Pro 3^5 


T. (3. rooke.lnd 8,460 
R. H. Sledge, Ind 849 
9th Dist R. Q. Mills, Dem 20,701 


2d Dist William W. Grout, Rep 24.219 
George W. Smith, Dem 9,605 


E. A. Jones, Ind 15,316 
10th Dist A Belknap Rep 12,266 


VOTE FOR GOVERNOR 1888 


J.D. Savers, Dem 24,094 
llth Dist.- D. Redfleld, Reo 975 


William P. Dillingham, Rep 48.522 
Stephen C. Shurtleff, Dem 19.527 


S. W. T. Lanham, Dvm 26,361 
D. W. Rumph, Ind 3,130 
LEGISLATURE. 

, 1889-90 1887-8 > 
Sen. Ho.J.Bal.Sen.Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans - 31 31.. 3 3 
Democrats 3 103 lOti.. 31 103 134 
Ind. Republicans . . 2 2 
Proliibitionists.. . - 1 1 


Henry M. Seeley,Pro 1,372 

LEGISLATURE. 

1 889-90 i 1887-8 
Sen. Ho.J.Bal. Sen. Ho.J.Bal. 
Republicans.... 30 219 249.. 29 206 235 
Democrats - 19 19. 1 29 30 
Independents... 2 2. . 3 3 
Prohibitionist.. --..- 1 1 



140 


CHICAGO 


DAILY 


NEWS ALMANAC FOR 18UO. 


COUNTIES. 
(101) 

Accomac 
,Albemarle 
Alexandria 
Alleghany 
Amelia. ..., 


VIRGINIA. 
-GOV. '89- 
Rep. Dem. 

Mahone. McKinne 

1651 3250. 
2017 2727. 
416 289. 
702 771. 
929 726. 
1134 1852. 
440 463. 
1965 3572. 
376 489. 
1732 2424. 
482 570. 
1092 1734. 
1541 1436. 
482 436. 
1243 1414. 
1279 2231. 
1462 1515. 
1166 1328. 
633 336. 
785 1709. 
359 681. 
1513 1758 
435 1197. 
117 568. 
944 1622. 
822 784. 
389 442. 
1278 1091. 
1312 658. 
921 926. 
1611 1969. 
1391 2780. 
1327 822. 
653 1128. 
1466 2489. 
662 1870. 
528 1089 

"S 'S 

1199 1319. 
409 641. 
589 639. 
1920 4097. 
1362 1948. 
2041 2066. 
1093 1053. 
432 614. 
849 1549. 
532 277. 
588 620. 
803 948. 
647 904. 

1431 2835! 
1296 1486. 
816 997. 
656 1222. 
569 1026. 
2285 2180. 
871 658. 
1299 1724. 
1921 2034. 
1220 1589. 
620 465. 
1670 2166. 
1130 1024. 
840 1003. 
1038 819. 
968 1342. 
1171 1191. 
912 1039. 
2665 4637. 
651 630. 
1018 1067. 
1027 550. 
830 1047. 
568 1293. 
927 1206. 
303 1155. 
677 635. 


,-PRES 
Rep. 

j. Hani-ion. 

1993 
2166 
462 
995 
1036 
1411 
787 
2525 
405 
1991 
509 
1217 
1521 
427 
1520 
1564 
1588 
1147 
684 
1036 
407 
1576 
529 
177 
1181 
1045 
384 
1411 
1316 
1088 
1824 
1778 
1482 
1739 
1767 
871 

1259 
520 
893 
2473 
1511 
2326 
1608 
440 
1116 
607 
720 
829 
1093 

18 

2190 
1677 
806 
907 
615 
2607 
909 
1516 
2086 
1224 
689 
3740 
1221 
905 
1116 
1153 
1333 
1022 
38 17 
767 

740 
993 
553 
741 


1888-s 
Dem. 

Clevel'd 

3184 
2573 
255 
759 
704 
1777 

33H 
482 
3204 
537 
1559 
1289 
492 
1184 
2089 
1442 
1322 
303 
1720 
674 
1589 

'S 

1404 
578 
451 
106o 
547 

2010 
2661 
952 
1004 
2403 
1832 
977 
1073 
674 
1288 
532 
714 
3570 
1721 
1712 
1409 
454 
1200 
219 
542 
958 
746 
839 
1479 
2842 
1157 
1215 
9ol 
1023 
1764 
635 
1335 
1382 
1554 
375 
1969 
980 
551 
611 
1126 
1195 
1238 
4261 
561 
1132 
661 
844 
1311 
1070 
1034 
658 


Mahone. McKinnej, Harrison. Clevel'd 

Roanoke 946 1158.. 2188 2090 


Rockbridge 1726 2264.. 2074 2030 
Rockingham 2464 3248.. 3175 2895 
Russell 1207 1663 1333 1601 


Scott . 1800 1550 


Shenandoah 1685 2254.. 2063 2164 
Smyth 1118 1334.. 1228 1310 
Southampton.... 1612 2159.. 2117 15W 
Spottsylvanla... 738 934.. 922 876 


Amherst 


Appomattox 
Augusta 
Bath 
Bedford 
Bland 


Surrey..., 753 905.. 1101 6(51 


Sussex... 1185 773.. 1582 895 


Tazewell......... 1760 1382.. 2245 1307 


Warren 402 1244.. 440 1224 
Warwick 939 455 763 385 


Botetourt 
Brunswick . . 


Washington 2277 3005.. 2548 2930 
Westmoreland.. 866 734.. 1009 626 
Wise 756 743 742 722 


Buchanan 
Buckingham 
Campbell 


Wythe 1379 1751.. 1643 1462 


Caroline 
Carroll 


York 684 725.. 972 495 
CITIES. 


Charles City 
Charlotte 
Charlottesville.. 
Chestertield 
Clarke 


Danville 741 1174.. 812 1070 
Fredericksburg. 336 616.. 409 595 
Lynchburg 1317 2157.. 1796 2053 
Manchester.... 701 1112.. 735 896 
Norfolk 1401 3288.. 3199 2x513 
North Danville.. 19o 431.. 228 337 
Petersburg 1533 1972.. 2197 2037 
Portsmouth 794 Iu31.. 1103 1439 


Craig .... 


Culpeper 


Cumberland 
Dickinson 


Dinwiddie.. 
Elizabeth City. . 


Roanoke 921 1481.. 
Staunton 434 793.. 535 719 


Fairfax 


Williamsburg... 155 101.. 161 101 
Winchester 474 518.. 540 488 




Floyd 


Total 120477 162654 150433 151977 


Plurality 42177 1539 


Franklin 


Percent 42.20 57 80 4949 4999 


Frederick 
Biles 


Scattering(Fisk) .. 1678 
Total vote 233131 .. 304093 
Taylor, Pro., received 897 votes. 

VOTE FOB OTHER STATE OFFICERS, 1889. 

Lieut.-Gov.C. C.Slemp. Rep 118.870 


loucester 




Greene 


Greenville 


. Shelburne, Pro 963 




FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 
lstDi.it Browne, Rep 14731 


Henrico 
Henry 


Kendall. Dem 14,317 


Highland 


2d Dist. Bowden, Rep 19 821 


Isle of Wight.... 
James City 
King George 
King and Queen 
King William... 
Lancaster 


Marshall Dem 13,726 


Williams Pro 228 


3d Dist Waddlll Rep 15,347 


Wise D"m 15608 


4th Dist Langston, Rep 12 657 


Venable, Dem 13,299 


Lee 


Arnold. Pro 3 207 


Loudoun 


5th Dist. Blackwell, Rep 13Q44 


Louisa 
Lunenburgh 
Madison 


Lester, Dem 14 409 


6th Dist. McCaull, Rep 13,829 


Edmunds Dem 17 559 


Matthews 
Mecklenburgh... 
Middlesex 
Montgomery.. .. 
Nansemond 
Nelson 
New Kent 
Norfolk 
Northampton 
Northumberland 
Nottoway 
Orange 
Page 


Hopkins, Pro 198 


7th Dist Roller, Rep 13,623 


O'Farrell, Dem 16,4*3 


Revercomb, Pro . 202 


8th Dist.Asnew, Rep . . .14.)1 


Lee Dfm 15,414 


9th Dist Bowen Rep 16,042 


Buchanan, Dem 16520 


10th Dist. Yost, Rep ..13994 


Tucker, Dem 14,587 


LEGISLATURE. 

1889-90 . 1887-8 . 
Sen. Ho. J.Sal. Sen. H'.J.Bal. 
Republicans... 10 14 24.. 10 30 40 
Democrats 30 86 116.. 30 70 100 

WASHINGTON. 
CorxTiES. Gov.m COXST'N. DEL.'SS. 
(34) Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. 

FerrT. Semple. For. Aarainst. All. n.Voorhoes. 

Adams 280 141.. 203 171.. 230 139 
Asotin 171 135.. 83 201.. 193 139 
Chehalis 897 615.. 1292 58 . 836 668 


Patrick 


Pittsylvania 
Powhatan 
Prince Edward.. 
Prince George... 
Princess Anne... 
Prince William.. 
Pulaski 
Rappahannock.. 
Richmond 



ELECTION 


RETURNS. 141 


Allen. Voorhees. Greene.BMshVY'rhees. 

Clallam 223 231.. 400 14.. 181 160 
Clarke 1216 692.. 1191 601.. 1033 663 
Columbia .. 668 648.. 467 730.. 664 665 
Cowlitz 666 355.. 576 361.. 588 385 
Douglas 353 265 449 113 262 198 


LEGISLATURE. 

, 1889. > 1888. . 
Senate. Ho. J.B. Council. Ho. 
Republicans 34 64 98.. 11 21 
Democrats 167 13 


Franklin. !.' 38 89." 35 81.'.' 38 103 
Garfleld.. .. 517 418.. 342 551.. 531 440 
Island 180 100.. 210 22. 168 97 
Jefferson. .. 867 633.. 1286 75.. 634 443 
King 4319 3989 5555 1136 3360 2533 


WEST VIRGINIA. 

COUNTIES. - 1888 PRESIDENT 1884 . 
(53) Rep. Dem. Pro. 1 ab.ReoDem 


KItsap 618 291.. 74 75.. 498 220 
Kittitas.. .. 1339 1158.. 2008 140.. 792 776 
Klickitat .. 686 332.. 806 217.. 706 365 
Lewis 1219 868.. 1641 240.. 8<i8 676 
Lincoln 1104 863.. 1477 293.. 915 706 
Mason 322 303.. 448 59.. 295 274 
Okanogan.. 322 211.. 418 41.. 312 248- 
Pacific... . 494 150.. 483 111.. 455 172 


Harrison. Cleveland. Fisk. Streeter.BlainoClevU 

Barbour... 1473 1508 2 9.. 1241 1263 
Berkeley.. 2183 2011 5 -..1763 1843 
Boone...... 520 741 1 2.. 362 470 
Braxton... 1062 1688 5 ..831 1441 
Brooke.... 787 804 11 .. 704 757 
Cabell 1947 2427 30 8.. 1442 1872 
Calhoun... 623 935 1 11.. 499 753 
Clay 464 414 8 276 306 


San Juan.. 264 104.. 294 36.. 264 111 
Skagit 961 563.. 1173 111.. 768 383 
Skamania.. 62 72.. 28 99 . 42 72 
Snohomish. 880 659.. 1204 137.. 805 473 
Spokane.... 3256 2272.. 3890 787.. 2535 1714 
Stevens 460 350.. 643 41.. 289 289 
Thurston.... 1067 725.. 1241 436.. 856 527 
Wahkiakum 135 284.. 307 87.. 201 116 
Walla Walla 1417 1118. . 996 1422. . 1321 1051 
Whatcom.., 1534 752. 1629 293.. 764 460 
Whitman... 2149 1844.. 2040 1742.. 1950 1706 
Yakima 537 519.. 845 105.. 461 398 


Doddridge. 1393 1151 3 P.. 1208 989 
Fayette.... 2ol6 1923 26 189.. 1753 1555 
Gilmer 833 1179 -. 674 1027 
Grant 1027 378 9 2.. 826 310 
Greenbrier 1393 2121 8 . . 1025 1834 
H'mpshire 519 1907 7 ..404 1748 
Hancock.. 675 489 12 88" 655 455 
Hardy 439 1153 5 -..275 1116 
Harrison.. 2628 2161 22 118.. 23-^3 2149 
Jackson... 2234 1942 20 ..1812 1^94 
Jefferson 1132 2357 7 16.. 1042 2254 
Kanawha. 4541 3089 95 582.. 4240 282', 


Total. . . . 33711 24732. .40152 11879. .26291 18920 
Majority.... 8979 ..28273 . 7371 
Per cent. . . . 57.68 42.32. .77.17 22 83. .56.71 41.25 
Total vote.. 58443 .. 52031 .. 46353 

In 1888 Greene, Pro., for delegate, received 
1137 votes. 

OTHER STATE OFFICERS, 1889. 


Lincoln... 950 1147 9.. 638 984 
Logan .... 393 1533 . . 161 1023 
Marion . . . 2233 2256 50 69. . 1958 1956 
Marshall. 2676 1837 91 -..2352 1734 
Mason.... 2646 2321 47 -..2405 2007 
Mercer.... 1402 1374 6 7.. 461 947 
Mineral.. 1251 1209 31 9.. 985 1077 

Monongalia... . 2208 1361 30 -.. 1938 1292 
Monroe... 1222 1338 27 -.. 973 1176 
Morgan 877 539 23 754 452 


L H Platter Dem 24363 


McDowell 582 409 " 186 203 


Sec'y of State Allen Weir, Rep. . . 34 014 


Nicholas 779 1016 40 13 549 696 


W H Whittelsey, Dem 24,478 


Ohio 4749 4855 92 4336 4461 


Treasurer A. A. Lindsley, Rep 34,203 


Pendleton 779 1012 1 599 844 




Pleasants 693 803 7 7 532 685 


Auditor T M Reed Rep 34*162 


Pocah'nt's 587 891 6 ' 389 667 


J M Murphy Dem 24 125 


Preston 2 t *93 1403 44 35 2(12) 1S16 


Att'y-Gen W C Jones, Rep 34 143 


Putnam 1521 1390 10 128 1283 1102 


H. J. Sniveley, Dem 24.411 
Supt of Schools R B. Bryan, Rep 33443 


Raleigh... 806 924 20 -., 588 773 
Randolph 772 1426 554 1119 


J. H Morgan, Dem 24939 


Ritchie 1960 1408 100 32 1720 12S3 


Comr. of Lands W. T. Forrest, Rep 34.134 
M. Z. Goodell, Dem. 24 344 


Roane.... 1449 1636 3 3.. 1110 1324 
Summers 1272 1353 15 .. 871 1058 


Supreme Court Judges R.O. Dunbar,/2ep 34,042 
T. C. Stiles, Rep. .. ... 32.636 


Taylor.... 1580 1219 30 2.. 1421 1040 
Tucker... 628 680 6 6.. 2S9 435 


T J Anders Rep 34302 


Tyler 1562 1137 14 1 1402 1040 


B Scott Rep 33830 


Upshur 1716 841 24 21 12o7 682 


j p Hoyt, Rep 33 578 


Wayne 1412 2058 3 . 103o 1780 


W H White, Dem 24 556 


Webster.. 295 653 .. 171 427 


B. L. Sharpstein, Dem . .. 25,50s 


Wetzel... 1385 2295 7 34.. 1058 1947 


J. P. Judson, Dem 24,461 


Wirt 921 1054 3 10.. 713 855 


J. B. Reavis, Dem 24,533 


Wood 3255 2803 62 134.. 2721 2340 


F. G anahl, Dem 24,029 


Wyoming 596 471 1 .. 263 236 


FOR STATE CAPITAL. 
Olympia... ... 25,490 


Total.... 78171 78.77 1084 1508. .63096 67317 
Plurality.. 506 ..4221 
Percent... 49.00 49.35 .68 .94.. 


North Yaktma.... .. 14.718 


Total vote 159440 


Ellensburgh 12 833 




PROHIBITION. 


FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 
1st Dist G W Atkinson Rep ... .19242 


For 19 546 


John O. Pendleton, Dem 19.258 


Against 31,487 


2d D'st.-W. H. H. Flick. Rep 20091 


WOMAN-SUFFRAGE. 
For 16 527 


William L. Wilson, Dem 20,46'J 
LEGISLATURE. 


Against 34 613 


1381 91 1387 3 


FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS. 
John L. Wilson, Rep 34 939 


Sen. ffo.J.Bal. Sen. HoJ.Bal. 
Republicans... 13 44 57.. 12 29 41 
Democrats 12 46 58 14 36 50 


T. C. Griffiths, Dem 24,992 


Labor .. . . 1 1 2 . 







142 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


WISCONSIN. 


COUNTIES. 


. PRESIDENT 1888 . 


. GOVERNOR 1888 , - GOVERNOR 1886 


(68) 


Rep. Dem. 


Pro. Lai 


. Rep. Dem. Pro. Lab. Rep. Dem. 


Pro. Lab 




llarri<on.Cleve!ac 


d. Fisk. Stree 






Adams 


. 1102 426 


16 


.. 1100 430 15 6 . 966 338 


16 2 


Ashland 


. 2868 2233 


56 - 


.. 2856 2201 53 1.. 1240 1355 


41 49 


Barren 


. 1800 885 


283 ( 


. 1794 881 295 6.. 1134 646 


447 


Bayfleld 


. 1205 708 


27 - 


.. 1204 707 27 .. 539 575 


15 


Brown 


. 2655 3554 


133 9e 


.. 2663 3540 115 112.. 2183 2850 


147 383 


Buffalo 


. 1754 1331 


88 ; 


.. 1767 1316 86 6.. 1552 957 


48 


Burnett 


. 490 . 69 


230 - 


.. 491 69 228 -.. 461 49 


103 


Calumet 


. 952 1984 


46 142 


.. 954 1082 44 145.. 879 1720 


25 14J 


Chippewa 


. 2685 2506 


283 - 


.. 2678 2503 282 -.. 1888 2406 


309 2 


Clark. 


. 22T-0 1297 


144 22 


. 2263 1286 144 32.. 1429 959 


227 257 


Columbia 


. 3509 2650 


393 K 


. 3506 2652 389 14.. 2820 2067 


603 6 


Crawford 


. 1799 1564 


62 42 


. 1806 1562 59 34.. 1547 1356 


62 - 


Dane 


. 6827 6426 


1082 t 


.. 6844 6410 1079 7.. 5956 5219 


1322 7 


Dodge 


. 318*5 6046 


212 4( 


.. 3144 6078 218 39.. 3289 5096 


303 187 


Door 


. 1688 1018 


55 2 


.. 1688 1039 52 2.. 1557 776 


74 2 


Douglas 
Dunn 


1183 778 
. 2531 1299 


19 3.. 1181 776 15 3.. 326 325 
50 91 . 2526 1302 285 92.. 1749 774 


3 - 
357 196 


Eau Claire 


. 3203 2412 


493 162 


.. 3215 2396 492 164.. 2102 1803 


640 37 


Florence 


. 321 227 


3 1] 


.. 813 236 3 11.. 336 74 






. 4511 4910 


297 101 


. 4496 4934 297 95.. 3403 3972 


402 443 


Forest 


234 217 


9 - 


. 233 218 9 . 153 209 


1 


Grant 


4242 3414 


449 '.-) 


..4264 3407 434 96.. 3642 2684 


675 37 


Green 


2659 2098 


440 217 


. 2625 2122 450 214.. 2114 1716 


672 4 


Green Lake 


1702 1416 


125 5 


.. 1699 1417 126 4.. 1601 1155 


158 2 


Iowa 


2484 2257 


461 - 


.. 2491 2256 463 -.. 2198 1961 




Jackson 
Jefferson 


2090 986 
2994 4282 


255 -..2093 1000 247 .. 1744 827 
204 13.. 3025 4238 191 15. 2R35 3413 


235 50 
261 43 


uneau 


. 2066 1666 


183 11 


.. 2077 1658 181 11.. 1882 1585 


240 4 


Ken os ha 


1684 1681 


102 1 


. 1691 1674 108 1.. 1451 1398 


95 












LaCrosse 
Lafayette.. i 


4128 3901 
2564 2275 


394 133 . 3935 3699 398 516.. 2418 2824 
268 5 . 2563 2284 263 1.. 2264 1873 


264 676 
349 22 




1138 1032 


107 113 


. 1114 1050 106 113. 994 939 


122 23 




2703 4218 


19 127 


.. 2681 4237 16 125 . 2333 3700 


9 53 




2122 3365 


42 304 


.. 2114 3356 42 317.. 1923 2608 


23 367 


Marinette 


1775 1767 


224 127 


.. 1777 1756 224 234.. 1117 594 


94 991 


Marquette 
Milwaukee 


1119 1005 
21394 17302 


26 4 
339 4494 


.. 1131 999 27 4.. 1088 826 
..20887 17703 333 4647.. 10936 7472 


83 4 
185 12914 


Oconto 


1315 1148 


37 7 


. 1313 1154 35 6.. 1134 851 


28 51 




2759 4000 


187 118.: 2779 4005 185 99.. 2229 3454 


135 472 


Ozaukee 


750 2026 


4 86 


. 755 2025 4 86.. 660 1821 


6 213 




2477 1158 


542 46 


1158 537 47 2034 817 




Polk 


1703 631 


332 


606 334 .. 1478 341 


351 - 


Portage 


2603 2322 


167 22 


2322 165 22.. J1858 1754 


219 1 


Price 
Racine 


914 619 
3947 3326 


101 - 
536 283 


. 912 620 101 -.. 688 376 
. 3923 3293 462 314.. 2682 1788 


9 9 
511 1525 


Richland 


2467 1740 


292 21 


. 2457 1734 294 25.. 2292 1527 


352 1 


Rock 
St. Croix 


6225 3501 
2759 2130 


478 13.. 6193 3509 508 7.. 4901 2686 
529 49 . 2753 2135 530 51.. 2229 1794 


786 2 
589 218 


Sauk 


3410 2648 


538 32 


. 3400 2657 535 34.. 2740 1982 


544 11 




542 511 


1 _ 


. 542 508 1 -.. 228 504 


12 


Shawano 


1775 1636 


31 23 


. 1784 1635 25 23.. 1293 1262 


39 10 


Sheboygan 


3729 4320 




. 3683 4386 65 436.. 2779 2985 


125 580 




792 719 


15 


. 788 723 15 1.. 802 585 


6 13 


Trempealeau 
Vernon 


2261 1571 
316 1540 


236 - 
268 45 


. 2276 1567 229 1.. 1784 975 
3321 1540 263 49.. 2907 1364 


409 1 
343 20 


Walworth 
Washburn 


4473 2028 
514 363 


563 93 
106 - 


. 4447 2036 584 94.. 3129 1205 
. 514 363 107 1.. 309 222 


757 223 
146 


Washington 


1869 2872 


12 


. 1853 2892 11 -.. 1640 2516 


34 35 


Waukesna 


E3456 


297 33 


. 3848 3445 302 24.. 3152 2862 


413 2 


Waupaca 


1769 


167 53 


. 3383 1778 163 53.. 2911 1344 


222 35 


Waushara 


663 


159 33 


. 2258 658 157 33.. 1326 438 


213 - 


Winnebago 
Wood 


4938 4611 
1904 1984 


402 682 
41 73 


. 4885 4609 401 713.. 3783 3288 
. 1696 1986 38 79 . 1268 1674 


607 1116 
44 19 


Total 


171)553 155232 


14277 8552 


.175696155423 14373 9196.. 133247 11452;) 


17089 21467 


Plurality 


21321 




. 20273 .. 18718 40.00 




Per cent 


49.78 43.77 


403 2.41 


..52.36 43.81 4.08 2.50.. 46.53 286, 


368 


Total vote 


354614 


360714 




VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS 1888. 


N. LaDue, Pro 


14,537 


Lieut.-G v. George W. 
Andrew Kull, Dem. . 
C Carlson, Pro 


Ryland, Rep 


....176.488 
154.735 
.... 14.533 


W. M. Lockwood, Lab 
Treasurer H. B. Harshaw, Rep 
Theo. Kersten, Dem 


.... 8,721 
176,567 
154,539 


N. E.Allen, Lab 
Sec. of State E. G. Timme, Rep 
A. C. Larsen, Dem 


8.763 
....177,495 
....153,921 


L. W. H oy t, Pro 
A. Manheimer, Lab 
Att'y-Gen.C. E. Estabrook, Rep 


.... 14,545 
.... 8,748 
....176,351 



ELECTION 


RETURNS. 143 


T B Ryan Dem, 154 943 


4th Dist I W Van Snbn.ipk Tien 99919 


C E Pike Pro 14582 


Henry Smi 
G. M. Heel 
John Schu 
5th Dist G K 


th,tem 20^685 
tendorn. Pro 302 


K. Shawvan, Lnb 8,709 


State Supt.J. B. Thayer, Rep 176,778 
Amos Squire Dem 154570 






J H Gould Pro . . 14489 


G. H. Bricb 
E. M. Dick 
Charles Ha 
6th Di*t. rhar 
Charles W. 
W. S. Swet 
P. A. Grifflt 
7th Dist. O B 
F. P. Cobui 
J. H.Mose 
8th Dist.-mis 
C.S.Johns 
C. Alexand 
9th Dist.M. H 
H. W. Earl; 
A. C. Merry 
J. F. Moore 

f 

Republicans.. 
Democrats 
Labor 
Independents. 

NTIES AND T( 
COUNTY. 
. I>TO. ProLab 

son.Cleve'd.FiskStr'ter 

47 171 11 - 
34 47 3 
20 152 

54 ass - - 


ner, Dem ' 17 Ool 


J W Stewart, Lab 8,t><)0 


Pro '179 


Railed Com'rA. Peterson, Rep 17C..124 
H Naber , Dem 155.087 


tch. Lab 854 


les B. Clark, Rep 17,977 
Felker Dem 14213 


E W Drake Pro 14 573 


F J Heines' Lnb 8733 


t Pro 1,'233 


Ins. Com'rP. Cheek, Jr.. Rep 17f.,353 
E W Evans Dem 154,951 


h. Lab 805 


Thomas, Rep 19918 


S M Bixby, Pro 14,511 


n, D: m 15433 


R Stephens, Lab 8,695 


Iv. Pro 1871 


FOB REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 
1st Dist L B Caswell Re 19311 


P. Haugen, Rep 26,911 


on, Dem. and Lab 16.476 
er. Pro . 3 687 


J B Doe jr Dem 14 997 


. McCord, Rep 27 538 


8 Faville' Pro . 1,809 


f, Dem 24775 


Henry Smith La 3 


man, Pro 1467 


2dDist.-E. C. McFetridge, Rep 13,859 
Charles Baring Dem 16.813 


, Lab 579 


LEGISLATURE. 

1889-90 1887- 8 . 
Sen. Ho.J.Bal. Sen. Ho.J.Bal. 
24 70 94.. 25 57 82 
6 28 34.. 6 36 42 
2 2.. 1 6 7 
.11 2.. 1 1 2 

>WNS 
Rep. Dem.. ProLab 

Harrison. Cleve'd.FiskStr'ter 

Lincoln 19 60 
Modena 134 28 22 
Mondovi 209 43 10 
Montana 54 76 
Naples ..149 24 2 


O H Crowl Pro 830 


C Hewitt Lab -- 103 


SdDist. R. M. LaFollette, Rep 


19,052 


...16.126 


F C Richmond P>o 2,654 




WISCC 
ADAMS COUNTY. 
Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Harri3on.Cleve'd.FiskStr'ter 

Adams 71 36 5 - 
Big Flats 40 8 
Dell Prairie.. 70 38 - - 
Easton 58 34 2 
Jackson 105 10 4 2 
Leola 53 4 - 
Lincoln 66 32 3 
Monroe 80 19 
New Chester.. -53 22 
New Haven... 114 68 1 - 
Preston 17 17 


)NSIN BY COU 
BAYFIELD 
Rep 

Harri 

Bayfleld 2 
Drummond .. 1 
Mason 2 
Washburn.... 5 


Nelson 196 103 24 
Wanmandee.. 49 100 1 


Total 121 
Plurality.... 4 

BROWN 

Ashwanb'non 
Allouez 
Bellevue 
Depere Tp... 
" City.. 1 
Eaton 
Fort Howard. 3i 
Glenmore 
Green Bay Tp 
" City 6 
Howard 


te 708 27 - 

97 

COUNTY. 

t>0 27 - 
24 54 1 - 
25 110 1 - 
30 148 1 

9 232 7 2 
33 105 - 4 
37 319 67 15 
37 124 - - 
55 48 
51 651 16 45 
83 95 6 - 
18 270 - - 
75 67 - - 
02 63 1 2 
18 152 2 
08 138 3 - 


Total 1754 1331 88 1 
Plurality.... 423 

BURNETT COUNTY. 

Grantsburg . . 281 34 86 
Marshland . . 28 13 36 
Trade Lake. 123 19 64 
Wood Lake. 53 3 44 


Quincy 57 33 


Richfield 41 26 1 - 
Rome 41 15 2 
Springville ... 74 20 
Strong's P'rie 162 44 1 


Total .... 490 69 230 
Plurality... 421 

CALUMET COUNTY. 
Brillion . 124 125 11 


Total 1102 426 16 5 
Plurality . . 676 

ASHLAND COUNTY. 

Ashland Tp.. 288 266 1 - 
City. 1505 1241 45 
Butternut.... 164 119 
Jacobs 115 188 
Vaughn 796 419 10 - 


Humboldt.... 
Lawrence 1 
Morrison 1 
NewDenmark 1 
Pittsfield 
Preble 


" Village 54 60 1 17 
Brothertown. 50 201 9 8 
Charlestown . Ill 167 7 
Chilton Tp... 62 181 11 8 
" City.. 61 214 1 17 
Harrison 63 246 32 
New Holstein 98 244 1 
Rantoul 146 163 -- 11 
Stockbridge.. 153 184 17 35 
Woodville.... 30 199 2 


Total 2868 2233 56 - 
Plurality ... 635 

BARRON COUNTY. 
Barron Tp 35 50 3 - 


86 131 
27 122 - 
65 116 1 
92 69 2 
29 218 26 9 
64 218 1 14 


Rockland 
Scott . ... 


Suamico 
West Depere. 1 
Wrightstown. 1 
Total 26 
Plurality... 

BUFFALO 

Alma Tp 
" City.... 1 
Belvidere 
Buffalo Tp... 

Canton 


Total 952 1984 46 142 
Plurality.... 1032 

CHIPPEWA COUNTY. 

Anson... 81 51 
Arthur 61 59 1 
Auburn 182 94 54 
Big Flats. ... 202 104 - 
Bloomer 241 204 54 
ChippewaF'ls 832 914 47 
Cleveland 62 45 3 
Colburn 38 55 
Eagle Point.. 99 118 31 
Edson 171 304 20 
Flambeau 30 21 
Larayette 193 92 23 
Lawrence 27 26 - 
Siegel 241 119 15 - 


Cedar Lake.. 58 29 4 
Clinton 70 22 7 


55 3554 133 96 
899 

COUNTY. 

56 74 
55 137 
47 72 - 
33 55 1 
ft) 20 - - 
96 77 2 
51 76 _ - 
43 8 1 - 
38 131 
14 29 5 - 
65 94 
25 78 - 
52 46 21 - 


Chetek ..248 89 45 


CumberlandT 164 44 36 
" City 145 90 31 
Dallas 128 40 34 
Maple Grove. 119 42 7 - 
Oak Grove.... 27 45 - 
Prairie Farm 143 17 12 
Rice Lake.... 200 171 32 3 
Stanfold 45 49 6 
Stanley 83 53 12 - 
Sumner 57 19 Irt 
Turtle Lake.. 103 89 13 
Vance Creek. 37 3 8 3 


Cross 


Dover 1 


FountainCity 
Gilmanton.... 1 
Glencoe 
Lincoln 
May ville 


Total 1800 885 283 6 
Plurality... 915 



144 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


Rep. Dem. Pro Lab 

Harrison.Cleve'd.FUkStr'tr 

Tllden 70 192 5 


DANE COUNTY. 
Rep.Drm.ProLab 

Harrison CleveUFiskStr'ter 

Albion 339 55 48 


Rep.Dem.ProLib 

Harrison. Cleve'd. FiskStr'ter 

Brussels 100 51 


Wheaton 155 108 30 


Clay Banks... 76 53 1 1 
Egg Harbor 62 58 


Total 2685 2506 283 - 
Plurality... 179 

CLARK COUNTY. 

Beaver 57 13 2 - 
Colby 106 88 5 


Berry 21 197 3 
Black Earth.. 101 61 37 - 
Bloom. Grove 121 129 9 1 
Blue Mounds. 201 97 12 - 
Bristol 109 154 3 


Forestville.'.'. 64 125 - 
Gardner 94 33 
Gibraltar 128 47 - 
Jacksonport.. 82 41 3 
Liberty Grove 233 42 35 
Nasewaupee,. 112 95 1 
Sevastopol.... 106 143 1 1 
Sturgeon Bay 144 54 12 
" City 225 189 2 - 
Union 82 9 


Burke 174 "ill 13 


Christiana.... 361 159 55 
CottageGrove 152 143 28 - 
Cross Plains. . 50 227 1 - 
Dane 99 134 23 - 


Eaton 88 42 36 
Fremont 64 10 


Green Grove. 39 17 


Deerfleld 226 133 26 
Dunkirk 220 106 38 
Dunn 193 83 18 - 
Fitchburg . . . . 103 170 8 - 
Madison Tp. 101 104 14 - 
Cityl229 1758 176 3 
MazoManie.. 205 133 30 2 
Medina 150 171 23 
Mlddleton,... 62 274 25 - 
Montrose 131 152 41 - 
Oregon 171 153 63 - 
Perry 141 41 40 - 
Primrose 143 41 30 
PleasantSpr's 292 46 30 
Roxbury 27 172 2 
Rutland 270 40 21 - 
Springdale ... 95 144 21 
Springfield... 20 234 11 - 
Stoughton.... 395 126 66 
Sun Prairie.. 221 163 14 - 


Washington.. 77 25 


Hlxon 73 39 


Total 1688 1018 55 2 
Plurality.... 670 

DOUGLAS COUNTY. 
Brule 66 21 


Lewis 47 27 - 
Loyal 124 59 21 - 
Lynn 37 38 
May vine 189 108 9 - 
Mentor 100 75 2 


Nelllsville.... 248 157 12 12 
Pine Valley. . 119 79 6 4 
Sherman 77 28 1 


Gordon . 19 33 


Nabagomain.. 54 27 
Superior 1044 697 19 3 


Thorp . , .. 155 154 2 


Total 1183 778 19 3 
Plurality.... 405 

DUNN COUNTY. 

Colfax ...112 17 - 
Dunn 136 88 - 


Unity 79 47 7 
Warner 73 36 10 - 
Washburn.... 30 16 - 
Weston 112 92 4 4 
Withee 117 69 1 1 
York 144 22 14 


Total 2260 1297 144 22 
Plurality.... 963 

COLUMBIA COUNTY. 

Arlington.... 84 63 25 - 
Caledonia.... 139 127 5 - 
Columbus.... 90 102 
" City 224 221 25 - 
Courtland 227 45 25 - 
DeKorra 191 99 22 6 
FtWinnebago 48 112 5 
Fountain Pr'e 176 111 117 - 
Hampden.... 93 102 12 - 
Leeds 116 124 7 


Vienna 152 70 12 - 
Verona 50 158 63 


Elk Mound... 81 41 6 - 
Grant 84 12 


Westport 81 221 7 
Windsor 191 74 44 
York 122 106 8 


Hay River.... 68 19 1 
Lucas 109 40 
Menomonee.. 140 112 5 1 
City 514 311 27 5 
New Haven.. 64 19 - 7 
Otter Creek.. 40 12 
Peru 45 18 
Red Cedar.... 132 102 - 
Rock Creek.. 141 34 13 
Sand Creek.. 68 14 
Sheridan 54 16 - 
Sherman 70 14 12 
Spring Brook. 119 96 - 
Stanton. .. 170 54 5 




Total 6827 64261082 6 
Plurality.... 401 

DODGE COUNTY. 

Ashippun .... 139 175 1 
Beaver Dam. 96 159 7 - 
" City 344 486 41 - 
Burnett 101 127 7 2 
Calmus 82 86 35 
Chester 79 76 5 3 


Lewiston 123 89 
Lodi 196 94 44 


1'amter 52 25 


Lowville 58 88 21 
Marcellon 106 84 6 - 
Newport 180 139 6 7 


Clyman 75 197 
Elba 91 131 24 3 
Emmett 57 225 2 


Weston 51 72 


Wilson 50 9 


Otsego 185 61 13 
Pacific 35 28 4 


Fox Lake 190 174 17 
Herman 98 209 - 
Hubbard 141 488 3 
Hustisford.... 93 284 1 
Juneau 49 117 


Total 2531 1299 50 91 
Plurality.... 1232 

EAU CLAIRE COUNTY. 


Portage 481 631 21 - 
Randolph 150 72 28 - 
Rio 60 11 12 - 


prinpvale.... 115 43 28 - 
West Point... 90 71 20 - 
Wyocena 217 85 35 


Lebanon 36 247 
LeRoy . 129 170 4 


Altoona 96 100 3 
Augusta 16V 81 44 
Bridge Creek. 108 84 22 1 
Brunswick.... 211 113 34 2 


Lomira 158 200 


Lowell 217 308 8 - 
May ville 59 192 - 
Oak Grove... 144 213 
Portland 81 171 - 
Randolph 46 30 15 - 


Total 3509 2650 393 13 
Plurality.... 859 

CRAWFORD COUNTY. 

Bridgeport... 36 48 - 
Clayton 2% 195 16 


Drammen 104 12 
Eau Claire..., 1720 1354 286 121 
Fairchild 232 68 9 - 
Lincoln 56 241 6 


Shields 17 171 
Theresa 35 322 - 


Ludington.... 45 20 6 30 
Otter Creek.. 108 37 11 
Pieasant Val. 91 48 12 
Seymour 31 32 - 
Union 50 66 25 5 
Washington.. 116 90 25 - 


Eastman 108 197 
Freeman 230 51 1 
Haney 106 42 5 7 
Marfetta 161 73 22 
Prairie duC'n 26 108 1 - 
" City 233 371 5 


Trenton 185 139 11 8 
*Watertown, 
wards5&6.. 66 372 14 
Waupun 169 65 25 8 
Westford 34 135 4 - 
Willlamstown 57 167 


Total 3203 2412 493 162 
Plurality.... 791 

FLORENCE COUNTY. 

Commonw'lth 112 41 10 
Florence 209 186 3 1 


Seneea 134 171 14 4 
Scott 148 98 3 


Total 3186 6906 212 4i 
Plurality.... 2860 
*See Jefferson County. 

DOOR COUNTY. 
Bailey's Har'r 1? 63 


Utica 223 89 18 8 


Wauzeka 96 121 - 


Total 1799 1564 62 42 
Plurality ... 235 


Total 321 227 3 11 
Plurality.... 94 



ELECTION RETURNS. 145 


FOND DU LAC COUNTY. 
Rep . Dem . ProL i b 

Harrison.Cleve'd.FikStr't<;r 

Alto 194 71 3 


Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Harri3oo.Cleve'd.Fi3kStr'ter 

Exeter 104 111 37 2 
Jefferson 147 116 35 2 
Jordan 90 121 27 3 
Monroe Tp... 71 120 11 5 
City. 466 414 32 20 
Mt. Pleasant. 115 117 29 3 


Rep. Dem. ProL b 

Harrison.CleveMFisk.Str'ter 

Sullivan 179 169 11 - 
Sumner 77 44 2 
Waterloo 129 399 21 
WatertownTp 83 277 
" *CIty, 
W'ds 1,2,3,4,7 337 835 1 11 


Ashford 147 232 14 2 
Auburn 183 155 3 - 
Byron 122 126 9 6 


Eden 135 190 2 6 
Eldorado. .. 181 132 3 - 
Empire 118 109 2 - 
Fond du Lac.. 156 124 4 - 
" Cityl226 1407 55 64 
Forest 93 170 - 2 
Friendship... 80 113 2 - 
Lamartine.... 159 133 12 1 
Marshfleld.... 6 378 - 2 
Metomen 205 158 30 
Oakfleld 190 87 16 5 
Osceola 143 119 1 
Ripon Town'p 165 64 7 - 
r ' City.... 360 282 52 - 
Rosendale.... 155 65 24 1 
Springvale.... 136 134 21 
Taycheedah.. 31 213 - 
WaupunTp.. 169 74 20 2 
City 135 109 17 10 


Spring Grove 171 68 14 7 
Sylvester 138 62 17 
Washington... 54 131 3 1 
York 147 26 25 - 


Total 2994 4282 204 13 
Plurality.... 1288 
*See Dodge County. 

JUNEAU COUNTY. 
Armenia 51 19 10 
Clearfleld 41 37 - 
Elroy 153 134 23 
Fountain 104 64 3 
Germantown. 32 72 1 
Kildare 46 89 1 
Kingston 42 12 - 
Lemonweir... 129 107 30 
Lindina ... 137 74 34 


Total 2659 2098 440 217 
Plurality.... 561 

GREEN LAKE COUNTY. 

Berlin Tp Ill 42 16 

" City... 457 402 19 
Brooklyn 218 75 11 
Green Lake.. 182 106 9 1 
Kingston 64 90 32 3 
Mackford 203 109 26 1 
Manchester.. 94 132 2 
Marquette.... 100 65 9 
Princeton .... 181 271 1 
Ste.Marie 43 75 
Seneca 49 48 


Lisbon 83 22 14 


Lyndon 29 78 1 
Marion 20 44 1 


Mauston 180 114 31 
Necedah 349 163 2 
New Lisbon.. 152 66 2 


Plurality.... 399 

FOREST COUNTY. 

Crandon 64 19 8 
Gagen 118 146 1 


Total 1702 1415 125 5 
Plurality.... 287 

IOWA COUNTY. 

Arena 127 136 72 
Clyde 43 101 2 


Plymouth.... Ill 70 7 
SevenMlleC'k 40 149 4 
Summit 105 100 9 


Wonewoc 178 192 17 1 


Total 2066 1666 183 11 
Plurality.... 400 
KENOSHA COUNTY. 
Brighton 80 143 16 
Bristol 192 62 27 






Total 234 217 y 
Plurality... 17 

GRANT COUNTY. 

Beetown 143 95 23 30 
Bloomington. 144 78 34 5 
Boscobel 212 150 5 
Cassville 109 182 8 12 
Castle Rock. .29 97 
Clifton 127 74 21 


Eden 105 112 14 


Highland 151 382 7 
Linden 256 103 51 


Mifflin 205 78 35 
Mineral Point 136 133 39 
" City 292 273 37 
Moscow 175 62 12 
Pulaski 103 165 7 . 
Ridgeway.... 263 251 53 - 
Waldwick.... 68 123 16 
Wyoming 73 41 18 


Kenosha 486 769 18 1 
Paris 94 114 10 
PleasantPr'ie 182 169 8 - 
Randall 115 45 


Salem 244 131 7 


Somers 208 124 16 
Wheatland.... 83 124 - 


Ellenboro 144 31 6 1 
Fennimore... 177 83 20 13 
Glen Haven .105 80 5 5 
Harrison 121 96 1 - 
Hazel Green. 149 157 18 - 
HickoryGr've 125 52 6 - 


Total 1684 1681 102 1 
Plurality.... 3 

KEWAUNEB COUNTY. 
AhnapeeTp.. 76 151 
City 89 121 1 
Carlton 68 249 


Total 2484 2257 461 
Plurality.... 227 

JACKSON COUNTY. 
Alma 273 116 27 


Lancaster.... 444 226 51 6 


Albion 194 115 24 - 
BlackRlv.F'ls 315 160 49 
Cleveland.... 51 74 1 
Franklin 91 25 3 
Garden Vall'y 84 53 4 
Garfleld, 80 34 8 
Hixton 233 71 42 


Casca 44 198 
Franklin 35 252 


Lima 150 79 11 


Kewaunee ... 6t 195 
Lincoln 64 129 
Luxemberg.. 52 182 
Montpelier.... 85 180 
Pierce 36 145 
Red River. ... 181 48 
W. Kewaunee 54 227 


Little Grant.. 90 37 4 4 
Marion 55 71 1 
Millville 45 88 


Mt. Hope 98 44 19 
Mt. Ida 115 48 16 9 
Muscoda 82 155 -- - 


Irving 102 86 14 
Manchester.. 75 32 13 
Melrose 145 87 45 
Millston 142 55 2 
Northfleld.... 107 30 16 
Springfield... 133 27 7 
Sullivan 65 21 - 


Paris 75 107 1 
Patch Grove.. 73 53 34 1 
Platteville.... 453 337 71 - 
Potosi 144 237 1 
" Brit.H.D. 68 72 1 - 
Smelser 160 126 24 - 
Waterloo 109 78 - 8 
Watterstown. 63 42 5 - 
Wingville .... 144 125 29 - 
Woodman 48 64 8 
Wyalusing.... 101 60 14 - 


Total 849 2077 1 - 
Plurality . . . 1228 
LA CROSSE COUNTY. 
Bangor 168 93 18 


Total 2090 986 254 
Plurality.... 1104 

JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

Aztalan 96 182 7 
Cold Spring.. 105 54 1 
Concord 97 180 1 
Farmington.. 98 321 
Hebron 156 100 9 - 
Ionia 139 179 
.Ictlcrson 204 725 7 1 


Burins 106 73 45 
Campbell 55 125 4 1 
Farmington.. 240 184 4 
Greenfield.... 54 104 
Hamilton.... 326 117 43 


Total 4242 3414 449 1)4 
Plurality.... 828 

GREEN COUNTY. 
Adams 78 114 1 - 


LaCrosse 2426 2688 252 132 
OnalaskaTp.. 176 55 12 - 
City 203 94 7 
Shelby 46 158 5 
Wellington... 49 106 - 


Albany 185 C>6 8!) 43 Koshkonong.. 495 448 53 
Brooklyn I'M) 80 If. 1'.) Lake Mills.... 289 128 26 - 
Cadiz 147 105 22 82'Milford 105 168 3 


Total 4128 3901 394 133 
Plurality,... 227 
LAFAYETTE COUNTY. 
Argyle 217 87 10 - 


Clarus 120 155 22 iUIOakland 156 107 19 
Decatur 340 151 ft) 8 Palmyra 251 81 39 



146 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


Rep . De m . ProLa b 

Hamjon.Cleve-d.FiSivSu-'ter 

Belmont 139 14 5 - 
Beaton 154 158 13 2 
Blancoard.... 1^1 74 5 
Darlington... 340 317 32 2 
Elk urove.... 88 96 3 
Pay cue 1*5 106 46 
Gratiot ..195 186 25 


Rep . Dem. ProLab 

Hari ison.CleveUFiskStr'tcr 

Hamburg.... 39 83 - 1 
Holton 45 73 
Hull 80 93 4 


MONROE COUNTY. 
Rep. Dem. ProLab 

Harrison.Cleve'd.FiskStr'ter 

Adrian 68 52 13 
Angels 87 23 10 
Byron 54 32 6 


Johnson 1 41 8 
Knowlton .... 35 40 5 
Kronenwet'er 30 32 5 
Maine 48 132 4 
Marathon '1 p. 16 165 1 4 
City 4 53 3 
Mosinee 106 123 2 
Norrie 42 30 


Clifton 73 131 
Glendale 206 102 6 
Greenfield ... 68 69 9 
Jefferson 81 182 9 
Lafayette 53 38 
LaGrange 127 39 3 
Leon 97 48 15 


Kendall 03 121 1 
Moimcello.... 47 43 7 
IN ew Diggings 162 132 31 
Seymour 73 125 2 - 
Shullsuurg.... 262 269 17 
Wayne 195 73 21 
White Oak S's 54 34 1 
Willow Spr'gs 55 181 35 1 
Wiota 274 13t 14 


f ike Lake.... 5 77 13 
Rib Falls 30 83 - - 
Rutbroek 10 102 
Sp ncer 153 169 6 


Lincoln 185 41 12 
Little Falls.. 107 110 17 
New Lyme... 35 22 
Oakdale 48 91 5 
Portland 176 72 9 


Stettin 31 131 4 


Total .....2564 2275 268 5 
Plurality.... &I9 

LAA GLADE COUNTY. 


Texas 69 96 1 
Wa jsau Tp.. 78 143 1 8 
City 857 897 17 209 
Weston 129 196 
Wein 41 69 - 5 


Ridgeville . . . 129 140 8 
Sheldon 113 58 4 
Sparta Tp.... 120 92 47 
- City.. 319 198 47 
Tom ah Tp 79 81 


Anugo i'p 75 Ibl 8 

" (Jity.. 337 408 - 
Elcho .35 29 


Total 2122 3365 42 304 
Plurality . . . 1243 

MARINETTE COUNTY. 

Marinette.... 961 1203 212 37 
Peshtigo 697 443 8 76 
Ponerneld... 50 32 3 1 
Wausaukee.. 67 89 1 13 


City.. 230 232 30 
Wellington... 117 80 5 
Wells 52 71 7 
Wilton 77 154 2 


*.lton 20 40 


Lauglade 16 18 1 
.Neva 23 87 


Total 2695 2138 246 
Plurality... 557 

OCONTO COUNTY. 


JNorwood 36 118 - 
Polar 27 75 2 


Price .... 51 70 


Rolling 54 8i> 1 
jSuiu.uit 34 31 
Vilas 41 26 4 - 


Total 1775 1767 224 127 
Plurality... 8 

MARQUETTE COUNTY. 
Buffalo 85 102 7 - 
Crystal Lake. 73 44 - 
Douglas 64 74 6 
H rris 62 62 - 
Mecan 41 74 
Montello 98 181 - 
Moundville.. 68 25 
Neshkoro.... 32 85 - 
Newton 68 73 
Oxford 107 24 5 4 


Gillet 107 27-2 
How 71 56 
,.ittle River.. 141 89 2 - 


Total 774 1192 96 
Plurality.... 418 

LINCOLN COUNTY. 
Corning 37 70 3 - 
Merrill Tp.... 67 24 - - 19 
city.. 596 5u3 69 109 
Pine River... HO 60 - 
Rock 'Fails... 1^6 167 
Russell 142 92 8 1 
bcott 00 56 4 


" Suamico 37 51 1 
Maple Valley 72 124 1 4 
OcontoTp.... 57 108 3 
" City. . 380 485 12 
Falls. 50 38 6 
Pensaukee... 241 61 11 
Stiles 66 85 - 


Total 1315 1148 37 7 
Plurality . . 167 
ONtlDA COUNTY. 
Eagle River. . 385 469 2 
Pelican 386 399 4 


Total 1133 1032 107 113 
Plurality.... lOo 

MANITOWOC COUNTY. 
Cato 173 208 2 1 
Ceuterville... 139 1*7 ' 
Coopertown.. 80 2^5 
Eaton 96 213 
Franklin 75 239 
Gibson... .. 112 157 2 


Shields 81 64 
Springfield... 93 37 1 - 
vvestneld .... 150 92 5 - 


Total 771 868 6 
Plurality... 97 
OUTAGAMIE COUNTY. 
AppletonCity 895 129(5 106 28 
Black Creek.. 102 147 6 1 
Bovina 88 25 7 1 
Buchanan.... 17 198 3 
Center 58 217 3 
Cicero 66 63 6 


Total 1119 1005 26 4 
Plurality... 114 

MILWAUKEE COUNTY. 

Granville.... 142 2468 
Greenfield.... 301 252 5 5 
Franklin 148 194 2 2 
Lake 318 397 4 17 


Kossuih 112 225 
Liberty 151 123 
ManitowocTp 138 91 1 11 
" City 6U8 593 4 83 
"Rapids IbO 154 3 8 
Maple Grove. 62 196 5 
Meeme 75 2U5 4 
Mischicott.... 41 264 3 
Newton 173 173 
Rocklaud 133 106 
Sehleiswig... 1UO 283 5 
Two Creeks.. 16 106 
TwoBiverarp 33 172 6 
City 116 338 3 5 
Total 2703 4218 19 127 
Plurality.... 1515 

MARATHON COUNTY. 
Bergen 18 14 
Berlin 49 155 1 


MilwaukeeTp 601 297 108 
" City W 1. 896 859 24 120 
W 2.1009 1233 6 188 
W 3. 476 1010 9 197 
W 4.1308 1158 47 166 
W 5.1094 900 18 202 
W 6.1319 963 17 284 
W 7. 975 669 18 56 
W 8.1394 840 34 377 
W 9.1644 1355 8 359 
W 10. 1875 867 10 381 
Wll. 986 727 2 321 
W 12. 845 885 14 372 
W 13. 1166 502 5 448 
W14. 300 1066 222 
W 15. 878 618 13 215 
W 16. 740 432 35 50 
W 17. 757 126 12 12t5 
W 18. 317 725 7 140 
Oak Creek.... 203 215 9 - 
Wauwatosa.,1702 766 40 130 
Total . . . .21394~i73U2 33'J 4494 
Plurality ...4092 


Deer Creek. .71 74 2 
Ellington 100 124 21 19 
Freedom 108 187 1 1 
Grand Chute. Ill 167 11 
Greenville ... 103 169 2 6 
Hortonia 151 139 13 
KaukaunaTp 63 203 2 2 
u City 283 529 9 16 
Liberty 44 34 
Maine 42 20 2 15 
Maple Creek.. 48 63 7 
New London. 14 36 2 
Osborn 85 49 
Seymour Tp 101 48 1 1 
City 101 53 . 2 


Total 2759 4000 187 118 
Plurality... 1241 
OZAUKEE COUNTY. 
Belgium 13 264 5 
CedarburgTp 82 204 
" City 118 124 9 
Fredonia 57 258 


Brighton 65 76 5 
Cleveland.... 10 27 
Day ..30 111 


Easton 34 34 3 
Eau i'leine 15 29 - 


Eldron 28 23 3 - 
Halsey 24 68 33 


Total Cityl7479 UiKJ6 279 4364 
Plurality ...3044 


Graf ton 85 212 3 3 
Mequon 217 331 



ELECTION RETURNS. 147 


Rep . Dem . ProLa b 

Harrison.Cleve'd.FiskStr'ter 

PortWash'on 40 147 27 
-- City 59 234 - 33 
Saukville .... 79 252 1 9 


Rep . Dem . ProLa b 

Harrison.Cleve'd.FiskStr'ter 

StevensPoint 49 107 1 
" City 802 739 35 
Stockton 93 244 3 - 


ST. CROIX COUNTY. 
Rep.Dem.PmLab 

HarrUon.Cleve'd.FiskStr'ter 

Baldwin 308 91 30 - 
Cady 94 57 8 
Cylon 41 65 77 


Total 750 2026 4 86 
Plurality . . . 1276 
PEP1N COUNTY. 
Albany 70 23 5 
DurandTp... 34 27 7 
" City.. 127 93 34 - 
Frankfort.... 96 28 27 
Lima 48 110 10 


Total 2603 2322 167 - 
Plurality ... 281 

PRICE COUNTY. 
Brannan 63 39 21 
Fifield 204 181 2 
Georgetown.. 24 12 
Hackett 27 7 21 
Ogeraa 183 43 52 - 
Prentice 78 60 
Worcester ... 335 277 5 - 


EauGalle.... 219 63 14 
Emerald 48 85 36 
Erin Prairie. 10 211 7 12 
Forest 16 21 10 
Glenwood.... 197 81 15 6 
Hammond ... 148 129 3t 
Hudson Tp... 49 75 10 6 
City. 379 287 45 5 
Kinnickin'ick 104 39 12 
New Richm'd 188 92 81 3 


Pepin 225 51 38 


Stockholm... 145 16 6 - 
Waterville... 161 100 39 - 
Waubeck 20 13 9 


Total 914 619 101 - 
Plurality... 295 

RACINE COUNTY. 

Burlington... 258 412 18 13 
Caledonia.... 174 404 18 
Dover 101 114 24 


Pleasant Val. 63 53 3 
Richmond.... 43 109 54 


Total 926 461 175 - 
Plurality ... 465 
PIERCE COUNTY. 
Clifton 74 26 29 
Diamond Bl'ff 67 19 8 - 
Ellsworth.... 288 106 36 3 
El Paso 62 80 11 
Gilman 164 28 16 
Hartland 171 67 51 1 
Isabelle 28 6 19 - 
Maiden Rock. 208 26 39 19 
Martell 190 56 23 9 


River Falls.. 15 55 
Rush River. (50 56 9 
St. Joseph... 85 99 6 
Somerset.... 123 104 
Springfield. 181 109 12 15 
Stanton 54 117 14 
Star Prairie. 138 33 19 
Troy 99 45 10 2 


Mt. Pleasant. 272 140 37 4 
Norway 163 64 7 - 
Racine 2192 1817 288 265 


Warren 97 104 18 - 


Rochester.... 85 69 25 
Waterford.... 220 152 23 
Yorkville 239 65 51 1 


Total 2759 2130 529 49 
Plurality ... 629 

SAUK COUNTY. 
Baraboo Tp. .193 68 47 
City 602 336 89 1 
Bear Creek... 57 122 7 


Oak Grove... 87 64 11 
Prescott City. 91 91 37 
River Falls.. .126 82 20 - 
" City 205 114 37 
Rock Elm.... 137 92 22 - 
Salem 74 48 42 - 
Spring Lake.. 134 49 18 
Trenton 134 37 23 12 
Trimbelle.... 171 60 59 1 
Union 66 97 41 1 


Total 3947 3326 536 283 
Plurality . . . 621 

RICHLAND COUNTY. 
Akan 117 103 6 
Bloomer 169 116 17 
Buena Vista. 99 77 21 4 
Dayton 133 130 22 - 
Eagle 18 98 10 - 
Forest 171 79 10 


Delton 126 43 27 
Excelsior 163 94 28" 
Fairfleld 108 34 38 


Franklin 65 115 - 
Freedom... .173 60 29 


Total 2477 1158 542 46 
Plurality... 1319 
POLK COUNTY. 
Alden 187 39 20 - 
Apple River.. 47 13 2 
Balsam Lake. 55 25 1 - 
Beaver 17 30 2 


Henrietta.... 117 110 23 
Ithaca 133 139 32 4 
Lone Rock... 45 38 4 3 
Marshall 155 53 16 
Orion 108 52 10 
Richland 116 53 20 1 
" Center 259 108 34 9 
Richwood.... 221 121 - 
Rockbridge . . 131 129 23 
Sylvan 102 94 19 
Westford 83 161 8 
Willow 140 79 17 


Honey Creek 110 89 
Ironton 158 146 27 
La ValleTp.. 115 110 7 
" Village 50 18 
Merrimack. . 78 98 19 
Prairie duSac 126 114 14 
ReedsburgTp 91 118 12 
City 158 205 41 
SaukClty 56 106 
Spring Green 152 103 19 
Sumpter 107 30 40 - 
Troy 146 46 8 


Black Brook. 75 22 48 
Clam Falls... 24 12 2 
Clayton 143 IS 20 
Clear Lake... 173 40 25 


Farmington.. 77 99 9 - 
Garfield 94 20 5 
Georgetown .32 2 
Laketown.... 59 16 37 
Lincoln 119 41 32 - 
Loraine . . 22 13 3 


Total 2467 1740 292 21 
Plurality... 727 

ROCK COUNTY. 
Avon 132 57 8 
Beloit Tp.... 100 46 3 
" City... 891 355 77 
Bradford 97 89 7 - 
Center 202 65 7 - 
Clinton 196 81 12 5 
" Village 174 50 25 2 
Edgerton 183 201 12 
Fulton 199 147 9 
Harmony .... 132 124 12 - 
Janesville Tp 116 90 2 - 
City 1211 1103 43 1 
Johnstown ... 128 127 9 
La Prairie... 138 65 9 


Washington.. 124 70 16 31 
Westfield.... 75 173 1 
Winfleld 92 115 4 
Woodland.... 140 99 41 - 


Total 3410 2648 538 32 
Plurality.... 762 
SAWYER COUNTY. 
Hayward 542 511 1 -r 


Luck 54 29 


Milltown 51 52 
Osceola 155 57 43 - 
St. Croix Fails 123 49 14 
Sterling 98 15 11 
West Sweden 28 9 11 - 


Total 542 511 1 
Plurality.... 31 

SHAWANO COUNTY. 
Almon 26 57 
Angelica 69 21 
Aniwa 72 71 1 
Bell Elaine.. . 102 93 - 
Birnamwood. 88 59 4 
Fairbanks.... 44 84 - 5 
Germania 26 4 - 


Total .....1703 631 332 - 
Plurality... 1072 
PORTAGE COUNTY. 
Alban 89 29 - 
Almond 168 30 22 - 


Amherst 320 71 16 
Belmont 107 15 33 
Buena Vista. 131 91 24 
Carson 43 104 


Magnolia 154 98 24 - 
Milton 413 115 44 


Newark 164 38 12 
Plymouth.... 183 107 8 - 
Porter 197 125 25 - 
Rock 123 119 7 


Green Valley 122 29 1 
Elartland 107 119 - 
German 53 92 4 
Hutchins.... 58 26 
Lessor 110 27 3 6 
Maple Grove. 72 116 - 
Morris 84 8 
Naverina 33 20 . 
Pella 53 116 1 
Richmond.... 118 116 


EauPleine... 52 87 6 
Grant 26 33 - 
Hull 46 226 5 - 
Lanark 122 59 5 
Lenwood 35 38 - 
New Hope.... 181 39 
Pine Grove.. 85 9 4 - 
Plover 242 94 13 
Sharon 12 307 


Spring Valley 278 57 16 
Turtle 194 HI 8 3 
Union Tp 190 52 28 - 
Village of Ev. 257 78 51 2 
Total C.225 5501 478 13 
Plurality . . .2724 



148 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


R'p.D'm.PrnLab 

Harrison. CleveVLFiskStr'ter 

Senera 31 32 


He p. Dem.ProLab 

Harrison CleTe'd.FUk.Str'ter 

Webster 132 89 9 1 
Wheatland ..153 39 3 1 
Whitestown .124 41 24 - 


Rep. Dem. P r>Lab 

Harri3on.Cleve'd.FUkStr'ter 

Farmington.. 223 26 5 
Fremont 60 88 2 6 
Helvetia 53 18 1 


Shawano 151 156 17 3 
Washington.. 67 148 


Wittenberg.. 162 51 6 3 


Total 3316 1540 268 45 
Plurality ...1776 

WAL WORTH COUNTY. 
Bloomfleld... 211 75 1 
Darien 205 143 16 
Delavan 431 213 79 


Larrabee 151 71 4 


Total 1775 1636 31 23 
Plurality... 139 

SHEBOYGAN COUNTY. 
Greenbush . . 188 168 14 24 
Herman 166 221 1 


Lebanon 42 139 1 
Lind 165 54 14 4 
Little Wolf.. 147 135 5 1 
Matteson 97 39 1 
Mukewa 106 77 1 7 
*NewLondon, 
wards 1,2,4,5. 184 159 9 2 
Royalton .... 128 95 10 
St. Lawrence. 203 20 6 
Scandinavia .266 11 8 
Union 83 87 3 33 
WaupacaTp. 143 48 14 - 
" City 344 71 36 
Weyauwega . 124 153 8 


East Troy.... 209 135 7 - 
Elkhorn 216 112 38 - 
Geneva 140 62 34 
Lafayette 161 80 15 
LaGrange.... 183 34 12 1 
Lake Geneva 412 122 28 - 
Linn 167 42 10 - 
Lyons 189 135 24 


Holland 491 128 3 11 
Lima 282 162 15 2 
Linden 284 102 11 1 


Mitchell 79 156 - 
Mosel 81 89 1 


Plymouth Tp 181 133 5 - 
City 145 176 2 1 


Russell 9 90 3 


Sharon 386 108 70 
Spring Pr'rie 202 62 33 - 
Sugar Creek.. 139 58 42 
Troy 142 97 21 
Walworth.... 239 71 30 
Whitewater .154 68 16 
" City 556 327 73 92 


Total 3385 1769 167 53 
Plurality. ..1616 
*See Outagamie County. 
WAUSHARA COUNTY. 
Aurora 169 46 17 
Bloomfleld... 169 53 2 


Scott 168 142 1 


SheboyganTp 100 236 3 
" Cityl004 1542 1 398 
" Falls 248 361 20 4 
Sherman .... 99 258 
Wilson 110 101 - 


Total 3729 4320 73 449 
Plurality .. . 591 
TAYLOR COUNTY. 
Browning 23 26 
Chelsea 77 78 1 


Total 4473 2028 563 93 
Plurality. ...2445 
WASHBURN COUNTY. 
Bashaw . 436 290 90 


Dakota 82 22 
Deerfleld 87 5 6 
Hancock 129 36 2 
Leon 130 39 14 
Marion 105 27 1 17 
Mt. Morris... 146 23 13 3 
Oasis 100 28 12 10 


Vezie 78 73 16 


Deer Creek.. 50 60 
Greenwood.. 20 28 
G rover. 41 18 


Total 514 363 106 - 
Plurality... 151 
WASHINGTON COUNTY. 
Addison 72 307 


Plalnfleld.... 267 41 9 2 
Poysippi 158 48 7 
Richford 56 59 
Rose 89 15 22 1 


Little Black. 113 135 
Medford 210 239 2 - 


Pine Creek.. 36 18 
Rib Lake 103 29 4 
Westboro 112 60 8 - 


Barton 99 156 2 
Erin 67 178 
Farmlngton.. 128 217 5 
Germantown 173 211 
Hartford Tp. 130 205 
" City 183 148 2 - 
Jackson 186 129 
Kewaskum... 194 153 1 - 
Polk. 147 177 - 
Richfield 95 211 
Schleis'rville. 26 65 
Trenton 73 282 2 
Wayne 181 118 


Saxeville 133 22 14 
Springwater,. 92 11 35 
Warren 96 81 1 
Wautoma.... 148 49 4 


Total 792 719 15 
Plurality... 73 
TREMPELEAU COUNTY. 
Arcadia. 244 377 42 
Albion 120 35 28 


Total 2245 663 159 33 
Plurality ...1582 
WINNEBAGO COUNTY. 
Algoma 124 45 9 4 
Black Wolf.. 52 107 3 
Clayton 129 120 1 11 


Brownslde... 90 158 5 
Caledonia.... 67 27 2 - 
ChimneyRo'k 112 22 1 
Dodge 5 66 1 - 
Ettrick 288 66 8 
Gale 254 153 21 


Menasha Tp. 33 66 15 6 
a City 287 532 7 84 
Neenah Tp.. 61 57 8 5 
City 424 437 50 75 
Neklmi 115 112 14 1 
\epeuskun... 148 45 25 
Omro 374 140 80 6 
Oshkosh Tp.. 105 94 4 9 
Cltyl927 2173 116 449 
Poygan 76 131 2 1 
Rushford 285 89 32 8 


WestBendTp 49 101 - 
City 66 214 


Hale 148 162 1 - 
Lincoln 113 100 27 
Preston 284 80 30 
Pyeon 89 116 13 - 
Sumner 131 55 21 
Trempeleau.. 231 101 26 - 
Unity 85 53 10 - 


Total 1869 2872 12 - 
Plurality... 1003 
WAUKESHA COUNTY. 
Brookfleld.... 151 309 4 - 
Delafleld 219 141 1 - 
Eagle 145 144 11 


Genesee 197 146 22 


Total 2261 1571 236 
Plurality ... 690 
VERNON COUNTY. 
Bergen. 116 81 2 
Christiana ... 285 36 14 


^isbon 207 167 22 
Menomonee . 174 316 18 
Merton 225 146 14 15 
Mukwonago.. 173 101 42 
Muskego 143 145 6 
few Berlin.. Ill 201 16 1 
Oconomowoc. 171 140 2 
" City 319 239 19 
Ottawa 156 88 2 
Pewaukee... 302 304 15 
Summit 119 123 9 
Vernon 198 78 38 
Waukesha.... 829 668 67 6 


Utica 168 51 14 
Vinland 139 74 8 1 
Winchester.. 157 66 2 2 
Winneconne. 129 67 6 
- Village 156 84 6 9 
Wolf River... 49 121 I 


Coon 208 38 5 


Total 4938 4611 402 682 
Plurality... 327 

WOOD COUNTY. 

Auburndale .117 85 
Centralia 141 144 1 40 
Grand Rapids 53 94 5 
" City 193 197 12 15 
Lincoln ...... 78 71 - 
Marshfleld ... 17 110 1 
City 278 375 6 
Milladore 26 145 
Port Edwards 51 56 
Pittsville 124 62 2 2 
Remington... 62 52 
Richfield 40 25 


Forest 137 37 28 - 
Franklin 164 98 4 3 
Genoa 102 78 3 1 
Greenwood .. 101 128 3 1 
Hamburg .... 138 102 1 
Harmony.... 141 62 13 2 
Hillsborough. 207 131 9 1 
.lefferson 136 66 66 10 
Kickapoo .... 149 90 9 
Liberty 85 39 1 1 
Stark 149 64 3 8 


Total 3839 3456 297 33 
Plurality... 383 
WAUPACA COUNTY. 
Bear Creek.. 68 103 2 
Caledonia.... 35 108 
Clintonville.. 181 107 14 
Dayton 167 31 19 - 
Dupont 164 112 2 - 


Sterling 154 61 3 1 
Union 73 73 4 
Viroqua Tp.. 216 76 24 4 
.City 190 63 34 11 



ELECTION RETURNS. 149 


Rfp.Dem.ProLab Rep.Dem.ProLab 

Harrison.Cleve'd FiskStr'ter Horrwon.Cleve'd. F Ukstr'ter 

Rock 73 57 SSherrv 87 18 - 


Rep.Dfm.Pr"Lab 

Harrison-Cleve'd. FiskStr'ter 

Wood 142 79 1 - 


Rudolph 90 139 11 3 
Saratoga 44 43 - 
Seneca 121 48 3 2 


Sigel 81 151 1 3 
Vesper 86 33 3 - 

WYOMING. 
DEL 1886 FO 
'em. Rep.Dem. Uinta 54J 

nran. Carej. B&lch. rprt+al ewr 

I 9f 2 - iii ~ M *fe s 

932 1034 - percent . 76. 
50: 4% 3H Total vote 
586. 513 115 
554. 822 38 
L767. 2304 
390 Republicans 


Total *904 1984 41 73 
Plurality... 80 

r. Against. Carey. Organ. Carej. Balch 

) 201.. 1437 600.. 924 


COUNTIES. CONST'N. ,1888 
(10) (1889) Rep. L 

For. Against. Carej. 

Albany... 719 117 . 1584 
Carbon.... 715 211 . 1701 
Converse. 758 176.. 696 
Crook 389 41. 650 
Fremont.. 303 218. 460 
Johnson.. 182 138. 362 
Laramie.. 2027 349 1928 
Sheridan. 238 315. 480 
Sweetw'r. 39G 157.. 1153 

During the year 1889 eight s 
The following tables give th 
Rhode Island the question was 

CONNECTICUT. 
Hartford. 4508 A 10673 


2 1932.. 10451 7557.. 8259 524 
9 ..2894 ..1639 
4523.55.. 58 42.. 56.40 43.60 
8204 .. 18010 .. 12811 
LEGISLATURE. 
. 1890. . 1888. , 
Council Ho. 


594.. 643 - Democrats ... 

NON-PARTISAN ELECTIONS 

tates have voted on the questio 
3 vote, with the date of electic 
on the repeal of an amendmen 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

COUNTIES. For. Against. 

Burleigh 269 799 


7 7.. 17 



n of constitutional prohibition, 
n, in each of these states. In 
t previously adopted. 

For. Against 

Bon Homme 624 1065 
'Brookings 1422 714 


Brown 2816 1576 
Tlrnlp Til lAt 


New London 2391 5292 
Fairfleld 3810 9558 


Benson 292 212 Buffalo 118 134 
Bqttineau 365 228Butte.... 


windnamv:." ::::::: 1&63 ife"^ 8 * & 

Litchfleld 2232 3945i Cass v. 1739 2156 


Campbell 397 268 
Charles Mix 575 458 
Clark 1214 566 
Clay 904 569 


Middlesex 1451 2120 
Tolland 102J 2000 


Cavalier 634 438 
Dickey 966 537 


Total 22379 49974 


Eddy 212 158 
Emmons 106 347 


Coddington 904 1020 
Custer 342 5^7 


Majority 27595 


Foster 148 186 




The vote of the towns of 
Ellington, Essex, and East 
Lyme are not included in the 
official canvass. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

April 22, 1889. 

COUNTIES. For. Against. 

Suffolk 12207 33686 


Grand Forks 1534 1432 
Griggs 345 180 


Day 1082 771 


Kidder . 186 151 




LaMoure 414 395 




Logan 26 61 


Fall River 301 334 


Morton 358 644 


Faulk 626 459 
Grant 834 582 


HcHenry 163 101 


McLean 69 170 


Hamlin 749 328 


Mclntosh 166 199 


Hand.. 1147 677 


; Essex 11426 18287 


Mercer 22 63 


Hanson 515 539 


Middlesex 176^1 23558 


Nelson . 540 276 


Hughes 545 710 
Hutchinson 401 1188 
Hyde 320 191 


Worcester 12050 17320 
Hampshire 2859 2756 
Hampden 4720 7334 
Franklin 2366 2711 


Oliver 29 40 


Pembina 1483 1137 


Pierce 124 70 


Jerauld 598 315 


Richland 1011 885 


Kingsbury.... 1305 619 


Berkshire 2884 5301 


Ransom 670 557 


Lake 828 783 


I Norfolk 5330 6964 


Ramsey 591 416 




Plymouth 4872 4768 


Rolette 112 304 


T,inprln inr79 ftio 


Bristol 6645 7171 


Stark 171 394lMcCook . 655 804 


Barnstable 1738 920 


Stutsman 509 809 MnPhfirson . 9on xn 




Stfiftle... . 444 172 


Marshall fill 3V* 


Nantucket 170 213iargent 620~ 577 Meade 445 622 
Total 85212 moral 11 - 1 -- *l SSM^V". 7 ?5 J54 


j Maiority 45820 
Returns were not received 
from the towns of Holliston, 
Montgomery. North Attlebor- 
ough, Tyringham. Westbor- 
ough, and the city of Woburn. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 
March 12, 1889. 

COUNTIES For. Against. 


Walsh 1760 1132 Moody 910 426 

Wells . 124 190 Ponnincrtr>n 7A1 fl\Z 


Ward 220 138 


Potter 438 418 
Roberts 267 129 


Total 18552 17393 


April 20, 1889. 

For Against 
COUNTIES. Repeal.Repeal. 

Bristol 1083 353 


Sanborn 828 361 
Spink . 1855 997 


Sully 441 279 


Turner 845 1106 > 


Union... .. 817 952 


Walworth 433 126 


I Carroll 1375 1234 


Kent 2146 1061 


Yankton 767 1251 
Tntai 4mai :iLMn 


Cheshire 20"'3 2331 


Newport 242(5 744 


Coos 1317 1144 


Providence 21327 6095 Mainritv.. . iifiai 


Grafton 2745 302S 
Hillsborough 4956 7358 
i Merrimack 3769 4327 


Washington 1333 1708 
Total 28315 9961 


PENNSYLVANIA. 
June 18, 1889. 

COUNTIES. For. Apun.t 

Adams 2167 3505 


Majority 8354 
SOUTH DAKOTA. 
Oct. 1, 1889. 

COUNTIES For. Aeainsf. 
Anrrfra.. fiQfl ~ fiftn 


Rockingham a301 5113 
Strafford 3460 3303 
Sullivan 1247 152U 
Total . ...257S6 30976 


Allegheny.. 19611 45799 
Armstrong 3760 3913 
Beaver 4751 3221 
Bedford 2829 3677 


Majority 5190 Beadle 1623 1179 



150 CHICAGO 


DAILY NEWS ALMANAC 


FOR 1890. 


Fo 

Berks 322 
Blair 632 


. Apiinst. 

9 22438 
2 4038 
3 3498 
8 9018 
4 3191 
8 4190 
1 373 
3832 
9 2:>54 
5 6723 
1 2241 
2 3570 
5 2181 
7 3848 
8 4014 
9 4422 
2 1837 
9 5595 
6 1579 
3 8978 
4 4142 
3 414 
5 4914 
3 1142 
3 2839 
6 2391 
6 2067 
5 2452 
1 1431 
9 9896 
) 18271 
3 1583 
6752 
} 11684 
a 14967 

VOTE ( 
AGO FC 

Rei 

Roc 
1.... 18 
2.... 12 
3.... 13 
4.... 7 
5.... 15 
6.... 19 
7.... 13 
8.... 17 
9.... 19 
10.... 13 
11.... 18 
12.... 16 
13. ... 9 
14.... 11 
15.... 14 


Lyooming 
McKean 


For. Against. 

.... 4556 5681 
. . 3054 20')8 


Chehalis BT 7M 


Clallam, 210 173 
Clarke 600 1269 


Bradford 690 


Mercer 


.. 6838 2882 


Bucks 469 


Mlfflin 


2034 1335 


Columbia. 484 745 


! Butler . . 561 


Monroe 
Montgomery.. 
Montour 


.... 970 2585 
.... 4638 14358 
.. 1199 1621 


Cowlitz 402 503 


j Cambria 275 


Douglas 251 299 
Franklin 33 72 


i Cameron 51 


Carbon 153 


Northampton 2986 11152 
Northumberland.. 5062 5699 
Perry 1908 2214 
Philadelphia 26468 118903 
Pike wn IBS 


Garfleld 3f2 446 


(Center .. 458 


Island 99 142 


Chester 841 


Kitsap 284 526 
King 2586 3965 


i C larlon 370 


I Clearfleld 515 


Jefferson 384 945 
Kittitas 609 1599 


Clinton 213 


Potter 


v 1575 1546 


Columbia 260 
Crawford 751 


Schuylkill 
Snyder 


.... 4180 16490 
947 2359 


Kiickitet . 554 448 


Lewis 802 1056 


Cumberland 377 
Dauphin 50b 
Delaware . 453 


Somerset 
Sullivan 


.... 2079 3451 
.... 667 961 


Lincoln 674 10b2 
Mason... . 169 329 


Susquehanna. 
Tioga 


.... 4781 2305 
. 4713 3637 


Okanogan 99 336 


Elk ... 82 


Pacific 200 355 


Erie 516 


Union 
Venango 


.... 1605 1412 
.. 5409 1908 


Pierce... ..' 2110 4665 


Fayette 715 

Forest 84 


Thurston 624 962 




3532 2672 


Stevens 184 408 


Franklin 360 
1 Fulton 54 




R7K9 17.17 


Spokane 1904 2827 


Wayne.. 2521 2770 
Westmoreland 8292 8184 
Wyoming 2250 1041 


Snohomish 464 821 


I Greene 314 


Skamania 31 89 
Skagit 499 846 
SanJuan 154 176 


j Huntingdon 309 


Indiana 496 


York 


.... 6341 11407 


(Jefferson 407 
iJuniata 133 


Total 


.29o617 484644 


Walla Walla 788 1534 


Lackawanna 788 
'Lancaster 7291 


WASHINGTON. 
Oct. 1, 1889. 

COBXrrBS. For. Against 

\dams i.w 9in 


Whatcom 836 1109 
Whitman 1822 1878 
Yakima 341 589 




Lebanon 140 
Lehigh 177" 




Total 19546 31603 




Asotin 


123 07 


Majority 12057 

[ICAGO. 
PRECINCTS. 
*ro.Soc. It p.Dem.Pro.Soc. 

Orch- Orch- 
ason.ards'n Roche.CregierMaaon.rrds'n 

1 9.... 112 217 
1 10.... lft> 261 2 
- 311.... 128 157 - 
- -12.... 231 164 
13.... 155 123 3 
14.... 78 101 4 


CHIC 

Rep.Dem.Pro.Soc. 

Orch- 
Roche. CregierMason-arda'B 

1.... 92 131 - - 
2.... 97 126 2 - 
3.... 91 111 1 - 
4...- 82 70 - 
5.... 124 113 1 
6. ... 107 132 1 - 
7.... 99 178 - 
8.... 127 232 
9.... 119 133 
10.... 99 217 2 
11.. ..139 174 - 
12.... 63 98 2 - 






)F COOK COU 
)R MAYOR BY 
III. 

j.Dem.Pro.Soc. 

Orch- 
be.CregierMason.ards'n 
? 85 - - 

8 62 5 - 
2 105 - - 
8 138 2 2 
5 133 2 1 
t 122 
1 126 - 
1 ' 108 - - 
2 125 - - 
2 123 - - 

3 97 1 - 


NTY AND CB 
WARDS AND 
Rep.Dem.I 

Roche.CreperM 

5.... 86 201 
6.... 36 182 
7.... 187 203 
8.... 72 169 
9.... 87 168 
10.... 101 206 
11.... 93 175 
12.... 108 159 
13.... 121 217 
14.... 90 243 
15.... 69 132 
16.... 122 174 
17. . . 114 181 


J |i To.1541 2323 -- 20 
10 VIII. 

1 - 1.... 86 327 - 1 
5 5 2.... 127 246 2 
9 2 3.... 105 272 1 


13. .. 79 203 1 
14.... 90 102 
15.... 131 120 - 
16.... 158 73 
17.... 54 92 1 
18.... 152 178 - 
19.... 100 62 - 


8 150 - 1 
1 108 2 - 


To.1644 3035 

VI. 
1.... 78 197 
2.... 121 170 
3.... 160 209 
4.... 136 233 
5.... 128 199 
6.... 106 231 
7.... 90 226 
8.... 70 213 
9.... 55 310 
10.... 130 224 
11.... 137 229 
12.... 137 214 
13.... 114 1% 
14.... 166 179 


61 B 5.... 61 213 1 
6.... 102 208 - - 
- - 7.... 156 214 - 1 
- - 8.. . 97 237 - 
- li 9.... 80 234 1 
- 210.... 31 234 - 


To.220 

1.... 22 
2.... 22 
3.... 14 
4.... 8 
5.... 8 
6.... 16 
7.... 11 
8.... 16 
9. ... 22 
10.... 18 
11.... 11 
12.... 12 
13.... 18 
14.... 13 
15.... 9 


3 1720 16 4 

IV. 

114 1 


To. 2003 2576 10 1 

1.... 139 '96 1 - 
2.... 88 108 1 - 
3.... 85 126 1 1 
4.... 117 143 - - 
5.... 128 96 2 
6.... 106 150 1 - 
7.... 124 156 


6 122 2 
9 127 1 


- -12.. . 77 203 - 1 


J 105 - 3 
1 131 - 
2 161 1 

7 109 2 
8 88 - 
4 103 2 - 
i) 49 __ 

9 105 5 - 
9 74 1 
6 95 3 - 
73 1 - 


. To.1102 2705 - - 11 
IX. 

2 ! 84 137 - 3 
_ 2.... 94 259 
_ 3.... 151 169 4 
_ _ 4.... 140 144 


9.... 161 74 
10.... 114 95 
11.... 136 61 3 - 


To.1628 2972 

VII. 
1.... 76 158 
2. ... 60 155 
3.... 59 178 
4.... 76 164 
5.... 129 161 
6.... 143 151 
7.... 98 153 


- 1X 6.... 176 172 - 3 
7.... 140 171 5 
o 8.... 83 242 - 4 
* 9.... 121 205 1 5 
_ 10.... 143 180 1 4 
_lt.... 119 107 2 3 
12.... 98 118 5 
9 13.... 90 268 - 4 

_ an.... 90 93 - 


13.... 136 133 3 
14.... 137 108 1 
li.... 163 101 2 - 
If,.... 123 137 1 
17.... 98 54 


To.2287 1648 19 3 

V. 

1.... 55 114 
2..., 79 156 - - 
3.... 114 168 - 1 
4.... 110 196 - - 


To.2107 1834 17 2 


8.... 90 175 


5! To.1669 2419 4 46 



ELECTION RETURNS. 151 


Rep.DemPro.Soc. 

Ort-h- 
Rochc.CregierMaaon.ardB'n 

1.... 94 177 1 
2.... 114 201 2 1 
3.... 124 172 2 
4.... 178 158 t 
5.... 209 124 2 - 
6.... Ill 173 - 2 
7.... 84 191 7 4 
8.... 116 142 3 3 
9.... 224 124 - 6 
10.... 119 135 - - 
11.... 99 98 - - 
12.... 154 98 3 4 
13.... 135 98 - 


Rep.Dem.Pro.Soc. 

Orch- 
Roche.CreglerMason.ards'n 

4... 179 94 - 8 
5.... 110 145 - 
6.... 95 175 1 
7.... 121 203 - 
8.... 91 126 - 
9.... 179 Ittl 6 
10.... 138 102 4 
11.... 138 135 1 
12.... 92 91 1 
13.... 163 135 - 1 
14..-.. 120 185 - - 
15.... 137 1552 


Rep.Dem.Pro.Soc. 

Orch 
Roche. Crerif-rMason.ar<Li'n 

7.... 94 ISO - - 
8.... 51 74 2 
9.... 59 135 
10.... 109 184 - 
11.... 127 127 - 1 
12.... 42 151 - 
13.... 62 99 - 1 


Rep.Dem.Pro.Soc- 

Orch- 
Roche-Crcpii rMason.arda'n 

4.... 114 103 
5.... 168 137 1 1 
6.... 126 124 1 1 
7.... 82 IbO - 
8.... 78 15t> 1 
9.... 86 93 1 1 
10.... 176 132 


To.1077 2007 13 4 
XVIII. 
1.... 64 146 - 
2.... 82 157 
3.... 52 139 
4.... 96 144 - 
5.... 55 129 


11 95 207 
12.... 62 216 - 
13.... Ill 131 
14.... 116 115 - - 
15.... 87 130 - 1 


17.... 147 146 - 1 


To.1745 2128 15 6 
XXII. 
1.... 145 101 - - 
2.... 158 128 - 
3.... 162 159 3 
4.... 93 147 
5.... 98 158 3 
6.... 94 122 
7.... 103 163 2 
8.... 87 193 3 
9.... 120 146 - - 
10.... 115 153 2 1 
11.... 140 150 1 2 
12.... 134 170 2 
13.... 181 152 2 
14.... 174 182 2 


To.1761 1891 17 29 
XI. 
1.... 130 167 5 - 
2.... 129 160 1 - 
3.... 139 221 1 
4.... 101 141 
5.... 88 106 - 1 
6. ...176 130 - - 
7.... 123 106 2 - 
8.... 115 249 
9.... 183 154 - 
10.... 167 74 2 - 
11.... 158 75 - 
12.... 138 92 3 


To.2259 2t!ll - - 26 

1.... 137 150 1 

2.... 136 139 - 4 
3.... 171 106 - 
4.... 74 81 
5.... 107 156 3 
6.... 172 146 6 
7.... 159 156 2 1 
8.... 102 128 4 
9.... 127 126 1 
10.... 127 126 - 
11.... 192 139 - - 
12.... 130 146 1 2 


6.... 81 124 - 
7.... 87 172 1 3 
8.... Ill 120 1 1 
9.... 78 128 2 2 
10.... 122 97 1 1 
11.... 129 115 2 
12.... 128 190 3 1 
13.... 115 123 5 
14.... 136 87 4 - 
15.... 182 163 1 - 
16.... 103 150 - 
17.... 104 176 - 3 
18.... 75 104 1 1 
19.... 79 116 4 1 


13 183 116 1 
14.... 190 111 1 
15.... Ill 130 - 
16.... 48 74 - 
17.... 148 76 1 - 
18.... 126 82 9 
19.... 73 185 
20.. ..103 63 4 
21. ...123 84 3 


To.1634 1608 4 21 
XV. 
1....101 280 2 - 
2.... 143 253 
3.... 139 250 2 1 
4.... 109 143 1 4 
5.... 101 135 3 2 
6.... 104 157 2 3 
7.... 68 88 4 - 
8.... 142 132 
9.... 123 111 2 1 
10.... 68 125 1 7 
11.... 128 149 1 
12.... 87 136 1 


To.1879 2580 23 15 

1.... 29 122 - - 
2.... 86 168 - 
3.... 75 151 2 
4. ... 114 105 1 
5.... 114 180 
6.... 80 228 5 4 
7 87 274 1 


To.1804 2124 8 15 
XXIII. 
1.... 116 113 5 
2.... 137 194 12 
3.... 82 225 3 1 
4.... 48 243 - - 
5.... 41 247 2 
6.... 68 187 - 

l::::ifi ffi 1 - 2 

9.... 148 94 3 
10.... 151 133 2 - 
11.... 116 157 1 
12 172 182 2 


To.2752 2506 32 2 

1.... 171 116 5 - 
2.... 176 101 2 - 
3.... 172 91 2 


8.... 91 214 1 
9.... 87 203 - 
10.... 79 203 1 
11.... 95 185 3 
12.... 29 96 - 1 
13.... 70 270 - 
14.... 69 180 1 
15.... 82 244 1 - 
16.... 61 307 - 
17.... 89 279 - - 
18.... 66 185 - 1 
19.... 81 222 - 
20.... 115 271 - 2 
21.... 104 175 1 


4 130 138 3 
5.... 131 122 1 - 
6.... 153 126 2 - 
7.... 173 98 2 
8.... 192 93 
9 199 113 1 


To.1341 1959 15 20 
XVI. 
1.... 171 189 3 
2.... 171 93 11 1 
3. ... 143 122 


13.... 68 135 
14.... 112 200 - 
15.... 87 240 4 
16.... 62 125 - 
17.... 97 147 1 2 


10.... 162 71 1 - 
11.... 174 104 7 - 
12.... 166 91 3 
13. . . 152 64 10 
14.... 121 11 
15.... 152 151 10 - 
16. ... 180 91 1 - 
17.... 135 111 3 - 
18.... 107 157 
19.... 192 144 6 
20.... 116 140 - 
21.... 153 92 3 - 
22.... 131 138 3 - 
23.... 157 105 
24.... 196 134 6 - 
25.... 114 102 2 


5.... 1H1 1224 
6.... 145 186 7 
7.... 118 129 2 
8.... 145 204 1 11 
9.... 114 154 
10.... 92 176 - - 
11.... 68 212 - 
12.... 74 261 1 
13.... 159 1041 
14.... 38 280 - - 
15.... 64 217 - 
16.... 87 134 1 
17. ...107 62 2 


To.1695 2953 32 11 
XXIV. 
1.... 171 166 
2.... 151 194 4 1 
3.... 183 140 3 - 
4.... 163 87 1 2 
5.... 108 101 1 
6.... 83 174 2 
7. ...127 99 - - 
8.... 120 164 1 - 
9.... 160 119 - - 
10.... 147 170 1 2 
11.... 108 156 
12.... 119 84 
13. ... 146 110 1 1 
14.... 59 171 


To.1703 4267 6 19 
XX. 
1.... 105 67 2 - 
2.... 120 118 - - 
3.... 141 179 - 2 
4.... 110 79 - 
5.... 178 146 1 - 
6.... 97 191 - - 
7.... 129 94 1 1 
8.... 163 177 - 
9.... 144 107 
10.... 112 103 


To.1988 2819 15 30 
XVII. 
1.... 75 176 3 
2.... 77 211 3 
3.... 66 134 5 - 
4.... 108 235 - 
5.... 144 186 2 


To. 4014 2814 84 - 

,....no xl &, - - 

2 . 147 153 1 


To.1299 1266 4 2 
XXI. 
1.... 162 132 3 1 
2.... 137 109 3 
3.... 145 163 5 - 
F VOTE FOR MAYOR. 

ro. Soc. Rep. Lab. 

Mason.Orchardson. Roche. Nelson 

10 1. 1396 34 
17 2. 1901 492 
16 4. 1987 409 
19 3. 4863 566 
31 17. 3029 4093 
11. 2449 3016 
- 20. 2581 2121 
11. 3171 1895 


15.... 81 108 2 - 
16.... 81 159 2 
17.. ..102 226 3 - 
18.... 82 148 - 5 


3.... 154 227 - ( 6.... 63 115 - 
RECAPITULATION O 

/ 1889 
"WARDS. Rep. Dem. j 

Roche, t'rerier. 

I 2003 2575 


To.2191 2576 19 13 

, . 1885 , 
Pro. Rep. Dem. Pro. 

\Vhitlock. Smith. Harrison.Bush. 

12.. 1217 lf)86 10 
1.. F.10 2221 2 
17.. 2063 1166 2 
34.. 3996 1886 22 
17.. 2973 4891 13 
4.. 2481 2926 4 
6.. 2064 3450 6 
4.. 2083 4109 


II . 2107 134 


III.... . 2205 1720 


IV 2287 l')48 


V . 1644 3035 


VI . 1G28 2972 


VII 1541 2323 
VIII 1102 2705 



152 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



Roche. Cregier. Mason. Orchardson. Roche 



1824 
1129 
3329 
5749 
2603 
3921 
3511 
2149 
2104 
3553 



IX 1669 2419 

X 1761 1891 

XI 2752 2506 

XII 4014 2814 

XIII., 2259 2611 

XIV 1634 1608 

XV 1341 1959 

XVI 1988 2819 

XVII 1077 2007 

XVIII 1879 2580 

IX 1703 4267 

;X 1299 1266 

XI 1745 2128 

XXII 1804 2124 

XXIII 1695 2953 

XXIV 2191 2576 

Total... 45328 57340 410 303. . 51249 

Plurality 12012 27406 

Scattering 

Grand total 103456 

STATE AND COUNTY OFFICERS 



Nelson. Whitlock. Smith. Harrison.Bush 

797 22.. 1439 2228 - 

894 4.. 1054 1335 2 

615 33.. 2992 1510 19 

593 148.. 4677 1680 81 

958 13.. 2256 1818 21 
2909 9.. 3631 3552 4 
1218 16.. 2617 2419 12 

959 4.. 1601 1805 
1032 6.. 1364 2114 

629 23.. 2868 2556 12 



23490 372.. 42977 



43352 
375 



"221 



WARDS. 



I 3192 2761 

LI. . 3169 2318 

III ! 3118 2173 

IV 2999 2044 

V 1951 3ti29 

VI 1924 3221 

VII 1687 2714 

VI11 1203 2893 

[X 1706 2851 

X 1913 2318 

XI 3728 2765 125 

XII .. .... 5227 3065 252 

XIII 3108 2776 61 

XIV 2015 1834 45 

XV 1763 2077 66 

XV'l'" ... 2206 3618 30 

XVII. 1405 2106 19 

XVIII 2661 3098 51 

K1X 2275 4810 18 

XX 1817 1428 24 

KX1 ... 1970 2638 27 

KXIl". ... 1917 2713 20 

xili: : " 2372 2997 55 

X1V 3081 3072 57 



1888. 

, GOVERNOR > . LIEUT. Gov. - , ^EC'Y STATE > , - AUDITOR - , 
.Dem.Pro. U.L. Rep.Dem.Prn. U.L. Rep.Dem.Pro. I '. L. Ren.Dem.Pro. U.L. 

_,_ ._. .._.. ._ k3HannaRobcrtsonPavej.Welch.CoppCoUi 



Beii.WhitlockFolcy Pea 




2044 

3808 2628 153 

5329 2896 310 

3234 2627 



11. 

8. 
22. 

75. . 2168 1624 

13.. 1860 1973 

77.. 2319 3471 

6.. 1509 1981 

26. . 2792 2927 

33. . 2363 4707 

8.. 1622 1321 

20. . 2088 2500 

24.. 2102 2505 

32.. 2496 2847 

18.. 3148 2945 



3278 2650 

3249 2220 

3204 2071 

3095 2028 

111.. 2103 3416 

29 . 2024 3096 

28.. 1770 2596 

13.. 1283 2808 

60.. 1801 2731 

42.. 2038 2154 

18.. 3833 2618 



49 13. 
45 14. 
83 23. 
51 118. 

27. 

23. 



10.. 3260 2670 39 10 



13.. 5360 2869 302 
73 30.. 3248 2620 71 
49 113.. 2195 15&5 48 



18 
124. 
11. 

48. 



18CO 1962 

2326 3461 

1514 1988 

2807 2903 

49.. 2372 4688 

9.. 1643 1271 

44.. 2103 2437 

51.. 2126 2458 

42.. 2553 2784 

29. . 3181 2895 



14. 



20. 



13., 
19. 
127., 

9., 
4t>. , 
50., 

9., 
49. , 
51., 
44. 



3234 
3194 2073 
3108 1931 



2019 3110 4 

1761 2624 7 

1282 2808 5 

1797 2750 22 

2044 2144 46 

3818 2fi22 150 

5350 2374 310 

3242 2611 

2188 1619 

1864 1972 

2319 3471 

1515 1988 

2801 2914 

2356 4696 

1607 1311 

2082 2486 

2111 2509 

2495 2847 



71 29 

47 113 

78 19 

31 117 



31.. 3155 2933 



Total (city).. .58107 65912 1154 605. .60582 63073 1373 941. .60966 62320 1344 948. .60698 62650 1349 906 



38 
102 
71 
575 



14 
2 
2 
56 
115 



TOWNS. 
3arrington ........ 734 

Jloom ... ......... 174 

Bremen ............ 185 

Dalumet ........... 844 

5icero ............. 1523 

Elk Grove ........ 136 

Svanston _________ 1318 

lanover .......... 146 

lyde Park ....... 6193 4993 177 

Fefferson .. ..936 693 70 

Ike ... ....... 5373 7003 230 

31763148 83 



1056 

34 

698 190 

50 17 



234 38 

166 102 

182 72 

847 567 

1549 1003 

136 32 

1328 680 

146 50 



14 

13 

2 

63 

134 



233 
16t; 
183 



18 
13 
2 
68 

135 



L,emont 

^eyden 



135 



^yo 
Mai 



SfewTrier 285 

Jorthfleld 195 

files 247 

Norwood Park.. 

Drland 

alatine 



Proviso 



181 
155 
277 
107 



137 
110 
100 



tiverside ....... 

schaumberg 
Thornton ......... 45a 

Wheeling ......... 258 

SVorth ....... 



595 
88 
276 
170 



160 
59 
43 
90 
88 

324 



53 
231 
203 



17 -. 

41 i 

16 -. 

2C -. 

8 -. 

5 . 

3 -. 

13 -. 

13 2 

39 ! 

1 . 



197 
17 
201 

600 80 
5573 6700 268 
3318 29S3 98 



75.. 6365 4776 



72 
560 
1000 
32 

674 196 
49 18 
201 



151 

464 
327 
286 
198 
182 
255 
156 
276 
107 
544 
139 
110 
100 
459 
257 



72 
2fi3 
170 

277 



152 
42 
90 
88 
315 
87 
52 
53 
227 
202 
195 



21 - 

49 
IS 
23 



8 . 1551 
-.. 136 
-.. 1333 
-.. 146 
83.'. 6385 4753 
13. 959 651 78 
20.. 5567 6461 300 
30. . 3341 2929 96 35. 



233 
165 
183 
847 
1547 



157 
465 
327 
289 
198 
184 
255 
156 
276 
107 
545 
139 
110 
100 
45'.) 
255 
330 



21 .. 



1333 

146 
6371 

954 
5547 
3266 2976 

336 584 



38 15 

102 13 

72 2 

568 ^3 

1004 136 

32 

674 196 

49 18 

4762 199 

662 79 

6618 302 
98 



35 



56 -.. 151 



170 
274 
89 
57 
152 
42 
90 
88 
314 
87 
55 
53 
227 
204 



23 -. 



1.. 



327 
28S 
198 
183 
253 
156 
270 
107 
543 
139 
111 
100 
439 
254 



72 
261 
170 
275 
89 
58 
154 



315 
87 
54 
53 
227 
2C5 
195 



Total ( town s) . 24856 21548 1270 136. .25479 20374 129,') lt>2. .25540 20315 1345 171. .17685 20678 1345 172 
Grand total. .82903 87460 2324 741. .86061 83447 2668 1103. .86506 82635 2689 1119. .86100 83228 2o94 1078 



ELECTION RETURNS. 153 


WARDS. 
I 


, TREASURER , r ATT'YGEN'L ^ ^STATE'S AT'Y^ ,-CL'K CIR'T C'T-> 
Rep.Dem.Pro.U.L. Rep.Dem.Pro.U.L. Rev.Dem.Pro.U.L. Rep.Dem.Pro.U.L. 

Becker. HoffinanHartBarnett. HuntCreiiht'nAnrtrewsDill. LonjrVr MayWilliamaErrant. BestNieblinzPriceT'wnal'y 

3250 2671 36 13.. 3288 2657 38 10.. 3239 2612 40 10.. 3359 2571 41 11 
3217 2258 48 13.. 3250 2223 47 14.. 3297 2152 43 12.. 3346 2065 46 12 
3182 2109 45 14.. 3193 2085 45 14.. 32C3 2004 42 7.. 3423 1807 47 13 
3068 1957 81 21.. 30915 1931 81 23.. 3163 1843 74 29.. 3379 1624 77 18 
2073 3467 51 115.. 20SK) 3450 51 118.. 2156 3372 51 114.. 2272 3218 51 120 
2002 3123 4 28. . 2115 3107 4 32. . 2165 2918 3 32. . 2033 3042 3 &> 
1745 2637 7 26.. 1750 2619 7 23.. 1781 2590 6 23.. 1799 2565 7 23 
1264 2829 5 11.. 1286 2804 5 14.. 1315 3768 4 14.. 1293 2799 5 14 
17(55 2783 22 57.. 1795 2753 22 62.. 1845 2674 21 58.. 1809 2724 22 62 
. 2021 2167 47 33. . 2050 2105 46 33. . 2112 2096 45 33. . 2076 20J9 48 39 
3800 2641 150 19 . 2824 2516 148 20.. 3837 2608 138 22.. 3846 2590 158 -20 
. 5304 2020 30C 11.. 5351 2868 308 11.. 5356 2814 297 11.. 5306 2768 318 9 
. 3232 2639 71 29.. 3244 2613 73 29.. 3274 2545 46 9.. 3216 2550 49 12 
2130 1682 46 109.. 2186 1622 49 113.. 2219 1583 48 117.. 2197 1606 50 115 
1842 1988 78 19.. 1865 1968 78 19.. 1874 1930 77 24.. 1884 1945 47 2fl 
2300 3486 31 131. . 2322 345 < 30 122. . 2312 3441 30 128. . 2323 3446 31 12 
1488 2005 21 8.. 1515 1987 22 9.. 1516 1972 18 19.. 1516 1973 22 li 
2777 2947 56 48. . 2801 2917 59 49. . 2802 2900 55 44. . 2822 2892 57 45 
2344 4713 18 51.. 2356 4695 18 36.. 2189 4535 21 54.. 2395 4603 20 5? 
1547 1382 34 9.. 1623 1306 36 10.. 1692 1254 35 8.. 1634 1300 46 o 
E2564 33 40.. 2075 2482 32 48.. 2284 2274 33 56.. 2107 2442 40 5n 
2665 18 45.. 2112 2482 18 52.. 2192 2391 17 69.. 2109 2491 17 4q 
2913 64 44.. 2493 2840 65 45.. 2525 2782 60 45.. 2506 2818 61 4* 
3112 2983 68 24.. 3160 2923 67 25.. 3271 2784 66 31.. 3177 2887 62 2g 




Ill 


IV 


V.... 


VI 


VII 


viii : 


ix ...... ::".::. 


X... 


XL... 


XII 

g:::. : :::::::::: 


XV... 


XVI... 


XVII 


XVIII . . 


XIX... 


XX.... 


XXI 


XXII 


XXIII 


XXIV 
Total (city)... 
TOWNS. 
Barrington .... 


60278 63529 1334 823. .60837 62410 1349 952. .61559 50842 1270 969. .61600 60825 1265 938 


233 38 15 .. 233 38 15 .. 234 35 16 - : 234 35 16 - 
165 102 14 1.. 165 102 13 1.. 167 102 13 -.. 168 101 13 
182 73 2 .. 183 72 2 .. 133 72 2 .. 183 72 2 - 
846 569 63 4.. 851 563 63 4.. 859 554 63 5. 853 558 64 4 
1546 1005 137 8.. 1554 987 136 8.. 1635 894 131 12.. 1C.08 958 136 9 
136 32 .. 136 32 -- .. 136 32 - -.. 13i> 32 - 
1327 680 198 .. 1334 671 195 -.. 1408 682 194 .. 1326 653 195 6 
146 48 18 -.. 146 49 18 -.. 146 49 18 -.. 146 49 18 - 
6351 4799 201 83.. 6368 4761 199 83.. 6598 4660 203 87.. 6455 4671 215 88 
949 665 80 14.. 953 662 79 14.. 954 651 79 15.. 957 653 80 16 
5513 6715 298 23. . 5561 6713 314 22. . 5S62 6458 300 22. . 5639 6583 306 18 
3266 3023 99 27. . 3330 2972 99 33. . 3352 2941 100 34. . 3333 2916 104 33 
338 581 21 -..338 581 21 -..337 583 21 .. 121 102 - 
147 80 .. 151 72 -- -.. l&l 72 -- ..339 581 21 
465 262 49 ..465 262 49 ..504 223 48 ..465 260 50 
326 171 18 .. 327 170 18 -..330 168 17 ..328 169 19 
288 275 23 .. 288 275 23 -.. 289 270 25 1.. 289 273 23 
198 89 8 198 89 8 200 87 8 199 88 8 


Bloom 


Bremen 


Calumet 
Cicero 


Elk Grove 
Evanston 
Hanover 


Hyde Park 


Jefferson 
Lake 


Lake View. . .. 


Lemont 






Maine 


New Trier 
Northfield 


Niles 
Norwood Park.. 


182 59 3 -.. 185 56 3 -.. 260 147 5 .. 190 51 3 - 
. 251 156 5 .. 256 152 5 .. 172 69 3 .. 251 156 5 
155 43 13 -.. 156 42 13 -.. 156 42 13 . . 156 42 13 
276 90 14 2.. 276 90 14 2.. 275 89 14 2.. 281 84 14 2 
107 88 107 88 107 88 112 83 


Palatine . . 


Palos 


Proviso 


540 318 40 ..545 313 40 ..553 306 41 -.. 541 319 41 - 
138 88 1 .. 139 87 1 .. 140 86 1 -.. 139 87 1 - 
110 55 .. 110 55 .. 116 49 .. 112 53 
.100 53 .. 100 53 .. 100 53 -.. 100 53 - 
469 227 6 1.. 459 226 6 1.. 460 227 6 1.. 459 227 6 1 
249 211 22 255 205 22 255 205 22 253 207 22 


Rich 
Riverside 
Schaumberg 


Wheeling 


Worth 


. 327 196 5 1.. 329 194 5 1.. 332 191 5 .. 332 192 5 


Total (towns). 
Grand total 

WARDS. " 

T 


24956 20791 1353 163. .25498 20632 1361 169.. 25381 3095 1348 179.. 17992 20208 1380 177 


.85234 84320 2687 986. .86335 83042 2710 1121. .87940 80937 2618 1148. .87592 81033 2645 1115 
COOK COUNTY. 
,-April, 1889. -, Election Nov. 5.1889. . 
r>TT irmoc- T?i?nrkRr>T!' Pres't Superior Cir. 
CIR. JUDGE RECORDER County Bd. Judge. Judge 
Re\ Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. 

Cratty. McConnell. Stephens. Crawford. Seniie. Edmouson. Shepard Drizrs. 

2101 2573.. 796 1128.. 798 1129.. 1877 1890 


JI 


2169 1745.. 1297 857.. 1298 856.. 2077. 2122 


Ill 


2185 1752 1411 916 1418 905 2284 2305 


IV... 


2200 1733.. 1446 868.. 1433 883.. 2250. 2288 


v 


1566 3125.. 828 1593.. 772 1649.. 240.i 239j 


VI 


1618 2970.. 773 1527.. 709 1583.. 2282. 2261 


VII 


1417 2426.. 868 1396.. 845 1441.. 22x8. 225Q 


VIII 


1057 2737 778 1642 657 1763 2419 2402 


IX 


1620 2482 1019 1479 968 1525 . 2479 2470 


x 


1791 1864 . 1090 1178.. 1095 1173.. 2252 2237 


XI 


2797 2.V45 . 1906 1254.. 1770 1354.. 3085. 313n 


XII 


3918 2834.. 2594 1319.. 2524 1409.. 3746. 3835 


XIII 


2364 2488 144 1 1479 1491 14* 57 2884 293,; 


XIV 


1719 1524 . 1016 774 1066 769 . 1783 180i 


XV 


1140 1S>0. . 90J 1024. . 9i>5 1031. . 1928. 193-4 


XVI 


1975 2527.. 1115 1438.. 1126 1431.. 2553.. 244g 



154 


CHICAGO DAILY 


NEWS ALMANAC FOR 


1890. 






XVII 
XVIII 
XIX 
XX t 
XXI 
XXII 
XXIII 
XXIV 
XXV 
XXVI 
XXVII 
XXVIII 
XXIX 
XXX 
XXXI 
XXXII 
XXXIII 
XXXIV 


Cratty. JlcConnell. Stephens. Crawford. Senne. Edmanson. 

.. 1123 1955.. 597 961.. 582 989.. 
... 1901 2532.. 1149 1127.. 1003 1289.. 
... 1731 4254.. 1306 2239.. 909 2638.. 
... 1371 1196.. 939 569.. 961 561.. 
1701 2172.. 1072 1101.. 1024 1151.. 
... 1674 22(19.. 1034 947.. 949 1036.. 
,.. 1966 2712.. 1114 1418.. 1085 1442.. 
... 2168 2598.. 1301 1345.. 1287 1374.. 
.. 10(57 622.. 1053 637.. 
.. 684 731.. 685 732.. 
.. 619 380.. 607 391.. 
- .. 257 455.. 292 441.. 
.. 629 1585.. 564 1661.. 
.. 1113 1442.. 1176 1442.. 
.. 784 462.. 769 480.. 
-.. 1346 722.. 1330 736.. 
- -.. 619 809.. 627 807.. 
- -.. 1347 1156.. 1302 1184.. 


Shepard. 

1574. . 
2217. . 
3504.. 
1481.. 
2149.. 
1961.. 
2511. . 
2570. . 
1661.. 
1407.. 
972.. 
725.. 
2213.. 
2546.. 
1240. . 
1982. . 
1421.. 
2476. . 


Drigzs. 

1541 
2240 
3516 
1501 
21(54 
1966 
2498 
2616 
1674 
1415 
993 
728 
2212 
2547 
1243 
2027 
1427 
2489 


Total 


... 44572 57063.. 36258 37958.. 35100 39370.. 


73136. . 


73658 


TOWNS. 
Barrington 
Bloom 
Bremen 
Calumet 
Cicero 
Elk Grove 
Evanston 

Hyde Park 
Jefferson 
Lake 
Lake View 
Lemont 
Leyden 
Lyons 
Maine 
New Trier 
Niles ! 
Northfleld 
Norwood Park 
Orland 
Palatine 
Palos 
Proviso 
Rich 
Riverside 
Schaumberg 
Thornton 
Wheeling 
Worth 


... 191 30.. 143 12.. 
... 138 32.. 117 23.. 
179 55.. 113 20.. 
... 538 463.. 594 330.. 
... 1052 1037.. 682 197.. 
... 119 23.. 73 4.. 
867 590.. 733 293.. 
87 19.. 109 23.. 
... 3905 4803.. - 
... 554 737.. -.. 
... 4468 5278.. 
... 2349 2937.. 
476 252.. 451 560.. 
110 36.. 87 22.. 
... 232 463.. 289 168.. 
... 301 208.. 247 80.. 
199 245. . 147 106. . 
65 172.. 147 52.. 
... 173 55.. 68 27.. 
... 199 100.. 104 77.. 
148 33.. 76 9.. 
... 155 85.. 130 68.. 
58 123.. 51 42.. 
264 141.. 273 109.. 
... 151 31.. 67 40.. 
78 48.. 88 43.. 
89 66.. 47 15.. 
269 97.. 273 97.. 
171 150.. 193 103.. 
269 182.. 266 93.. 


141 12.. 
116 23. . 
110 23.. 
577 342. . 
685 201.. 
72 2.. 
729 287.. 
102 28.. 

238 549.'.' 
81 26.. 
231 2>6.. 
242 83. . 
152 100. . 
123 62.. 
49 41.. 
102 79. . 
77 8.. 
133 75. . 
50 42.. 
264 120.. 
68 39.. 
83 47.. 
46 15.. 
268 102. . 
178 119. . 
255 104.. 


149.. 
128.. 
133.. 
909.. 
841.. 
75.. 
997.. 
132.. 

508.'.' 
109.. 
1440.. 
317.. 
252.. 
199.. 
94.. 
174.. 
85.. 
197.. 
93.. 
382.. 
107.. 

"ft: 

370.. 
291.. 
355.. 


155 
139 
133 
920 
878 
77 
1016 
132 

504 
109 
465 
324 

252 

'1 

181 
85 
197 
93 
384 
107 
132 
62 
364 
295 
359 


Total (towns) 


... 18774 18461.. 5368 2613.. 5172 2755.. 


7840.. 


7948 


Grand total 
Majorities 


VOTE 


... 63346 75524.. 41626 40566.. 40272 42125.. 80976.. 
12178.. 1060 - .. 1863.. 

FOR DRAINAGE TRUSTEES. 
Election held Dec. 12, 1889. 


81606 


. Cn 
WARDS..Rep. Dem. 

Nelson.Prenrt'gast 

1 1094.2 1004.9 


'IZENS 
Rep. 

Willing. 

1071.7 


' TICKET. 
Lab. Dem. 

Altpeter. Gilmore. 

976.5 1005.8 


Hotz.' 

1016.7 


XXV 
XXVI... 
XXVII.. 


Nolson.Prend'east. Willing. Altpeter. Gilmore. 

1737.1 1445.2 1718.7 1532.5 1538.8 
1247.1 1105.2 2248.0 1236.2 1143.9 
511.0 451.6 503.8 479.0 494.8 


Hotz. 

1544.5 

1179.2 
5725 


II 


1753.5 


1444.9 


1704.4 


1456.2 


1553.5 


1529.9 


XXVIII. 


539.0 629.9 


512.8 534.5 


509.0 


5045 


Ill 


1873.1 
2011.5 


1526.1 
1712.7 


1813.5 
1933.3 


1550.3 
1642.6 


1627.8 
1804.4 


1(531.3 
1760.4 


XXIX... 
XXX.... 


1269.0 1773.0 
2116.2 2332.6 


1268.4 1335.6 
209"x6 2285.2 


1294.5 
2034.4 


1250.1 

2090.5 


Y' 


2013.7 


2343.2 


1997.4 


2244.2 


2017.8 


2017.2 


XXXI... 


1276.3 1115.4 


1242.0 1121.8 


1183.6 


114(5.7 


VI 


1726.4 


2438.8 


1729.0 


18:58.0 


1755.1 


1(537.3 


XXXII.. 


1994.8 1545.3 


1899.6 1502.7 


1727.2 


1(531.5 


VII 


1391.0 


1880.0 


1447.2 


2063.0 


1393.4 


1460.3 


XXXIII. 


101.9 91.5 


101.4 93.3 


94.8 


966 


VIII.... 


1302.5 


1775.9 


1284.1 


1704.3 


1302.2 


126:5.5 


XXXIV. 


951.4 718.0 


9&5.0 754.1 


781.1 


770.9 


IX 


1678.5 


2103.2 


1(588.0 


2025.7 


K91.3 


1612-(i 


Cicero... 


756.9 534.5 


693.2 550.0 


644.3 


583.6 


X 

XI 
XII 


1496.1 
2353.2 
3610.1 


1(552.6 
2057.7 
2784.5 


1589.4 
2211.3 
3442.6 


1593.4 
1842.5 
2920.7 


1440.0 

2063.4 
3092.8 


1469.2 
2032.2 
3154.8 


Lyons . . 


19.0 43.6 


21.3 26.6 


25.0 


22.0 


Total..55021.2 68601.1 


54604.8 53906.8 52042.4 51712.9 


XIII 


2015.9 


1959.7 


1907.1 


1859.8 


1919.3 


1853.4 




-R 


EPUBLICAN 


TTPK"P! 


r - N 


XIV 
XV 


1481.2 

1707.7 


1441.7 

172(5.4 


1520.1 
1780.3 


1(529.8 
1780.3 


1450.0 
1749.4 


1504.2 
1717.7 


I... 


Corthell. 

997.9 


Spry. Guthrie.Weinh.irrtt. 

934.4 900.8 815.8 


COT. 

789.0 


XVI 


1615.2 


K-U 


1617.4 


1(59(5.2 


1549.2 


1602.5 


II 


1515.3 


1292.7 1190.8 


971.8 


859.4 


XVII.... 


1093.6 


1252.8 


1131.6 


1133.4 


1105.4 


1099.0 


Ill 


1892.5 


1(525.0 1647.4 


1343.5 


128*5.0 


XVIII... 


1398.3 


1396.8 


1348.1 


12905 


1308.2 


1:301.9 


IV 


1893.5 


1564.7 1576.2 


12(57.2 


1170.8 


XIX 


2066.5 




2081.9 


2243.8 


2092.7 


1996.8 


V : 


898.2 


833.8 813.0 


821.2 


625.9 


XX 


1073.3 


1032.6 


1117.2 


1079.5 


1041.2 


1033.2 


VI 


803.9 


893.4 857.6 


731.6 


680.9 


XXI 


1837.6 


1*18.5 


195(5.0 


2040.7 


1840.9 


19223 


VII 


931.1 


1045.2 8(50.4 


921.3 


618.6 


XXII.... 


>( 171.7 


2143.9 


2103.0 


2232.8 




2100.7 


VIII.... 


(591.5 


1023.7 622.5 


667.4 


480.Q 


XXIII... 


If. 1*2.4 


r.us.7 


1761.1 


1764.0 


1737.5 


1(591.1 


IX.... 


1129.7 


l->44:2 1057.2 


10(50.6 




XXIV... 


2121.6 


1818.1 


2123.3 


1802.9 


1996.7 


1915.7 X 


1367.9 


1363.9 1194.8 


1179.0 


918.5 



ELECTION RETURNS. J55 


XI 


Corthell. Sprr. Guthrie. Weinhardt Coy. 

2521 2 2758 2 1957 4 1844 1 1589.5 


VTcnter Russell. Kin*. Gahan. Lmc-h. 

V 21040 19918 20009 19268 19076 


XII 


&.115 84198 27553 2501 6 21797 


VI 20766 <2010 22843 2:tt40 23289 


XIII... 


.. 2134.3 20)8.8 1831.5 17495 1460.8 
.. 13T5.9 1275.5 1237.6 1759.0 1010.6 


VII 20174 IftjyS 18085 1566.5 16269 


XIV.... 


VIII 2390.8 2179.4 2330.4 2081.5 2154.4 
IX i0033 170*) 7 Ib0l9 160o4 16926 


XV 


llftS 11)690 10283 12571 8428 


XVI 


13498 13*92 l'>765 1.5401 10707 


X 18084 16057 Mj46 15205 1565.3 


xvii.:: :::::: 

XVIII 
XIX.... 


.. 527.0 531.0 462.8 544.5 404.0 
.. 1191.8 12C0.9 1049.3 1019.3 914.0 
.. 988.4 1124.5 89i>.3 834.7 701.2 


XI 14872 15376 18782 1423.7 1501.8 


XII 15077 14426 1572.7 1204.2 13009 


XIII 1606.8 1040.9 1794.6 1465.8 1548.2 


XX 


10o33 9139 9396 9104 7535 


XIV 1130.5 909.2 912.5 800.3 808.8 
XV 13953 12420 12676 11373 12223 


XXI 


.. lltiO.8 973.4 989.1 9t&3 664.1 
1241.8 785.5 861.4 781.2 586.0 


xxii . 


XVI 2334.6 2216.7 2217.0 2115.4 2134.5 
XVII. .. 23202 13S5.4 1391.4 1304.7 1367.6 


XXIII .. 


.. 1127.1 944.3 854.0 944.3 762.7 


XXIV 


.. 1101.7 1252.7 1059.2 1252.2 791.9 


XVIII 1481.1 1534.1 1623.6 1491.0 1539.3 
XIX 3426.9 32:30.1 3413.9 3143.3 3263.9 
XX 9069 8:~04 8205 756.6 8161 


XXV 


14762 12280 11888 10303 7873 


XXVI . 


908.3 758.2 747.2 701.4 5331 


XXVII 
XXVIII 
XXIX 


.. 846.3 823.9 &00.0 791.8 726.0 
.. 382.4 373 323.3 359.1 286.2 
.. 714.3 719.4 643.7 613.4 827.5 


XXI 14621 1 %) 602 1199.5 974.6 10829 


XXIL 13592 1079.5 1036.3 901.3 1003.3 


XXIII . . . 2204.0 2303.7 2292.1 2170.1 2564.5 


xxx 


1410.0 1306.0 1289.8 1224.0 11575 


XXIV 1806.5 181K.8 1815.4 1620.0 1823.3 
XXV 774.3 668.9 t9.6 574.9 6053 
XXVI 1170.5 9b2.8 978.0 855.9 877.7 


xxxi . 


. . 894.0 842.1 828.9 702.8 6593 


xxxii 

XXXIII 
XXXIV 


. . 2070.8 1700.5 1612.1 1350.3 1367.0 
.. 105.3 93.3 97.1 89.7 96.4 
7599 6945 679.0 5373 4783 


XXVII 519.0 510.3 519.9 468.7 511.9 
XXVIII 4739 4") 2 4b63 502") 476.5 


Cicero 


863.0 815.5 727.9 613.3 518.3 


XXIX 2437.7 2570.1 2497.2 2925.5 2619.6 
XXX 2022.8 W57.9 1896.6 2103.3 1853.0 


Lyons 


.. 63.0 73.8 104.7 75.6 72.0 


Total 
I... 


. .43775.6 41029.9 36013.5 35370.4 29511.1 
, DEMOCRATIC TICKET. > 

Wenter, Russell. King. Gahan. Lynch. 

. 1780.2 1799.4 1802.6 1706.5 1742.0 


XXXI 6292 644.6 6221 636.1 506.8 
XXXII 90t>.l 1024.6 963.2 866.8 8034 


XXXIII . 217.8 219.3 220.8 217.8 216.0 


XXXIV 74S.9 751.4 732.0 687.8 676.1 
Cicero 333 5 308 4 272 9 240 9 198 1 


II 


. 1151.8 1204.5 1150.9 1024.0 1088.5 


Lyons 173.8 115.2 180.0 195.5 178.2 


Ill 
IV 


. 1033.8 1268.5 1048.9 972.7 979.2 


Total 51252.1 49183.0 5037L1 46479.1 47656.8 

FICERS. 
pril, 1889. 

-, ATTORNEY. , CLERK. , 
c. Rep. Dem. Pro. Rep. Dem. Pro. Soc. 

fel. Breuuno. Suee.. Lane. Ambere.Bnmsfield.Orelup. McGUl. 

1.. 2288 2281 8. 2227 2354 10 3 
2.. 2394 1495 23. 2357 1559 21 
5.. 2419 1476 16. 2463 1456 15 4 
3.. 2512 1395 22. 2544 1388 16 3 
9.. 1705 3017 29. 1574 3138 29 18 
8.. 1651 2917 2. 1587 3019 2 8 
18.. 1498 2314 2 1590 2250 1 27 
9.. 1121 2674 1. 1176 2621 1 11 
3.. 1761 2305 4. 1705 2364 3 54 
12.. 1856 1757 18. 1869 1753 18 40 
6.. 3143 2186- 37. 3190 2151 35 11 
2.. 4530 2276 101. 4582 2205 88 2 
3.. 2731 2142 27. 2837 2038 26 2 
5.. 1952 1286 7. 2001 1254 4 25 
4.. 1609 1672 17. 1647 1641 14 19 
9.. 2111 2675 20. 2147 2590 14 31 
5.. 1221 1851 16. 1263 1823 17 5 
7.. 2072 2356 23. 2174 2262 23 13 
8.. 1827 4124 9. 1873 4078 8 19 
3.. 1511 1029 15. 1616 953 5 3 
6.. 1997 1886 12. 2134 1739 11 6 
f.. 2085 1845 5. 2219 1719 5 16 
2039 2628 23. 2024 2620 22 11 


WARDS. 
I 


CITY OF 
Election A 

. TREASURER. 
Rep. Dem Pro. So 

Rajmond.Roesing. Spencer.Knaf 

2208 2367 10 


II 


2223 1692 25 


III 


2269 1634 16 


IV 


2430 1504 21 


v 


1562 3102 29 1 


VI 


. 1524 3079 2 


VII . . 


.. 1214 2634 2 5 


viii::.: 


.. 970 2818 1 


IX.... 


... 1476 2609 4 i 


x 


1653 1971 18 4 


XI 


2987 2343 36 


XII 


4254 2478 94 


XIII 


... 2436 2418 22 


XIV. 


.. 1583 1650 4 5 


XV. .. 


.. 1441 1837 17 5 


XVI. .. 


. . 1806 2968 20 J 


XVII 


1101 1971 17 


XVIII 


1915 2302 24 ] 


XIX 


.. 1677 4272 9 1 


XX 


.. 1273 1291 5 


XXI 


.. 1679 2196 11 


xxii"" 


.. 1649 2249 5 : 


XXIII 


1937 2774 23 


XXIV 


2445 2296 17 13.. 2582 2182 18. 2574 2185 18 14 


Total 


...'. 45712 56655 430 35 


2.. 50615 51769 445.. 51373 51160 410 345 
1154 .. 213 


Pluralities... 
Majority 




10943 


WARDS. 
I 


SOUTH TOWN OFFICERS. 
^-ASSESSOR. >^-COLLECTOR.v SUPERVISOR >TOWNCLERK. 
DeYoT Ad.; *' P> - ' &'- ^ #'- -^ 


2&*5 227( 


2282 2276.. 2270 2305. 2230 2318 
2442 1468.. 2445 1474. 2?44 1564 
2473 1413.. 2483 1425. 2418 1482 
2608 1335.. 2602 1336. 2540 1383 
J. 1775 2*1.. 2001 2717. 1647 3000 
).. 1735 2S72.. 1697 2871. 1651 2934 


II 


.. 2478 144( 


III 


... 2556 1355 


IV .. 


... 2600 1331 


V... 


1805 286! 


VI 


1739 285( 


Total.. .. 


13463 12116.. 13305 12245.. 13498 12128.. 12830 12681 



156 



CHICAGO DAILY XEWS ALMANAC FOR 1820. 



ASSESSOR. . 

WARDS. Rep. Dem. Soc.Pro. 

Williams. Cantwcll.Berg. Rice. 

VII 1472 2341 



WEST TOWN OFFICERS. 
, COLLECTOR. . SUPERVISOR.- 



-Towx CLERK. 



Rep. Dem.soc. Pro. Rep. Dem. S<:c.Pro. Rep. Dem. S c. P 

laiy"eT.Seigmund.Grief.BolgerWe8ffindXikodemPetereSiininoMMeanneTV&lentiniHen)nW< 



1062 2728 11 1. 
1H30 2448 53 3. 
1443 2171 40 19. 
40. 



1162 2620 17 
1768 2305 56 



VIII 

IX 

X 

XI 

XII.... 

XIII.... 

XIV.... 

XV.... 

XVI... 

XVII.. 

XVIII. 

XIX... 

Total.. ..24604 33179 269 267..27107 29936 292 244.. 28008 



2767 2480 

3%'4 2762 

2294 2543 

1727 1490 28 

1458 1794 21 



1904 2850 35 

1121 1953 4 

1920 2501 18 

1822 4118 23 



5 

- 87. 
3 26. 
8. 

21. 



1580 2251 28 



28 2. . 1619 " 2-215 



2.. 1576 2258 

8.. 1428 2358 10 . . 1182 2604 

2.. 1830 2253 53 1. 1788 2291 

1888 1729 44 17.. 1866 1761 43 18. 

3162 2156 5 33.. 3190 2114 7 

4542 2249 2 85.. 4583 2175 1 

2744 2117 

1687 1544 




1 27. 



1874 4076 26 



7.. 1927 1294 29 7. 

1643 22 15. 

14. . 2104 2664 51 14. 

7 17. 

16.. 2125 2296 17 23. 

19 7. 



1934 1665 

3151 2119 

4512 2205 

2844 1987 



1944 1284 

1597 1639 

2123 2647 
1221 



2053 2342 
2214 3710 



288 254. .28182 28563 251 



WARDS. 



NORTH TOWN OFFICERS. 

^-ASSESSOR-* ^-COLLECTOR-^ SUPERVISOR. CLERK.-s 

Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. 

BurmeistCT. Chase. Ball. Temple, Wood. Hajes. Busse 

XX 1465 1087.. 1617 935.. 1593 964.. 

XXI 1579 2295.. 2068 1786.. 2125 1741.. 

XXII 2093 1847.. 1971 1935.. 1890 1988.. 

XXIII 1916 2743.. 2786 1892.. 1927 2734.. 

XXIV 1843 2909.. 2797 1967.. 2199 2544.. 

Total 



SifUvan: 

1563 971 

2015 1831 

2192 1699 

1822 2644 

2: 



8896 10881.. 11239 8515.. 9Y34 9971.. 9957 

VOTE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. 

COUNTRY DISTRICTS. 



U470 



N. A. Cool, R 5230 



O.D. Allen, R 



CITY DISTRICTS. IJ. Spry, .R 

George Edmanson, D 39470 H. Englt hardt, It 

J. C. Scuhbert, D 38680 G. W. Spencer, R 

H.Lieb. D 38568;H. Michaelson, *,' 36139 ; J. M. Green, R 

M. M, Hayes, D 38238 P. A. Sundelius, R 360,8|H. C. Senne, R 

A. W. Bowner, D 38038IF.M. Fox, /. 3o806|G. Struckman, 7? 

J.Stalner, D 379o6 J. C. Schllesswohl, R 35802 M. M. Gridley, D 

J.Monheimer, D 37763 C.Warner, R 35730 M. Warner. Z> 

J. T. Kel v,# 37.180 S. Quinlin^ 35389 D. J. Hull, D 

J. W.Reilly 37o71iV.E. Cerving, R 33166 H. Behrens, D 262? 

P. J. Malony, D.... 375231 H. C. Batterman, D 253y 

VOTE FOR ALDERMEN. 



5124 
5049 
6038 

4rVSU 

3073 



4. M. B. Madde 
D. E. 



April, 

Wards 

1. Arthur Dixon, R 2378 

J. T. Appleton. D 2167 

2. John Summerfield, R, 2yrs 2558 

F. C. Vierling, R 1 yr 1887 

P. Sanders, D, 2 yrs 1259 

P. Magnus, D, 1 yr : 1543 

W. Tyrrel, P 24 

J. R. Robertson, P. 22 

J. H. Dunnington, L 45 

3. L. B. Dixon, R 2432 

W. H. Russel, I> 1478 

n,R 1448 

Root, D 1143 

G. Montague, Ind 1342 

H.M.Starkey 15 

5. JohnDugan, R 1218 

Thomas Hickey, D 2196 

E. D. Connor, j 1326 

E. Rooks, P 24 

6. Charles Hillock, J? 1272 

W.J. O'Brien, D 2530 

G. Emmerick, D 706 

7. J. H. Hildreth, Ind 920 

W.J. Murphy, D 2*58 

8. J.M.Weber, I?, 2 yrs 1280 

J. F. Lally, 12, 1 yr <iOO 

G. P. Bunker, D, 2 yrs 24^5 

F. J. Dvorak, D, 1 y r 20T4 

C. A. Monear,J? 111!) 

9. J..Bidwell, 237 

T. Carroll, D 1437 

G. Bartels, S. 53 

10. A. W. None, R 1650 

T. McEnerny , D 1964 

J. Eckelburg, S : 39 

11. F. E. LocKe.J? 2248 

W. D. Kent, R 2189 



1889. 
Wards. 

12. D. W.Mills,^ 4458 

R. P. Bates, D 1610 

W. Cowan, P 87 

13. J.W. Lyke.U 2672 

G. McGregor, Ind 1615 



14. 



F. J. Spencer, P ........................... 373 

A. P. Johnson, I* .......................... 1258 



Philip Jackson, D 1957 

J. Boulinski, S 17 

15. J.Dornbos, R 1546 

M.Ryan, D 1709 

C.F.Dosch,5 16 

F. J. Seymour, i *. 30 

16. J.C. Horn,JK '. 2430 

S. Kunz, D 2332 

17. H. M. Deal,J? 114) 

J.Mulvihill,D 1914 

C.F.Witt, P. 

18. R. Harris, R 2222 

J. Gaynor, D i 2153 

J. L. Joiner, P. 43 

19. James Mcfann, Ind 2959 

R. F. Sheridan, D 2789 

C.F.Heeg, S 20 

20. J. H. Hartwick, R 932 

Daniel Long, D 933 

G. K. Rix, Ind f.9*! 

21. C. W. Andrews, Jr., R 1814 

John McGillcn, D 20dO 

22. C. W. Dahnke, R 1045 

E. Muelhoef er, R 1508 

H. Hosruer, D 1368 

23. H. W. Hanson. R 1843 

J. J. McCormick, D 2812 

A. Gould, S 16 

24. J. S. Dunham, R 2412 

C. J. E. Parker, D 2303 



COOK COUNTY COMMITTEES. 157 


Wards. 
25. F. M. Chapma 
M Keck R 


Sept. 
n R . 862 


10, 1889. 
Wards. 
30. 1. G. Spencer 
D. W. Wood, 
j Kenny D 


R 1337 


984 


R ISti'l 


G. H. Kettelh 
A. W. Bonner 
26. F. La Balm, / 
C. M. Chandlt 
B. P. Weber, 
E. F. Hayes, J 
27. D. B. Fonda, , 
M. J. Con way 
L. A. Budlong 
L. F. Hayes, 1 
28. John McKenE 
J Kuxton, R 


1 D .... 695 


;. If! 


, ) 620 


M. Pauley, D 
31 E J Noble, 1 


1535 


720 


J 8s->l 


r 2? 434 


G. F. McKnig 
W. B. Moak, 
J. D. Bacon, j 
32. W. R. Kerr,J 
W. C. Kinney 
E A Hill, D 


ht, R 847 


D 1270 


D 571 


[>.... 944 


D 557 ' 


S 574 


1 1759 


, JZ 575 


, R . 199 


.I.R.. 476 


848 ' 


) 477 


33. W. B. Arnold 
A. Krimbill, i 
P. J. Gorman 
Charles Jocki 
34. J. O'Neill, R. 




a, R ... 440 


f? 813 


* Isfi 




T. Kelly, D .. ... 456 


sch D 1028 1 


J. Lucas, D ... 457 


1561 


29. T. Hogan, /. I 
J. Nugent, I. j 
P. N. Reirdon 
T. Gahan, ).. 


I 915 


J. Chasey, R. 
C. Corkery. L 
B. Gansel, D 
W. C. Parker 


1HOO 


D ..784 




,>.... ...1800 


MM 


...1858 


, l.'jj go 


M. Bauman, 1 


nd 45 






COOK COUNTY COMMITTEES. 


REPUBLICAN. 
Chairman ARTHUR DIXON. Secre'ary GEORGE B. SWTFT. 


WABDS. 


Members. 


WARDS. 


Members. 


1st 


Arthur Dixon. 
William D. Preston. 
Perry A. Hull. 
T. N.Jameson. 
A. L. Oldenburg. 
James A. Hogan. 
William Lorlmer. 
Henry Westerfield. 
C. W. Woodman. 
Philip J. Carboy. 
George B. Swift. 
George S. Varley. 
F. D. Miller. 
Fred L. Wilk. 
O. F. Severson. 
Phil Knopf. 
Vacant. 
John R. Wheeler. 
P. J. Meany. 
George Reich. 
George H. Wood. 


22d 


A. Schlotthauer. 
John Weissbrodt. 
A. J. Calder. 
J.F. Lambertson. 
J. P. Frohn. 
George Wolff. 
Thomas E. Fagan. 
Timothy Hogan. 
Alf W. Adklnson. 
J. S. Kendall. 
H. D. Patton. 
C. H. Krimbill. 
John f-ymonds. 

John Humphrey. 
F. C. Kile. 
E. S. Conway. 
J. W. Byte. 
Meyer Bloom. 
Frank Thoma. 


2d 


23d 


3d 


24th 


4th 


25th 


5th 


26th.... 


6th 


27th 


7th 

8th 


28th 




9th .... 


30th 


10th 


31st . 


llth 


32d. . 


12th 


33d.... 


13th 


34th 

DlSTBICTS. 

1st.... 


14th 


15th . 


16th 


17th 


2d... 


18th 


3d 


19th 


4th 


20th 


5th 


21st 


6th 


DEMOCRATIC. 
Chairman Joy AS HDTCHINSON. Secretary 3 AMES C. STRAIN. 


COXG. DISTS. 


Members. 


WARDS. 


Members. 


1st .... 


John P. Hopkins. 
Daniel Duffy. 
E. P. Burke. 
William E. McCarthy. 
L. J. Kallish. 
Charles Wesley. 
D. C. Cregier. 
S. B. Chase. 

J. J.Townsend. 
Thomas Gahan. 
Thomas Henneberry. 
Martin Carroll. 
John O'Brien. 
William J. Donlin. 
Thomas J. McGrath. 
John Norton. 
M. J. Bransfleld. 
J. Nash. 

Sol Van Praag. 
John P. Leindecker. 


2d 


Charles H. King. 
U. T. Murray. 
Jonas Hutchlnson. 
James C. Strain. 
M. D. Flavin. 
M. P. Evans. 
P. J. Wall. 
Anton Annweiler, 
Christopher J. Reed. 
John McCormiek. 
Francis T. Murphy. 
Mathew Lett. 
George P. Bunker. 
John G. Panoch. 
H. H. Dunn. 
Joseph Keane. 
P. McMahon. 
J. J. Cullerton. 
Joseph Schotleld. 
M. C. McDonald. 
W. S. Bogle. 
Thomas Fitzgerald. 
T. P. Murphy. 
Patrick Donohue. 


2d 


3d 


3d 


4th 


4th 


5th 


SEX. D13TS. 
1st 


6th 


7th.. 


2d 


8th 


3d 


4th 


9th 


5th 


6th 


10th 


7th 


9th 


llth 


llth. 


13th 


12th 


WARDS. 

1st 


13th 







CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



COOK COUNTY COMMITTEES. -Continued. 



WARDS. 



Members. 



WARDS. 



Members. 



14th 

15th 

16th 

17th 

18th 

19th, 

20th 

21st 

22d 

23d 

,24th 

25th 

26th 



H. O. Hanson, 
John J. Block. 
J. C. Merrick. 
John Durkin. 
William Griffin. 
Charles B. Stone, Jr. 
W. H. Ford. 
John Rolsen. 
Horace Banyon. 
Dennis Calvin. 
Frank Kennedy. 
M.J. O'Brien. 
Henry Ebertschauser. 
B. F. Jenkins. 
F. X. Brandecker, Jr. 
William C. Niehoff. 
J. H. Farrell. 
John F. Seward. 
John F. O'Malley. 
Edward Colford. 
Fred Greisheinier. 
James B. McAbee. 
Leo Austrian. 
Austin O. Sexton. 
Herman Alschuler. 
Aaron M. McKay. 



27th. 



29th 

30th 

31st 

32d 

33d 

34th 

COM'K DISTS. 
2d 

3d 

4th 

5th 

6th . 



The country towns are now divided into dis- 
tricts as follows: 

1st Bloom, Thornton, Bremen, Orland, Rich. 
2d Calumet. Worth, Palos, Lemont. 
3d Cicero, Lyons, Riverside, Proviso. 



George Fuertach. 
Leonidas Thomas. 
T. Clifford. 
W. Monroe. 
Thomas Carey. 
William Prendergast. 
Thomas Byrnes. 
John Fitzgerald. 
Philip Bertemes. 

E. E. Brown. 

F. X. Combs. 
W. C. Asay. 
James C. Dickson. 
Thomas C. Egan. 
John W. Brown. 
James Tobin. 

M. M. Gridley. 
Adam Heron. 
W. A. Loomis. 

harles Sigwalt. 

. C. Crafts. 
George E. Steele. 
George F. Borman. 
Edward Smith. 
John W. McCarthy. 
JohnConley. 



4th Evanston, Northfleld, New Trier, Niles. 

5th Barrington,Schaumberg, Palatine, Han- 
over, Wheeling. 

6th Norwood Park, Maine, Leyden, Elk 
Grove. 



ASSESSMENT OF REAL ANB PERSONAL PROPERTY IN COOK COUNTY. 

As equalized by the County Board for 1889. 



TOWNS. 



REAL PROPERTY. 



Equalized 
Valuation. 



Assessed Av. Val 
Valuation, per Acre 



Equalized 
Valuation. 



PERSONAL PROP. 



As 



Equal' 



VuluationlizedVal. 



Barrington 

Bloom 

Kremen 

Calumet 

Cicero 

Elk Grove , 

Evanston , 

Han over 

Hyde Park 

Jefferson 

Lake.... 

Lake View 

Leyden 

Lemont ,..., 

Lyons. 

Maine 

New Trier.., 

Niles 

Northfleld 

Norwood Park 

Orland 

Palos 

Palatine 

Proviso 

Rich 

Riverside 

Sohaumberg 

Thornton 

Wheeling 

Worth , 



$11.62 
11.22 
9.58 
30.02 
76.86 
14.47 
77.92 
12.71 

120.59 
42.67 

151.20 



14.59 
10.50 
13.70 

9.90 
12.54 
15.75 
10.31 
22.78 

8.19 

5.80 
11.81 
12.57 

9.72 
61.60 
13.05 
12.03 
11.90 
13.00 



SMI. 881 
337,fi76 
242,988 
773,809 
1,716,531 

253,oas 

1,852,363 

274,023 

9,519,532 

1,178,845 

7,176,457 

3,017,485 

2S4,i87 

232,611 

599,833 

285,727 



238,781 
226,355 

169,164 
196,140 
13>,295 
352,420 
432,647 
241,571 
287,O.S6 
253,293 
449,276 
314,674 
463,224 



$74,921 
40,178 
39,818 
43,202 
71,193 
34,701 

145,775 
44,35(2 

808.445 

49,622 

1.128.805 

218,235 
32,103 
41,058 
70,141 
39.942 
19.238 
36,485 
32,0.8 
10,658 
36,013 
13,093 
63,656 
48,012 
48,038 
11,077 
39.402 
78,567 
56,226 
53,534 



Total county towns... 

North Chicago 

South Chicago 

West Chicago 



$500.55 
218.79 



$32,200,382 
14,307.350 
51,987,255 

.'i'.I.OO'UL'U 



Total citv towns 

Grand total 



$105,294,625 
_137,4a>,907 




$71,175 
42,186 



43,202 
71.193 
34,701 

142,860 
44,392 

808.445 

49,622 

1,117,517 

227,276 
32,103 
43,110 
77,155 
39,942 
19.238 
36,485 
32,078 
10,658 
36.013 
13.420 
63,656 
45,532 
46,491 
11,077 



82,495 

5C.W 

52,463 



$3.429,911 
1,612,130 

18,361,670 
4,841,350 

$24.815.150 

28,245.082 



THE AUSTRALIAN SYSTEM. 



159 




THE AUSTRALIAN SYSTEM. 



The Australian system of voting, so called 
because flrst used in Australia, has been for 
several years in successful operation there, 
and with non-essential variations in England, 
Scotland, Ireland, and Canada. It has also 
been adopted in Massachusetts, where it went 
into "effect in 1889. Its principal objects are to 
prevent bribery and intimidation, to place all 
candidates upon an equality before the law, 
and to undermine the dangerous powers of 
political machines. 

The system will be readily understood by 
reference to the accompanying drawing. 

The voter, upon entering the polling-place, 
turns to his right at the point marked "EN- 
TRANCE, "where he receives, from two election 
officers selected from opposing political par- 
ties, a single ballot or a single set of ballots 
according to the local custom of voting, printed 
at public expense. On the back is indorsed a 
stamp or signature, sufficient and only suffi- 
cient to identify the ballot as official; and on 
the face are plainly printed the names of the 
candidates for each office, with a designation 
of their respective political parties, after this 
manner: 



Democratic.. 



Republican.. 



Prohibition... 



Independent. 



Democratic.. 



For Mayor. 



John Doe. 



Richard Roe- 



David Smith... 



Samuel Jones. 



For Coroners. 



Alanson Jacobs.. 



HarveySylvester 
Republican... Martin Rawson.. 
Wyman Simpson 



Vote for One. 



Vote. for Two. 



Prohibition.. 



Independent. 



Valentine Rose.. 



Victor Sampson. 



Erastus Myers. . . 



Samuel Bixby.... 



Having received his ballot, the voter enters 
one of the booths back of the railing, where, 
secluded from observation, he prepares the 
ballot by placing in the blank column a cro^s 
opposite the name of each candidate for 
whom he desires to vote; or, if he prefers, by 
writing the names of candidates of his own 
nomination in place of those already there. 
If there are several candidates for the same 
kind of "ffice, as coroners in the sample ballot 
above, or presidential electors, and he wishes 
to vote the 'straight" ticket of his party, he 
places the cross under the name of the party 
or draws it through the space in the blank 
column alloted to the party's candidates, 
which signifies that he votes for each candi- 
date named in thatspace. Thus, in the sample 
ballot, a cross under the word "Democratic" 
or through the flrst two spaces of the blank 
column to the right, is one vote each for Alan- 
son Jacobs and Harvey Sylvester. 

After preparing his ballot by indicating 
every candidate for whom he votes, the voter 
folds it in such manner as to conceal the face 
and expose the indorsement, and, withdrawing 
from the booth, gives the ballot to the inspect- 
ors, who identify it by the indorsement as offi- 
cial. It is then deposited in the box and the 
voter passes out at the gate marked "EXIT." 

From the time he receives his ballot until he 
casts it the voter is permitted to have no 
communication with any one but the election 
officers, and with them only for official pur- 
poses; and only election officers and persons 
actually engaged in voting are ever admitted 
within the railing. 

Upon proof of inability from physical in- 
firmity or illiteracy a voter may call into the 
booth officers appointed and sworn for the ' 
purpose to aid him in preparing his ballot, and 1 
when a ballot is accidentally destroyed or! 
defaced it must be exchanged for a clean one. | 
The importance of the latter requirement; 
may not at once be apparent, but to secure 
secrecy every ballot delivered to a voter must 
be either cast or returned. This explains the 
necessity for indorsing ballots. But for the 
indorsement a blank paper outwardly re- 
sembling a ballot might be cast by a voter, 
who would then be able surreptitiously to 
carry away an official ballot. This could be 
prepared for a bribed voter, the proof of its 
use being his production of a second official 
ballot. That could be similarly prepared and 



160 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



used, and so on. Such a fraud, known as the 
" Tasmanian dodge," was successfully perpe- 
trated in Australia in the early days ol the 
system, but its repetition was prevented by 
requiring ballots to be officially indorsed. 

As it is essential that ballots be printed at 
public expense and distributed by public offi- 
cers, the system must include some mode of 
certifying nominations to the proper authori- 
ties a reasonable time before elections. That 
proposed by the Yates-Saxton bill of New 
York was, perhaps, as convenient as could be 
desired. Under it state nominations were to 
be certified fifteen days and local nominations 
ten days before election. Nominations of a 
political party which at the next preceding 
election polled 3 per cent of the whole vote 
were to be certified by party officers, and inde- 
pendent nominations, if for a state office, 
were to be certified by 1,000 voters and if for a 
local office by 100. 

The evils of machine organization and the 
remedy of the Australian system are summa- 
rized as follows by William M. lvins,than whom 
no one has done more intelligent, energetic, 
and effective work for electoral reform: 

THE EVFL. THE REMEDY. 

1. The necessity for 1. The printing and 
vo 1 u n taril y printing distribution of all bal- 
and distributing the lots at public expense 
ballot justifies organi- does away with the ne- 
zation for this pur- cessity of organization 
pose. for this purpose, 



2. It practically vests; 2. And will deprive 
the machine with the the political machines 
i monopoly of the elec-!of the monopoly of an 



tion machinery, 

3. And, as a conse- 
quence, with the mo- 
nopoly of nomination. 



essential part of the 
election machinery. 

3. It will enable any 
body of citizens of the 
number prescribed by 
law to have the name 
of their candidate 
printed on the same 
ballot with the names 
of all other candidates 
for the same office, so 
that before the law and 
before the voters al 
candidates and all par- 
ty organizations wil" 
stand on a perfectly 
even footing. 

4. It involves the ne- 4. This will dispense 
cessity of defraying altogether with the ne- 
the expenses of hoth cessity of and excuse 
printing and distribu- for levying political as- 
tion by means of as- sessments 
sessments on or contri-l 

butions by candidates, 
office-holders, or party 
leaders, 

5. Which facilitates 5. And leave no legal 
bribery and corruption cover for bribery. 

by affording them con- 
venient covers. 



WHEAT CROPS OF THE WORLD. 

Prepared by S. G. Brock, Chief of Bureau of Statistics on Foreign Commerce of the 

United States. 



COUNTRIES. 



Bushels. 



Bushels. 



Bushels. 



Bushels. 



North America: 

United States 

Canada 

South America : 

Argentine Republic and Chili. 
Europe: 

Austria. 

Hungary 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 

Great Britain 

Ireland 

Greece 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Portugal 

Roumania 

Russia 

Servia 

Spain 

Sweden 

Norway 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

Asia: 

India 

Africa: 



357,112,000 
35,000,000 



25.000,000 



457,218,000 




28,800,625 

143,001,488 
18.514,688 
4,731,531 

2W.1U7/.20 
82,000,000 
65,285,353 




415.868.000 
32,000,000 

28,375,000 




Egypt, 
istralasi 



Australasia. 
All other... 



Total. 



287,955,584 

14,187,500 
37,077,134 
125,672,877 



239,000,000 



35,000,000 
177,567,500 



266,882,112 

14,187,500 

47.588,167 
107,388,436 



2.099.109,635 



2.031,322,285 



2,152,669,134 



*Ouantities by weight are reduced to Winchester bushels at the rate of 60 pounds to the 
bushel, tlncluded in all other. ^Estimate of the Austrian Consul at Buda-Pesth. Other esti- 
mates are lower, that of the Evening Corn Trade List being 37,000,000 bushels. Exclusive 
of Poland. 



RELIGIOUS. 161 


Heli 

ROMAN CATH 
ARCHBISHOPS OF T 
Archdioceses. Names. 
St. Louis, Mo Peter Richard Kenrlck. 


gfotis. 

OLIO CHURCH. 
HE UNITED STATES. 
Archdioceses. Names. 
Philadelphia, Pa Patrick John Ryan. 
Portland Or . W H Gross 


Cincinnati O William H Elder 


Chicago 111 Patrick A Feehan 


New York, N Y M. A. Corrigan. 


Boston Mass John Joseph Williams. 


New Orleans, La Francis Janssens. 


j Baltimore, Md James Giboons. 


San Francisco, Cal Patrick W. Riordan. 
St Paul Minn. . John Ireland 


Milwaukee Wis Michael Heiss 


Santa Fe N M J B Salpointe 


UNITED STATES. 
Dioceses. Names. 
Jamestown, N. D J. Shanley. 
Winona Minn J. C. Cutter. 


BISHOPS OF THE 
Dioceses. Names. 
Brooklyn, N. Y John Loughlin. 
Burlington, Vt L. DeGoesbriand. 
Dubuque Iowa John Hennessy 


Helena Mont J. B. Brondel. 


Little Rock, Ark Edward Fitzgerald. 


Sioux Falls, S. D Martin Marty. 
Columbus J A Watterson 


Louisville Ky William & McCloskey 


Rochester, N. Y B. J. McQuaid. 
Harrisburg, Pa Thomas McGovern. 
Scranton Pa William O'Hara 


Natchez Miss .. JohnHeslin 


San Antonio, Tex J. C. Neraz. 
LaCrosse, Wis .Killian C. Flasch. 
South Orange, N. J W. M . Wigger. 
Trenton N J M J O'Farrell 


Erie Pa Tobias Mullen. 




Wilmington, Del A. A. Curtis. 


Charleston, S. C H. P. Northrop. 
Galveston, Tex N. A. Gallagher. 
Grand Rapids, Mich....H. J. Richter. 
Nashville, Tenn J. Rademacher. 




Buffalo NY. S V Ryan 


Alton 111 James Ryan 


Detroit, Mich JohnS. Foley. 
Springfield. Mass P. T. O'Reilly. 


Manchester, N. H D. M.Bradley. 
Davenport, Iowa H. Cosgrove. 


Leavenworth, Kas L. M. Fink. 
Fort Wavne, Ind Joseph Dwenger. 
Cleveland O Richard Gilmour 


Indian Territory Ignatius Jean. 
Boise City Idaho A J Glorieux. 


Covington Ky C. P Maes 


Albany, N. Y Francis McNelrny 
Providence, R. I M. Harkins. 
Ogdensburg, N. Y E. P.Wadhams. 


Mobile, Ala J. O'Sullivan. 


Savannah, Ga T. A.Becker. 


Green Bay, Wis F. Katzer. 
Lincoln Neb Thomas Bonacum 


Los Angeles, Cal F.Mora. 
Wheeling, W. Va JohnJ.Kain. 
St. Cloud, Minn Zarditti. 
Portland, Me J. A. Healy. 
St Paul, Minn Thomas L. Grace. 


Tucson Arizona . P Bourgade 


Cheyenne, Wy T . . M F Burke. 


Nachitoches, La Anthony Durier. 
St. Paul, Minn T. L. Grace. 




Belmont N C Leo Haid 


Omaha x'eb James O'Connor 


Bellville 111 John Janssen. 


Peoria 111 . J L Spalding 


Syracuse NY PA Ludden. 


St. Augustine, Fla John Moore. 
Indianapolis, Ind F. S. Chatard. 
Richmond, Va A. Van de Vyver. 


Salt Lake City, Utah....L. Scanlon. 
Concordia, Kas Richard Scannel. 
Wichita. Kas J. J. Hennessy. 
Newark, N. J W. M. Wigger. 


Hartford, Conn L. S. McMahon. 
Marquette, Mich JohnVertin. 
Vancouver. W. T ^Egidius Junger. 
Virginia City, Nev P. Manogue. 
Duluth, Minn J. McGobrick. 


Allegheny, Pa R. Phelan. 
Wilmington, N. C Leo Haid. 
Vancouver Island. J. N. Lemmens. 

SCOPAL CHTJRCH. 

Dioceses. Bishops. Residence. 
Minnesota. .H. B.Whipple Faribault. 


PROTESTANT EPI 

Dioceses. Bishops. Residence. 
Alabama. ..R. H. Wilmer Mobile. 


Ar. &N.M..J. M. Kendrick Santa Fe. 


M. N. Gilbert, asst . .St. Paul. 
Mississippi .H. M. Thompson. . . .Jackson. 
Missouri D. S. Tuttle ...St. Louis. 
Montana L. R. Brewer Helena. 
Nebraska. . .G.Worthington Omaha. 
Western.. A. N. Graves. 
N.H W.W. Niles Concord. 
NewJersey- 
South J. Scarborough Trenton. 
North T. A. Starkey Newark 


Arkansas. . .H. M. Pierce Little Rock. 
California- 
North J. H. Wingfield Benicia. 
South W. I. Kipp SanFrancisco. 
Colorado -...J. F. Spalding Denver. 
Conn John Williams Middletown. 
Delaware L Coleman . .. Wilmington 


Florida E. G. Weed Jacksonville. 
Georgia J. W. Beckwith Atlanta. 
Illinois- 
Chicago... W. E. McLaren Chicago. 
Spr'gfield G F Sevmour Springfield. 


New York- 
City H. C. Potter NewYork City 
Central. ..F. D. Huntingdon.. ..Syracuse. 
Albany W. C. Doane Albany. 
Long Id... A. N. Littlejohn ...Brooklyn. 
Western. .A. C. Coxe Buffalo. 
N. Carolina. T. B. Lyman Raleigh. 
Eastern.. .A. A. Watson Wilmington. 
N. Dakota.. W. D. Walker Fargo. 
Ohio- 
Northern.W. A. Leonard Cleveland. 
Southern. T. A. Jaggar Cincinnati. 
B.Vincent, asst Cincinnati. 
Oregon B W Morris Portland. 


Quincy.. . .Alexander Burgess. .Peoria. 
Indiana D.B. Knickerbacker. Indianapolis. 
Iowa W. S. Perry Davenport. 
Kansas B. S. Thomas Topeka. 


Kentucky.. T. U. Dudley Louisville. 
Louisiana... J. X. Gallaher New Orleans. 
Maine H. A. Neely Portland. 
Maryland. . . W. Paret Baltimore. 
Eastern... W. F. Adams Easton. 
Mass B. H. Paddock Boston. 
Michigan- 
Eastern. . .T. F. Davies Detroit. 
Western.. G. DeN. Gillespie... Grand Rapids. 


Penn 
Phila O.W. Whitaker Philadephia. 



162 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



Pittsburg .C. Whitehead Pittsburg. 

Central. ..M. A. DeW. Howe.. Reading. 

N. A. Rulison, asst.. Bethlehem. 

Rhode Isl'd.T. M. Clark Providence. 

S. Carolina. W. B.W. Howe Charleston. 

S, Dakota.. .W. H. Hare Sioux Falls. 

Tennessee. .C. T. Quintard Sewanee. 

Texas- 
Eastern ..A. Gregg Austin. 

Western.. J. S. Johnson San Antonio. 

Nortbern.A. C. Garrett Dallas. 



Utah A. Leonard Salt Lake City 

Vermont W. H. A. Bissell Burlington 

Virginia.... F. McN. Whittle Richmond.' 

A. M. Randolph,asst. Richmond 

W.Virginia. G. W. Peterkin Parkersburg. 

Wisconsin- 
Eastern . .C. F. Knight Milwaukee. 

F. du Lac.. Charles C. Graf ton.. Fond du Lac. 

Washingt'n.J. A. Paddock Tacoma. 

Wyoming & 
Idaho E. Talbot Laramie City. 



REFORMED EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 



Synods. Bishops. Resilience. 

Chicago Charles E. Cheney . .Chicago. 

N.Y.&Penn.W.R. Nicholson Philadelphia. 

Pacific Edward Cridge Victoria, B. C. 

North west.. Samuel Fallows Chicago. 

*For colored parishes and congregations. 



Residence. 



Synods. Bishops. 

South* P. F. Stevens Charleston. 

South J. A. Latane Baltimore. 

Canada Samuel Fallows Chicago, 111. 



METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 



Bishops. Residence. 

Thomas Bowman St. Louis, Mo. 

Randolph S. Foster Boston, Mass. 

Stephen M. Merrill Chicago, 111. 

Edward G. Andrews New York, N. Y. 

Henry W. Warren Denver, Col. 

Cyrus D. Foss Philadelphia, Pa. 

JohnF. Hurst Washington, D. C. 

William X. Ninde Topeka, Kas. 

JohnM. Walden Cincinnati, O. 



Bishops. 

WillardF.Mallalieu 

Charles H. Fowler 

John H. Vincent 

James N. Fitzgerald 

Isaac W. Joyce 

John P. Newman , 

Daniel A. Goodsell 

William Taylor (Mission) 
J. M. Thoburn (Mission). . 



Residence. 
.New Orleans, La. 
.San Francisco, Cal. 
.Buffalo. N. Y. 
.Minneapolis, Minn, 
.Chattanooga, Term. 
.Omaha, Neb. 
.Texas. 
.For Africa. 
.For India. 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 



Moderator, Rev. W. C. Roberts, D. D., LL. D., Lake Forest, 111. 
Permanent clerk. Rev. W. E. Moore, D. D., Columbus, O. 
THE BOARDS OF THE CHURCH. 

Church Erection, Rev. S. D. Alexander, D. D., 



Home Missions, Rev. John Hall, D. D., LL.D., 

president, New York. 
Foreign Missions, Rev. John D. Wells, D. D., 

president, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Education, Rev. G. D. Baker, D.D., president, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Publication and Sunday School Work, Hon. 

R. N. Wilson, president, Philadelphia, Pa. 



president, New York. 
Ministerial Relief, George Junkins, president 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Freedmen, Rev. E. P. Cowan, D. D., president, 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
Aid for Colleges, Rev. Herrick Johnson, D D 

LL. D., president, Chicago, 111. 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 



A. B. C. F. M., R. S. Storrs, D. D., LL.D., presi- 
dent, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

College and Education Society, Hon. Nathan- 
iel Shipman, president, Hartford, Conn. 

Congregational Association, Hon. Rufus S. 
Frost, president, Chelsea, Mass. 

Congregational Union, W. M. Taylor, D. D., 



LL. D., president, New York. 
Home Miss onary Society, J. H. Seelye, D.D 

LL. D., president, Amherst, Mass. 
Missionary Assoc ation, W. M. Taylor, DD 

LL. D., president. New York. 
Sunday School and Pub. Society, S. B. Capen 

president, Boston, Mass. 



BAPTIST CHURCH. 

Missionary Union, Hon. G. A. Pillsbury, pres- 1 president, Cambridge, Mass. 

ident, Minneapolis, Minn. ( Ministers' 1 Aid Society, Rev. S. A. Northrup, 

Publication Society, S. A. Crozer, president, president, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Upland, Pa. Education Society, Hon. Francis Wayland, 

Home Mission Society, Hon. C. W. Kingsley, president, LL. D., New Haven, Conn. 



THE CHURCHES OF THE UNITED STATES. 

August 1, 1889. 
Condensed from the New York Independent. 



ADVENTISTS. 

Chs. Min. Com. 

Adventists 91 107 11,100 

Second Adventists 583 501 (33,500 

Seventh-Day Adventists. 901 232 26.112 



Total 1,575 840 100,712 

The Adventists are divided into at least five 
bodies or companies: 1, Second Advent 
Christians, who believe in the resurrection 
and everlasting destruction of the wicked 
dead; 2, Evangelical Adveutists. who hold 
the orthodox view respecting future punish- 
ment; 3, Seventh Day Adventists, who ob- 
serve the seventh day as the Sabbath; 4, Life 
and Advent Union, a distinctive tenet of 
whose belief is the nou-resurrectiou of the 



wicked dead; 5. Age-to-Come Adventists, who 
look for the restoration of the Jews to the 
Holy Land. In polity these branches, except- 
ing the Seventh Day, which lodges ecclesi- 
astical power In its annual and general con- 
ferences, are congregational. 
BAPTISTS. 

Chs. Min. Com. 
Regular.. 32,900 21,420 2,897,794 



Anti-Mission 1,800 

Free 1,619 

Other Free >50 

Disciples of Christ fi,437 

Christian, North 1,662 

Christian, South 75 

Church of God 500 



900 
1,414 

(WO 
3.2(13 
1,327 

a5 

484 



4I5.000 
S6,2H 
34,144 
(120,000 
122,000 
18,000 
31,000 



RELIGIOUS. 



163 



Chs. 

Seventh-Day Baptists.... 110 
*Dunkards: Conservative 470 
*Dunkards: Progressive. 255 
*Dunkards: Old order.... 130 

Six Principle W 

Total 

Estimated. 



Min. 

113 

l,aS5 



Com. 

9,000 

100,000 

11,000 
2,000 
1,450 



.46,624 32,017 4,078,589 



The baptists form a very large family. The 
largest body, called Regular or Particular 
Baptists, are generally Calvinistic in doc- 
trine, practice close communion, and, in com- 
mon with most other Baptists, are congrega- 
tional in polity and reject infant baptism. The 
Free Baptists are Arminian in doctrine and 
open-communion in practice. The Disciples 
of Christ, who are also called Christians and 
"Campbellites," baptize by immersion for the 
remission of sins, observe the communion 
every Sabbath, and accept no standard or doc- 
trine save the Bible. The Christians, often 
confounded with the Disciples of Christ, exist 
in two branches Northern and Southern. 
They are considerably older than the Disci- 
ples. They baptize by immersion almost uni- 
versally and take the Bible as their only 
standard of doctrine. Excepting the South- 
ern branch, they are generally Arians, hold 
the moral-influence view of the atonement, 
and reject Calvinistic tenets. The Church 
of God, founded by Elder Winebrenner, a 
minister of the Reformed (German) Church, 
is a German organization, presbyterian in 
polity, rejecting human creeds, holding that 
churches should consist of immersed be- 
lievers, that the Lord's supper should be re- 
ceived in a sitting posture and in the evening, 
and that feet-washing is obligatory. Tne 
Dunkards, or German Baptists, originated in 
Germany in 1706. They hold to triune immer- 
sion, close communion, and enforce on 
their members non-conformity to the world in 
matters of dress and conduct, and exist in 
several separate bodies. The Anti-Mission 
Baptists are Regular Baptists save in their 
opposition to missions, Sunday schools, and 
similar church enterprises. 

CHRISTIAN UNION CHURCHES. 

Chs. Min. Com. 
Christian Union Churches. 1,500 500 120,000 

This body arose in the west a quarter of a 
century ago. It holds to the oneness of the 
church, of which Christ is the only head, and 
the Scriptures the only rule of faith and prac- 
tice. It protests strongly against sectarian- 
ism. It might with propriety, perhaps, be 
classed as a Baptist body, as baptism by im- 
mersion is oracticed. 

CONGREGATIONALISTS. 

Chs. Min. Com. 
Congregationalists 4,569 4,284* 475,608 

*Last year's figures. 

The Congregationalists have been repre- 
sented in this country since 1620. Their name 
is taken from their polity, which vests all 
ecclesiastical power in the congregation. In 
doctrine, according to the declaration of the 
Oberlin National Council, their interpreta- 
tion of the Holy Scriptures is in "substantial 
accordance with the great doctrines of the 
Christian faith, commonly called Evangelical, 
held in our churches from the early times, 
and sufficiently set forth by former general 
councils." This, it is claimed, gives to Armin- 
ians equal standi-ng in the denomination with 
Calvinists. 



Orthodox 

Non-affiliating orthodox, 
including Philadelphia 
and Wilburite bodies... . 

"Hicksite" ._ 

Total 



Chs. 
663 



100 



Min. 
1,017 



Com. 
71,930 



12,000 
23,000 



Orthodox Friends hold to the inspiration 
and sufficiency of the Scriptures, to immedi- 
ate revelation by the Holy Spirit to the heart 
of the individual, and that the only baptism 
essential to salvation is the "washing of re- 
generation and the renewing of the Holy 
Ghost." The Lord's supper is not to be ob- 
served by the use of the visible elements, 
and no one should exercise the ministry with- 
out being moved thereto by the Holy Spirit. 
There is much discussion at present concern- 
ing the ordinances. The "Hicksite" Friende 
(as they are usually called) date from 1827. 
They are regarded as Unitarian in doctrine, 
and hold that all church organizations are 

urely human and should not claim to speak 
y God's authority. They reject the idea of 
exercising discipline over individuals or so- 
cieties. 

GERMAN EVANGELICAL CHURCH. 

Chs. Min. Com. 

German Evangelical Chu'h 675 560 125,000 
This body occupies the same position theo- 
logically as the United Evangelical or State 
Church of Prussia, which was formed by the 
union of Lutheran and Reformed bodies. 



LUTHERANS. 

Chs. 
1,337 
368 



General Synod 

United Synod South 

General Council ........... 1,461 

Synodical Conference ..... 1,706 

Independent Synods (15).. 2,102 



Min. Com. 

938 141,631 

175 34,252 

840 244,788 

i,162 320,128 

1,036 247,209 



Total .................... 6,971 4,151 988.008 

Lutherans accept as their doctrinal symbols 
the Augsburg confession, the larger and 
smaller catechisms, the Schmalkald articles, 
and the Book of Concord. They are divided 
into four general bodies and into independ- 
ent synods. These divisions have been 
caused chiefly by confessional differences. 
The Synodical Conference is most rigidly con- 
fessional; the General Council is moder- 

METHODISTS. 

Chs. Min. Com. 
Methodist Episcopal ...... 21,361 12,802 2,154,349 

Meth Episcopal South.... 11,432 4.B87 1,140097 

African Meth. Episcopal. 3,600 



2,943 

Af rican Meth. Epis.Zion. 2,200* 2,600 
' 



United Brethren 4,451 

Colored Meth. Episcopal. 2,016 



Methodist Protestant ..... 
Evangelical Association 



1,871 
1,916 

American Wesleyan 495 

70 

9(51 
35 
122 



Congregational Meth 



1,490 
1,729 
1,282 
1,159 
179 
200 



50 112 



390,000 
325,000 
'204,517 
165,000 
147,503 
141,853 
16,197 
8,000 
18,522 
5,000 
4,343 

3,500 



Free Methodists. 
Independent Methodists. 
Primitive Methodists .... 
Union American Meth. 
Episcopal (colored) ^^^ 

Total 50,680 29,770 4,723,881 

*Estimated. 

The first societies of Methodists in America 
were organized about 1766 in Baltimore and in 
New York. The numerous branches which 
have sprung from this beginning vary in 
polity, some being Episcopal, some Presbyte- 
rian, and some Congregational and independ- 
ent, but all agree substantially in doctrine and 
usage. All are distinctively Arminian. Slav- 
ery was responsible for the division of the 
Methodist Episcopal church in 1844, for the 
secession of the American Wesleyau connec- 
tion, in 1843, from the former body, and for the 
division of the Methodist Protestant church, 
now reunited. The Methodist Protestant 
secession was the first considerable one. It 
began in 1830, and was largely due to unsatis- 
fied demands for changes in polity. The Afri- 
can Methodist Episcopal and the African 
Methodist Episcopal Zion churches are the 



763 1,017 106,930 I result of secessions of colored men from the 



164 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



Methodist Ep.scopal church nearly a century 
ago. The colored Methodist Episcopal church 
was organized by the Methodist Episcopal 
church South, in 1870. The Evangelical Asso- 
ciation and the United Brethren in Christ are 
of German origin, and are about as old as the 
present century, but they are Methodistic, 
having an itinerancy and other Methodist 
peculiarities. 

MENNONITES. 

C hs. Min. Com. 
Old Mennonites ........... 300 325 65,000 

Amish Mennonites ........ 100 foO 22,000 

Reformed Mennonites.... 20 40 3,000 

New School Mennonitea. ... 90 10,000 



Total .................... 420 605 100,000 

These figures are estimates made by a very 
competent Mennonite. Mennonites baptize 
"penitent believers" by pouring or sprinkling, 
practice close communion, observe feet-wash- 
ing, refuse to take judicial oaths, are non- 
resistants, and use the ban against unworthy 
members. Their bishops, elders or ministers, 
and deacons are chosen by lot. The literal 
ban is not in general use among the Old 
Orthodox Mennonites, nor among the New 
School. The Amish branch and the Reformed 
branch, however, hold strictly to the ban. 
The chief cause of separation between the 
Old Mennonites and the Amish, about A. D. 
1700, was the ban. The chief cause of separa- 
tion of the New School, in 1848, was a deter- 
mination on the part of the New School rep- 
resentatives to enjoy a greater degree of 
worldly conformity, both in doctrine and 
practice, including, of course, also the mat- 
ter of dress, but this was not the chief cause, 
by any means. The doctrine of non-resist- 
ance, an educated ministry, and matters of 
this kind were the questions involved. 
MORAVIANS. 

Cfiis. Min. Com. 
Moravians ................... 98 111 11,219 

The official name of this body is Unitas 
Fratrum. Ecclesiastically, the American is 
one of three provinces, the German and the 
British being the other two. The Moravians 
have bishops, whose functions are spiritual, 
not ecclesiastical. Th y make Christ the cen- 
ter of theology. The American province con- 
sists of two districts the northern and 
southern. 

PRESBYTERIAN. 

Chs. Min. Com. 
Presbyterian, northern.... 6,543 5,789 722,021 

Presbyterian, southern .... 2,280 1,129 156,249 

Presbyterian, Cumberland 2,648 1,584 151,929 
Presbyterian, Cumb'd (col.) 500 200 15,000 
Presbyterian, United ....... 907 753 98,992 

Presbyterian, Ref . (synod). 121 116 10,970 
Welsh Calvinistic ........... 186 99 10,652 

Ass. Ref . synod, south ..... 110 84 7,400 

Reformed (general synod). 54 32 6.800 
Total ...................... 13,349 9,786 1,180,113 

The Presbyterians observed in 1884 the bi- 
centenary of the founding of the first Pres- 
byterian church in the United States by the 
Rev. Francis Makemie. The divisions have 
been caused chiefly by doctrinal differences. 
Some of the bodies represent divisions in 
Scotland. All accept the Westminster con- 
fession of faith save the Cumberland church, 
which was organized near the beginning of 
the present century in the Cumberland val- 
ley. It takes a theological position between 
Calvinism and Arminianism. 

EPISCOPALIANS. 

Chs. Min. Com. 
Protestant Episcopal ...... 5,053* 3,910 450,042 

Reformed Episcopal.. . . . ..106 102 9,600 



The Protestant Episcopal church is the out- 
come of the planting of Anglican churches by 
English colonists in this country. After the 
revolutionary war these churches became in- 
depe dent of the Church of England and or- 
ganized the Protestant Episcopal church, 
which retains the Prayer-Book, the Thirty- 
Nine Articles of the English church, slightly 
changed, and is in close communion with that 
body. In 1873 Assistant Bishop Cummins of 
Kentucky, with a number of other clergymen 
and laymen, organized the Reformed Episco- 
pal church, which accepts in substance the 
Thirty-Nine Articles, adheres to Episcopacy, 
though not as of divine right; retains a liturgy, 
but denies that it is imperative, and rejects 
certain "erroneous doctrines." among which 
is baptismal regeneration and the Real Pres- 
ence. 

REFORMED. 

Chs. Min. Com. 

Reformed (German) 1,512 823 190,527 

Reformed (Dutch) 546 555 87,015 



Total 5,159 4,012 459,642 

*In eluding 2,078 missions. 



Total 2,058 1,378 277,542 

The Reformed church in America and the 
Reformed church in the United States are 
better known as the Reformed (Dutch) 
church and the Reformed (German) church 
respectively. The Dutch church began its his- 
tory in this country with the Dutch immigra- 
tion to this country early in the seventeenth 
century, the German not until a much later 
period. There is only a shade of difference 
between the two bodies doctrinally. The 
symbols of the Dutch church are the confes- 
sion of faith and canons of the synod of 
Dordrecht; also the Heidelberg catechism, 
which is the only symbol of the German 
church. 

ROMAN CATHOLICS. 

Chs. Priests. Pop. 
Roman Catholics 7,424* 7,996 t7,855,294 

*Not including 3,133 chapels and stations. 

tSadlier's Catholic Directory. Largely con- 
jectural. Hoffman's Directory gives 8,157.676. 

The services of the Church of Rome were 
the earliest Christian services held on this 
continent. The fathers were diligent mis- 
sionaries among the Indians from a very 
early date and ministered among Catholic 
colonists, but there was no Catholic bishop 
until after the revolutionary war. The 
church has grown enormously by immigra- 
tion. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Chs. Min. Com. 

Universalists 721 691* 38,780 

New Jerusalem 100 113 6,000 

Unitarians 381 491 f20,000 



Total 1,202 1,295 64,780 

"Including 67 licentiates. fEstimated. 
There are Christadelphians, Plymouth 
Brethren, and other small bodies and a num- 
ber of independent congregations not in- 
cluded under this head. Of Plymouth Breth- 
ren there are perhaps a hundred or more as- 
semblies or societies in this country, with, it 
may be, 5.000 or 6,000 members. There are two 
branches of them, one of which is spoken of 
as the branch of ''Loose" Brethren, because 
they allow liberty of belief as to certain doc- 
trines which the other body of Brethren re- 
gard as vital to Bible religion. The Brethren 
have no church buildings or church property. 
Their meetings are held in halls. They have 
no ordained ministers and no salaried o'fflcials 
of any kind. All are allowed to exercise the 
functions of the ministry who have gifts and 
grace. 





BASE BALL. 


165 


SI 
Chs 
1 Roman Catholics* . 7 424 


ANDING BY DENOMINATIO 
Min. Com. 
7,956 4,438,019 14 Reformed ( 
21,4202,997,794 15 Colored Me 
12.8012 2.154,349 16 Presbyteria 
41,687 1,140,097 17 Presbyteria 
5.789 722,021 18 Methodist 1 
3,263 620,000 19 Evangelical 
4,284 475,608 20 Lutheran G 
3,910 450.042 *We estimat 
2,943 390,000 ; municants on 
2,600 325,000 population, us 
1,162 320,814 statistics have 
840 244,788 communicants 
1,490 204,517 viz.: 1.77. tRe 
ERAL SUMMARY BY FAMII 
1888.- 
Chs. Min. 
1,563 835 


tfS. 
Chs. Min. Com. 
German)... 1,512 823 190,527 
th. Epis'pal 2,016 1,729 165,000 
n (South'n). 2,280 1,153 156,249 
n Cumber'd 2,648 1,584 151,929 
rotestant.. 1,871 1,282 147.503 > 
Assooia'n. 1,916 1,159 141,853 
en. Synod.. 1,337 938 141,631 
e the number of Catholic com- 
the basis of 7,855,294 Catholic 
ng the ratio which Lutheran 
established between souls and 
In the Synodical Conference- 
ally three denominations. 
IBS. 

Com. Chs. Min. ' ConT. 
100,441 1,575 840 100,712 
3,971,685 46,624 32,017 4,078,589 
120,000 1,500 500 120,000 
457,584 4,569 4,284 475,008 
107,968 763 1,017 106,930 
125,000 675 560 125,000 
987,600 6,971 4,151 988,008 
93,009 420 605 100,000 
4,699,529 50,680 29,770 4,723,681 
10,966" 98 111 11,219 
5,750 100 113 6,000 
1,136,685 13,349 9,786 1,180,113 
446,785 5,159 4,012 459,642 
269,523 2,058 1,373 279,542 j 
7,200,000 7,424 7,996 '7,855,294 
20,000 381 491 20,000 ! 
37,807 721 691 38,780 


2 Regular Baptistst 32,900 
3 Methodist Episcopal... 21,361 
4 Meth. Epis'pal South... 11, 432 
5 Presbyterian (North'n) 6,543 
6 Disciples of Christ 6,431 
7 Congregationalists 4,569 
8 Protestant Episcopal.. 5,053 
9 African M. E 3.60C 
10 African M. E. Zion 2,200 
11 Lutheran Synod'l Con. 1,703 
12 Lutheran Gen. Council 1,461 
13 United Brethren 4,451 
GEN 

Adventists 


Baptists 


45 434 30 998 


Christian Union 


I'oOO '500 


Congregationalists 


4404 4090 


Friends 


700 500 


German Evangelical Church.. 


675 560 


Lutherans 


7,992 4,215 




385 605 


Methodists 


48 258 28 313 




' 94 'l08 


New Jerusalem 


95 101 


Presbyterians 


. 13,057 9,585 


Episcopalians 


4.766 3,951 




2028 1 349 




6829 7596 




375 488 


Universalists 


730 677 


Grand total 


138 885 94 457 


9,790,323 142,767 98,322 20,667,318 

j-ball championship took place 
joken were the great center of 
n, and Empire clubs had their 
and a Brooklyn club (Atlantic), 
impionship. In 1861 two picked 
ooklyn clubs, contested for the 
r took away the interest in the 
National club of Washington 
tiei. 
pmentof professional players 
ssional club, took the field, and 
ng a tie with the Troy (N. Y.) 
eld and a series of games pro- 
on of the Base-Ball league on 
for each succeeding year. 
1889. 
CLUBS. WonLost 
Buffalo . . 45 38 


*Catholic population. 




BASE BALL. 
HISTORY OF THE GAME. 
The first series of contests for what may be called the bas( 
during 1857-8 and 1859. At that time the Elysian Fields at Hoi 
base-ball playin^. and here the Knickerbocker, Eagle. Gotha 
contests. A rivalry sprung up, however, between these clubs 
and after seven exciting games the Atlantic club won the chs 
nines, one from the New York clubs and the other from the Br 
" silver ball," and the latter won. The breaking out of the wa 
game, which was not revived until 1866. The next year the 
made a tour to the west playing with clubs in all important ci 
In 1869 the National association first sanctioned the emplo 
by the clubs, and the Cincinnati Red Stockings, the first profe 
out of fifty-seven games played they lost only one, that bei 
club. In 1871 the first convention of professional clubs was h 
vided for. The treat increase of clubs led to the organizati 
the 2d of February, 1876. We give the record of league games 
LEAGUE RECORD FROM 1876 TO 
1876. CLUBS. Won Lost 
CLUBS. Won Lost Indianapolis 24 36 

Chicago . 52 14 Milwank^P If. 45 


Detroit ... 41 43 


Hartford 47 21 


1879. 
Providence 55 23 


Troy 39 45 


St Louis 45 19 


Boston .38 45 




Cleveland 36 48 
Worcester 32 50 


Louisville 30 36 


Boston 49 29 




Chicago 44 32 


1882. 
Chicago 55 29 


Athletic 14 45 


Buffalo 44 32 
Cincinnati 38 36 


1877. 
Boston .31 17 
Louisville 28 20 


Cleveland 24 53 
Trov 19 56 


Providence 52 32 
Buffalo 45 39 


Syracuse 15 27 

1880. 


Boston 45 39 
Detroit 42 41 
Cleveland 42 40 


St.Louis 19 29 
Chicago 18 30 
The Cincinnati club disband- 
ed in June and its games are 
not counted. 


Chicago 67 17 
Providence 52 32 
Cleveland 47 37 
Troy 41 42 
Worcester 40 43 
Boston 40 44 


Troy.'. 35 48 
Worcester 18 66 
1883. 
Boston 63 35 
Chicago 59 39 


1878. 
Boston 41 19 
Cincinnati 37 23 


Buffalo 24 58 
Cincinnati 21 59 
1881. 

Phir-HPTi ? 9S 


Cleveland 55 42 
Buffalo 52 45 
New York 46 50 


Providence 33 27 




Chicago 30 30 Providence 47 37 


Philadelphia 17 81 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



1884. 
CLUBS. 
Providence ......... 

Boston ............. 

Buffalo ............. 

Chicago ............ 

New York .......... 

Philadelphia ....... 

Cleveland .......... 



WonLost 
...84 28 
...73 
...64 



1885. 
Chicago ............. 

New York .......... 

Philadelphia ....... 

Providence ......... 

Boston .............. 

Detroit .............. 

Buffalo ............. 

St. Louis ........... 

1886. 
Chicaeo ............. 

Detroit .............. 

New York .......... 

Philadelphia ....... 

Boston .............. 

St. Louis ............ 

Kansas City ........ 

Washington ........ 



1887. 
CLUBS. WonLost 

Detroit 79 

Philadelphia 75 

Chicago 71 

New York 68 

Boston 61 

Pittsburg 55 

Washington 46 

Indianapolis 37 

1888. 

New York 84 

Chicago 77 

Boston 70 

Philadelphia 69 

Detroit 68 

Pittsburg .66 

Indianapolis 50 

Washington 48 

1889. 

New York 83 

Boston 83 

Chicago 67 

Philadelphia 63 

Pittsburg 61 

Cleveland 61 

Indianapolis 59 

Washington 41 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 

Record of games won by the 
48 several clubs of the American 
50 association since its organiza- 
tion. 



CLUBS. 



St. Louis.... 
Brooklyn... 

Athletic 

Cincinnati.. 
Baltimore . . 



68| Cleveland.;... 
Louisville 
Kansas City . 

4g Metropolitan. 

45 



Pittsburg 

Columbus 



65 Toledo.... 
64 Virginias.... 
71i Indianapolis.. 
""Washington.. 




923765^67,79929488 
40,53,76598894 
. .........76 

-~63 ! 64;80,80!75 
148,7615770 




AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES. 



STATES. 



Location. 



Presidents. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California.... 

Colorado 

Connecticut.. 



Dakota 

Delaware.. 

Florida 

Georgia.... 



Auburn. 
Fayetteville 
Berkeley 
Ft. Collins 
New Haven 



Mansfield.. 
Brookings., 

Newark 

Lake City. 
Athens.. 



Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts.. . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 



Mississippi 

Missouri 

Sebraska 
evada 

New Hampshire. 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina... 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island.... 

South Carolina. . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 



uthbert.... 

Dahlonejra 

Miliedgeville.., 
Thomas ville... 

[Jrbana , 

Lafayette 

Ames. 



W.LeRoy Brown, A. M., LL. D. 

E. H. Murfee, A. M., LL. D. 
Horace Davis, A. B. 

^. L. Ingersoll, M. S. 
r. J. Bush, LL. D. 
B. F. Koons, A. M., Ph. D. 
McLouth, A. M., Ph. D. 

A. N. Raub, A. M., Ph. D. 

F. L. Kern. 

W. E. Boggs, D. D. 

B. T. Hunter, A. M. 
W. S. Basinger, A. M. 
D.H. Hill.LL.D. 



k M. Lov 
. H. Peal 



ejoy. 



W. Virginia 

Wisconsin 



Manhattan 

Lexington 

Baton Rouge 

Orono 

Agricultural College. 

Amherst 

Jamaica Plain 

Lansing 

St. Anthony Park 

St. Anthony Park 

Agricultural College. 

Rodney 

Columbia 

Lincoln 

Reno 

Hanover 

New Brunswick 

Ithaca 

ChapelHill 

Columbus 

Corvallis 

State College 

Providence 

Kingston 

Columbia 

Orangeburg 

Knoxville 

Colle/e Station 

Burlington 

Blacksburg 

Hampton 

Morgantown 

Madison 



eabody, Ph. D., LL. D. 
u.. Smart, LL. D. 
W. I. Chamberlain, LL. D. 
S. F. Fairchild, A. M. 
J. K. Patterson. Ph. D. 
J. W. Nicholson, A. M. 
M. C. Fernald, A. M., Ph. D. 
H. E. Alvord, C. E. 
H. H. Goodell, A. M. 

W. Elliott, LL. D. 
E. Willits, LL. D, 
Cyrus Northrop, LL. D. 
W. W. Pendergast. 
S. D. Lee. 

J. H. Burrus, M. A. 
J.W. Sanborn, B. S. 
I. J. Manatt, Ph. D., LL. D. 
L. D. Brown, A. M., Ph. D. 
S. C. Bartlett, D. D.. LL. D. 
M. E. Gates, Ph. D.,LL. D. 

K. Adams, LL. D. 
K. P. Battle, LL. D. 
W. H. Scott, LL. D. 

B. L. Arnold, A. M. 

G. W. Atherton, LL. D. 

E. G. Robinson, D. D., LL. D. 

C. O. Flagg, B. S. 

J. M. McBryde, Ph. D., LL. D. 

L. M. Dunton, D. D. 

C. W. Dabney, Jr., Ph. D. 

L. L. McInnis,LL. D. 

M. H. Buckham, D. D. 

L. L. Lomax. 

S. C. Armstrong. 

E.M.Turner. LL.D. 

T. C. Chamberlin, LL. D. 



EVENTS OF 1889. 



167 



(Ebents of tfje Hear 1889. 



DOMESTIC. 



JANUARY. 

1. Mississippi river steamer Natchez sunk at 
Lake Providence, Louisiana. 

3. Anarchist Hronek of Chicago sentenced to 

twelve years in the penitentiary for con- 
spiring to assassinate public officers. 

4. Officers and strikers of the Chicago, Bur- 

lington & Quincy come to an agreement. 

6. Heavy rains do considerable damage on 
the New England coast. 

9. A tornado causes great destruction in 
Pennsylvania. Many lives lost. The old 
suspension bridge at Niagara Falls blown 
down. 

12. Fight between the partisans of Ingalls 
and Cimarron, Kas. , in which several are 
killed. 

14. Eight persons are killed and a number in- 
jured at a railroad accident near Tall- 



15. Judge Tuley decides that the Arbeiter 
Bund has a right to meet without molesta- 
tion by the police. 

16. Thirteen White Caps arrested in New 
Hampshire for assaulting a citizen. 

19. Terrible railroad accident on the Chicago 
& Northwestern railroad near Elmwood, 
Mich. Lieut. -Go v. McDonald among the 
killed. 

24. Discovery of the defalcation of Joseph 
Moore, agent of a life-insurance company 
in Indianapolis; $500,000 involved. 
FEBRUARY. 

2. A $3.000,000 fire in Buffalo, N. Y. 

5. Street-car strike in New York declared 

"off." 

6. W. S. Bradley kills himself and his wife in 

this city. 

11. The Rev. E. A. Ashfleld of Memphis, 
Tenn., murdered. 

17. Collapse of the Owings building in this 
city, corner of Adams and Dearborn 



18. Park Central hotel, Hartford, demolished 
by an explosion. Fifty lives lost. Cy- 
clone in Alabama. 

22. The president approves the bill admitting 
four new states. 

25. President Harrison starts from home for 
Washington. Eleven girls killed by an ex- 
plosion in a squib factory in Philadelphia. 

MARCH. 
4. Mr. Harrison inaugurated. 
8. An earthquake shakes eastern portions of 
Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland. 

10. Five French tourists reported to have 
been murdered in the Yellowstone park. 

11. Chicago division of the Wabash road sold 
for $3,500,000. 

15. Mayor Grant of New York decides that 
the Irish nag may be hoisted over the city 
hall. 

20. Violent storms on the Atlantic coast. 

26. Incendiary fire in Chicago destroys 40.000 
chests of tea, valued at $1,250,000. 

30. Fire among the oil tanks at Long Island 
City destroys large quantity of petroleum. 
APRIL. 

1. Carpenters in St. Louis go on a strike 

2. DeWitt C. Cregier elected mayor of Chi- 

cago. 

3. Edwin Booth stricken with paralysis dur- 

ing performance of ' 'Othello'' at Roches- 
ter, N. Y. Prairie fires in Minnesota and 
Dakota destroy much farm property. 

6. Heavy fall of snow in the Potomac and 

Ohio river valleys. 

7. United States ship Pensacola sunk at her 

dock in Portsmouth, Va. 



8. The Chicago and the All Americas ball 
clubs returned to New York from their 
trip around the world. 

10. Four persons killed and four injured by 
wreck of a private car at Joliet. 

11. A Finnish woman, at York Mills, Minn., 
gives birth to six children. 

19. Fire in New York destroys two grain ele- 
vators; loss $3, 000. 000. ' 

22. Great raid across the boundary into Okla- 
homa. 

29, Centennial celebration of the inaugura- 
tion of Washington begun in New York. 
MAY. 

6. Forest fires in the northwest, chiefly In 
Wisconsin and Michigan. 

8. Windstorms general in the northwest. 

10. Three Bald-Knobber murderers hung at 
Ozark, Mo. 

12. Robbers attack a United States paymaster 
in Arizona and take $30,000. 

17. Great and destructive storms in Kansas, 
Illinois, and Wisconsin. 

20. Villages of Clark's Summit and Clark's 
Green, Pa., destroyed by a storm. 

22. The Carter divorce suit decided in favor 
of the husband. 

25. Expedition leaves New York to begin 
work on the Nicaragua canal. 

27. Troops ordered to disperse the Braidwood 
(111.) strikers. 

31. Great rainfalls in the middle states. 
JUNE. 

1. Dam at the reservoir on the Conemaugh 
niver breaks and deluges the entire valley, 
destroying Johnstown and other villages; 
5, 000 lives are lost and millions of prop- 
erty destroyed. 

4. Capt. Schaack of the Chicago police force 

suspended. 
6. Great fire at Seattle, Washington. Loss, 

11. Great storm of rain and wind in New York 
and Brooklyn. 

12. Fire at Grinnell, Iowa, destroys forty-one 
buildings. 

26. Serious accident on the Chesapeake & 
Nashville railroad, near Bledsoe. Ky. 

29. Accident on the Consolidated road in Mas- 
sachusetts. 

JULY. 

1. Joseph C. Mackin released on pardon from 
Joliet. 

6. Labor riots at Duluth. 

8. Fight between Sullivan and Kllrain at 

Richburg. Miss. Seventy-five rounds are 
fought and Sullivan wins. 

9. Cloud-burst near Amsterdam, N.Y.. which 

does much damage. Eight lives were lost. 

10. Strike begun in the Homestead steel mills, 
near Pittsburg, Pa. 

17. Fire in Lowell, Mass., burns a stable with 

120 horses. 
24. Large party of workmen sail for Europe 

to study the industries of the old world. 

Their letters appeared in THE CHICAGO 

DAILY NEWS. 

28. High wind in Chicago crushes a house and 
kills seven persons. 

30. Floods in New Jersey, in which Plainfleld 
is partially destroyed. 

AUGUST. 

1. Destructive floods in Pennsylvania, Mary- 
land, and Virginia. 

5. Entire business portion of Spokane Falls, 

Washington, destroyed by fire. Loss, 

7. J. F. Callens, a Minneapolis lawyer, ar- 

rested for large forgeries. 



168 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 



10. Three attempts made to burn Danbury, 
Conn. Two hotels were fired. 

11. Earthquakes in the Adirondac region, 
New York. 

13. The City of Paris owers the ocean record 
eastward, crossing in 5 days 23 hours and 
44 minutes. 

14. David S. Terry attacks Justice Field at 
Lathrop, Cal., and is shot dead by Deputy 
United States Marshal Nagle. 

16. Justice Field arrested as accessory to the 
killing of Judge Terry and is released. 

17. John L. Sullivan sentenced to twelve 
months' imprisonment at Purvis. Miss., for 
prize-flghting. 

23. One section of Barnum & Bailey's circus 
wrecked near Watertown, N. Y. 

26. A wheat warehouse, forty-two cars, and 
three ships burned at Port Costa.Cal. Stage- 
robbery b v Holzhay in northern Wisconsin. 

28. The City of Paris breaks her own record, 
making the westward trip in 5 days 19 
hours and 18 minutes. 

SEPTEMBER. 

1. Carlisle Graham goes safely over Niagara 
falls in a barrel. 

2. Two Montana towns destroyed by forest 
flres. 

11. Great damage done and many lives lost 
by storms from Sandy Hook to the Chesa- 
peake bay on the Atlantic coast. 

12. Resignation of Commissioner of Pensions 
Tanner accepted by the president. 

14. Bronze statue of Gen. Grant unveiled at 
FortLeavenworth. Kas. 

23. Heavy frosts in Vermont and northern 
New York. 

24. Five persons killed and several injured at 
a needless accident on the Chicago. Rock 
Island and Pacific road, near this city. 

26. Bursting of a blast furnace at the Edgar 
Thomson steel works near Pittsburg 
burns half a dozen men to death. 

27. H. F. Clifford, a Chicago book-keeper, 
becomes an embezzler of $39,000. 

OCTOBER. 

3. Thirty-eight lives lost by blowing up of 
the steamer Corona in the Mississippi. 

7. Knights Templar triennial conclave begins 
in Washington. The next conclave will 
be held in Denver, Col., in 1892. 

13. Dr. Talmage's church in Brooklyn de- 
stroyed by fire. 

15. Accident on the inclined-plane railway at 
Cincinnati kills six persons. 

16. The international marine congress meets 
in Washington. 

21. The South American delegates to the 
Pan-American conference reach Chicago. 
23. Mississippi Valley Wheat-Growers hold a 
ion in St 



convention in St. Louis. 



JANUARY. 



29. American Missionary association meets 
at Chicago. 

31. A fight occurs between the methodists 
and catholics at Axtell, Kas. 

NOVEMBER. 

2. The president issues a proclamation ad- 
mitting North and South Dakota as states 
of the union. 

3. First report of the department of agri- 

culture issued by Secretary Rusk. 

8. Great loss of stock by reason of snow- 

storms in New Mexico. National conven- 
tion of the W. C. T. U. begins in Chicago. 

13. Knights of Labor meet in annual conven- 
tion at Atlanta. Ga. South American dele- 
gates reach Washington. 

18. The United States squadron of evolution, 
consisting of the Chicago. Atlanta, Bos- 
ton, and Yorktown, under command of 
Rear Admiral Walker, leave New York 
for a European cruise. 

26. Great fire in Lynn, Mass. Loss, $10.000.- 
000. National silver convention meets at 
St. Louis. 

27. Supreme court of Illinois decides the Chi- 
cago Gas trust to be illegal. 

28. An 18, 000, 000 fire in Boston. 

30. Burning of the Minneapolis Tribune 
building, in which eight or ten lives are 
lost. 

DECEMBER. 

3. Fifty masked men lynch a barn-burner 

at Marlboro, Md. 

4. Judge David J. Brewer appointed justice of 

the Supreme court. 

9. The Auditorium dedicated. President Har- 

rison makes a speech on the occasion. 

10. False alarm of fire in a Johnstown, Pa. . 
theater creates a panic and twelve are 
killed and many injured. The American 
Federation of Labor meets at Boston. 

12. High floods in the Sacnjnento river, Cal- 
ifornia. 

14. Floods in the Conemaugh river carry 
away bridges and seriously damage 
Johnstown. Pa. 

22. Several persons wounded in a race riot 
at Potts Camp, Miss. 

23. Seventeen men buried under a mass of 
rock in a mine at Angel's Camp, Cal. 

25. Race riot at Jesup. Ga. Several negroes 
were killed and two whites. Another race 
riot in progress at Barnesville, Ga. The 
usual result: "Several negroes shot." 
White Cap outrages near Concordia, Kas. 

26. Great windstorm in eastern states. 

27. ' 'La Grippe" reaches Chicago and many 
persons are down with the influenza. 

29. Great flre in Houghton, Mich., in which 
eleven persons perish. 



FOREIGN. 



2. Brig S. B. Horton burned at sea. 

3. Eight persons killed by an earthquake in 

Nicaragua. 

4. Edward Harrington and Mr. Finucane, 

members of parliament, sent to jail. 

10. Great fire in Paris. 

14. Emperor William opens the landtag. 
Duel between M. Lassagarny and M. 
Rochefort, in which both are wounded. 

16. Letter from Stanley, dated Aug. 17, 1888, 
received in Brussels. 

27. Gen. Boulanger elected deputy by a plu- 
rality of 81. 550. 

29. Daniel Sheehy, member of parliament, 
sentenced to six months' imprisonment 
under the crimes act. William O'Brien 
arrested in Manchester. 



FEBRUARY. 

4. The Panama Canal company dissolved. 

6. Riotous Chinese wreck the British consu- 
late at Chmg-Kang-Foo. Prince Alex- 
ander marries Marie Loisinger. 

8. Theater Royal at Aldershot burned. 

11. Constitution of the Japanese empire is 
proclaimed. 

21. Parliament reassembles. 

22. The new French cabinet received with 
disfavor. 

23. Chili prohibits Chinese immigration. 

26. Escape of Pigott, the witness in the 
Times-Parnell case. 

27. Wreck of a train at St. George, Canada; 
ten killed and thirty injured. 



EVENTS OF 1889. 



169 



MARCH. 

1. Pigott commits suicide in Madrid, Spain. 

2. The pope celebrates his 79th birthday. 

6. King Milan of Servia abdicates in favor of 
his son, who ascends the throne as Alex- 
ander I. 

7. Dr. Tanner, member of parliament, sent 

to jail for three months under the crimes 

act. 
14. Government of Newfoundland deny 

American fishermen the right to buy bait. 
20. Von Tisza, prime minister of Hungary, 

pelted with stones in leaving chamber of 

deputies. 

23. A French torpedo-boat founders off Cher- 
bourg; fifteen lost. 
29. Hurricane at Samoa wrecks the Vandalia, 

Trenton, and Nipsic; loss, four officers 

and fifty seamen. 

APRIL. 

1. Letter from Stanley, dated Sept. 4, 1888, 
received at Edinburgh. 

3. The Roumanian ministry resigns. 
12. Trial of Gen. Boulanger begun. 

19. Nihilist plot to blow up the czar discov- 
ered. 

25. Prince Ferdinand announced as heir to 
the Roumanian throne. 

26. The Weldon extradition bill passed by the 
Canadian senate. 

27. The American Samoan commissioners 
call on Prince Bismarck. 

28. Limited express on Grand Trunk railroad 
flies the track near Hamilton. Canada, 
and eighteen persons are burned to death 
and twenty injured. 

29. Deliberations of the Berlin Samoan con- 
ference begin. 

MAY. 

2. Canadian parliament prorogued. 

3. Mr. Conybeare, M. P., sentenced to three 
months' imprisonment under the crimes 
act. 

5. Centennial of the French revolution cele- 

brated at Versailles. 

6. Paris exposition opened by President Car- 
not. 

9. Seventy thousand miners in Westphalia 

strike. 
14. Emperor William addresses the strikers. 

16. Great fire in Quebec; 700 houses burned. 

17. Widespread plot against the czar discov- 
ered. 

23. The shah of Persia is the guest of the 

czar in St. Petersburg. 
31. Gen. Hyppolite captures Port-au-Prince 

and proclaims himself president. 

JUNE. 

. Donovan wins the Derby. 
. Treaty between Mexico and Japan ratified. 
9. The shah reaches Berlin. Statue of Bruno 
unveiled in Rome. 

12. Railroad accident at Armagh. Ireland. 
Seventy-two killed and 100 injured. 

13. Ten thousand persons lose their lives at a 
fire in Suchow, in China. 

14. Berlin Samoan agreement signed by the 
commissioners. 

17. Fire in Montreal burns over seventeen 
acres of buildings. 

23. Peace congress opens in Paris. 

24. Marriage of Prince Frederick Leopold and 
Princess Louise of Schlesing is celebrated. 
The shah arrives in Brussels. 

JULY. 

1. Emperor William leaves Kiel for a trip to 

Norway. Shah reaches London. 

2. International Sunday school convention 

opens in London. Alexander anointed 
king of Servia. Norwegian ministry re- 
signs. 



3. Three hundred miners intombed at St. 
Etienne, France. 

8. Emperor William narrowly escapes being 
killed by a falling glacier in Norway. 

13. Empress Augusta Victoria embraces Ro- 
man Catholicism. 

15. International Socialistic congress opens 
in Paris. 

18- Two hundred houses burned in Constan- 
tinople. 

20. Parnell presented the freedom of the city 
of Edinburgh. 

25. Mr. and Mrs. Gladstone celebrate their 
golden wedding. 

27. Marriage of Princess Louise of Wales and 
the duke of Fife is celebrated. A plot to 
blow up the Vatican and quirinal discov- 
ered in Rome. 

30. The shah reaches Paris. 
AUGUST. 

1. Emperor William arrives in England. 

3. Gen. Grefell attacks the Egyptian dervish 
army and routs it. The czar declines to 
hold a conference with the German and 
Austrian emperors. 

7. Mrs. Maybrick found guilty of murdering 
her husband. 

12. Emperor Francis Joseph of Austria 
reaches Berlin. 

13. Emperor of Italy confers a decoration on 
Thomas A. Edison. 

14. Boulanger sentenced to be deported. 
20. Ex-King Malietoa returns to Samoa. 

22. Mrs. Maybrick's sentence commuted to 

penal servitude for life. 
24. Legitime leaves Hayti. Great strike of 

dock men in London. 
30. British parliament prorogued. Island of 

Crete occupied by Turkish forces. 
SEPTEMBER. 

2. William O'Brien taken to jail to serve out 
his sentence. 

6. Explosion in a cartridge factory at Ant- 
werp kills 200 persons and injures 3''0. 

13. Elections in Brazil result in the return of 
95 liberals and 30 opposition members. 

14. London strike ends. Riot at Navassa and 
four Americans killed. 

16. Malietoa returns to power in Samoa. 

a 9. An avalanche of rocks and earth crushes 
a number of buildings and kills thirty per- 
sons in Quebec. 

22. Business portion of Kensington, P. E.I., 
burned. 

26. Paris commission declares the votes cast 
for Boulanger to be null and void. 

28. Thomas A. Edison decorated in"Paris with 
the cross of the Legion of Honor. 

30. Ex-Queen Natalie visits her son, King 

Alexander. 

OCTOBER. 
1. An infernal machine found in the royal 

palace at Genoa. 
10. The czar lands at Kiel. 
14. Malietoa declines to be king of Samoa. 
16. Cunard steamer Malta wrecked near 

Land's End. 
22. The reichstag opened. Central American 

congress approves the basis for a union of 

Central American States. Work on the 

Nicaragua canal begun. 

27. Princess Sophie of Russia and the crown 
prince of Greece married at Athens. 

28. Marriage of Miss Huntingdon to Prince 
Hatzfeldt takes place at Brompton, En- 
gland. 

NOVEMBER. 
1. Fifty women and six girls caught under a 

falling wall in a Glasgow carpet factory 

and lose their lives. 
3* Emperor William entertained at a banquet 

by the sultan. 
6. Paris exposition closes. 



170 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



15. Revolution in Brazil results in overthrow 
of the empire and establishment of a re- 
public with Gen. Fonseca at its head. 

16. Statue of William III. unveiled at Bel- 
fast; 30,000 Orangemen present. 

19. Queen Victoria invites Dom Pedro, ex- 
emperor of Brazil, to be her guest. 

22. Republics of Uruguay and the Argentine 
Confederation recognize the new United 
States of Brazil. 

25. Plot to dethrone King Alexander of Servia 
discovered. 

29. France recognizes the United States of 
Brazil. 

DECEMBER. 

3. Dom Pedro reaches Portugal. The presi- 
dent of Nicaragua signs the treaty of 



union between the five Central Americar 
republics. With the signature of CosU 
Rica the union is complete. 

5. Emin Bey falls from a balcony In Baga 

moyo and fractures his skull. 

6. Stanley arrives at Zanzibar. 

7. The new government of Brazil Issues a de- 

cree proclaiming a provisional federal re- 
public. The United States eclipse expedi- 
tion arrives at St. Paul de Loando, Africa 
Dom Pedro and family reach Lisbon. 

9. Dom Pedro declares he has no intention ol 

abdicating the throne of Brazil. The 
French chamber of deputies invalidate 
the election of Boulanger. 

10. The Swiss federal assembly elect M.Louis 
Ruchonnet president of the republic. 



JANUARY. 



1. Col. JohnC. Dent, brother of Mrs. Grant, 

at Carthage. Mo. 
7. The Very Rev. James Croke, at New 

York. 
10. Father Garazzi, the ally and friend of 

Garibaldi, in Italy. 



NECROLOGY. 

27. J. W. Johnson, ex-United States senator, 
at Richmond, Va ; the Rev. Dr. William 
Thompson, Hartford Theological semi 
nary, at Hartford, Conn. 

28. Col. Silas dispin, U. S. A., at New York 

MARCH. 



11. Prof. Charles S. Stone of Cooper union, 
at New York. 

13. Andrew Paxton, reformer, at Chicago; 
Mrs. Jay Gould, at New York; Prof .Alex- 
ander T, McGill of Princeton Theolog- 
ical seminary, at Princeton. N. J. 

14. The Rev. George C.Noyes,D.D., at Evans- 
ton, 111. 

15. Luther Laflin Mills, Sr. t old resident of 
Chicago, at Chicago. 

17. Perry S.Westfall, editor, at Terre Haute, 
Ind.; Mai. -Gen. C. P. Herring, at Phila- 
delphia; Joel Henry Wells, at Chicago. 

20. Isaac Bell, Jr., noted republican poli- 
tician, at New York. 

23. Alexander Cabanel, distinguished French 
artist, at Paris; Prof. Wilhelm Schott, 
great orientalist, at BerUn. 

27. Augustus B. Cazauran, journalist, at 
New York; Khanh, king of Anam, at 
Hue. 

28. Antoine Carterret, leader of Swiss radi- 
cals, at Geneva. 

29. George L. Phillips, well-known Chicago 
man, at Chicago; Mrs. Amy Kirby Post, 
noted abolitionist, female - suffragist, 
and spiritualist, at Rochester, N. Y. * 

30. Crown Prince Rudolph of Austria com- 
mits suicide near Vienna; John M. Clay- 
ton, assassinated at Plummerville, Ark. 

31. James B. Lamkin, artist, at Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

FEBRUARY. 

I. N. C. Claiborne, prominent Missourian, at 

St. Louis. 

3. S. M. Hibbin. journalist, at Wabash, Ind. 
: . WJlliam M. Merrick, judge Supreme court 

of District of Columbia, at Washington. 
5. William Knabe of piano fame, at Aiken, 

S. C. 
10. Thomas M. Nichol, "Honest Money, "at 

New York. 

II. Rear Admiral Ralph Chandler, U. S. N., 
at Hong Kong, China. 

12. John Mattocks, prominent lawyer, at Chi- 

14. Edwin Wells, chief engineer, U. S. N., 
commits suicide at Shanghai, China. 

20. Franz Mendelssohn, great German bank- 
er, at Berlin. 

21. Dr. D. W. Bliss. Garfleld's physician, and 
Dr. Francis Wharton, solicitor of state 
department, at Washington; P.V. Hickey, 
journalist, at Brooklyn, N. Y. 

26. John S. Lee, prominent citizen of Peoria, < 
111., at Washington-.George E. Kilbourne, 
wealthy citizen of Keokuk, at New York. 



1. Pigot, perjurer in the Parnell-Times case, 
commits suicide at Madrid, Spain. 

5. Miss Mary L. Booth, editor of Harper's 
Bazar, at New York. 

7. Isaiah V. Williamson, philanthropist, at 

Philadelphia; George H.Williamson, phi- 
lanthropist, at Baltimore. 

8. John Ericsson, inventor, at New York; 

G. B. Docharty, mathematician, at Hemp- 
stead, N. Y. 

12. F. W. Dawson, editor News and Courier, 
assassinated by Dr. McDow at Charleston, 
S. C. 

13. Rear Admiral John L. Davis, U. S. N., at 
Washington. Admiral James, French min- 
ister of marine, at Paris. J. A. Campbell, 
ex-justice United States Supreme court, at 
Baltimore. 

14. H. C. Morey, real-estate operator, at Chi- 
cago. The Hon. M, W. Field, original 
greenbacker of Michigan, at Chicago. 

18. Samuel Carter Hall, F.S. A., distinguished 
litterateur, at London. William Garrard, 
first maker of tool steel in this country, at 
Fallston, Pa. 

19. Col. F. S. Pinckney, writer and journal- 
ist, at Jacksonville, Fla. 

20. Sir Thomas Gladstone, brother of William 
E. Gladstone, in Scotland. 

22. Stanley Matthews, justice of the Supreme 
court, at Washington. 

23. Gen. W. F. Tilton at Newtonville, Mass. 
27. John Bright, the English statesman. The 

duke of Buckingham and Chandos. Peter 
Paul Mahoney at Brooklyn. 
31. John A. Duff, theatrical manager, at New 



York. 



APRIL. 



I. John H. Pope, Canadian minister of rail- 

roads and canals, at Ottawa. 
2! Alexander McCue, ex-solicitor of the 
United States treasury, at New York. 

3. H. W. Richardson, editor, at Portland. Me. 

4. The Rev. Asa Mahon, ex-president of Ober- 

lin (O. ) college, at Eastbourne. England. 

8. Prof. B. H. Kennedy, professor of Greek 

at Cambridge university, at Cambridge, 
England. 

9. M. E. Chevreul. noted French chemist, at 

Paris. Rear Admiral T. H. Patterson, 
U. S. N., retired, at Washington. 

10. Gen. Francis F. Miller, soldier in the late 
war, at New York. The Rev.J.Damien de 
Venster, ' ' the leper priest, " at Molokai, 

II. Col'. Edward Hatch, 9th cavalry, U. S. A., 
at Fort Robinson, Neb. Solomon Moloney, 
well-known citizen of this city. 

13. John P. Usher, secretary of the interior 



EVENTS OF 1889. 



171 



under Mr. Lincoln, at Philadelphia. Rear 
Admiral W. R. Taylor, U. S. N., at Wash- 
ington. 

14. S. B Chittenden. financier and ex-con- 

fressman. at New York. Charles K. Gra- 
am, distinguished federal officer, at Lake- 
wood, N. J. 

15. Charles F Hatch, railroad officer, com- 
mits suicide at Minneapolis. 

16. Louis Ulbach, renowned French journal- 
ist, at Paris. 

17. Gen. Samuel K. Dawson. U. S. A., re- 
tired at Orange. N. J. Col. E. P. Nettel- 
ton, a federal soldier, at Boston. 

19 The Rev. Dr. Bradford Pierce, noted di- 
vine and writer, at Newton. Mass. 

21. IgnacioAlas, Mexican consul this city, at 
Chicago. Sebastian Lerdo de Tegada, 
ex-president of Mexico, at New York. 

25. Elijah M. Haines, ex-speaker lower 
house of Illinois assembly, at Waukegan. 

30. Hon. W. H. Barnum, chairman demo- 
cratic national committee, at Lime Rock, 
Conn. Carl Rosa, distinguished musician, 
at Paris. David G. Craty, well-known 
journalist, at New York. 
MAY. 

2. Robert W. Wen, ex-professor United 

States Military academy, at New York. 

3. Herr Myers, largest ivory importer in the 

world, at Kiel. 

7. Count Demetrius Tolstoi, distinguished 
Russian nobleman, at St. Petersburg. 

9. Gen. William Harney. oldest officer in the 
service, at Orlando. Fla. He was appoint- 
ed lieutenant by President Monroe. 

14. Dr. Samuel Hirsch, prominent Jewish re- 
former, at Chicago. 

15. Rear Admiral Edward Donaldson, U. S. 
N., at Baltimore. W. W. Harding, pro- 
prietor of the Inquirer, at Philadelphia. 
Gen. A. Anderson, prominent railroad 
man of New York, commits suicide at 
Philadelphia. 

16. Allen Thorndike Rice, minister to Russia, 
at New York. Queen Mary of Bavaria at 
Munich. 

17. Earl of Malmsburg, ex-keeper of the 
privy seal, at London. 

21. Guy C. Noble, prominent lawyer and pol- 
itican, at St. Albans, Vt. 

23. Samuel Lord, merchant prince, at New 
York. 

24. Laura Bridgeman, noted blind-and-deaf 
mute, at Boston. George Henry Calvert, 
great grandson of Lord Baltimore, founder 
of Maryland, and a distinguished citizen 
of Rhode Island, at Newport. 

25. Henry Smith, oldest soldier in the United 
States service ;he entered the army in 1837. 
The Rev. James H. Harding, founder of 
reformatories for boys, at New Haven, Ct 

JUNE. 

4. F. Broughton, ex-general manager Great 

Western railway of Canada. 
6. Mrs. Charles Francis Adams, at Quincy, 



8. Col. C. C. Langdon, secretary of state Ala- 

bama, at Mobile. 

9. Leonard Swett, noted lawyer, at Chicago. 
13. The Rev. W. N. Scholl, D. D., oldest 

Lutheran minister, at Canajoharie, N. Y. 

16. The Rev. P. K. Donohoe, one of the old- 
est priests at Milwaukee. J. M. Gamble, 
a well-known citizen, at Chicago. 

17. John Gilbert, the actor, at Boston. The 
Rev. William Hosmer, famous anti-slavery 
agitator, at Auburn, N. Y. 

19. Elisha Packer, railroad magnate, at New 
York. 

20. Gen. A. C. Myers, late Q. M. G. of con- 
federate army, at Washington. 

21. Mrs. Lucy Webb Hayes, wife of ex-Presi- 
dent Hayes, at Fremont, O. Geo. H. Purser. 



proprietor New York Daily News, at New 
York. 

23. The Rev. W. H. Beecher, eldest son of 
Henry Ward Beecher, at Chicago. 

24. Judge E. S. Leland, noted lawyer, at Ot- 
tawa. 111. The Hon. F. E. Bryant, demo- 
cratic politician, at Bement, 111. Roland 
G. Mitchell, the author. 

25. James B. Sheridan, once Senator Douglas' 
private secretary, at New York. Geo. L. 
Brown, painter, at Maiden, Mass. 

28. Maria Mitchell, noted astronomer, at 
Lynn, Mass. Carlotta Patti, noted singer, 
at Paris. Col. A. M. Saxton, wealthy cit- 
izen of Missouri, at St. Joseph, Mo. 

29. Abram Wakeman, contemporary of Sew- 
ard, Greeley, Weed, and Raymond in or- 

finizing the republican party, at New 
ork.- Mary A. Brigham, president Mount 
olyoke seminary, killed in railroad acci- 
dent. 

JULY. 

1. Ex-President T. D. Woolsey of Yale col- 

lege, at New Haven, Conn. John Hanks, 
relative and associate of Lincoln, near De- 
catur, 111. 

3. William Nelson (D'Alvini), famous juggler, 

at Chicago. 

5. Charles W. Sanders, educator and writer, 

at New York. John Norquay, ex-premier 
of Manitoba, at Winnipeg. 
8. Stephen Wicks, writer of note, at New 
York. Herbert A. Pearsons, capitalist, 
drowned at Chicago. 

10. S. L. M. Barlow, able lawyer, at Glen 
Cove, N. Y. Mrs. Julia G. Tyler, wife of 
ex-President Tyler, at Richmond, Va. 

13. Robert Humerling, German poet. 

14. The Hon. A. N. Cole, known as the 
"Father of the Republican Party, '' at 
Wellsville, N. Y. 

16. Col. Joseph C. Tiffany, well known in 
New Mexico. Arizona, and Colorado as an 
active business man, at Dem ing, N. M. 
Michal Amari, Italian statesman, at Flor- 
ence. 

19. Count Leo Schwab, known as "The Sol- 
dier's Friend, " at Beachmont, Mass. 

20. Prof. Alexander Johnston of Princeton, 

22. Frank M. Brown, railroad president, 

drowned in Colorado river. 
31. E. H. Rollins, ex-United States senator 

from New Hampshire, at Isle of Shoals, 

AUGUST. 

4. George Z. Gray, eminent divine of Cam- 
bridge Mass. Hiram Leland of Spring- 
field, at New York. 

5. Fannie Lewald, novelist. 

6. Cardinal William Massaia, at Naples. 

8. Gen. Henry Du Pont, soldier and manu- 
facturer, at Wilmington, Del. James R. 
Doolittle of board of education, at Chicago. 

11. Judge Rollins S. Williamson of the Chi- 
cago bench, at Chicago. 

13. W. H. Newton, inventor, at Superior, 
Wis. 

15. Prof. Elias Loomis, mathematician, at 
New Haven, Conn. 

18. Congressman Laird of Nebraska. 

22. Maj. J. B. Davis, well known in this city, 

at Chicago. 

25. Henry Shaw, philanthropist, at St. Louis. 
27. Granny Boston, aged 121. revolutionary 

pensioner, atMurpJiy, N. C. 
29. George Fawcett Rowe, noted actor, at 

New York. 

SEPTEMBER. 

2. Samuel Austin Allebone, distinguished 
scholar and writer, at Luzerne, Switzer- 
land. 

4. Daniel D. Lloyd, dramatic writer, at New 
York. 

6. H. W. Garrett, railroad magnate. 



172 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



9. A. M. ("Tony") Delight, evangelist, at 
Chicago. 

10. The Hon. Samuel S. Cox, congressman, 
at New York. 

11. Charles III., prince of Monaco. 

12. A. E. Tonzalin. railroad president, at 
Bennington, Vt. Capt. John Rees and W. 
H. Cilley, both well known in this city, at 
Chicago. 

16. Prince Gunther of Schwarzburg, at Ber- 
lin. 

18. Dr. Louis Maas, famed pianist and com- 
poser, at Jamaica Plain, Mass. Mrs. Eliz- 
abeth S.McClellan, mother of Gen. George 
B. McClellan. at Drifton. Pa. 

20. Edwin P. Wilse, well-known citizen of 
Chicago, at this city. 

23. Commodore Joseph Beale. U. S. N.. at 
Philadelphia. Wilkie Collins, tine novel- 
ist, at London. 

25. Eliza Cook, English authoress, at Wim- 
bledon. Gen. D. H. Hill, writer and sol- 
dier, at Charlotte, N. C. Father Joseph 
P. Boles of St. Mary's parish, this city, at 
Chicago. George T. Simmons, well- 
known citizen, at Chicago. 

27. Judge John T. Nixon. United States Cir- 
cuit court judge, at Trenton, N. J. 

29. Col. W. S. Scribner, recorder of Cook 

county, at Chicago. 

). W. P". Dole. Indian commissioner under 
Lincoln, at Washington, D. C. 

OCTOBER. 

2. Ex.-Gov. John A. Martin of Kansas. 
George Buck, well-known citizen, at Chi- 
cago. 

4. Gen. A. P. Blunt. U. S. A., at Manches- 
ter, N. H. Gen. J. T. Averill, prominent 
citizen of St. Paul, at home. 

7. Jules Dupre, greatest French artist, at 
Paris. 

10. James W. Reedy, well-known manu- 
facturer, at Chicago. 

13. Gen. H. D. Clayton, president university 
of Alabama, at Tuscaloosa. 

15. N. W. Nutting, member of congress, at 
Oswego, N. Y. E. A. Perry, ex-governor 
of Florida, at Kerrville. 

17. Gen. John F. Hartranft, ex-governor of 
Pennsylvania, at Norristown. 

19. JohnCrerar, millionaire and philanthro- 
pist, at Chicago. 

20. Benjamin T. Babbitt, soap manufacturer, 
at New York. Prince William of Wer- 
temberg assassinated. Luis I., king of 
Portugal. 

22. Earl of Orkney. Earl of Leoni and Mel- 
ville. 

25. James M. Hill, popular citizen, at Chica- 
go. Emil Augier, celebrated dramatist, at 
Paris. 

27. William Henderson, theatrical manager, 
at Stockbridge. Mass. 

NOVEMBER. 

1. Libartus Van Bokkelen, divine, educator, 
and reformer, at Buffalo. 

3. Bradley Barlow, politician and banker, at 

Denver, Col. 

6. Viscount Falmouth. 

7. Marie, wife of Prince Alexander of Bat- 

tenberg. atGratz. 
10. Gen. Thomas Francis Banke. prominent 
in Irish circles, at New York. William 
Warren, insurance man, at Lake Forest, 
111. 

13. Earl of Montcashel. 

14. W. N. H. Smith, chief justice of North 
Carolina, at Raleigh. 

16. Sir Samuel Morton Peto, famous English 
financier, at London. 

18. Lewis C. Cassidy. most prominent lawyer 
in Philadelphia, at that city. 



19. H. B. (Buffalo) Miller, ex-county treas- 
urer of Cook county, at Chicago. 

25. George H. Pendletbn, statesman and dip- 
lomat, at Brussels. 

26. A. T. C. Pearson, one of the most promi- 
nent masons in the country, at St. Paul. 

29. Martin Farquhar Tupper, poet and philos- 
opher, at London. 

DECEMBER. 

1. Cyrus Fillmore. brother of ex-President 
Fillmore. at LaGrange, Ind. 

2. Isaac L. Milliken, ex-mayor of this city, at 
Chicago. 

4. Gen. S. R. Smith, one of the best-known 
citizens of Connecticut, at New Haven. 

6. Jules Fleury-Husson. French journalist, 

at Paris. Jeff Davis at New Orleans. 
George Suydam, singer and musician, at 
Belvidere. N. J. 

7. Gen. Israel Vogdes. distinguished officer 

D. S. A. (retired), at New York. Fran- 
cesco Soto-Villamizai, noted capitalist of 
the United States of Colombia, at New 
York. 

8. Samson Wallach, Jewish philanthropist, at 

New York. 

9. Col. J. H. Rathbone. founder of the order 

of Knights of Pythias, at Lima, O. W. 
J. Allen, professor University of Wiscon- 
sin, at Madison. 

10. Oliver Johnson, prominent journalist and 
abolitionist, at Brooklyn, N. Y. Eliz- 
abeth Scott Lord, sister of Mrs. Harrison, 
at Washington. 

11. Gen. David Atwood, editor State Journal, 
at Madison, Wis. James A. Gray, oldest 
piano manufacturer, at Albany, N. Y. 

12. Edward U. Diekenson, noted patent law- 
yer, at Crest Wave, N. Y. O. R. Kings- 
bury, treasurer American Tract society, 
at New York. Andrew J. Denison, prom- 
inent citizen, at Chicago. Robert Brown- 
ing, the poet, at London. 

15. Carl Formes, once greatest basso In the 
world, at New York. 

18. Solomon Austrian, of the firm of Aus- 
trian, Wells & Co., at Chicago. W. S. 
Harrison, nephew of the president, con- 
nected with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. 
Paul railway, at River Forest, 111. 

19. Alonzo E. Stoddard, well-known opera 
singer, at B9ston. M. B. Kearney, prom- 
inent politician, at Chicago. 

20. Alfred Cowles, for twenty-five years busi- 
ness manager of the Tribune, at Chicago. 

21. T. J. Whipple, well-known lawyer and 
Mexican veteran, in New Hampshire. 

22. Elton A. Fay, well-known chemist of this 
city, at New York. Ex-Congressman O. 
B. Mattison of New York, at Utica. 

23. Henry W. Grady, journalist and orator, 
at Atlanta, Ga. Edward T. Waite, son of 
ex-Chief Justice Waite of Toledo, at 
Washington. 

24. Henry W. Austin, millionaire and prom- 
inent citizen, at Oak Park. William Law- 
horn, one of the oldest settlers in north- 
ern Illinois, at Lena, 111. 

24. Henry D. Wallen. ex-superintendent 
Pittsburg, Fort Wayne & Chicago Rail- 
way, at New York. Jack Sanders, noted 
pugilist, at Louisville, Ky. 

26. Charles J. Wicker, resident of Chicago 
since 1839, at Tallahassee, Fla Mrs. 
George H. Thomas, widow of the late 
Gen. George H. Thomas, at Washington. 
Mrs. Rodgers, wife of Rear Admiral G.R. 
P. Rodgers, U. S. N., at Washington. 
Count Aloys Karolyi. Austrian diplomat, 
at Pressburg, Hungary. 

28. Theresa, wife of Dom Pedro, ex-emperor 
of Brazil, at Operto. Portugal. 



EVENTS OF 



173 



EVENTS IN THE CRONIN CASE. 
A chronological review of the incidents of that now celebrated murder. 



FEBRUARY. 

20. J. B. Siraonds, or Williams, rents the 
rooms at 117 South Clark street. 

21. The furniture is purchased at Revell's. 

MARCH. 

20. Williams vents the cottage at 1872 Ash- 
land avenue. 

22. The furniture arrives at the cottage. 

APRIL. 
20. Williams pays another month's rent for 

the cot tape. 

26. Iceman O'Sullivan makes his peculiar con- 
tract with Dr. Cronin. 
MAY. 

4. Detective Coughlin, at 10 a. m., orders the 
rig for his "friend.'' At 7:15 the "friend" 
leaves Dinan's livery stable, 260 North 
Clark street, with the white-horse rig. At 
7:20 the ' "friend" calls for Dr. Cronin at 
470 North Clark street and drives him 
away. At 8:15 the buggy arrives at the 
Carlson cottage. Between 8: 15 and 9 Dr. 
Cronin meets his death. At 9:15 Cough- 
lin r s ' 'friend" returns the white-horse-rig 
to the livery stable. 

5. At 2 a. m. two Lake View policemen see 

the wagon which contained the trunk. At 
11 a. m. the bloody trunk is found at 
Evanston road and Sulzer street. At 2 
p. m. the Conklins report Dr. Cronin's dis- 
appearance at the East Chicago avenue 
station. 

6. At 10 a. m. Liveryman Dinan meets Cough- 

lin and Schaack. Coughlin at once makes 
his appeal for silence. The latter says he 
will investigate. 

10. Miss Annie Murphy states she saw Dr. 
Cronin in a street car at about 9 o'clock of 
the night of the murder. Frank Wood- 
ruff, alias Black, arrested. Reporter Long 
claims he met Dr. Cronin in Toronto. 

11. Long sends the Cronin dispatches to the 
papers. 

13. A "prominent" railroad official sees Dr. 
Cronin in Toronto. 

16. The St. Catharines (Canada) chief of po- 
lice sees Cronin in Sherwood, N. Y. 

17. Pat Egan and Father O'Reilly denounce 
the action of Cronin's friends in claiming 
that he was murdered. 

18. Detective Simmons telegraphs that Cronin 
was not in Toronto. 

20. Cronin's friends offer a big reward. 

22. Cronin's body is found in a catch-basin cor- 
ner of 59th place and Evanston avenue by 
Henry Rosch. It is subsequently identi- 
fied by his friends. 

24. The "Maj." Sampson story made public. 
Discovery of the cottage 1872 Ashland 
avenue. Alexander Sullivan publicly ac- 
cused of misappropriating Clan-na-Gael 
funds. 

25. Dan Coughlin is locked up at the armory 
station. Dinan's horse and buggy fully 
identified . Detective Michael Whelan sus- 
pended on suspicion. Woodruff, upon 
Coughlin's arrest, refuses to talk to any- 
body. 

26. At 2 a. m. King is arrested on suspicion 
of being the man mentioned by Woodruff. 
Willard J. Smith appears on the scene; 
he says he is a friend of Coughlin, but he 
did not hire the white-horse rig. Dr. Cronin 
buried in Calvary cemetery. 

27. Dan Coughlin sent to the county jail 
without bail on a charge of murder. P. 
O'Sullivan, the iceman, also held on the 
same charge but kept at Lake View sta- 
tion during the day. 

28. Coughlin, Woodruff, and O'Sullivan in- 



dicted by the grand jury for Dr. Cronin's 
murder. The coroner's jury visits the 
scenes of the crime and adjourns one day. 
Frank Woodruff makes a confession (?). 

29. The coroner's jury adjourns until Mon- 
day. Full exposure of the bogus Toronto 
interviews. Revelations, about the expe- 
ditions of Dr. Gallagher, Daly, and Lomas- 
ney to England and their betrayal. 

30. P. O'Sullivan's house and-barn searched. 
The books of the Traders' bank to be ex- 
amined. 

31. P. O'Sullivan, Frank Woodruff, and Dan 
Coughlin arraigned before Judge William- 
son. All policemen of Irish extraction 
taken off the case. 

JUNE. 

1. Frank Woodruff begins to write a book. 
Le Caron declares Cronin was not a spy. 
Hakan Martinson, the expressman, found 
by the police. 

2. Alexander Sullivan's speculations through 

J. T. Lester & Co. exposed. 

3. The united Irish societies vote to send 
funds direct to Parnell instead of turning 
them over to the ' 'burial committee" of the 
Clan-na-Gael. The executive of the Clan- 
na-Gael made public. Inquest resumed; 
Mrs. Conklin, Frank T. Scanlan, employes 
of A. H. Kevell & Co., Patrick Dinan, the 
liveryman; Jonas Carlson, Justice Maho- 
ney, and John J. Cronin testify. 

4. At the inquest Capt. Schaack tells Wood- 

ruff's contradictory stories and is sus- 
pended; Capt. Wing of Lake View and the 
medical experts who conducted the post- 
mortem testify. 

5. At the inquest Byron L. Smith gives Alex- 

ander Sullivan's account with the 
Traders' bank; Patrick McGarry tells of 
Dr. Cronin's expulsion by camp 96 (20) 
and exposes the Clan-na-Gael ; Alexander 
Sullivan named by a number of witnesses 
as the person from whom Dr. Cronin 
feared death. 

6. Alexander Sullivan's speculations with 
J. T. Lester & Co. reviewed before the 
coroner's jury. Senior Guardian John 
F. Beggs' record in Cleveland exposed. 
Beggs tells at the inquest of meeting 
Starkey in New York May 14. Capt. T. F. 
O'Connor explains why he refused to go 
on a ' 'foreign mission." 

7. Luke Dilldn testifies. Alexander Sullivan's 

protest to the executive committee made 
public. Lawyer A. S. Trude comes to 
Alexander Sullivan's defense and admits 
that Sullivan obtained $100, 000 tempora- 
rily from Patrick Egan in Paris. 

8. A letter from Dr. Cronin denouncing Le 

Caron in 1886 read before the jury. Mc- 
Geehan, No. 1 of his Philadelphia camp, 
examined. John Moss shows the power 
of the inner circle over life and death. 
Martinson, the expressman, tells his story. 
John F. Beggs is expelled from the Clan- 
na-Gael. 

9. P. O'Sullivan, Woodruff, Coughlin, or Mc- 
Geehan declared by Martinson not to be 
his employer. Clerks of A. H. Revell & 
Co. say John F. Beggs resembles the pur- 
chaser of the furniture. 

10. Thomas Morgan, a former employe of P. 
O'Sullivan, taken into custody. Mike and 
Tom Whelan at the inquest. Police search- 
ing for Thomas Geohegan as the driver of 
the white horse. 

11. Inquest ended. Dr. Cronin's notes read. 
Alexander Sullivan held by the coroner's 
jury for complicity in the murder. John 
Maronev and Charles McDonald arrested 
in New York. 



174 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



12. Special grand jury impaneled. 

13. Special grand jury begins work. Gov. 
Hill of New York refuses requisition pa- 
pers for Maroney and McDonald. 

14. Alexander Sullivan admitted to bail. 

16. Woodruff's fourth confession, which no- 
body believes. 

17. Martin Bourk arrested at Winnipeg and 
held by the police of that city to await the 
action'of the Chicago authorities. 

18. Bourk making threats that somebody in 
Chicago will be punished for his arrest. 
Father Dorney before the grand jury. 

19. Announcement that "Cooney, >r believed 
to be one of the Williams brothers, has 
evaded the police. Martin Bourk indicted 
for murder. 

20. Bourk identified by Officer Collins. 

21. The police in search of Cooney, and no 
doubt he was one of the principals in the 
tragedy. Close of the inquiry by the grand 
jury. Bourk identified by Martinson at 
Winnipeg. 

23. Story of Bourk's capture. Reported ar- 
rest of Cooney, which proved untrue. 

24. Evidence that Dr. Cronin was tried, con- 
demned, and "removed" by camp 20 of 
the Clan-na-Gael. The cases against 
Coughlin, Woodruff, and O'Sullivan con- 
tinued. President Harrison signs the pa- 
pers for Bourk's extradition. 

25. Police advertising for Cooney. Names of 
the men who condemned Dr. Cronin made 
public. 

26. Arrest of John F. Beggs. Bourk held by 
the dominion authorities to await further 
evidence. 

28. Cronin memorial meeting at Central Music 

29. Seven men indicted for the murder Dan 
Coughlin, Martin Bourk, Patrick Cooney. 
P. O'Sullivan, Frank Woodruff, J. F. 
Beggs, and John Kun/e. 

JULY. 

1. Kunze under arrest. 
3. Kunze's admissions and other evidence 

tending to show his complicity in the crime. 
5. Frank Tremble arrested and released. 
7. Confessions of a suicide who pretended to 

have helped kill Cronin. Young Carlson 

goes to Winnipeg. 
3. Kunze transferred to the county jail. 

9. Identification of Bourk by Carlson. 

10. Beggs' petition for a writ of habeas corpus 
denied. Bourk to be extradited by order 
of the court at Winnipeg. 

12. Motion for Beggs' release from jail denied 
by Judge Horton. 

24. Bourk's lawyers unsuccessfully en- 
deavor to secure his release. 

25. State Senator Kennedy of Wisconsin ap- 
pears at Winnipeg as counsel for Bourk. 

26. Arguments in the case at Winnipeg. 

29. O'Sullivan asks for a change of venue. 

30. Bourk's application denied and extra- 
dition ordered. 

31. The warrant for his return to Chicago 
signed. 

AUGUST. 

5. Arrival of Bourk in Chicago. The 
Cronin suspects transferred to Judge Mc- 
Connell's court and the case passed to 
Aug. 26. 

Bourk a close prisoner, admittance to 
him at the stations being refused. 

7. Attorney Kennedy as volunteer counsel 

for Bourk. 

8. Bourk placed in the county jail. 

9 Bourk arraigned and pleads not guilty. 

15. Addresses issued by both the Cronin and 
anti-Cronin factions. 

26. Cronin suspects brought into court and 
applications for separate trials are made 
by Kunze, Coughlin, O'Sullivan, Wood- 
ruff, and Bourk. 



29. Judge McConnell decides all must be 
tried together except Woodruff. 

30. The trial begins. 

SEPTEMBER. 

18. Four jurors are sworn in. 

23. Kunze demands of the court to know why 
he is not released. 

OCTOBER. 

8. Four more jurors sworn in 

11. Plot to bribe the jurors discovered. Bai- 
liffs Alexander L. Hanks and Mark Solo- 
mon arrested for attempting to bribe. 

14. John Graham and Fred W. Smith ar- 
rested for complicity with Hanks and 
Solomon, and all indicted and Graham 
released on bail. 

16. Henry N. Stoltenberg arrested. Solo- 
mon released on bail. 

17. Grand jury returned new indictments 
against John Graham. Mark Solomon, A. 
L. Hanks, Thomas Kavanaugh, F. W. 
Smith, Jeremiah O'Donnell, and Joseph 
Konen for jury-bribing. All except Smith. 
O'Donnell, and Kavanaugh released on 
bail. 

21- Three jurymen sworn in. 

22- One juryman sworn in. making the 
jury complete. In all 1.115 veniremen 
were examined. The jurymen are John 
Culver. John Pearson, John L. Hall, 
Charles C. Dix, Henry D. Walker. Frank 
Allison, Charles L. Cook. William L. 
North, Charles F. Marlor, Elijah Bonte- 
cou. Edward S. Bryan, and Benjamin F. 
Clarke. All are native-born Americans. 

24. The trial begins. Judge Longenecker 
makes the opening address to the jury. 
Attorneys for the defense waived the 
right to address the jury, and Capt. Vil- 
liers was sworn as the first witness in the 
case. 

NOVEMBER. 

8. Dr. Cronin's surgical instruments and hat 

found in a catch-basin on Evanston av- 
enue. 

9. Alexander Sullivan released from bail. 

Judge Baker held that not having been in- 
dicted by the grand jury he could not be 
held. 

13. Case adjourned at request of the defend- 
ants to Nov. 16. 

16. The state rested its case and the defense 
began. 

25. The defense closed its case and the state 
began with its rebutting testimony. 

26. Trial adjourned until the 29th. State's 
attorney said he had only one more wit- 
ness. The defense introduced its last wit- 
ness. 

29. Testimony all in and the arguments 
begun, Mr. Longenecker, state's attorney, 
reviewing the case. 

DECEMBER. 

7. Mr. Forrest began his plea in defense and 
spoke three davs and a half. 

13. Mr. Longenecker spoke for the state, 
Judge McConnell gave his instructions, 
and at 4:15 p. m. the jury retired to con- 
sider their verdict. 

16. At 2:28 the jury in the case rendered their 
verdict. Daniel Coughlin, Martin Bourk. 
and Patrick O'Sullivan were found guilty 
as charged in the indictment and their 
punishment was fixed imprisonment dur- 
ing their natural lives. John Kunze was 
found guilty, his punishment being im- 
prisonment for three years. John F. Beggs 
was found not guilty. Motion for new trial 
was made and Jan. 13 was set as the time 
for argument. 



EVENTS OP 1889. 



175 



SPORTING. 



THE BASE-BALL CHAMPIONS. 

The season of 1889 was crowded with sensa- 
tions in the base-ball world. First there was 
the return of the globe-trotting aggregation, 
consisting of the Chicagos under Anson and 
the All-Americas under John Ward, after 
giving exhibitions of the American national 
game on five continents and in thirty-three 
different countries and states. The great 
undertaking was organized by President Spal- 
ding of the Chicago team, .and perhaps will re- 
main the greatest advertisement the game 
will ever receive. The two teams played ball 
for all that they were worth, and the All- 
Americas had the pleasure of defeating the 
Chicagos in about four out of every five 
games. The Chicagos came home and began 
the season entirely demoralized. They had 
been banqueted and wined until they were 
little more than society dudes. It was close 
work for many weeks between them and the 
two tail-enders, "Washington and Indianapolis. 
Detroit had been succeeded by Cleveland in 
the League, the most of the famous team 
going to Boston and Pittsburg, giving the 
former what was supposed to be the pen- 
nant-winning club. For two-thirds of the sea- 
son, however, the Cleveland "Spiders," with 
their playing ability, made wonderful progress 
against all the old Leaguers. They created 
terror wherever they went and drew immense 
crowds. Suddenly, however, the New Yorks, 
who had been plodding along in third and 
fourth positions, began to crawl up on 
the two leaders, overtaking the Cleve- 
lands, who dropped to a good third. The 
~!hicagos began to recover about the first of 

eptember and challenged Philadelphia for 
fourth place. Suddenly both clubs pass d 
Cleveland, and from that time until the close 
of the season it was a desperately fought 
battle for the first four places so close, in 
fact, that the final positions of New York, 
Boston, Chicago, and Philadelphia all de- 
pended on the result of the last game of the 
season. Had the Giants lost at Cleveland and 
Boston won at Pittsburg, instead of the oppo- 
site, Boston would have waved the flag during 
the season of 1890. The Philadelphia team 
had the same chance to rank third by winning 
at Chicago, but the superb pitching of Hutch- 
inson was too much for them. 

In the Association the famous Browns of St. 
Louis were forced to yield the pennant to 
Brooklyn, for the first time in five years. The 
Brooklyn and the New York clubs then played 
a world's-championship series of eleven games, 
out of which New York won six of the first 
nine and decided the dispute. All New York 
went wild witn two world 's-championships to 
her credit, and that popular cry "We are the 
people" was adopted as the motto of the club 
and became a by-word all over the country 
soon after. 

The season had hardly closed until the 
Brotherhood of Base-Ball Players sprung 
their co-operative league scheme and struck 
terror to the hearts of the magnates and 
former bosses, who had previously simply 
laughed at the idea of their players leaving 
them. Second-Baseman Fred Pfeffer, John 
Ward, Mike Kelly, Tim Keef e, and others be- 
came the moving spirits in the new organiza- 
tion and proceeded to see that the players in 
each city were incorporated as new clubs. The 
League men retaliated by offering fabulous 
sums to buy back the ringleaders of the 
Brotherhood and thus break up the project. 
Clarkson signed to play with Boston at a sal- 
ary of $10,000 per annum for a period of three 
years, it was said, while several Philadelphia, 
Washington, and Indianapolis players also 
accepted large offers. 



About this time Brooklyn and Cincinnati 
withdrew from the Association and were 
taken into the League fold, thus making a 
League of ten clubs for the season of 1890. The 
Association at once took steps to fill its ranks 
from clubs in the International League, but 
before New Year's day it became a matter of 
much speculation whether St. Louis would not 
join the Brotherhood League. Everything 
hung in an unsettled state. The League men 
began suits at law against John Ward of New 
York and certain Philadelphia players, further 
threatening to enjoin every old player under 
contract for the previous year from playing 
with the Brotherhood during 1890. The Broth- 
erhood men are keeping quiet and the end is 
uncertain. 

TROTTING RECORDS. 

One mile in harness Maud S., 2:08%. 

One mile to wagon Hopeful, 2:16J^. 

One mile under saddle Great Eastern, 2:15%. 

One mile by a mare-Maud S., 2:08%. 

One mile by a gelding Jay-Eye-See, 2:10. 

One mile by a stallion Axtel, 2:12. 

One mile by a yearling colt Faustino, 2:35. 

One mile by a yearling filly Norlaine, 2:31^. 

One mile by a 2-year-old colt-RegalWilkes,2:20% 

One mile by a 2-year-old gelding Fred Crock- 
er, 2 ;25M- 

One mile by a 2-year-old filly Sunol, 2:18. 

One mile by a 3-year-old colt^ Axtel, 2:12. 

One mile by 4-year-olds Edgemark and Man- 
zanita, 2:16. 

Fastest first heat trotted in a race Clingstone 
and Phallas, 2:14. 

Fastest second heat trotted in a race Axtel, 
2:14. 

Fastest third heat trotted in a race Maud S., 
2M3M- 

Fastest fourth heat trotted in a race Phallas, 

Fastest fifth heat trotted in a race Gean 
Smith, 2:16. 

Fastest sixth heat trotted in a race Clemmie 
G., 2: 18^. 

Fastest heat ever trotted in a race Maud S., 
2* 13-^ 

One mile to wagon Maxey Cobb and Neta 
Medium, 2:15%. 

One mile to pole-cart^-Cleora and Independ- 
ence, 2:16^. 

One mile with running mate H. B. Winship 
and Gabe Case, 2:06. 

PACING RECORDS. 

One mile Johnston, 2:06^. 

Two miles Defiance and Longfellow (dead- 
heat), 4:47%. 

Three miles James K. Polk, 7:44. 

Four miles Longfellow, 10:34M. 

Five miles Lady St. Clair, 12:54%. 

One mile to wagon Johnston, 2:14K. 

One mile to wagon (team) Richball and West- 
mont,2:19. 

One mile under saddle Johnston, 2:13. 

RUNNING RECORDS. 

Quarter mile Jim Miller, Deer Lodge, Mon- 
tana, Aug. 16, 1880, :21^. 

Three-eighth mile Daniel B., 6 years, Hele- 
na, Montana, July, 1888, :34%. ' 

Half mile Geraldine,NewYork,Aug.30,1889,:49. 

Five-eighth mile Britannic, New York, Aug. 
31, 1889, :59. 

Three-quarter mile El Rio Rey, New York, 
Aug. 31, 1889, 1:11. 

Seven -eighth mile Britannic, Sheepshead 
Bay, Sept. 5,1889,1:262-5. 

One mile Ten Broeck, 5 years, 110 pounds, 
Louisville, May, 1877, 1:39%. 

Mile and one-sixteenth Wheeler T., 3 years, 
98 pounds, St. Louis, June, 1888, 1:47; Elyton, 



176 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



Chicago, June 28, 1889, 1:47. 
Mile and one-eighth Terra Cotta, 4 years, 124 

pounds. Sheepshead Bay, June, 1888, 1:53. 
Mile and three-sixteenthsJoe Cotton, 5 years, 

109V6 pounds, Sheepshead Bay, September 

1887,2:00^. 
Mile and one-fourth Kingston, Brooklyn, 

Sept. 24, 1889, 2:06^. 
Mile and 500 yards Bend Or, 4 years, 115 

pounds. Saratoga, July. 1882, 2:10J^. 
Mile and three-eighths Triboulet, 4 years, 117 

pounds, San Francisco, April, 1888, 2:21^; 

Richmond, 6 years, 112 pounds, Sheepshead 

Bay. J une, 1888. 2:21^. 
Mile and a half Firenzi, Monmouth Park, 

Aug. 2, 1888,2:34; Luke Blackburn. Monmouth 

Park, August, 1880, 2:34; Jim Guest, 4 years, 

98 pounds. Chicago, July, 1886, 2:34. 
Mile and five-eighths Hindoocraft, New York, 

Aug. 27, 1889, 2:48. 
Mile and three-quarters Glidelia, 5 years, 116 

pounds, Saratoga, August, 1882, 3:01, 
Mile and seven eighths Enigma. 4 years, 90 

pounds,Sheepshead Bay, September,1885, 3:20. 
Two miles Ten Broeck, 5 years, 110 pounds, 

Louisville, May, 1877, 3:27^. 
Two miles and one-eighth Monitor, 4 years, 



110 pounds. Baltimore, October, 1880, 3:44^. 
Two miles and a quarter ypringbok, 5 years 

114 pounds, Saratoga, July, 1875. 3:56*4; Freak 

ness, 4 years, 114, Saratoga, July, 1875, 3:56M. 
Two miles and a half Aristides, 4 years, 104 

pounds, Lexington, May. 1876. 4:27%. 
Two miles and five-eighths Ten Broeck, 4 

years, 104 pounds, Lexington, September, 

18*6, 4:58^. 
Two miles and three-quarters Hubbard, 8 

years,107pounds,Saratoga,August,1873,4:589i. 
Three miles Drake Carter, 4 years, 115 pounds, 

Sheepshead Bay. September, 1884, 5:24. 
Four miles Ten "Broeck, 4 years, 104 pounds 

Louisville, September, 1876, 7:15%. 

HURDLE-RACE RECORDS. 
One mile Swan-na-noe, Brighton, July 16, 

1881, 1:50. 
One mile and one-eighth Winslow, Chicago, 

Aug. 29, 1888, 2:02%. 
One mile and one-quarterJim McGowan, 

Brighton, Nov. 9, 1882, 2:16. 
One mile and three-eighths Guy, Latonia, 

Oct. 8, 1885, 2:35. 
Mile heats Will Davis, Chicago, July 3, 1886, 



FARM MORTGAGES. 

Two states, Illinois and Michigan, have, by their Bureaus of Labor Statistics, made an 
effort to show the burdens of mortgages borne by the farms of these states. The following 
figures are taken from the last reports of the Bureaus of Labor Statistics in these states. 
MICHIGAN MORTGAGES ON LAND. 



COUNTIES. 



Alcona. 

Alger 

Allegan 

Alpena 

Antrim 

Arenac 

Baraga 

Barry 

Bay 

Benzie 

Berrien 

Branch 

Calhoun 



Charlevoix 

Oheboygan 

Ch.ppewa. 

Clare 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Delta 

Eaton 

Emmet 

enesee 

ladwin 

Grand Tr'v'se. 

Gratiot 

Hillsdale 

BLoughton 

Huron 

ngham 

onia 

[osco 

ron 



sabella 

[sle Royal 

Jackson 

alamazoo.... 

Kalkaska 

Kent 

Keweenaw 
Lake 



FARMS 
MORTGAGED. 



Princi- 
pal. 

$42,985 



1,878 1,448,941 

94 33,750 

346* 130,964 

192 73,963 



1 
1.321 



700 

1,191.358 
289,486 



551, 
136| 

1.086 884,073 

1,037 1,177,595 

1,040 1,476.250 

723; 779,994 

353 120,695 

130 33,241 



75 

1,178 
14; 
36 

'1 
'IS 

122 

1,537 

444 



2.855 

18,223 

1,374,827 

41.789 

1,500.439 

18,481 

40.002 

952.405 

546.469 



. 
1.0112 



74!> 



495 

975 

312 

1.372 



1,559,004 
7,716 



Inter- 
est. 



$3,393.80 



107,492.68 

2.861.51 

11,349.76 

5,896.60 

42.00 

86.295.67 

22.299.82 

3.303.01 

64,655.78 

81,437.91 

103,616.46 

55,316.25 

10.4(18.23 

2,955.00 



1,696.42 

97.THS.S2 

226.60 

1.490.55 
99.035.62 

3,668.14 
108,761 .37 

1,405.32 

ai21.44 
72.216.25 
37,481.18 



&204 

133,918 

9,286 
26,885 
14,866 
50 



COUNTIES. 



Lapeer 

Leelanaw 

Lenawee.... 
Livingston 
Mackinac... 
Macomb... 
Manistee... 



110.021 'Manitou.... 
32.556 Marquette. 



13,437 
78,143 



Mason 

Mecosta..... 



103.155 
88478 

31,306 



86.397 Menominee 



Midland.... 
Missaukee.. 
Monroe 



45,025.58 

91,250.20 

114.812.45 

550.73 



392,829 30,978.28 




17.041 



1488.80 



11,563 iMontcalm.... 

Montmorency 

6.210 iMuskegon 

101.488 |Neway*o 

1.332 Oakland 

3,767 Oceana 

107.620 ! 0gemaw 

12,201 .Ontonagon 

115.233 Osceola 

4.203 Oscoda. 

10.774 Otsego 

104.457 Ottawa 

37.248 Presque Isle. . 

Roscommon... 

92,408 Saginaw 

100,305 Sanilac 

123.478 Schoolcraft... 
2,252 Shiawassee. .. 
. St. Clair 
i ^ 



56,381 1 St. Joseph.. 
hTuscola 

56,379 Van Buren. 

96,911 Washtenaw 

22.640 Wayne 

103,608 jjWexford.... 

4JBMI Total... 



1,462 

298 

1,264 

1,199 

G 

1.109 

243 

4 

18 
405 
412 
44 
378 
157 
1.110 
977 
19 
237 
418 
34 
718 
215 



FARMS 
MORTGAGED. 



Princi- 
pal. 



1,240.427 

91,117 

1.584.984 

1,672.94 

750 

1,250,381 

101,394 

750 

7,894 

149,377 

175,264 

14,245 

149,803 

47,671 

1,144,309 

485.014 



181,41* 



363.793 
84,280 



4731'" 175,460 



42 



5,321 
39.109 
715.891 
11,456 



712.380 
146,744 
1,693 
604.408 



Inter- 
est. 



7,224.20 
106,014.62 
114,233.54 



1,965.33 

58.50 

632.15 

12,474.89 

13.516.58 

l,247.8 

11.499.72 



79,605.11 

37,353.45 

492.76 

9,742.25 

14.306.1 
2,076.25 

29,172.87 
7,498.82 



698.951 

276 4.50,358 

1.048 723,201! 

1,540 1.233207 

590 1.232 331 

54! 823.758 

214 69.154 



14,428.65 
420.52 

3.280.66 
52.504.09 

1.013.81 

"5l',2i4.'84l 

11.724. 38 1 

160.30 

43,945.84' 

53,170.07! 



90,500.03 

78.658.78! 
55.634.27! 
5,886. 48' 



136,280 

29.449 

100.781 

131.263 

560 

79.221 

22.720 

746 

3,181 
27,457 
2S.437 

3,791 
24,951 
1S.091 
84.276 
63.818 

3,982 
18.613 
29.093 

4.246 
52.043 
19,377 

' 38.045 
2.525 
9.051 
62,322 
4,195 

' 78,661 
28.376 
720 
53,485 
77.456 
28,561 
81,104 

121^26 
67.514 
58.622 
17,999 



3,079 37,456,372 2.701,669 . 22 479,610 



Average rate of interest is 07.2. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 177 


ILLINOIS MORTGAGES ON LAND. 


COUNTIES. 


1 


FARMS 
MORTGAGED. 


Acres 
Mortgaged, 


CotTNTIES. 


I 


FARMS 
MORTGAGED. 


Acres 
Mortgaged. 


Princi- 
pal. 


Inter- 
est. 


Princi- 
pal. 

~4,824J42 
2,120.252 
1,729,195 
1,219,562 
1,685,034 
271,803 
978,827 
872,172 
67,818 
1,342,773 
1,922,076 
2,956,151 
954,649 
1,062,673 
593,522 
735,355 
1,506,497 
1,015,606 
2,217,821 
3,523,987 
273,281 
1,486,140 
1,013.235 
61.185 
74,030 
485,964 
452,549 
198,530 
1,271,958 
153,425 
3,199,689 
684,353 
467,486 
1,192,260 
1,089,220 
1,177,381 
2,046,631 
2,145,521 
237,499 
2,529,816 
168^64 
1,240,180 
926,998 
493,226 
533,159 
2,499,457 
2,811,762 
171,015 
1.394.175 
1,336,336 


Inter- 
est. 

169,107 
75.481 
62.397 
44,941 
69,060 
10,587 
34.258 
30,613 
2,621 
49,951 
66,600 
101,396 
34,701 
39,266 
21,129 
26,988 
52,351 
35,292 
75,073 
115,763 
10,412 
50,752 
38,351 
2,426 
2,895 
16,450 
16,948 
7,395 
45,981 
5,869 
114,869 
26,142 
18,396 
42,444 
37,850 
41,336 
69,381 
75,093 
8,942 
87,532 
6,712 
45,329 
33,001 
19,285 
20,767 
88,231 
93,632 
6,687 
45.659 
46,304 




1.1M 
122 
574 
636 
620 
1,915 
268 
756 
559 
2.348 
1.204 
1,149 
612 
577 
1,023 
2,388 
512 
758 
929 
857 
1,004 
441 

MB 
iJS 

l l 

466 
722 
853 
1,357 
69 
260 
1,373 

ffl 

643 
678 
587 
737 
336 
1,459 
1.394 
678 
1,351 
990 
1,928 
514 
1,135 


$1~500.5< 
68,823 
458,631 
940,817 
537,133 
3,044,881 
197,896 
1,197,984 
1149:698 
3,062,770 
1,518,464 
471,091 
319,746 
765,102 
945,648 
18^67,202 
262,246 
439,282 
1,832,233 
1,191,927 
1.296,176 
1,042,259 
1,274,404 
155,196 

US 

1,703,831 
101,792 
2,256,480 
357,667 
769,307 
1,586,809 
240.584 
1,601,021 
15,296 
597,810 
2,629,356 
3,514.359 
453,350 
250,277 
278,005 
949,758 
938.031 
107,417 
2.720,848 
238,335 
1^29,682 
2.553,858 
1,331,782 
4,132,133 
281,741 
2.184,977 


$51,696 
2,742 
16,994 
31,847 
20,118 
108,837 
7,095 
41,271 
39.780 
99,693 
57,853 
17,171 
12,502 
28.079 
34,185 
584,283 
9,782 
16,385 
64,220 
42,432 
45,042 
33,300 
45,879 
5,758 
15,088 
31,361 
56,482 
3,832 
85,069 
13,734 
28,964 
49,112 
9,347 
56,836 
610 
22,149 
94^25 
114,920 
16,979 
7,935 
10,661 
34.430 
31,799 
4254 
90,727 
82,656 
48,992 
9a534 
41,635 
141,112 
10^46 
74,617 


93,765 
13,067 
46,745 
48,387 
50,169 
201.1574 
32,*0 
67,578 
66,658 
197,105 
108,715 
85,054 
48,596 
62,273 
59,903 
116,228 
31,189 
38,674 
88,463 
70,527 
79,356 
26,982 
92,089 
17,055 
80906 
106,905 
114,594 
17,032 
167,820 
41,815 
87,810 
79,619 
56.634 
105,926 
4,838 
36,347 
147,767 
232,152 
62,048 
46,763 
46,465 
70.917 
72,823 
29,294 
107.955 
170.703 
75,425 
148,183 
58,197 
195,120 
37,458 
121,182 


Livingston 
Logan 
Macon 


2,973 

aat 

1,093 
975 
1,023 
490 
476 
556 
193 

648 
395 

S 
IS 

1,665 

41 

216 
164 

276 
517 
428 
840 
480 
1,580 
683 
305 
1,572 
544 
659 
U38 
952 
411 
2,128 
308 
732 
914 
1,451 
1,087 
U22 
].:;:>? 
515 
762 
693 

92,777 


27U.87rt i 
105,863 
92,775 
76.833 

st.f>S8 

32,916 
;>.;.> >s 
75.297 
1&977 
87,443 
113.694 
158,120 
4966 
67,265 
54,551 
57,187 
64,444 
80,162 
104,670 
152,223 
404)38 
105,371 
77.HO'.) 
18,156 
29,973 
47,252 
20,608 
76,989 
35,369 
24,850 
12.678 
74.375 
29.186 
109,994 
50,497 
47,564 
95,125 
93,446 
37.845 
143,143 
18.046 ! 
71,709 

ss.nio 

91.271 
73.930 
154,461 
12tK831 
33,840 
54,405 
65,703 


Alexander...... 




Macoupin 
Madison 




Bureau 


Marion 




Marshall 




Mason .... 




Massac 


Champaign 
Christian 


McDonough 
McHenry 
McLean ,. . .. 


Clark. 


ploy 






Mercer 
Monroe .. .. 






Montgomery 
Morgan 


Crawford 


Cumberland 
DeKalb 


Moultrie 


Ogle 


DeWitt 
Douglas 
Du Page 


Peoria 


Perry 


Piatt . 


Edgar 


Pike 


Edwards 
Efflngham 
Fayette 


Pope . 


Puiaski 


Putnam 
Randolph 
Richland. 


Ford 


Franklin 


Fulton 


Rock Island 
Saline 


Gallatin 




Sangamon 
Schuyler 
Scott 




Hamilton 


Hancock. 


Shelby- 


Hardin 


Stark 
St. Clair 


Henderson x 


Stephenson 
Tazewell 
Union 






Jasper 


Vermilion 
Wabash 


Jefferson 






Jo Daviess 
Johnson 
Kane 


Washington 
Wayne 


White. . 


Kankakee 


Whiteside.. 
Will 


Kendall 




Williamson 
Winnebago 
Woodford 

The state 


Lake 


LaSalle 




Lee 


$142,400,300,$4,919,754:8,082,794 


The average rate of interest is 06.90. In explanation of this table Secretary Lord says: 
" The term 'lands' in this connection embraces all acre-tracts of land as distinguished 
from town lots, blocks, and subdivisions, and is consequently, in general, equivalent to 
farm lands. The exception is that in the vicinity of large cities, notably Chicago, certain 
lands are held for speculation rather than cultivation, and possess a value as suburban 
property which practically takes them out of the class of farm lands, though they necessarily 
appear in that category here. The number of acres of this kind is relatively small, but their 
value as security and the consequent incumbrance upon them is relatively great." 


Argentine Repu 
Austria-Hungary 
Belgium 


NAVIES 

blic 32 
7 67 


F THE 

France. 
German 
Great B 
r^rppfp 


WORLDS-VESSELS OF WAR. 
331 Peru. __ n 


y 128 I 


'ortu 
loum 
Lussij 
pain 
wede 
^urke 
Jnite< 
^enez 


*al 30 




<-itain and Ireland.. 455 1 
94. T 


ania 15 


Brazil 46 




....171 
ill 


Canada 12 


Italy :.'-"-" " ""::: :::::: '107 ? 




Chili 17 
China 95 


Japan. . 
Mexico. 
Netherls 
Norway 


40S 
...12 1 


n 49 


y 99 




inds 118 I 


1 States 7Q 


Egypt 11 


45 A 




4 









178 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMAXAC FOR 1890. 



POPULAR VOTE 



For presidential candidates from 1824 to and including 1888. Prior to 1824 electors 
were chosen by the legislatures of the different states. 
1824-J. Q. Adams had 105,321 to 155,872 for 

Jackson, 44,282 for Crawford, and 46,587 for 

CJay. Jackson over Adams, 50,551. Adams 

less than combined vote of others, 140,869. 



Of the whole vote Adams had 29.92 per cent, 
Jackson 44.27. Clay 13.23, Crawlord 13.23. 
Adams elected by House of Representa- 
tives. 

1828 Jackson had 647,231 to 509,097 for J. Q. 
Adams. Jackson's majority, 138,134. Of the 
whole vote Jackson had 55.97 per cent, Ad- 
ams 44.03. 

1832-Jackson had 687,502 to 530,189 for Clay, 
and 33,108 for Floyd and Wirt combined. 
Jackson's majority, 124,205. Of the whole 
vote Jackson had 54.96 per cent, Clay 42.39, 
and the others combined 2.65. 

1836 Van Buren had 761,549 to 736,656, the com- 
bined vote for Harrison, White, Webster, 
and Maguin. Van Buren's majority, 24.893. 
Of the whole vote Van Buren had 50.83 per 
cent, and the others combined 49.17. 

1840 Harrison had 1,275,017 to 1,128,702 for Van 
Buren, and 7,059 for Birney. Harrison's ma- 
jority, 139,256. Of the whole vote Harrison 
had 52.89 per cent, Van Buren 46.82, and Bir- 
ney .29. 

1844-Polk had 1,337,243 to 1,299,068 for Clay and 
62,300 for Birney. Polk over Clay, 38,175. Polk 
less than others combined, 24,125. Of the 
whole vote Polk had 49.55 per cent, Clay 48.14, 
and Birney 2.21. 

1848 Taylor had 1,360,101 to 1,220,544 for Cass, 
and 291,263 for Van Buren. Taylor over Cass, 
139,577. Taylor less than others combined, 
151,706. Of the whole vote Taylor had 47 .36 
per cent, Cass 42.50, and Van Buren 10.14. 

1852 Pierce had 1,601,474 to 1,386,578 for Scott, 
and 156,149 for Hale. Pierce over all, 58,747. 
Of the whole vote Pierce had 50.90 per cent, 
Scott 44.10, and Hale 4.97. 

1856-Buch:man had 1.838,169 to 1,341,264 for 
Fremont, and 874,531 for Fillmore. Buchanan 
over Fremont, 496,905. Buchanan less than 
combined vote of others, 377,629. Of the 
whole vote Buchanan had 45.34 per cent, 
Fremont33.09, and Fillmore 21.57. 

1860 Lincoln had 1,866,352 to 1.375,157 for Doug- 
las, 845,763 for Breckinridge, and 589,581 for 
Bell. Lincoln over Breckinridge, 491,195. 
Lincoln less than Douglas and Breckinridge 
combined, 354,568. Lincoln less than com- 
bined vote of all others, 944,149. Of the 
whole vote Lincoln had 39.91 percent, Doug- 
las 29.40, Breckinridg j 18.0S, and Bell 12.61. 

1864 Lincoln had 2,216,067 to 1,808,725 for Mc- 
Clellan (eleven states not voting, viz.: Ala- 
bama,Arkansas, Florida,Georeia,Louisiana, 



Mississippi, North Carolina. South Caro- 
lina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virgina), Lin- j 
coin's majority, 408,342. Of the whole vote j 
Lincoln had 55,06 per cent and McClellan 44.94. i 



1868 Grant had 3,015,071 to 2,709,613 for Sey- ! 
mour (three states not voting, viz.: Missis- 1 
sippi. Texas, and Virginia). Grant's ma- 
jority, 305,458. Of the whole vote Grant had ! 
52.67 per cent and Seymour 47.33. 
1872 Grant had 3,597.070 to 2,834,079 for Gree- 
ley, 29,408 for O'Conor, and 5,608 for Black. 
Grant's majority, 729,975. Of the whole vote 
Grant had 55.63 per cent, Greeley 43.83, 0'Con- 1 
or .15, Black .09. 

1876 Hayes had 4,033,950 to 4,284,885 for Tilden, I 
81,740 for Cooper, 9,522 for Smith, and 2,636 ; 
scattering. Tilden's majority over Hayes, 
250,935. Tilden's majority of the entire vote ; 
cast, 157,037. Hayes less than the combined 
vote of others, 344,833. Of the whole vote 
cast Hayes had 47.95 per cent, Tilden 50.94, 
Cooper .97, Smith .11, scattering .03. 
1880 Garfleld had 4,449,053 to 4,442,035 for Han- 
cock, 307,306 for Weaver, and 12,576 scatter- 
ing. Garfleld over Hancock, 7,018. Garfleld 
less than the combined vote for others, 313,- 
864, Of the popular vote Garfleld had 48.26 
per cent, Hancock 48.25, Weaver 3.33, scat- 
tering .13. 

1884 Cleveland had 4,874,986 to 4,851,981 for 
Elaine, 150.369 for St. John, 173,370 for Butler. 
Cleveland had over Elaine 23,006. Cleveland 
had 48.48 per cent, Elaine 48.22, St. John 1.49, 
Butler 1.74. 

1888-Harrison had 5,441,902 to 5,538,560 for 
Cleveland, 249,937 for Fisk, 147,521 for Streeter, 
3,073 for Cowdrey, 1,591 for Curtis, and 9,845 
scattering. Harrison had 96,658 less than 
Cleveland. Of the whole vote Harrison had 
47.83 per cent, Cleveland 48.63 oer cent, Fisk 
2.21 per cent, and ttreeter 1.3T 
Of the presidents, Adams, Ft 
Buchanan,and Cleveland, Dei 
Whig; Lincoln, Hayes, GarfleL 
Republicans, did not, when ele 
majority of the popular vote. The h _ 
percentage of popular vote received by any 
President was 55.97 for Jackson, Democrat, in 
1828, and the lowest 39.91 for Lincoln, Repub- 
lican, in 1860; Harrison Republican, next 
lowest, with 47.83. Hayes and Harrison, with 
the exception of John Quincy Adams, whd 
was chosen by the house of representatives, 
were the only Presidents ever elected who 
did not have a majority over their principal 
competitors, and Tilden and Cleveland the 
only defeated candidates who had a majority 
over the President-elect. 




LETTERS. Prepaid by stamps, 2 cents each 
ounce or fraction thereof to all parts of the 
United States and Canada; forwarded to 
another postoffice without charge on request 
of the person addressed; if not called for, 
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and returned to the writer. For registering 
letters the charge is 10 cents additional. Drop 
letters at letter-carrier offices, 2 cents per 
ounce or fraction thereof; at other offices, 1 
cent per ounce or fraction thereof. On insuffi- 
ciently prepaid matter mailed in Canada, 3 
cents per } ounce or fraction thereof. 
Stamped postal cards, furnished only by 
government, 1 cent each; if anything except 
a printed address slip is pasted on a postal 
card, or anything but the address written on 



RATES OF POSTAGE. 

the face, letter postage is charged. Postage 
on all newspapers and periodicals sent from 
newspaper offices to any part of the United 
States, to regular subscribers, must be paid in 
advance at the office of mailing. 



SECOXD - CLASS MATTER. Periodicals is- 
sued at regular intervals, at least four times ! 
a year, and having a regular list of subscrib- 1 
ers, with supplement, sample copies, 1 cent ! 
a pound; periodicals, other than weekly, if: 
delivered by letter-carrier, 1 cent each; if! 
over 2 ounces, 2 cents each. When sent by j 
other than publishers, for 4 ounces or less, 1 j 
cent. 

THIRD-CLASS MATTER (not exceeding 4 
pounds). Printed matter, books, proof- 
sheets, corrected or uncorrected, unsealed 
circulars, inclosed so as to admit of easy in- 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 179 


spection without cutting cords or wrappers, 1 
cent for each 2 ounces. 

FOURTH-CLASS MATTER. Not exceeding 4 
pounds, embracing merchandise and samples, 
excluding liquids, poisons, greasy, inflamma- 
ble, or explosive articles, live animals, in- 
sects, etc. , 1 cent an ounce. Postage to Can- 
ada and British North American states, 2 
cents per ounce; must be prepaid; otherwise, 
6 cents. 
POSTAGE RATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 
To the countries and colonies which, with 
the United States, comprise the Universal 
Postal Union, the rates or postage are as fol- 
lows: Letters, per 15 grams (J^ ounce), pre- 
payment optional, Scents; postal cards, each, 
2 cents; newspapers and other printed mat- 
ter, per 2 ounces, 1 cent. Commercial papers 
First lo ounces or fraction thereof, Scents; 
every additional 2 ounces, 1 cent. Samples 
of merchandise First 4 ounces, 2 cents; every 
additional 2 ounces, 1 cent. Registration fee 
on letters or other articles, 10 cents. All cor 
respondence other than letters must be pre- 
paid at least partially. 

Printed matter other than books received in 
the mails from abroad under the provisions of 
postal treaties or conventions is free from 
customs duty. 


Dutiable books for* 
States from the Postal 
addresses at postoffice 
payment of the duties 1 
POSTAL MONEY ORE 
single money order is 8 
formerly. The fees ch 
For orders not exceec 
For orders from $10 t 
For orders from $1 5 t 
For orders from $3.J t 
For orders from $4O t 
For orders from $5 > t 
For orders from $60 t 
For orders from $70 t 
For orders from $80 t 

To Switzerland, Gern 
gal, Canada, Newfour 
Algeria, New South 
mania, New Zealand, , 
exceeding $10, 15 cents 
$20 to $3 i, 45 cents; $3( 
to $50, 75 cents. To C 
land and adjacent islai 
ceeding $10, 25 cents; $ 
to $30, 70 cents; 93 > to 
$50, $1. To British Ind 
exceeding $10, 35 cent 
70 cents; not exceeding 
$40, $1.25; not exceedii 


arded to the United 
Union are delivered to 
s of destination upon 
evied thereon. 
ERS. The limit of a 
LOO, instead of $50, as 
arged are as follows: 
ling $10 8c 


o $15 lOc 


o $30 15c 


o $40 20c 


o $50 25c 


o$60 3i>c 


o $70 35c 


e>$80 4 >c 


3 $100 45c 


lany, Belgium, Portu- 
idland, Italy, France 
iVales, Victoria, Tas- 
laniuiea: Fees, for not 
; $10 to $2 , 3 cents; 
to $40, 60 cents; $40 
rreat Britain and Ire- 
ids: Fees, for not ex- 
10 to $20, 5 >cents; $2') 
$40, 85 cents; $40 to 
ia: Fees, for sums not 
s; not exceeding $20, 
83 ', sl; not exceeding 
ig$50, $1.50. 


TO OBTAIN STANDARD TIME. 

Persons living in the following places, or in their vicinity, will add or subtract the figures, 
given to Local time to find the new Standard time. 


CITIES. 


Standard 
or 
D ivision . 


Correction 
Minutes. 


CITIES. 


Standard 
or 
D ivision. 


Correction 
Minutes. 


Portland, Me 


Eastern. 

Central. 
Eastern. 

Central. 


Sub. 19 
" 16 
" 14 

" 8 
Add 16 
2 
Sub. 5 
Add 1 
5 
" 11 
" 1 
" 20 
Sub. 40 
Add 7 
Sub. 1 
Add 2 
6 

'.! 10 

:: I 

8 
Sub. 33 
" 28 
" 26 
22 
" 23 
" 19 
" 10 

": ! 

Add 2 
Sub. 2 
Add 3 

Sub. 23 
" 13 
Add 9 


St. Joseph, " 
Kansas City, " . . . . 
Grand Haven, Mich . . 
Detroit. ' . . 
Milwaukee, Wis 
La Crosse, " .. . . 
Superior City, " 
Janesville, " 
Keokuk, Iowa 


Central. 

Eastern. 
Central. 

Mountain. 
Central. 

Mountain. 
Central. 


Add 19 
" 18 
Sub. 15 
28 
8 
Add i 

Sub. 4 
Add 6 

" H 

'.! 3 
5 
" 12 
9 
21 
" 24 
" 13 
" 15 
" 20 
24 
Sub. 36 
" 11 
" 33 
12 
8 
" 15 
Add 1 

:: ,5 

Sub. 24 
" 13 

Add 9 

- B 

" 21 


" I 

4 
" 21 




ProvirJeMf T? A. 


NewH^BJKkA 
NewTfl K. 
BuffalflH 

iAfdP*^" 


UticaT " 


Des Moines, " 


Rochester " .... 


Dubuque, " 


1 Philadelphia, Pa 
Pittsburg, 
1 Erie, " 


Burlington," 


St Paul Minn 


Duluth, " 
Lawrence, Kas 


i Harrisburg, " 
Trenton, N. J 


Omaha City, Neb 
Wilmington, N. C 
Raleigh " 


Wilmington, Del 


Baltimore Md 




Charleston S C 


Norfolk " 


Columbia, " 


i Lynchburg, " 
Wheeling, W. Va 
Washington, D. C 
Cleveland, O 


Savannah, Ga 


Pensacola, Fla 
Jacksonville, " 
Huntsville, Ala.... 


Mobile, " 


Toledo, " 


Montgomery," 
Jackson, Miss 
New Orleans, La 
Shreveport, " 


i Cincinnati " 




Fort Wayne, Ind 
Evansville, " 


Knoxville, Tenn 
Nashville " 


Chicago, 111 
Cairo, " 
Galena, " 
Springfield, " 
i Rock Island, " 
aiincy, " 
xington Ky 


Memphis, " . .. . 


Little Rock. Ark 
Galveston, Tex 


Austin " 


Houston, " 
Denver, Col 


Yankton, Dak 


Louisville, " 
Jefferson City, Mo 
St. Louis, 


Bismarck, " 
Santa Fe, N. M 
Ft.Gibson.Cher. Nation 


To find Local time from Standard time, reverse the operation. Local time is given in the 
Calendar pages of this work. 



180 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 


EXPORTS BY COUNTRIES, 1881 AND 1889. 
The values of domestic merchandise exported from the United States to the principal and 
all other foreign countries (in the order of magnitude of the values of 188*.)) during the fiscal 
years 1881 and 1889 respectively are shown, as follows: 


1 


COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1881. 
Dollars. 


1889. 
Dollars. 


Per 

cent of 
total 
for 1889 


2 
3 

I 

6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 

21 

22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
2S 
29 
30 

1 

83 

34 
35 

36 
37 
!3S 
89 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
4S 
49 
50 
51 


United Kingdom 




477,450,619 
68,858.571 
89,844,100 
35,793,031 
29,143,738 
85.683.57i 
25,785.004 
8.987,417 
6,633,130 
12,536,283 
9,198.077 
9.138,637 
2,258.183 
15,818.823 
1,440,146 
858.0H9 
1,541,229 
5,179,366 
2,704,0f>3 
2,914,668 
2,694,583 
6,392,539 
1,598,270 
4,291,088 
5,447,281 
3,405,484 
2,394,507 
1 728 786 


379,990,131 
66,568,695 
45,110,922 
39,806,682 
29,941,525 
22,603,406 
14,800,780 
12,543,928 
12,252,147 
11,932,614 
10,886,288 
9,276,511 
8,376,077 
8,255,357 
4,615,712 
4,330,413 
4,146.511 
3,728,961 
3,703,705 
3,675,594 
3,336,040 
3.213,248 
2,967,254 
2,872,507 
2.799,621 
2,612,526 
2,384.602 
2.249.6.K5 
2.03S.W3 
2,027,383 
773,244 
762,546 
720.825 
618.637 

388^422 
382,7fiO 
363,364 
362,623 
345.0S6 
343.034 
319,427 

2SS.12I5 

179,647 
167.734 
165,079 
117,426 
108,592 
71,536 
45,371 
25,099 
157,488 


52.03 1 
9.12 j 
6.181 
5.45 

i 

2.03 
1.72 
1.6? 
1.64 
1.49 
1.27 
1.15 
1.14 
.63 
.60 
.57 
.51 
.51 
.51 
.46 
.44 
.41 
.39 
.38 
.36 
.32 
.31 
.28 
.28 
.10 
.10 
.10 
.08 
.07 
.05 
.05 
.05 
.05 
.05 
.05 
.04 
.04 
.02 
.02 
.02 
.02 
.01 
.01 
.01 

.03 


Germany 




France 




British North American Provinces 




West Indies 








Netherlands 




Italy 




British Possessions in Australasia 




Spain 








Brazil 








Russia in Europe 




Japan 




British East Indies 




Central American States 




United States of Colombia 




Venezuela 




Hong-Kong 




Hawaiian Islands 




Denmark 




Chili 








China 




Sweden and "Vorway 




British Possessions in Africa 












1.995,744 
1,536,326 
93,785 
103,905 
2,255,140 
122,678 
2,802,610 
526,852 
325,119 
309.8S9 
471,302 
894,593 
322,435 






Peru 




Ecuador and Bolivia 




Austria-Hungary 




British Possessions, all other 




Gibraltar 








French Possessions in Africa 




Miquelon, Langley, and St. Pierre Islands. 
British Honduras 






All other countries in Africa 




French Possessions, all other 




French East Indies 




All other countries in Asia 






Philippine Islands 






Spanish Possessions in Africa. 




218.146 
142.042 
590,058 
203,912 
167.019 
2S9.MJ1 
619,419 
212,996 


Greece 








Russia Asiatic 




Liberia 




Turkey in Asia 




Turkey in Europe 




All other countries 




Total 


883,925,947 


730,282,609 


100-00 


PRINCIPAL OF THE PUBLIC DEBT. 
185-^ -1lv 1 $ 3:i 58fi_ Sr58 Kfi 1873 .Tiilv 1 . . $2.234.482 


993.20 
468.43 
53 1 . 95 


1 S 5 
; is." 
18fi 
181 

18fc 
181 

it 

I8fc 

181 
18- 

1 

18' 
18- 
18' 


7 28, 699, 83 1.85 


1 874 ' . 
1875 * 


.. 2.251.690 


... 2,232.284, 


8 44 9 ll 881 03 


1876 ' . 
1877 ' . 
1878 ' . 
1879 ' 


2, 18( 395 


067. 15 
392.10 
892.53 
072.04 
370.63 
569. 58 

9 '^3! 57 
275 14 
205.78 
536. 38 
706. 23 
583.00 


9 58 496 837 88 


2,205,301, 
2.256,203. 
.. 2. 24.-,. 495 


iO 64 84 287 88 


1 90 580 873 7 ' 


2 5 '4. 176,412 13 


1880 ' 2.120.415, 


3 1.119,772,138.63 
4 1,815,784,370.57 
5 2 6so 647 869 74 


1881 ' 2.069013, 
)882 ' 1.9H.312 


1883 " . 
1884 " 


1 884 171 


6 9 773 2s6 173 H9 


1 830 528* 


7 ..2 67-<,r>6 103 87 


1885 " 
1886 " . 
1-87 Pec. 1 
1888 .. 
889 " 


1,876.424. 
l,75'i.445 


8 ... 2 6H.687'851 19 


9 2,5^8. 15-'. 213.9 
2 180 i>~ 427 81 


:...::. : r.%446i. 

1.680 917 
1 fiOS rjo.-: 


1 . 2 :!53 211 33'' 2 


2 "5 ; 251 328 78 







MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



181 



NUMBER OF PENSION CLAIMS, PENSIONERS, AND DISBURSEMENTS, 1861-1889. 



FISCAL YEAR END- 
ING JUKE 30. 



is.; i. 



1863 

1864 



. 

is67. 



1870 , 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879.... 



1883. 

issi. 



issr. 
isss. 



Total. . 



Army and Na- 
vy Claims 
allowed. 



Inva- Wid 
lids. ows,etc 



413 

4,121 

17.041 

15.212 

22.8-3 

16..-)S9 

9.460 

7,292 

5,721 

7.934 

6,468 

6,551 

5,937 

5,7(0 

5,a:0 

7,282 

7,414 

7,242 

10,176 

21.3W 

22,946 

32,014 

27,414 

27,580 

31.93; 
3.VJS3 

44.S93 
36,S3J 



49 
3,763 

224U5 
24 '.159 
2; :.-4 
I us 1 .-:; 
19 461 
15.904 
12 500 
8.399 
7.214 
4,013 
3.152 
4, 

4,376 
3,861 
3,550 
3,379 
4.455 
3,920 
3,999 
5,303 
6.3i;r, 
7,743 
8,610 
11.21 
15.359 
11,924 



Total 
No. of 

appli- 
cations 

filed. 



2,487 
49.332 
53.599 
72.684 
65.256 
3ti,753 
20,708 
26,066 
24,851 
43,969 
26,391 
18,303 
16,734 
18,704 
23.523 
22,715 
44 ,.587 
57,116 
141,46* 
31,116 
40,939 
48,776 
41,785 
40,918 
49,895 
72.465 
75,726 
81,220 



4-O.OP7 263 392 1 1.24^, 146 789 '21 ' 



Total 
No. of 
claims 
allowed 



Number of pensioners on the roll and 
the amoun paid for pensions, with 
cost of disbursements. 



Inva- Wid- 
liclft. own, etc 



462 
7,884 
39,487 
40,171 
50,177 
36,482 
28,921 
23,196 
ls.221 
16,5,,2 
34,333 
16,052 
10,462 
11,152 
9,977 
11,326 
11,962 
31,316 
19,545 



27,664 
38,162 
34,192 
35,767 
40,857 
55,194 



51,912 



4,337 
4,341 

7,821 
23,479 

35,880 
55.652 



75,957 

82.856 
87,521 
93,394 
113.954 
119,500 
121,628 
122,989 
124.239 
12S.123 
131>,49 
138,615 
145,410 
164,110 



5.042 

225,470 
247,146 
270.346 



343,70l! 
351,484, 



4,299 
3,818 
6,970 
27,656 
50,106 
71,070 
83,678 
93,<:86 
105,104 
111,165 
114,101 
118.275 
118,911 
114,613 
111,832 
107.898 
103.381 
92.349 
104.140 
105.392 
104.720 
103,064 
97,616 
97,266 
97,979 
95,437 
99,709 
10S.857 
173,241 



Total. 



8,159 
14,791 
51,135 
85,986 
126,722 
153,183 
169.643 
187,963 
198,68ii 
207.495 
232.229 
238,411 
236,241 
234.821 
232,137 
222,104 
223.998 
2 12.1 55 
250.802 



322.756 
345,125 
3(55,783 
40ii,007 
452,557 
489,725 



Disburse- 
ments. 
11.072,482.00 

790.385.00 
1,025,140.00 
4,564,617.00 
8,525,15300 
13,459,996.00 
18,619,966.00 
24,010,982 00 
28,422,864 00 
27,780,812 00 
33,077,384 00 
30,169,341.00 
29,185,290.00 
30,593,750.00 
211,683,117.00 
28,351,600.00 
28,580,157 00 
26,844,415.00 
33,760,520.00 
57,240,540.00 
50,626,539.00 
54,29<>,281.00 
60,431,973.00 
57,273,537.00 
65,693,707.00 
64,584,270.00 
74,815,486.85 
79,646,146.37 
88,275,113.28 



*1. 052,218,413. 17 



Of the pensioners on the rolls at last date 455.887 are pensioners of- the late war, 10,567 are 
those of the war of 1812, 23,271 are those of the Mexican war. 



POPULATION OF THE CITY OF CHICAGO. 

From its incorporation in 1837 to January,1890 



MAYORS. 



William B. Ogden.. 
Alexander Lloyd... 
Augustus Garrett. . 
Augustus Garrett. . 

John P. Chapin 

James Curtiss 

Jas. H.Woodworth. 
Jas. H.Woodworth. 

James Curtiss 

Charles M. Gray... . 

LeviD. Boone 

Thomas Dwyer 
John Wentworth.. 
Francis C. Sherman 
Francis C. Sherman 

JohnB. Rice 

JohnB. Rice 

John B. Rice 

Roswell B. Mason.. 

Joseph Medill 

Harvey D. Colvin.. 

Monroe Heath 

Monroe Heath 

Carter H. Harrison. 
Carter H. Harrison. 
Carter H.Harrison. 
Carter H. Harrison. 

John A.Roche 

DeWittC. Cregier. 



Census -p^nii 
Year. taken Si 



July, 1837 City.... 

July, 1840 U. 8 

July, J843 City 

July, 1845 State... 
Sept., 1846) City.... 

Oct., 1847:City 

Sept., 1848 1 City 

Aug., 18491 City 

Aug., 1850IU. B.... 

Dec. 1853|City 

June, 1855 State... 

Aug., 1856 City 

Aug., 1860 U. B.... 

)ct., 1862 City 

Oct., 1864 City 

Oct., 1865 State... 

Oct., 1866 City 

Oct., 1868 City 

Aug, 1870 U.S.... 
Oct., 1872 City 

)ct., 1874 City 

Oct., 1876 City 

Oct., 1878 City 

Tune, 1880 U.S....] 
lune, 1882 City.... 
May, 1884 City.... 
May, 1886 City.... 
May, 1888 City.... 
I Jan., 1890 Estim'd 



4,170 

4,479 

7,580 

12,088 

14,169 

16,851) 

20.023 

23,047 

29.963 

59.130 

80,000 

84,113 

109,206 

138,186 

169,353 

176,192 

200,418 

252,054 

306.<i<)5 



395.40S 
407.>5l 
43>;,731 
503.185 
560.>93 

I?.". <K-> 

703.S17 

802,651 

1,100,000 



SIGHTS AND DISTANCES. 
In accordance with the United States army 
standard of sights and distances, at 30 yards 
the whites of a man's eyes can be seen; at 100 
yards the general lines of a man's face are 
distinguishable and brass buttons can be 
counted; at 200 yards the lines of the face are 
confused and rows of buttons look like stripes; 
at 300 yards details of clothing disappear; at 
400 yards the movements of a man's limbs 
are distinct; at 600 yards it becomes impossi- 
ble to see the motions of a man's arms and 
legs; at 800 yards a group of men standing to- 
gether cannot be counted; at 1,000 yards a 
company of soldiers look like a broad line; 
at 1.200 yards a man cannot be told from a 
woman, but horsemen are distinguishable 
from footmen; at 1. 600 yards it is impractica- 
ble to distinguish a man from a horse; at 2, 000 
yards a horseman is a mere speck. 

THE SEXES-WOMEN TO 1,000 MEN. 

United States 983 

America (at large) 980 

Scotland 1. 096 

Ireland 1, OoO 

England and Wales 1,054 

France 1,007 

Prussia 1, 030 

Greece 940 

Europe (at large) 1, 021 

Africa (estimated) 975 

Asia (estimated) 940 

Australasia (estimated) 985 

In a grand aggregate, therefore, of 12,000 
men there is a surplus of about 161 women. 



182 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 




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z: 5 



TRADE, COMMERCE, AND MANUFACTURES IN 1889. 



183 



TRADE, COMMERCE, AND 

An approximately correct record of the con- 
ditions prevailing in the business world dur- 
ing 1889 will be found in the subjoined re- 
ports. They have been furnished for THE 
DAILY NEWS ALMANAC by persons and firms 
of high standing in commercial, manufactur- 
ing, and trade circles, and may, therefore, be 
relied upon as trustworthy. Many of the 
minor lines and branches of business have, of 
course, been omitted as a matter of necessity, 
but nearly all of any considerable importance 
are represented. These reports will give a 
fair idea of the course of prices and the gen- 
eral condition of commerce, trade, and man- 
ufacturing throughout the country during the 
year 1889. They will be found valuable for 
purposes of reference and comparison. 

BOARD OF TRADE MARKETS. 

The course of prices In 1889 has been ex- 
ceptional. During nearly every year the mid- 
winter prices have not materially changed un- 
til after the 1st of May, when lake naviga- 
tion is resumed and some estimate may be 
intelligently made of crop prospects. But 
this year prices declined rather rapidly from 
the 1st of January to the month of May, the 
decline amounting to about? per cent upon 
the chief commodities; and then, what was 
strange in view of good crop prospects, prices 
advanced about 3 per cent. This was a re- 
action from the unusual course of the mar- 
kets from January to May and indicated that 
the depression in the earlier months of the 
year led to unduly desponding views regard- 
Ing the influence on the markets of full crops. 
The history of the markets during the last 
few years renders the public business pulse 
very sensitive to depressing indications, 
while on the other hand any prospects of 
better prices are looked upon with compara- 
tive distrust. The speculator has during the 
last few years witnessed so many sudden and 
unlooked-for changes that he has grown 
timid and transforms many things which 
come within his horizon into fatalities which 
he must avoid by precipitate retreat or 
change of front. This accounts for the trend 
of the markets and the absence of any con- 
stancy of confidence in advancing prices. 
Capital whispers fear into the ear of specula- 
tion, and enterprise and faith are shaken, and 
forthwith plans are abandoned. This has 
kept the markets most of the time timid, 
spasmodic, abnormal, and without any ster- 
ling characteristics. 

It is estimated that prices are fully 20 per 
cent below those current Nov. 1. 1860. The 
cost of transportation, improved methods, 
and mechanical appliances account sufficient- 
ly for the reduction in values. In November, 
1860, the freight on wheat was 65 cents per 
100 pounds from Chicago to New York. It is 
now 25 cents. Thus a reduction of 24 cents 
per bushel Is accounted for, all other things 
being equal. In addition should be observed 
the reduction in rates of freight between 
points west of Chicago and this city. It should 
also be borne in mind that the prices of iron 
and its products, especially steel and steel 
rails, have been reduced, I think, from 60 to 
80 per cent during this period, both on ac- 
count of a decline in transportation charges 
and Improved methods in manufacturing, 
brought about to some extent by securing the 
services of scientific young men in great 
works to take the places formerly occupied 
by those who were merely copyists and were 
without any know ledge of the laws of physics, 
and who were also without that mental dis- 
cipline which prompts a man to grapple with 
problems Instead of dismissing them. Com- 
petition in this age is an educator, for it has 



MANUFACTURES IN 1889. 

exhausted the facilities along the coarser and 
superficial lines and reaches up Into the realm 
of education and acute mental analysis. It 
is not now how many hours a man can work In 
a day. how early he can rise, and how late he 
can toll, but how much brain he can bring to 
his task, for brain-work will overcome brute 
force and long days and cheap labor. It is 
getting to be understood in all of the great 
industries that low-priced help is the most 
expensive element In business conduct 
and high-priced and brain help is the 
more economical. Great corporations and 
broad-minded men at the head of extensive 
business interests understand this fully, and 
that to financially recognize great ability is to 
obtain the full fruits of that ability. We do 
not seek in this country to compete with the 
low-priced labor of other lands by low-priced 
labor. We do not propose to curtail in any 
degree the requirements of enlightened la- 
bor, but we grapple with the problems intro- 
duced by competition by applying to them 
that study. Inventive ability, and mental acu- 
men which are essential to the unremitting 
investigation of methods of manufacture, 
and also by considering the economic relation 
of transportation and storage to such prob- 
lems. In this way we shall exalt labor, in- 
crease its rewards, multiply its fruits, brighten 
its prospects, and usher the children of the 
laboring man to a new and higher realm and 
promote a common prosperity. 

As a rule, prices in 1889 have been lower 
than in 1888. It is only in cases where trusts 
or combines controlled that prices have 
been higher. 1 judge that business, notwith- 
standing, has been fully as remunerative as 
In the year preceding, because the volume of 
business has been much larger, and also be- 
cause of the facts I have hereinbefore at- 
tempted to describe. Business has not been 
seriously disturbed at any period of the year 
by financial distresses, and we shall enter 
upon the new year with well-founded ex- 
pectations of substantial prosperity. It does 
not, In my opinion, detract from these views 
that a certain kind of speculation has dimin- 
ished. The business on this board has been 
satisfactory. GEORGE F. STONE. 

Secretary Chicago Board of Trade. 

Chicago. Dec. 13, 1889. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 
The volume of trade in agricultural imple- 
ments generally follows or is largely af- 
fected by crop prospects and prices. The 
crops of 1889 were unusually good and the 
acreage was large, but the prices for farm 
produce were far from satisfactory. The 
spring trade in plows, seeders, grain drills, 
harrows, etc.. was unusually large and con- 
siderably in excess of average years. In grain 
and grass harvesting machinery the trade was 
large but not increased as might reasonably 
have been expected, particularly in grain 
harvesters. The trade in mowers was larger 
than ever before. The demand for twine 
grain-binders was considerably affected by 
the belief among farmers that a gigantic 
"twine trust" existed to fleece them by ex- 
orbitant prices for twine, and they showed 
their displeasure by deferring the purchase 
of binders when they could possibly harvest 
their crops with the old machines. There was 
a good demand for threshers, corn-shellers. 
feed machines, and other farm machinery for 
autumn and winter use. The manufacturers 
of threshing machines, of plows, and of sev- 
eral other lines of farm machinery have con- 
served their own Interests and those of the 
dealers in their goods by trade organizations, 
but in the line or harvesting machinery sharp 



134 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



competition still exists. There is. however. 
a tendency to concentrate the business in the 
hands of the larger manufacturers. Chicago 
leads the country in the important class of 
grain and grass harvesting machinery. More 
than 60 per cent of all this kind of machinery 
is sold from Chicago by the manufacturers lo- 
cated here or in the immediate vicinity. Fully 
40 per cent of all the grain-harvesting ma- 
chinery of the country is made within the 
precincts of the city of Chicago. 
MACHINERY. 

The volume of business in the manufacture 
and sale of machinery was greater than ever 
before, the demand being more active than in 
1888. This was the case with all the large 
machine shops and especially so with engine- 
builders. The demand has been fostered 
largely by the rapid introduction of electrical 
plants for lighting and railway purposes, and 
requiring large steam powers. Prices for all 
standard articles were low, apparently not 
being influenced by the sharp advance in 
iron and steel. No advance is looked for by 
the leading manufacturers, though the out- 
look is that there will be a larger demand 
than ever and that machinery will sell at 
fair prices. 

SHELF HARDWARE. 

The shelf-hardware trade of the country for 
the year 1889 opened very satisfactorily with 
an increased volume of business and a flat- 
tering outlook for a partial recovery from the 
low prices that had been ruling in 1888. Quite 
early in the spring, however, it became evi- 
dent that the production of finished goods 
largely exceeded the demand, and with a 
slackened trade prices rapidly fell to the 
lowest point known in the history of the busi- 
ness, and unquestionably much lower than 
a large proportion of the goods could be 
profitably produced at. This unsatisfactory 
condition of affairs continued until about the 
middle of August, when, excellent crops be- 
ing assured, the experienced and long-headed 
merchant began buying freely, and the busi- 
ness of the fall months was considerably in 
excess of even the notable autumn trade of 
the previous year. About the same time a re- 
markable reaction began in the prices of tron 
and steel and their immediate products in 
the markets of the world, and while this was 
soon reflected in many items of shelf hard- 
ware, the bulk of goods remained cheap. 
IRON AND STEEL. 

The year 1889 started in with a not very 
active demand for iron, and prices declined 
steadily during the entire first half of the 
year, pig-iron selling from $18 per ton in Chi- 
cago down to $15 or $15.50 in July. Since that 
time the demand has increased steadily and 
prices have correspondingly advanced, so that 
at the present writing prices are on about the 
same level as they were a year ago. The con- 
dition of the pig-iron trade is typical of that 
of all other branches in the iron-and-steel in- 
dustry, with this exception, that Bessemer 
steel and Bessemer pig-iron have advanced 
still more than other grades of iron and steel. 
Production of all kinds during the year was 
larger than in any other year in the history of 
:he trade. The quantity of pig-iron now be- 
ing made is larger than that being made in 
Great Britain, and at the same time prices are 
actually lower than in Great Britain. For in- 
stance, iron that was quoted there Nov. 15 at j 
77 shillings 6 pence, or about $19 per ton. was 
quoted on the same day in Chicago at $18. 50 
to $19. Bar iron, quoted in England at 8 6d. I 
>r about $40. was quoted at $38. This is be- 
ieved to be the first time that the production 
ia& been greater and the prices lower here j 
,han in England. 



STOVES. 
The total value of stoves manufactured in 

1888 is estimated at $35,800,000; that for 

1889 at $3(5, 000, 000. This shows an increase 
for 1889 of about 2 1 A per cent. The improve- 
ment was in the south, which, as its pros- 
perity increases, buys more stoves and stoves 
of better quality and higher grade. There 
was a slight increase in the western trade and 
a decrease in the eastern. The lack of cold 
weather In the fall had a detrimental effect 
upon the November and December trade. 
Prices were firmly maintained everywhere. 
In the south there was a decided advance, 
especially in the cheaper classes, necessitated 
by the higher prices for raw material. The 
average for 1889 was slightly higher than for 
1888. Stocks in the hands of manufacturers 
at the close of the year were about normal. 
Purchases by consumers have been in excess 
of those by dealers, and it may consequently 
be predicted that there will be an active de- 
mand in 1890. providing the country is fairly 
prosperous. The profits of the manufactur- 
ers have suffered, the advance in material 
not having been followed by a corresponding 
advance in the price of the product. The 
amount of pig-iron consumed in the manu- 
facture of cooking and heating stoves, ranges, 
and furnaces in 1889 is estimated at 417,600 
tons. 

TOBACCO. 

The cigar-leaf crops of 1888, which are en- 
tering at present into the process of manu- 
facture, were with a few exceptions of a su- 
perior quality and are as a rule commanding 
very good, and in some instances a very high 
price. The crops of 1889 are at this writing 
(December) still on the poles, but it may be 
stated as a fact that they contain a far less 
quantity of fine grades than the 1888 crops 
did, and consequently they will have to be 
sold at a lower figure. During the fiscal year 
ending June 30. 1889, we imported 20,106,- 
881 pounds of foreign leaf at a cost of $10,- 
868. 226. During the fiscal year ending June, 
1888, we imported but 18. (500. 142 pounds, 
thus showing an increase of 1,500.000 pounds 
in favor of the present year. During the year 
ending June 30 last there were manufactured 
3, 867, 385. 640 cigars, as against 3, 844, 720, 650 
during the preceding year. The reason for 
the small increase in the manufacture of ci- 
gars may be found in the increased consump- 
tion of cigarettes. This year the output was 
2.151,661,300. as against 1,862,72(5,100 in 
1888. Manufactured plug, chewing, and smok- 
ing tobacco produced during the fiscal year 
ending June 30 amounted to 221, 524". 868 
pounds, as against 209,302.602 pounds in 
1888. The western leaf, which used to be a 
great staple article for export, makes the 
poorest showing in the tobacco trade. We 
exported during the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1889, but 223,759.232 pounds, against 
262,682,821 pounds in 1888. 

LEATHER. 

The manufacture of leather for the past 
year has been fairly successful to most tan- 
ners, and while prices have been very low, 
and Lower for the year on general lines of up- 
per leather than at any other time for the last 
twenty-five years, yet the goods have paid a 
small profit. The prices, however, have got 
so low and the stocks have become so much 
reduced, both in the hair and finished 
article, that the tendency now points 
most positively to higher prices for the 
coming year not a large advance, but 
somewhere near an average of from 5 to 10 
per cent. The sole-leather business has not 
stood the shrinkage that upper stock has and 
the comparative prices of this class have 



TRADE, COMMERCE, AND MANUFACTURES IN 



185 



been higher than upper leather. At the same 
time sole-leather hides have been relatively 
higher and still prices have advanced mate- 
rial I. v. The prospect in most kinds of raw 
materials is to a further advance, which will 
also have the effect to further enhance the 
value of finished goods. The volume of 
trade has been large and the season's busi- 
ness, generally speaking, has been favorable 
to tanners. 

FLOUR. 

A year ago the milling business was in a 
very depressed state, owing to the price of 
wheat being forced up to abnormal figures by 
speculation, the shutting off of export trade, 
and the glut in the market caused by over- 
production in the early part of the season. 
These conditions existed all over the milling 
territory, with the exception of the Atlantic 
coast, where the mills were favored by excep- 
tional circumstances. Especially were the 
spring-wheat mills at a disadvantage, as win- 
ter wheat, wnile it was affected to some ex- 
tent by the high prices in the northwest, did 
not go to such an extremely inflated value. 
Later on as prices declined millers felt better 
and were given an opportunity to manufact- 
ure at a profit. Since Sept. 1 the mills in the 
northwest have been running steadily. Mill- 
ing generally all over the United States was 
fairly satisfactory, and owing to the more 
reasonable range of values the export trade 
steadily improved. 

BREAD. 

In the fall of 1888 the price of flour was ad- 
vanced, until in October high-grade "patents" 
such as bakers use in making the better grades 
of bread were ruling at an advance of from 
$2. 50 to $3 per barrel. To meet this advance 
in the cost of flour the price of bread was 
raised 20 per cent, or 1 cent per pound loaf. 
As the season advanced the price of flour was 
gradually, reduced, until in February (1889) 
the trade felt warranted in putting the price 
back to the old figures, although the reduc- 
tion they then made was more in proportion 
than the reduction in the price of flour. Since 
that time prices have remained unchanged, 
being on the basis of 5 cents per pound loaf 
for the better grades of bread. 
CROCKERY. 

There are 412 potteries in the United States 
of all classes. Of these sixty-seven are en- 
gaged in making what is known in the trade 
as white and decorated goods. This includes 
all classes of dinner, tea. and toilet ware and 
sanitary goods for household and public uses. 
The remaining potteries are devoted to Rock- 
inham, col9red ware, flower-pots, sewer- 
pipes, cooking utensils, architectural work, 
and conservatory goods. The principal capi- 
tal employed is in the manufacture of white 
and decorated goods for household uses. The 
range is from $50,000 to $500.000 in capital 
and the output ranges from $75. 000 to $4)00, - 
000 per annum. The chief potteries are lo- 
cated in Trenton, N. J.. and East Liverpool, 
O. The product of the American potteries 
last year equaled the amount imported. In- 
ternal competition gradually reduced prices 
from 25 per cent discount on the regular list 
to 50 and 60 per cent, with a downward tend- 
ency. 

MILLINERY AND STRAW GOODS. 

There is very little change to note in the 
millinery trade for the year. The Business 
shows a small percentage of gain and the 
trade generally will not much exceed that of 
1888. Goods were from 5 to 10 per cent lower 
in Chicago but the new business from the 
northwest about equalized the shrinkage in 
prices. The manufacture of straw goods is 
steadily increasing. The jobbing business in 



the millinery line for the year is estimated at 
from $5,000,000 to $6.000.000. 
BARB WIRE. 

The use of barb wire for fencing purposes 
Is constantly increasing, especially in the 
west and southwest. The indications are 
that the present large demand will continue 
indefinitely. As the country is being settled 
for farming purposes barb wire must be used 
to fence it. It is now cheaper than any 
other fence that is manufactured. The con- 
sumption for the year 1889 is estimated at 
150.000 tons, which amounts to an increase 
of about 10 per cent over the preceding year. 
Prices ruled lower until in October, when the 
upward tendency of steel billets caused a 
slight increase. The prospects are that a 
steady increase will be maintained, at least 
through the spring trade. 

LUMBER. 

At the opening of navigation this year 
stocks in Chicago were very heavy excessive 
as compared with former years. Prices on 
low-grade lumber gradually declined. The 
receipts were somewhat less than last year, 
and the sales perhaps less by half the differ- 
ence in receipts. Good lumber was held firm 
during the year. Competition from the south 
of yellow pine in markets formerly controlled 
by "Chicago and the north, the running of rail- 
roads to Michigan and Wisconsin manufactur- 
ing points and bringing the consumer closer 
to the stump have all tended to force serious 
competition in the Chicago market and make 
the trade more scattered for wholesale deal- 
ers. The local trade, however, increasing 
from year to year, makes up in part for the 
outside loss. 

FISH. 

Many kinds of fish were much higher this 
year than last. The catch of mackerel was 
very small and prices ranged extremely high, 
and would undoubtedly have advanced still 
more had it not been for the mackerel catch 
on the Scotch, Irish, and Norwegian coasts. 
Lake fish ranged about the same in price as 
last year. The year may be considered to 
have been a disastrous one to the Atlantic 
fleet, as many vessels passed into the sheriff's 
hands on account of the light fishing of the 
summer. 

DRY GOODS. 

The year was uneventful in the dry-goods 
jobbing business. Prices were generally firm. 
Trade was active and a healthy business was 
done. Sales increased considerably over 
1888, collections were better, and fewer 
failures occurred. The merchants in the 
northwest especially were never in a better 
shape, and there is at this writing every 
prospect for a very large and profitable spring 
business. 

SPORTING GOODS. 

The business in sporting goods during the 
past year has been satisfactory. While the 
trade has not shown the percentage of in- 
crease that it has in some years, it has, on the 
whole, been good, especially in the 1-ine of 
exports. The foreign trade, especially in 
Australia, promises to be very large. In con- 
sequence of the trip made around the world 
by the Chicagos and All-Americas a year ago 
great enthusiasm has been manifested over 
base ball. The general trade in athletic 
goods has been very good and the tendency 
of the people generally is to indulge more in 
athletics and outdoor recreations. The de- 
partment that has shown the greatest in- 
crease is that of lawn tennis. It is about 
eight or ten years since the game was first 
introduced in this country, and for some time 
it was played by comparatively few. In the 
past year, however, the increase in the num- 



186 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



ber of those devoted to the sport has been 
marvelous. 



Trade In jewelry, precious stones, watches, 

lver, and silver-plated ware has been un- 

usually good during 1889. There are no 



marked changes In the quantity and value of 
exports and Imports in any of these lines of 
goods, although on an average the exports 
slightly exceed those of the preceding year, 
while the importations are not quite so large. 
There is no pronounced Increase in prices, 
except on diamonds. Rough diamonds are 
nearly 50 per cent higher, owing to an in- 
creased demand and a diminished supply, re- 
sulting from a consolidation of African dia- 
mond-mining interests. Finished gems are 
not yet proportionately higher, although the 
prices are steadily rising. The reductions in 
prices are confined to lower-grade watch- 
cases and silver-plated cutlery. A heavy re- 
duction in the price of aluminium ingots has 
rendered that mineral available for trade 
uses to a degree not previously anticipated. 
The demand for electric clocks, non-magnetic 
watches, and anti-magnetic shields for watch- 
es has materially increased. 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 
The trade among dealers in musical instru- 
ments during the year showed a small per- 
centage of increase over 1888. the prices re- 
maining about the same. There was, how- 
ever. a large increase in the manufacturing 
of pianos, ci-pans. and small musical goods. 
In Chicago, for instance, the manufacture of 
reed organs increased at least 20 per cent, and 
possibly 25 per cent. In the manufacture of 
pianos, comparatively a new industry in the 
west, the increase was from 40 to 50 per cent. 

BICYCLES. 

The retail prices of bicycles for 1889 were 
for all grades the same as in 1888; high-grade 
' "ordinary" or high machines costing from 
$120 to $140, and "safeties" of the same 
grade selling at a uniform figure $135. Low 
grades of both styles varied from $35 to $115. 
The business for 1889 was the largest in the 
history of the trade. The demand for high- 
grade safeties for men amounted almost to a 
craze, while the orders for the same machine 
for boys poured in upon the manufacturers so 
thick and fast that at one time they could not 
be had for love or money. This condition of 
things has caused cycle manufactories to 
spring up like mushrooms all over the coun- 
try, and from present indications it would 
seem as if the market would be flooded with 
low-grade machines in 1890. The number of 
safeties sold this year compared with "ordi- 
naries" is about four to one. The number of 
riders has greatly increased, especially among 
the ladies, who, almost without exception, 
use the safety bicycle, the tricycle becoming 
obsolete. The total number of riders in the 
country is slightly over 100,000; in Chicago, 
2,700, of whom 75 to 100 are ladies. 

VEHICLES. 

It Is difficult to secure accurate data regard- 
ing the manufacture of vehicles In the United 
States. No estimate of the business done in 
1889 can yet be made, though there is no rea- 
son for thinking that it will be less than in 
1888. when the product was from 575, 000 to 
600,000 wheeled vehicles of all kinds, valued 
at about $60,000,000. Reports from 1,066 
individual and corporate manufacturers 
showed that 169,833 business vehicles were 
made, 2,225 omnibuses, hacks, etc.; 2,592 
heavy private carriages. 232. 784 buggies, road 
carts, and other light vehicles; sleighs. 27, 166. 
These figures, however, represent only about 
half the product. 



WALL-PAPER, STATIONERY, ETC. 
Dealers in wall-paper, window-shades, 
stationery, and similar articles report that 
business was generally good during the past 
year, the volume being larger than ever be- 
fore. Customers throughout the west and 
northwest, with the exception of North Da- 
kota, where there was a partial failure of the 
crops, bought freely on the average. Me- 
dium-priced goods were chiefly in demand. 

FINE ARTS. 

The year was a very poor one for dealers in 
fine-art goods throughout the country and 
particularly in Chicago. A presidential elec- 
tion generally unsettles this line of business 
from October to May, and the bad effect was 
even more noticeable the past year than 
usual. A large part of the custom comes 
from those connected in some way with the 
board of trade, and, as the speculative year 
was a comparatively poor one, the art trade 
suffered proportionately. The sale of paint- 
ings on this side of the Atlantic was very poor 
on account of so many of the better buyers 
going to the Paris exposition. Art goods 
come entirely under the head of luxuries and 
business in that line is good only when all 
other lines are at their best. 

FURNITURE. 

Manufacturers of furniture are not disposed 
to complain of the business done in 1889, al- 
though the competition was so great that the 
margin of profit was not as large as desirable. 
There was no material change in prices as 
compared with 1888, except a tendency to 
rule higher. With some exceptions the gen- 
eral condition of the trade was good. 
BRICK. 

The demand for brick, especially of the 
pressed variety, was brisk. New yards were 
started wherever clay beds could be found 
that would do for this purpose, and the result 
was that prices during the year were lower 
than ever before. The season was an unusu- 
ally busy one with all the manufacturers of 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

Prices of boots and shoes for the past year 
have been a little off say about 5 per cent. 
The sales have been from 5 to 10 per cent 
more. The prospects for the future are first- 
rate, with a slight upward tendency in price. 
FEATHERS. 

The season in feathers has been a good one. 
Sales run from 15 to 20 per cent in advance 
of those last year. Prices have been very 
nearly the same as in 1888, though they de- 
creased slightly during the year. The mar- 
ket on raw stock was firm and collections 

BOOKS. 

Book dealers in most parts of the country 
did an excellent business during the year. 
The most notable failure among publishers 
was that of Belford, Clarke & Co. of Chicago 
and New York. 

WATCHES. 

The manufacture of watches is gradually 
increasing, especially in the west. The Elgin 
company, for instance, did a business in 1888 
of over $3, 000, 000, and the past year their 
production exceeded even these enormous 
figures. The demand continues in advance 
of the production. 

SALT. 

There was little or no change to note in the 
salt business during the year. Prices for 
dairy and table salt remained about the same, 
though the sale of some varieties, as, for in- 
stance, the Genesee, was greatly increased. 



FOREIGN IMMIGRATION. 187 


TOILET ARTICLES. 
Leading manufacturers report that their 
total output of toilet articles, laundry soap, 
and chemically pure glycerine during 1889 was 
considerably larger than for the correspond- 
ing period in 1888. While the volume of 
business increased, prices ruled somewhat 
lower, so that the net result of each year was 
about the same. Collections were satisfac- 
tory. 
CONFECTIONERY. 
The confectionery business is one of steadi- 
ly increasing magnitude in this country. The 
census reports of 1880 placed the value of the 


confectionery product at about $26.000,000. 
It is believed that the census returns of 1890 
will show that the production has increased 
to between $40, 000. 000 and $oO. 000, 000. The 
past year has not been in any sense an event;- 
ful one, although the high price of sugar for 
several months in the summer caused a cor- 
responding advance in prices on the part of 
the wholesale trade. It may be said that the 
average prices during about eight months of 
1889 corresponded with those of 1888, and 
during the other four months were from 1 to 
2 cents a pound higher. As a rule retail 
prices were not affected. 


FOREIGN IMMIGRATION. 

Statement of *the number and sex of immigrants by nationality arriving in the United 
States during the fiscal year 1889, not including those from British North America and Mexico. 


COUNTRIES OF LAST PER- 
MANENT RESIDENCE OB 
CITIZENSHIP. 


Males 


Fe- 
males 

167954 
32,334 
7,598 
449 
4 

67,339 


Total 


MANENT RESIDENCE OR 
CITIZENSHIP. 


Males 


Fe- 

Males 


Total 




41,549 
33,223 

10,699 
732 
8 


68,503 
65,557 
18,296 
1,181 
12 

153,549 

3,085 

10,987 
20,122 
2,562 
8,699 
5,918 
99,538 
13 
158 
24,843 
459 
6,460 
13,390 
4,922 
57 
893 
31,889 
2,027 
526 
35,415 
7,070 
252 
279,270 


Chili 


8 
5 
7 
253 
20 

11 

~337 


5 
1 

1 
53 
12 

6 
90 


13 
6 
8 
306 
32 

17 
427 




Ecuador 




Guiana 
United States of Colombia 
Venezuela 
South America, not speci- 
fied 


\Yales 


Great Britain, not specified 
Total Great Britain and 


86,210 

1,608 

7,866 

fffl 

5,301 

3,789 


Austria-Hungary: 


1,477 
3,101 
6.703 
923 
3,398 
2,129 
44,662 

6,927 
107 
2,666 
5,818 
1,731 
23 
450 
11,801 
454 
115 
15,496 

2 ^ 

110,596 


Total South America 




1 
7 
20 
1,170 


1 
14 
56 
4,181 
1 
25 
80 
24 
9 
9 
523 
"4^23 

5,438 

~i^9CT 
21 
106 

15 
2.109 

996 
1,163 
4 

33 
2.196 

4 

55 

59 


Hungary 


Bahamas 


7 
36 
3,011 








Cuba 






Hayti 


21 
44 
20 
5 

l 

3,422 


4 

36 
4 
4 
4 
251 
1,501 




54,876 
5 
149 
17,921 
352 
3,794 
7,572 
3,191 
34 
443 
20,088 
1,573 
411 
19,9 J 9 
4,525 
202 
168,674 




vreriiiJiiij . . 




~^ 


St Croix 


Italy (Continental) 
Sicily and Sardinia 


Trinidad...- 


West Indies, not specified. 
Total West Indies 


Norway 


Portugal 


Azores 


1,253 
19 
87 

8 


714 
2 
19 

7 


Russia (except Poland) .... 
Finland 


Bermuda 


Cape Verde 
Islands of the Atlantic, 
not specified 




Sweden 


Switzerland 
Turkey in Europe 


Total islands of the At- 
lantic 


1,367 


742 


Total Europe 


254,884 


177,935 


432,819 


Australia 
Hawaiian Islands 


646 
702 
2 

29 
1,379 


350 
461 
2 

*4 


Arabia 


189 
86 
90 
50 
558 
3 
499 


27 
10 

28 

g 

82 
' ' " 94 


216 
96 
118 
59 
640 
3 
593 


Islands of the Pacific, not 
specified 


Armenia 


China 
India 


Total islands of the Pa- 
cific 


817 


Persia 
Turkey in Asia 
Total Asia 


Greenland, Iceland, and 
Faroe Islands 
Born at sea 


2 
31 


2 
24 


1,475 


250 


1,725 


Algeria 


4 
27 
1 
30 


4 

6 

"" 8 

T9 


J 

39 
81 


Total all other countries 
and islands 


33 


26 


Egypt 


RECAPITULATION. 


Africa, not specified 


Total Africa 

British Honduras 
Central America, not speci- 
fied 


62 


Europe 
Asia 


254,884 

1,475 
62 
3,824 
1,367 
1,379 


177,935 

250 
19 
1.614 

742 
817 

181,403 


432,819 
1,725 
81 
5,438 
2,109 
2,196 

59 
444,427 


62 


4 

19 


7 
81 


Africa 
America . 


Islands of the Atlantic 
Islands of the Pacific 
All other countries and 


Total Central America.. . 

Argentine Republic 
Brazil 


65 


23 


88 


101 4 
231 8 


14 
31 


Aggregate 


263,024 



188 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1890. 



EXPORTS OF PRODUCTS OF AGRICULTURE AND MANUFACTURE. 
The following table shows the values of our exports of domest c commo 'ities, subdivided 
into products of agriculture and manufacture, of mining, etc., from 1860 to 1889. 



YEAR. 


Products of 
Agricult- 
ure. 


Per 

cent. 


Products of 
Manufact- 
ure. 


Per 

cent. 


Product of 
Mining. 
For siry, 
Fisheries, 
etc. 


Per 
cent. 


Total. 


1800 


256,5 ( ',0,972 


81.14 


45,658,873 


14.43 


14,022,578 


4.43 


316,242,423 


1870 


361,1-6,483 


79.34 


47,921,154 


10.53 


46,09x704 


10.13 


455,208,341 


1S75 


43i),30U,570 


76.95 


75,755,432 


13.55 


53,175,63*5 


9.50 


559,237,1 38 


187o 


466,113 515 


7667 


81,374,077 


13.68 


57,430 123 


965 


594,917 715 


1377 


, 459,734,148 


72.63 


88,007,773 


13.91 


85,238.933 


13.46 


632,930 854 


1878 


536,192873 


77.07 


91,416,576 


13.14 


68,140,481 


9.79 


695,749,1)30 


1879 


546,476,703 


78.12 


89,117,215 


12.74 


63,914,824 


9.14 


699,538,742 


1880 


685,961,091 


83.25 


79,510,447 


9.65 


58.474,815 


7.10 


823,94; 5,353 


1831 


730,394,943 


82.63 


89,219.380 


10.10 


64,311,624 


7.27 


883,925,1)47 


1882 


552,219,819 


75.31 


103,132 481 


14.08 


77,887,432 


10.61 


733,239,732 


1883 


619,269,449 


77.00 


111,890,001 


13.91 


73,0(54,182 


9.09 


804,223 632 


1884 


536,315,318 


73.98 


111,330,242 


15.35 


77,319.292 


10.67 


724,9o4,852 


1885 


530,172,966 


72.96 


117,259,810 


16.14 


79,250,170 


10.90 


726,682,946 


18S6 


484,954,595 


72.82 


103,419,692 


15.98 


74,590,242 


11.20 


665,964.529 


Ig87 


523,073,798 


74.41 


136,735,105 


19.45 


43,214,026 


6.14 


703,022,923 


1888 


500,840.086 


73.23 


130,300,087 


19.05 


52,721,931 


7.72 


683,8:12.104 


1889 


532,141,490 


72.87 


138,676,507 


18.99 


59,466,612 


8.14 


730,282,609 



CURIOSITIES OF FIGURES. 

A very curious number is 142, 857, which, 
multiplied by 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6, gives the same 
figures in the same order, beginning at a dif- 
ferent point, but if multiplied by 7, gives all 
nines. Multiplied by 1 it equals 142,857, 
multiplied by 2 equals 285. 714, multiplied by 
3 equals 428. 751, multiplied by 4 equals 571. - 
428, multiplied by 5 equals 714,285, multi- 
plied by 6 equals 857,14-', multiplied by / 
equals 999,999. Multiply 142.857 by 8 and 
you have 1, 142, 856. Then add the first figure 
to the last, and you have 142,857, the origi- 
nal number, the figures exactly the same as at 
the start. Another mathematical wonder is 
the following: It is discovered that the mul- 
tiplication of 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 by 
4a gives 44, 44. 44. 44. 44, 45. Re- 
versing the order of the digits and mul- 
tiplying, 12345679by45we 
get a result equally curious. 5,5oo,ooo, oOo. 
If we take 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 as the multiplicand 
and, Interchanging the figures of 4a, take 54 as 
the multiplier, 6,6(36.6(3(5.60(3. Returning 
to the multiplicand 987654321, and tak- 
ing 54 as the multiplier again, we get 53, 333, - 
333.34 all 3's except the first and the last 
figures, which together read 54. the multi- 
plier. Taking the same multiplicand and 27, 
the half of 54, as the multiplier, we get a 
product of 26, 666, 666, 667-all 6's except the 
first and last figures, which together read 27, 
the multiplier. Now interchanging the order 
of the figures 27 and using 72 as the multi- 
plier, 987654321 as the multiplicand, we 
get a product of 71,111,111,112 all 1's ex- 
cept the first and last figures, which read to- 
gether 72, the multiplier. 

TIME MEASUREMENT. 
Why the Hours and Minutes Are Divided Into 

Sixtieths. 

Why is our hour divided into sixty minutes, 
each minute into sixty seconds, etc.? Simply 
and solely because in Babylon there existed, 
by the side of the decimal system of notation, 
another system, the sexagesimal, which 
counted by sixties. Why that number should 
have been chosen is clear enough, and it 
speaks well for the practical sense of those 
ancient Babylonian merchants. There is no 
number which has so many divisors as 60. 
The Babylonians divided the sun's daily jour- 
ney into 24 parasangs, or 720 stadia. Each 



parasang, or hour, was subdivided into 60 
minutes. A parasang is about a German mile, 
and Babylonian astronomers compared the 
progress made by the sun during one hour at 
the time of the equinox to the progress made 
by a good walker during the same time, both 
accomplishing one perasang. The whole 
course of the sun during the 14 equinoctfal 
hours was fixed at 2C perasangs, or 720 
stadia, or 360 degrees. The system was 
handed on to the Greeks, and Hippar- 
chus, the great Greek philosopher, who lived 
about 150 B. C., introduced the Babylonian 
hour into Europe. Ptolemy, who wrote about 
150 A. D., and whose name still lives in that 
of the Ptolemaic system of astronomy, gave 
still wider currency to the Babylonian way of 
reckoning time. It was carried along on the 
quiet stream of traditional knowledge through 
the middle ages, and, strange to say, it sailed 
down safely over the Niagara of the French 
revolution. Here we see the wonderful 
coherence of the world, and how what we 
call knowledge is the result of an unbroken 
tradition of a teaching descending from father 
to son. 

HARVESTS OF THE WORLD. 

January is the harvest month in Australia, 
New Zealand, Chili, and Argentine Republic. 

February and March In East India and 
Upper Egypt. 

April in Lower Egypt, Syria, Cyprus. Persia, 
Asia Minor, India, Mexico, and Cuba. 

May in Tunis, Algeria, Central Asia, China, 



Japan, Morocco, Texas, and Florida. 

June in Turkey, Greece, Italy, 
gal, the south of France, California, Oregon, 



Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, 
Carolina. Tennessee, Virginia, Kentucky, 
Kansas, Arkansas, Utah, Colorado, Missouri, 
and Southern Maryland. 

July in Roumania, Bulgaria, Austro-Hun- 
gary, the south of Russia, Germany, Switzer- 
land, France, the south of England, Xebraska, 
Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, New 
York, New England, and Western Maryland. 

August in Belgium, Holland, Great Britain, 
Denmark, Poland, Minnesota, Wisconsin, 
Dakota, Montana, Canada, Columbia, and 
Manitoba. 

September and October in Scotland, Sweden, 
Norway, and North Russia. 

November in Peru and South Africa. 

December in Burmah. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



\ 



CIKCULATION CHICAGO DAILY NEWS, 


1877. 


Day. 


Jan 


Feb. 


March 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


I.... 
2.... 
3.... 


H ''SH 

9,790 
11,098 


14,474 
14,239 
15,233 
Sund'y 


17,376 
16,722 
16,063 
Sund'y 


Sund'y 
16,561 
16,901 
16,213 


21,744 
20,792 
21,284 
21,192 


21,604 
21,926 
Sund'y 
20,427 


Sund'y 
23,756 
24,953 
H'lid'y 


28,555 
28,498 
30,281 
27,970 


25,605 
Sund'y 
24,158 
23,696 


25,467 
24,925 
25,122 
26,301 


22,018 
21,124 
22,235 
Sund'y 


24,409 
Sund'y 
23,663 
25,487 


K 


11,242 


13,693 


16,032 


16,712 


21,672 


21,321 


18,958 


Sund'y 


23,560 


24,199 


19,709 


26,244 


&'.'.'.'. 

!i. ; . : . : 


11,234 
Sund'y 
7,469 
9,031 


14,528 
14.468 
16,229 
14,965 


16,647 
17,496 
14,143 
16,462 


16,952 
16,916 
Sund'y 
15,978 


Sund'y 
16,44X> 
20,208 
19536 


22,556 
21,669 
21,780 
20,840 


23,091 
24,056 
Sund'y 
23,905 


25,176 
26,612 
25,968 
26,003 


25,486 
23,609 
23,940 
Sund'y 


24,946 
Sund'y 
22,135 
19,317 


26,729 
25,668 
19,233 
24,067 


26,042 
26,352 
25,751 
Sund'y 


10.... 

11.... 


10,999 
9,994 


3,840 
Sund'v 


18,456 
Sund'y 


16,598 
21,210 


20,952 
20,400 


Sund'y 
20,825 


25,683 
26,262 


26,015 
25,009 


22,027 
25,416 


21,508 
22,464 


22,826 
Sund'y 


25.507 
27,303 


12.... 


10:391 


12,092 


13,198 


18,064 


22,512 


22,019 


26,242 


Sund'v 


25,031 


22,042 


23,654 


28,891 


13... 


11,175 


12,989 


17,233 


17,692 


Sund'v 


22,130 


26,704 


23,709 


24,469 


23,231 


23,054 


28,208 


14... 
15... 
16... 


Sund'y 
9,076 
9,993 


14,168 
14,980 
16,990 


17,077 
16,862 
15,351 


20,928 
Sund'y 
16,845 


19,800 
19,128 
20424 


22,740 
22,847 
23,330 


26,819 
Sund'y 
26,038 


25,202 
24,802 
25,912 


23,972 
24,499 
Sund'y 


Sund'y 
22,244 
22,961 


27,224 
32,131 

28,376 


27,822 
28,593 
Sund'y 


17... 


10,754 
12,055 


17,974 
Sund'y 


15,045 
Sund'y 


17,340 
18,143 


20*544 
20494 


Sund'y 
20,603 


26,192 
26,077 


25,617 
24,335 


22,735 
23,012 


21,975 
2L297 


25,720 
Sund'v 


27,769 
26,310 


19 


13.095 


14,647 


16,356 


18,135 


21240 


22,468 


26,681 


Sund'y 


23,895 


18,837 


23,617 


27,106 


21"" 


12,162 
Sund'y 


15,777 

16,865 


14,419 
16,624 


18,540 
20,007 


Sund'v 
20,208 


23,254 
25,413 


28,699 
29,690 


23,799 
24,019 


26,689 
24,818 


23,089 
Sund'y 


23,474 
21,518 


27,118 
27,553 


22!;; 


11,483 


16,911 


17,664 


Sund'y 


20' 544 


26,159 


Sund'y 


23,807 


25,902 


23,192 


24,991 


27,090 


23... 


11.440 


15,949 


17,075 


15,686 


20^472 


24,484 


55,326 


20,904 


Sund'y 


26,513 


27,358 


Sund'y 


24... 


12,440 


17.386 


15,427 


18,250 


21^120 


Sund'y 


61,838 


23,997 


31,856 


24,911 


26,329 


25,903 


25... 


12,986 


Sund'y 


Sund'y 


19,019 


21*500 


21,824 


74,015 


22,834 


27,690 


23,707 


Sund'y 


Chrm's 


26... 

27... 


13.369 
14,564 


15,223 
16,537 


16,523 
16,724 


19,293 
19,360 


23;040 


23,632 
24,055 


72,583 
77,643 


Sund'y 
21,807 


26,165 
27,566 


24,737 
24,104 


26,053 
26,236 


25,773 
26,975 


28... 
29... 


Sund'y 
13,487 


16938 


17,139 

16636 


19,176 
Sund'y 


"28,881 


25,224 

24,864 


41,535 
Sund'y 


23,319 
27,480 


26,977 
27,927 


Sund'y 
23,769 


26,670 

Thk'sg 


27,063 
27,073 


30... 
31... 


14,251 
14;256 




17,189 
17,262 


19,661 


20;<)40 
21,144 


24,014 


35,700 
31,165 


26,964 
26,296 


Sund'y 


23,018 
23,435 


23,973 


Sund'y 
27,270 






Total 


297,179 356,195 


443,201 


460,210 


559,318 


592,008 883,011 684,890 


632,100 


C.29 446 


610.987 


667,885 


Av'rg 


11,429' 14,841 


16,414 


18,408 


20.715 


22,7691 35,3201 25,366 


25,204 


23,312 


24,439 


26,715 


TOTAL ISSUE FOR 1877, 8,809,428 COPIES. DAILY AVERAGE, 22,037 COPIES. 


373. 


Day. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


March 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


1.... 
2.... 


H'lid'y 

26,238 


32,036 
34,420 


39,031 
38,673 


37,671 
40,844 


37,850 
37,416 


39,394 
Sund'y 


40,708 
46.856 


41,824 
42,976 


Sund'v 
38,7oO 


38,530 
39,853 


37.826 
38.260 


Sund'y 
37,906 


3.... 


26,430 


Sund'y 


Sund'y 


40,169 


38,734 


37,975 


44,833 


41,064 


39,077 


39,52i> 


Sund'y 


36,526 


4.... 


25,694 


33,021 


38,156 


38,679 


39,879 


38,540 


H'lid'y 


Sund'y 


40,974 


34,814 


37.676 


36,867 


5.... 


23,485 




38,420 


38.507 


Sund'y 


39,559 


42,840 


40,661 


41,003 


42,410 


41,327 


37,310 


6.... 


Sund'y 


34403 


37,682 


40,210 


38.374 


38,591 


42,974 


41,062 


40,602 


Sund'v 


42.135 


38,082 


7 .... 


23,566 


35,061 


38,021 


Sund'y 


38,368 


36,843 


Sund'y 


41,649 


41,313 


38,555 


39,715 


38,839 


8.... 


23,174 


35,634 


37,074 


37,153 


38,682 


38,469 


41,990 


41,337 


Sund'y 


40,695 


39,323 


Sund'y 


9.... 


26,253 


34,102 


37,632 


36,613 


39,200 


Sund'y 


42,200 


41,562 


39,192 


42,191 


29,218 


36,562 


10.... 


27,077 


Sund'y 


Sund'y 


37,456 


39,021 


37,873 


42,625 


40,598 


40,115 


40,729 


Sund'y 


3T,a58 


11.... 
12.... 
13.... 
14 .... 


26,363 

Sund'y 
28,265 


34,933 
35,468 
! 36, 731 
38,361 


36,703 
36,953 
36,186 
36,932 


38,691 

l;ii 

Sund'y 


39,430 
Sund'y 
38,148 
38,435 


38,836 
39,883 
39,952 

42,928 


41,848 
56,639 
47,257 
Sund'y 


Sund'y 
39,774 
40,727 
40,387 


39,899 
39,642 
40,114 
41,243 


41,565 
42,022 
Sund'v 
37.753 


37,8/4 
37,789 
38,623 
38.302 


37,653 
37,917 
37.327 
37,883 


15 .... 


27,336 


36,528 


36,655 


36.862 


38,223 


40,986 




40,343 


Sund'y 1 38,' 153 


36,217 


Sund'y 


16.... 


28,694 


39,679 


37,166 


37,715 


39,620 


Sund'y 


43'343 


40,635 


38,709 37,015 


38,866 


37,7L3 


17.... 


28,650 


Sund'y 


Sund'y 


37,549 


39,718 


41,909 


43,044 


40,237 


38,633 37,800 


Sund'y 


37,787 


18. .. 
19 .. 
20. .. 


28,371 
30U03 
Sund'y 


37,046 
38.235 


36,198 
36,725 
37,480 


36,709 
37,149 
38,068 


37,484 
Sund'y 
37,997 


41,951 
43^525 


44,657 
! 44,077 
43,219 


Sund'y 
41,421 
41,442 


38,600 38,344 
38,828| 39,281 
38,569 Sund'y 


42,982 
38.067 
40,133 


37,347 
36,360 


21. .. 
22. .. 


29,290 
30,044 


37,890 
39,506 


37,072 
37,517 


Sund'v 
36,755 


39,577 
38,452 


62,732 
46,401 


Sund'y 
43,824 


41,462 
42,217 


39,5881 38.864 
Sund'y 37,936 


38,111 
43,013 


36',070 
Sund'y 


23. .. 


29,758 


41,351 


39,894 


36,119 


38,172 


Sund'y 


43,885 


41,687 


38,333 38,396 


38.859 35,93*2 


24 . . 


30,500 
34,947 


Sund'y 
40,765 


Sund'y 
38,736 


33,887 
34,678 


,434 
,214 


42,803 
40,654 


44,723 
42,583 


40,639 
Sund'y 


38,808 38,480 
36,542 37,847 


Sund'y 38,896 
45.815 Chrm's 


26 


32,574 


39483 


38,667 


36,448 


Sund'y 


39,764 


43.734 


39,586 


39.006] 33,438 


38.133 


34,337 


27 '. '. 


Sund'y 


39,432 


37,582 


38,053 


38,6$ 


39,325 


44,713 


39,968 


39,039 Sund'v 


37,699 


35,598 


28 . . 

8::: 


30,042 

8^ 


39,546 


38,398 
41,191 
36^403 


Sund'y 
41,611 
39,101 


38,346 
38,872 
36,505 


38,638 
39,292 
Sund'y 


Sund'y 
41,963 
43,684 


40,044 
40,574 
39685 


39,621 

si $5 


36,494 
36,875 
37,027 


H'lid'y 

37,872 
38,765 


37,402 
Sund'y 
36,213 


31.. . 


29,541 




Sund'v 




38,567 




44,069 


40,940 




37,387 




36,827 


Total 
























738,578 


888,4581 981,147 


984,564 


1,035,417 


1,068,551 


1,139,933 


1,104,601 


984,263 1,046.983 


984,505 


920,426 


Av'rg 


28,406 


37,0191 37,736 


37,867 


38,348 


43.74:5 


49,844 


40,911 


39,371' 38,777 


39,380 


36,817 


IOTAL ISSUE FOR 1878, 11,877,426 COPIES. DAILY AVERAGE, 38,314 COPIES. 



CIRCULATION OF THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS. 


1879. 


Day. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


March 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


1... 


H'l'day 


41505 


44,873 


47,433 


47,233 


Sund'y 


48,846 


48,216 


44,761 


44,309 


43,399 


45,479 


2.... 
3.... 


29,619 
31,406 


Sund'y 
40,702 


Sund'y 
45,440 


46,199 
44,799 


47,542 

47,336 


48,741 

48,643 


48,895 
47,914 


48,780 
Sund'y 


44,917 
44,530 


43,879 
45,238 


Sund'y 
44,306 


44,668 
44,561 


4.... 


37,126 


41,522 


45,419 


42,11 


Sund'y 


47,862 


H'l'day 


47,391 


44,88S 


44,078 


43,837 


44705 


5... 


Sund'y 


41,511 


45,144 


48,851 


46,631 


47,396 


49,547 


47,267 


45,741 


Sund'y 


47,088 


44,599 


6... 


35.316 


41,292 


46,575 


Sund'y 


46,583 


47,264 


Sund'y 


46,638 


45,473 


44,430 


44,172 


46,558 


7.... 


36,783 
37,131 


41,004 
42,369 


45,202 

46,337 


44,836 
44,310 


47,204 
47,381 


50,042 
Sund'y 


46,438 
48,040 


47,860 
47,493 


Sund'y 
43,648 


43,721 
45,030 


46,112 
45,053 


Sund'y 


10!!!! 


37,305 
37,076 


Sund'y 


Sund'y 
45,144 


43,504 
44,628 


47,446 
47,899 


48,281 
48,251 


48,019 
47,731 


47,772 
Sund'y 


45,894 
44,843 


42,258 
45,385 


Sund'y 
45,941 


45^077 


11... 


38,925 


39 566 


46,845 


45,498 


Sund'y 


49,835 


46,912 




44,431 


44,046 


45,21S 


44,675 


12... 


Sund'y 


40^338 


48,556 


46,805 


45,92C 


48,921 


48,731 


46,397 


44,416 


Sund'y 


42855 


43,515 


13 .... 


37,817 


39,523 


49,490 


Sund'y 


46,037 


49,072 


Sund'y 


46,346 


44,685 


44,496 


46,422 


46,033 


14 .... 


38,172 


38.725 


48,049 


44,885 


45,343 


51,016 


45,700 


46,137 


Sund'y 


43,486 


46,630 


Sund'y 


15.... 


34,980 


40,550 


50,543 


45,52C 


46,670 


Sund'y 


146,056 


45,7!82 


43,991 


42,246 


46,774 


44,277 


16.... 


38,441 


Sund'y 


Sund'y 


46,117 


47,045 


47,4(3 


46,854 


45,413 


42.129 


45,167 


Sund'y 


44,164 


17.... 
18 .... 


38,711 
39,676 


40,523 
41,007 


43.8o5 
46,976 


46,303 
47,975 


48,178 
Sund'y 


48,560 
48,506 


48,909 
47,678 


Sund'y 
46,078 


938, 


45,370 
43,952 


45,829 
44,092 


44,284 
43,979 


19 .... 


Sund'y 


41,670 


46,592 


49,456 


46,515 


49,574 


48,161 


45,615 


44,179 


Sund'y 


45,079 


44,215 


20.... 


39,170 


41,872 


45,004 


Sund'y 


45,981 


49,291 


Sund'y 


45,650 


45,739 


44,751 


43,797 


45,733 


21 .... 
22.... 


40.179 

40,278 


42,398 
43,967 


46,236 
47,366 


47,071 

47,269 


46,670 
46,063 


49,270 
Sund'y 


45,710 

47,450 


44,973 
46,315 


Sund'y 
44,275 




44,781 
44,962 


Sund'y 
45,138 


23.... 


41,231 


Sund'y 


Sund'y 


47,377 


45,507 


50,529 


47,712 


47,441 


42,978 


43 221 


Sund'y 


46,087 


24.... 


40,404 


42.050 


46,031 


47,463 


47,115 


49,488 


47,422 


Sund'y 


44,661 


43,677 


44,380 


43,578 


25 .... 


41,918 


42,557 


46,160 


47,011 


Sund'y 


150,708 


147,007 


44,505 


46,925 


43,133 


44,981 


Chrm's 


26 .... 
27.... 
28.... 
29.... 
30.... 


Sund'y 
42,454 
42,960 
42,793 
43,064 


141,089 
42,255 
43,441 


45,931 
45,525 
44,892 
46,637 
Sund'y 


50,047 
Sund'y 
48,775 
48,342 
48,215 


46,106 
46,286 
46,275 
48,574 
48,244 


51,005 
50,525 
55,468 
Sund'y 
49,982 


48,360 
Sund'y 
46.229 
46,498 
47,306 


45,505 
46,389 
44,829 
46,233 
47,693 


44,672 
43,923 
Sund'y 
44,244 
43,672 


Sund'y 
43,702 
45,246 
45,108 
44,983 


43,994 
Th'k'g 
44,8*5 
45,234 
Sund'y 


40,958 
44,371 
Sund'y 

S$ 


31 


42411 




44960 




53613 




47443 






45254 




46716 




























Total 
Av'rg 


1,005,346 

38,667 


992,318 
41,346 


1203,782 
46,299 


1,211820 
46,608 


1,271837 
47.105 


"BS 


1236^68 


1,209,006 


U S!S 


"SB 


"ass 


1163,771 
44,760 


TOTAL ISSUE FOR THE YEAR 18 
DAILY AVERAGE FOR THE YEA1 


79 


13,965,203 COPIES. 

4A.1M POPrRS 


fi 1879 


1880. 


Day. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


March 


April. 


May. 


June. \ July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


1. .. 
2. .. 


H'l'day 
45,211 


Sund'y 
47,812 


48.670 
50,035 


49,706 
49,253 


50,110 
Sund'y 


58,425 54,767 
66,372 55,094 


Sund'y 
57,179 


m 


56^943 


60,718 
87,659 


56,183 
56,727 


3. . 


44,332 


49,532 


49,144 




48,897 


68,863 54,029 


62,097 


58,31S 


Sund'y 


82198 


56,277 


4. . 


Sund'y 


48,261 


49,056 


Sund'y 


50,084 


68,439' Sund'v 


62,111 


59,336 


55,047 


68,207 


58,003 


5. 


46,081 


48,572 


49,058 


46,514 


49,526 


68,480 


H'l'day 


62,045 


Sund'y 


56,549 


64,511 


Sund'y 


6. 


46,490 


47,904 


51,054 


49,321 


49,251 


Sund'y 


.54,224 


62,243 


55,42? 


56,841 


57I735 


53,341 


7. 
8. 
9. 


46,415 
46,775 
47,048 


50,038 
Sun'dy 
49,253 


Sund'y 
49,465 
49,419 


50,519 
50,234 
50,084 


49,003 
49,553 
Sund'y 


67,546 
67,488 
62,160 


53,861 
53,956 
54,420 


67,392 
Sund'y 
61,085 


57,452 
58,828 
59,053 


56,109 
56,878 
55,995 


Sund'y 
59,3$ 
60,834 


53,279 
52,976 
53,051 


10. 
11. 


48,206 
Sund'y 


50,223 
46,256 


49,530 
49,825 


47,558 
Sund'y 


52,800 
53,859 


59,328 
57,295 


54,679 
Sund'y 


62,746 
63,314 


59,434 
59,514 


Sund'y 
56,391 


58,615 
57,412 


54,819 
56,421 


12. 


46,432 


50,397 


49,097 


48,140 


54,530 


55,232 


54,426 


63,003 


Sund'y 


76,666 


59,057 


Sund'y 


13. 
14. 


51,9o5 
50,398 


49,237 
50,439 


51,407 
Sund'y 


48,386 
41,481 


54,838 
55,138 


Sund'y 
50,573 


53,977 
56,291 


63,032 

62,472 


57,833 

58,447 


75,526 
63,751 


58,373 
Sund'y 


55,772 
57,548 


15. 

16. 


49,711 
50,407 


Sund'y 
49,303 


48,814 
49,537 


49,740 
49,276 


55,276 
Sund'y 


55,293 
55,992 


54,813 
55,414 


Sund'y 
62,340 


56,704 
60,276 


57,827 
54,482 


54,979 
55,450 


56,437 

56,832 


17. 


53,275 


49,967 


48,927 


50,152 


53,762 


55,398 


56,432 


53,305 


59,633 


Sund'y 


54,571 


54,664 


18. 


Sund'y 


48,852 


49,527 


Sund'y 


55,344 


55,215 


Sund'y 


58,932 


58,482 


53,874 


55,103 




19. 
20. 


47,845 
49.942 


48,234 
49,694 


49,619 
50,926 


49,299 
51.151 


59,732 
61,028 


53,786 
Sund'y 


56,232 
57,754 


59,279 
59,926 


Sund'y 
56,363 


56,309 
59,534 


54,659 
55,633 


Sund'y 
56,391 


23! 
24. 


48,051 
49.589 
49,948 
52,096 


51,404 
Sund'y 
50.292 
51,778 


Sund'y 
52.668 
53,016 
50,654 


51.025 
50,744 
51,379 
45,185 


57,773 
56,662 
Sund'y 
55,274 


52,961 
54,455 
58,349 

59,718 


58,745 
57717 
57,122 
56,717 


59,584 
Sund'y 
59,029 
60,159 


57,484 
57,978 
57,903 
57,620 


57,760 
58,480 
57,679 
Sund'y 


Sund'y 
54,579 
55,050 
54,694 


56,044 

8:11 

53,813 


25. 


Sund'y 
50,106 
51,095 


49,618 
50,158 
50,020 


49,743 
49,268 
49,070 


Sund'y 
51,666 
51,049 


55,021 
54,564 
54,979 


53,930 
55,021 
Sund'y 


Sund'y 
55,532 
59,128 


61,842 
55,199 
61,265 


57,704 
Sund'y 
55,548 


54,794 

58'.220 


Th'ksg 
55,765 
55,916 


Shrrn's 
Sund'y 
47,664 


28. 


49,993 


49,967 


Sund'y 


51,450 


55,388 


55,624 


58,382 


56,871 


56,102 


58,368 Sund'y 


51,559 


29. 


49,306 


Sund'y 


49,768 


51,277 


52,510 


55,825 


58,127 


Sund'y 


57,375 


59,010 55,230 


47,378 


30 


50052 




49566 


50603 


Sund'y 


56430 


58332 


60007 


56210 


60 864 55,506 


51612 


31. 


50,420 




49,747 




54,793 




57,172 


59,742 




Sund'y 


52,909 


Total 
Av'rg 


1271,189 

48,891 


1186,211 
49,425 


1346,610 

49,874 


1285,5891,399,6951,528,198 
49,4451 53,834' 58,776 


1457,293 
56,049 


1576,199 
60,623 


1506,913 1,522,462 1491812 
57.9581 58,566 59,672 


1416,319 
54,473 


TOTAL ISSUE FOR THE YEAR 1880 16,988,490 COPIES 


DAILY AVERAGE FOR THE YEAR 1880. 54,801 COPIES. 



CIRCULATION OF THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS. 


1881. 


Day. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


March 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


I.... 


H'l'day 


58,64] 


64,800 


68,546 


Sund'y 


77,017 


79,052 


78.194 


S7.'.97 


81,735 


78,184 


76,593 i 


2.. . 


Sund'y 




66,668 


73,028 


76,097 


73,611 


139,387 


84.875 


83,598 


Sund'v 


74,444 


70,79,3 


3.. . 


52,512 


6t53E 


55,711 


Sund'y 


76,651 


77,231 


Sund'y 


82,334 


85.642 


78,218 


76,498 


77,586 


4.. . 
5.. . 


55,778 
56,472 


62,005 
62.394 


65.683 
67,058 


70,841 
80.933 


76,920 
7B3BE 


77,257 
Sund'y 


"10,105 
102,106 


81,649 
68,581 


Sund'y 

81.400 


79,419 
80,158 


76,931 

76.668 


Sund'y 
76,174 ; 


6.. . 
7.. . 


57,078 
55,582 


Sund'y 
59,746 


Sund'v 
66,70"! 


79,923 
76,952 


77,442 
78,240 


73,824 
74,347 


96.538 
90,235 


81.2:34 
Sund'v 


Si 


K 


Sund'v 
74.201 


77,544 
77,917 ! 


8.. . 


55,897 


62,353 


68,004 


77,036 


Sund'y 


74,949 


84.528 


81.702 


87.-.N'. 


80.668 


76,644 


77.421 


9.. . 
10.. . 


Sund'y 

54,856 


160,154 
64,177 


69.429 
69.699 


75,449 
Sund'y 


76.334 
76,734 


78,244 
78,449 


82,958 
Sund'y 


83,713 
83,300 


88.117 
83.143 


Sund'v 
78,316 


77.475 
75,715 


77.594 : 
70,951 


11.. 


56,955 


63,538 


69,070 


67,744 


76,624 


76,479 


82,870 


8L400 


Sund'y 


78,885 


61,509 


Sund'y 


12.. . 


66,436 


62.715 


69.078 


69,927 


77,605 


Sund'y 


82,797 


82.593 


85,119 


79,741 


72.936 


77,046 


13.. . 


66,981 


Sund'v 


Sund'y 


70.869 


77,282 


76,737 


83,392 


80.409 


85,834 


78361 


Sund'v 


70,426 


14 ... 


53.397 


63,552 


71,673 


70,995 


77,441 


77,242 


84,375 


Sund'v 


83,921 


74,068 


72.376 


73.150 


15.. . 


56,215 


65.007 


70,701 


7a6'5 


Sund'y 


178.240 


82,751 


89,684 


74,402 


79.364 


73,304 


78.392 


10.. . 
17.. . 


Sund'v 
57,203 


63,807 

64.868 


69,551 
69,154 


7f631 

Sund'y 


70.469 
77,692 


76,719 
77,680 


76,814 
Sund'y 


84,190 
98,140 


82,673 
24.552 


Sund'y 
79,955 


73,786 
74,672 


77,294 
, 77,768 


i!::: 


8% 


165,264 
62,471 


69.199 
55,484 


71.967 
71,107 


77.476 
77,503 


76,253 
Sund'y 


81,446 
82,610 


87,829 
B68fl 


Sund'y 
103,273 


79,760 
79.210 


72.150 
73.8M 


ound'y 

76.507 


20.. . 


58,710 


Sund'y 


Sund'y 


i 72,510 


77,693 


74,379 


81,035 


90,677 


130,503 


82,735 


Snnd'y 


77,866 


21.. . 


59,884 




78,635 


71,220 


77,591 


77,765 


80,067 


Sund'y 


94.71!} 


80.038 


75.573 


75,416 


22.. . 


21,768 


teW 


74,981 


73,438 


Sund'y 


77,014 


82,690 


89.195 


85,821 


82.273 


76,a35 


76.936 


23.. . 
24.. . 


Sund'y 
53,949 


162,978 
64.174 


75,876 
74,650 


72,654 
Sund'y 


77,455 
176,694 


77,704 

77,829 


86,386 
Sund'y 


88.918 
88,322 


87,243 
83,162 


Sund'y 
75.350 


175.0:50 
*1U224 


75,315 
74,078 


25.. . 


59.552 


65.176 


72,896 


70.270 


76.542 


77,370 


84,555 


90,499 


SHnd'v 


82.003 


74,015 


Sund'y 


26.. . 


60,779 


64,914 


73.205 


72.220 


76,285 


Sund'y 


186,536 


110,461 


78,851 


79,527 


76.604 


*1S.135 


27. . 


59,812 


Sund'y 


Sund'v 


72,037 


76,317 


76,990 


86,930 


114,660 


86,594 


78,814 


Sund'y 


170.794 


28.. . 


59,354 


61,590 


70.627 


71.845 


74,623 


76,436 


83,030 


Sund'y 


474 


73,487 


175.225 


79,711 


29.. 


62,348 




70,742 


71 524 


Sund'y 


76,989 


82.042 


83,324 


82,747 


77,892 


77,277 


79.046 


30 


Sund'v 




69255 


70,933 


74,877 


79,581 


80.693 


90.035 


78,379 


Sund'v 


72,475 


75.836 


31.. . 


60,835 




70,524 




76,247 




Sund'y 


89,239 




77,006 




73,964 




























Total 
Av'rg 


1.444.895 
57.795 


1,511.167 1,869,054 1.886,274 
02.905 69.2241 72.549 


1,997.222 

70,816 


1.996.366 

76.783 


2,181,983 

86,635 


2,356,493 

87,277 


272.a52 

S7.:;i>s 


2,063.659 
79.371 


1,880.145 2.017.255 ' 
74.5561 76,966 


Holiday. Partial issue only. 


TOT\L ISSUE FOR THE YEAR 1881 23476865 COPIES 


TOTAL AVERAGE FOR THE YEAR 1881 .... . 75,820 COPIES 


1882. 


Dai/. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


March 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


1.... 


Sund'v 


87,318 


85.873 


85,746 


84,205 


91,596 


104,043 


97,058 


93,278 


Sund'v 


85,878 


87,009 


2.... 


*10.9ii8 


80,529 


88.594 


Sund'y 


84,998 


85,736 


Sund'y 


95,534 


90,660] 88,407 


85,011 


80,965 


3. .. 


74,921 


87,461 


89.223 


90.446 


84.423 


88,447 


88,425 


96,974 


Sund'v 89,826 


84,624 


Sund'y 


4.... 


75.344 


89,746 


89,186 


89,105 


80.590 


Sund'y 


23^08 


94,303 


90.969 85,899 


83,071 


97.965 


5.... 


75.830 


Sund'y 


Sund'y 


91.503 


83,871 


89,238 


91,809 


94,040 


92,055 86,513 


Sund'v 


87,232 


6.. . 


77.094 


8-5.060 


79,016 


91.029 


83,272 


91,671 


93J66 


Sund'v 


91,594 87,957 


82,195 


85.352 


7. 


70,626 


100.409 


85,963 


291,287 


Sund'y 


92,194 


90.755 


92,357 


91.4661 87,097 


983B3 


77.519 


8.. 


Sund'y 


91.S41 


88,108 


89.054 


83,901 


91.822 


92,782 


97,260 


91,821 Sund'y 


112,478 


79.375 


9.. . 
10.. 
11.. . 


76.535 
73,641 
77,244 


88.873 
88,451 

87,462 


79,512 
87,200 
86320 


Sund'y 
82.147 
84.244 


85,997 
84.667 
85,929 


92.654 
90,746 
Sund'y 


Sund'v 
105,3* 
111.490 


97,100 
98,457 
90,553 


92,592 
Sund'y 
89,873 


86.494 
83,292 
87,858 


91,215 81,377 
83.124 Sund'y 
85.846 ; 83,623 


12.. . 


78,034 


Sund y 


Sund'v 


86.247 


84,778 


89,817 


111,593 


94.254 


91,880 


89^88 


Sund'y 88.390 


13.. . 


80.454 


80,850 


86,418 


86343 


83,907 


90,714 


98,556 


Sund'v 


90,074 


88481 


82,0(51 85,794 


14.. . 


76,162 


87.734 


87,647 


86,925 


Sund'y 


90,283 


104.506 


92,103 


Jw/js: 


80,722 


84.190 88,539 


15.. . 


Sund'v 


87.420 


86,505 


8(5,038 


87,572 


90,016 


98.519 


93,171 


llo..V>7 Sund'y 


84,130 89,816 


16.. . 


7(5.123 


88,560 


87,413 


Sund'y 


89,752 


90,100 


Sund'v 


97,367 


92.393 81.598 


80.9:36 : a3,034 


17.. . 


76.918 


85,318 


83.433 




91,053 


90,548 


100,105 


98,767 


Sund'v 


87,147 


83,909 Sund'v 


18.. . 


78 595 


80,40!) 


86,924 


87!054 


88,342 


Sund'y 


103,273 


97,720 


90.1:39 


86,896 


82.280: 85 037 ! 


19.. . 
20.... 


8U10 

81.802 


Sund'y 
81,233 


Sund'y 
84,790 


85,604 


87,643 
87.891 


90,120 
91,775 


102.404 
100.742 


93,910 
Sund'y 


92,080 
92,689 


S7.D77 Sund'y 83.386 
85,689 83,970 85,908 


21.... 


82,339 


85,966 


82.438 


85329 


Sund'y 


93,098 


98,065 


C3,732 


S7..V>7 


84,530 85,974! 87,721 


22 . 


Sund'y 


84,167 


86,031 


83,459 


88,053 


91,126 


94,978 


96.112 


89.803 


Sund'y 85,2201 85,685 


23 . 
24. . 


86,677 
81369 


83366 
96,823 


88318 

87,787 


Sund'y 
86,421 


90370 

85,113 


89,513 
88,347 


Sund'y 
95,089 


95,675 
97.503 


87,840 
Sund'v 


84.336 82,942! 82,631 
85,694 82,578' Sund'v 


25. . 


91,337 


88,785 


85,825 


87,483 


89,515 


Sund'y 


95,520 


94,833! 89,717 


86.338 82.569, 23.757 


26.. . 


95,514 


Sund'y 


Sund'y 


84,542 


89,273 


91,150 


96308 


91,181 91,582 


- -siid'y 83,568 


27.. . 


85,507 


87,084 


96,535 


87,515 


82.827 


93,499 


95,760 


Sund'y 89,772 


>:...-! 81.279 86,459 


28.. . 


84,968 


79,447 


88,608 


87,309 


Sund'y 


91.679 


11 H 1.4 40 


93,280 91.510 


82,750 83.5221 83,855 


29.. . 


Sund'y 




88,192 


Ri.rtlfi 


.->'. ** 


97,921 


93.866 


97.490 S9.S35 Sund'yj 82.2971 87,407 


30.. 


83943 




87,843 Sund'y 


^ (Kb 


II'K" "t'\'\ 


Qnnrl'v 


945451 84125 83730 **> 753 K' 654 


31.... 


87,823 




89,488 


....:... ["92,4413 


94,19o! 86,178 .....'... Sund'y 


Total 2.035,3782,093.926 
Av'rs 80.0,30 87.240 


2.a31.177 2.172.284 2,m916 2,439,445' 2,485.235 2.575.529 2.377,103 2,242.299 2.103.719 2.159.5.38 ' 
86,339 86,8911 86.5151 93.824| 98,4411 95.339 91.4271 86.242 3.798 8.1.432 


Holiday. Partial Issue only. 


TOTAL ISSUE FOR THfi YEAR 1882... ....27.4M.fiflfl COPIES. 


TOTAL AVERAGE FOR THE YEAR i882. 




88,723 COPIES. f 





CIRCULATION 


OF THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS. 


1883. 


Day. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


March 


April. \ May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


ISept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


1... 


*23,180 


86,155 


98.438 


Sund'y 


97,307 


104,132 


Sund'y 


107,603 


99,270 


,146 


102,816 


106.925 


2. . 
3. . 


&%481 
85.501 


86.349 104,136 
89,3461 98,286 


97,865 
114,540 


96'503 


103,216 
Sund'y 


101,644 
100,961 


108,870 
110466 


Sund'y 
97,970 


93,366 
95,524 


103,302:Sund'y 
103,693 104,348 ' 


4. . 

5. . 


83,818 
85,141 


Sund'y Sund'y 
84,998 97.275 


115,454 
98,426 


91,102 
94,770 


101,493 
105,133 


*23,774 
103.581 


10(5,072 
Sund'y 


95,668 
100,467 


96,629 
96,017 


Sund'y 106,456 
91,641 107.116 


6. . 


83,189 


89,479 


99,340 


93.637 


Sund'y 


103,542 


101.027 


106.1(30 


100.071 


99,249 


108,887 


1106,768 


7. . 
8. . 


Sund'y 
81,664 


90,821 
90,939 


96,491 

98,682 


97,795 
Sund'y 


94,637 
95,021 


104.029 
104,061 


98,857 
Sund'y 


110.694 
109.161 


99,579 
99,291 


Sund'y 
100,947 


110,158 
105,331 


106,952 
107,412 


9. . 


84,541 


90,171 


99274 


96.431 


96,926 


102,322 


100.834 


108.513 


Sund'y 


103.091 


103.922 


Sund'y 


10. . 


104.755 


92.243 


97,183 


98,057 


96,758 


Sund'y 


101,789 


108.12*; 


98,397 


105,097 


105,221 


106,280 


11 . 


93,038 Sund'y 


Sund'y 


99.259 


98,547 


98,547